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Richard Morter

DPhil


Postdoctoral immunologist

Biography

I completed my DPhil at the Jenner Institute in 2019, supervised by Prof Katie Ewer and Prof Adrian Hill. Part of my project was also undertaken at the KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme in Kilifi, Kenya supervised by Prof Philip Bejon. My studies were supported by a studentship from the Wellcome Trust through the Infection Immunology and Translational Medicine programme.

 

My project investigated differences in immune responses to an experimental malaria vaccine (ChAd63 / MVA ME-TRAP) between malaria-naïve and malaria-exposed individuals. In particular I was interested in the effect Regulatory T cells (Tregs) had on immune responses to vaccines. I also investigated the role of Tregs in the immune response to controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) as part of a larger study being undertaken in Kilifi. During my DPhil I was also involved in primary analyses of immune responses to experimental vaccines for both malaria and Ebola in clinical trials.

 

I am now a medical student on a fast-track programme at the University of Warwick, supported by a Foulkes Foundation Fellowship. In April 2020 I returned to the Jenner Institute to support the initial clinical trials for the Oxford COVID-19 vaccine. I was mostly involved with a large team assessing T cell responses to vaccination and was responsible for running and analysing flow cytometry experiments and supervised reading ELISPOT plates. I continue to assist with data analysis and writing manuscripts for the trials, alongside my medical studies.

 

I am interested in many aspects of infectious diseases, global health and cellular immunology and am looking to pursue these interests both clinically and academically in the future.