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ABSTRACTPlasmodium vivaxis the world's most widely distributed malaria parasite and a potential cause of morbidity and mortality for approximately 2.85 billion people living mainly in Southeast Asia and Latin America. Despite this dramatic burden, very few vaccines have been assessed in humans. The clinically relevant vectors modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) and the chimpanzee adenovirus ChAd63 are promising delivery systems for malaria vaccines due to their safety profiles and proven ability to induce protective immune responses againstPlasmodium falciparumthrombospondin-related anonymous protein (TRAP) in clinical trials. Here, we describe the development of new recombinant ChAd63 and MVA vectors expressingP. vivaxTRAP (PvTRAP) and show their ability to induce high antibody titers and T cell responses in mice. In addition, we report a novel way of assessing the efficacy of new candidate vaccines againstP. vivaxusing a fully infectious transgenicPlasmodium bergheiparasite expressingP. vivaxTRAP to allow studies of vaccine efficacy and protective mechanisms in rodents. Using this model, we found that both CD8+T cells and antibodies mediated protection against malaria using virus-vectored vaccines. Our data indicate that ChAd63 and MVA expressing PvTRAP are good preerythrocytic-stage vaccine candidates with potential for future clinical application.

Original publication

DOI

10.1128/iai.01187-13

Type

Journal article

Journal

Infection and Immunity

Publisher

American Society for Microbiology

Publication Date

03/2014

Volume

82

Pages

1277 - 1286