Other Seminars

seminar-banner

Fri 1 Nov 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Using research to change paradigms in diagnosing and managing early prostate cancer

Mr Vincent Gnanapragasam

Vincent Gnanapragasam graduated with BMedSci and MBBS degrees from Newcastle University. Following basic surgical training, he was one of the first trainees to be funded through a Cancer Research UK PhD for Clinicians. Whilst undertaking Higher Specialist Training in Urology in the North East,... Read more

Vincent Gnanapragasam graduated with BMedSci and MBBS degrees from Newcastle University. Following basic surgical training, he was one of the first trainees to be funded through a Cancer Research UK PhD for Clinicians. Whilst undertaking Higher Specialist Training in Urology in the North East, Vincent was appointed as Urology First Assistant (Clinical Lecturer) at Newcastle University in 2003. In 2004, supported by the first CRUK Clinician Scientist Fellowship given to a surgeon, Vincent established his own research group. He is currently a University Lecturer at the University of Cambridge, and Honorary Consultant Urologist at Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge. Vincent’s current research covers the full spectrum of basic science, translational, clinical and epidemiological disciplines in prostate cancer. He is CI of the TAPS study (Janssen), NIHR i4i funded CAMPROBE study and national Predict Prostate and PRIM bio-marker study. He is a member of the UK ICGC prostate group and the International Pan Prostate Cancer Collaborative and GAP 3 Active Surveillance consortium. He has developed novel more accurate prognostic prediction models for both group stratified cohorts and for individualised prediction and pioneered risk stratified pathways for active surveillance follow up. To date he has raised over £6M in research grant funding and published over 120 peer reviewed papers. His work has been cited in prostate cancer guidelines by NICE in 2019 and the European Association of Urology in 2018. In the University of Cambridge he (i) leads the University Academic Urology Group, (ii) co-leads the CRUK Cambridge Cancer Centre Urological Malignancies Programme and (iii) established and directs the Cambridge Urology Translational Research and Clinical Trials office. He holds patents and has won numerous prizes for research including the CE Alken prize, Urological Research Society Medial and a Hunterian Professorship. He is also a Visiting Professor at Anglia Ruskin University having established a Master’s research degree programme there for early career aspiring urologists.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 1 Nov 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Systems-level analysis of monocyte cytokine responses in inflammatory bowel disease

Dr Dominik Aschenbrenner

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 1 Nov 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

Medical Sciences Teaching Centre, The lecture will be followed by opportunities for networking and discussion over drinks and refreshments., off South Parks Road OX1 3PL

Cell and gene therapy by somatic stem cells: the paradigm of epithelial stem cells

Prof Michele De Luca

Michele De Luca, MD is Director of the Centre for Regenerative Medicine “Stefano Ferrari”, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, and Scientific Director and Founder of Holostem Terapie Avanzate S.r.l. Michele De Luca is internationally recognised as a leading scientist in epithelial stem... Read more

Michele De Luca, MD is Director of the Centre for Regenerative Medicine “Stefano Ferrari”, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, and Scientific Director and Founder of Holostem Terapie Avanzate S.r.l. Michele De Luca is internationally recognised as a leading scientist in epithelial stem cell biology aimed at clinical application in regenerative medicine and played a pivotal role in epithelial stem cell-mediated cell therapy and gene therapy. Beside his work on the use of human epidermal stem cell cultures in life-saving treatment of massive full-thickness burns, he, and his principal collaborator Graziella Pellegrini, were first in establishing human urethral epithelial stem cell cultures aimed at urethra regeneration in posterior hypospadias and human limbal stem cell culture aimed at corneal regeneration in patients with severe limbal stem cell deficiency. This latter treatment leads to recovery of vision in patients with poor alternative therapy and was recently approved as advanced therapy medicinal product by the European Medicine Agency with the name of Holoclar®. He is currently coordinating several ex-vivo epidermal stem cell-mediated combined cell and gene therapy clinical trials for genetic skin diseases as Epidermolysis Bullosa. During these studies, Michele De Luca and Graziella Pellegrini reported life-saving regeneration of the entire human epidermis of a Junctional EB patient by means of transgenic epidermal stem cells.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof Colin Goding

Fri 1 Nov 2019 from 17:00 to 19:00

AfOx insaka - a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research

St Cross College, Lecture Theatre , St Giles OX1 3LZ

AfOx insaka

Robtel Neajai Pailey, Dr Jacob McKnight

The AfOx insaka is a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research with speakers from diverse and varied academic disciplines. There are two events each term. Speakers for the first AfOx insaka in the new academic year are Dr Robtel Neajai Pailey, Leverhulme Early Career... Read more

The AfOx insaka is a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research with speakers from diverse and varied academic disciplines. There are two events each term. Speakers for the first AfOx insaka in the new academic year are Dr Robtel Neajai Pailey, Leverhulme Early Career Fellow, Oxford Department of International Development and Dr Jacob McKnight, Senior Researcher, Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health. At this AfOx talk, Robtel Neajai Pailey uses her anti-corruption children’s books to argue that equipping children with verbal tools to question the confusing ethical codes of adults can revolutionise how we talk and theorise about corruption. Jake McKnight is a Health Systems Researcher at the Oxford Health Systems Collaboration (OHSCAR). He was originally a logistician for MSF in Angola and Somalia, before conducting his PhD research in Ethiopia. He then read for the MSc. in African Studies at Oxford, before completing his PhD at Said Business School, where he concentrated on healthcare reform in Ethiopia. Jake will talk about the failures and successes of projects he’s studied or been involved in, reflecting on the idea that ‘Africa Works’, and as researchers and implementors, it’s up to us to fit local cultures rather to try to ‘fix’ them.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Africa Oxford Initiative

Mon 4 Nov 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

Type-1 interferon response in metabolic inflammation and cellular bioenergetics

Dr Fawaz Alzaid

Metabolic inflammation in type-2 diabetes (T2D) is initiated by type-1 interferon signalling, through its transcriptional mediator IRF5. Whilst studies in auto-immunity link pro-inflammatory polarisation to increased glycolysis, this phenomenon remains unexplored in T2D or in the context of... Read more

Metabolic inflammation in type-2 diabetes (T2D) is initiated by type-1 interferon signalling, through its transcriptional mediator IRF5. Whilst studies in auto-immunity link pro-inflammatory polarisation to increased glycolysis, this phenomenon remains unexplored in T2D or in the context of IRF5-dependent inflammation. We hypothesise that macrophage bioenergetic adaptation in T2D is distinct, due to the distinct nature of insult and systemic abundance of substrates. IRF5 may play a key role in adapting cellular bioenergetics to initiate, amplify and sustain inflammation. To address these hypotheses, we analysed public and in-house sequencing datasets and carried out mechanistic in vivo and ex vivo analyses.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Jennifer Pope

Mon 4 Nov 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Phase separation and formation of condensates in physiology and disease

Tony Hyman

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Mon 4 Nov 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FZ

Signalling with ubiquitin — communication between metabolism, immune responses and DNA damage repair

Dr Elton Zeqiraj

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alex Bullock

Mon 4 Nov 2019 from 14:00 to 15:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 seminar room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

The T-cell Antigen Map Project

Jonathan Carlson PhD

The T-cell Antigen Map Project is a partnership between Microsoft and Adaptive Biotechnologies that aims to map T-cells to antigens to diagnose and treat disease. The basis of the approach is decoding T-cell specificity. As the central component of the adaptive immune system, T-cells play a... Read more

The T-cell Antigen Map Project is a partnership between Microsoft and Adaptive Biotechnologies that aims to map T-cells to antigens to diagnose and treat disease. The basis of the approach is decoding T-cell specificity. As the central component of the adaptive immune system, T-cells play a critical role in mediating health and disease, actively controlling cancers and pathogens, and causing autoimmune disorders when they attack healthy human cells. The antigen specificity of each individual T-cell is determined by its T-cell Receptor (TCR), with adaptive immunity collectively achieved through the selective expansion of T-cells after they bind their cognate antigens. These expanded, antigen-specific T-cells circulate in the blood, making their TCRs accessible to high throughput DNA sequencing. If we could decode the specificities of those circulating TCRs, we could diagnose a plethora of diseases and could engineer T-cells to target individual cancers. Over the past year and a half, we have focused on building capacity in both data generation and analysis. To date, we have sequenced the TCR repertoires of over 10,000 individuals, and have mapped over 400,000 TCRs to thousands of disease-associated antigens, which has enabled the development of new machine learning approaches to associating TCRs with antigens and disease. This is a highly collaborative project, involving scientists, researchers and engineers from Adaptive and Microsoft. In this talk I will provide an overview of the partnership and the project, and describe some early results.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Suki Kenth

Please arrive 5 minutes before the talk starts to gain access to the building

Tue 5 Nov 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Predicting the progression of myeloid neoplasms

Dr Moritz Gerstung

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 5 Nov 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richar Doll Seminar - Cardiovascular research in the Tromsø Study

Professor Ellisiv Mathiesen

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 6 Nov 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Organization of intracellular antiviral defense mechanisms and disturbance by viruses

Prof. Andreas Pichlmair

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 7 Nov 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

WIMM / Structural Genomics Consortium

Prof Ahmed Ahmed, Prof Chas Bountra

WIMM: "Towards Advanced Personalization of Therapy in Ovarian Cancer: The Oxford “CLASSIC”", Prof Ahmed Ahmed -- Structural Genomics Consortium: "How do we work together, to more rapidly translate novel genetic insights, into novel experimental medicine studies in patients", Prof Chas Bountra -- Chair: Prof Richard Cornall

WIMM: "Towards Advanced Personalization of Therapy in Ovarian Cancer: The Oxford “CLASSIC”", Prof Ahmed Ahmed -- Structural Genomics Consortium: "How do we work together, to more rapidly translate novel genetic insights, into novel experimental medicine studies in patients", Prof Chas Bountra -- Chair: Prof Richard Cornall

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 7 Nov 2019 from 13:15 to 14:15

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Perfecting DSB Repair on Transcribed Chromatin

Dr Michael Huen

Synopsis: DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induce transient pausing of transcription on flanking chromatin. Although this phenomenon is driven by ATM and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activities, the molecular determinants that couple transcriptional silencing and DSB repair remain unclear.... Read more

Synopsis: DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induce transient pausing of transcription on flanking chromatin. Although this phenomenon is driven by ATM and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activities, the molecular determinants that couple transcriptional silencing and DSB repair remain unclear. Mechanistically how gene expression resumes upon completion of DNA repair also warrants scrutiny. This talk will highlight our recent effort to delineate DSB response pathways that fine-tune local transcriptional activities to preserve genome integrity.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Thu 7 Nov 2019 from 16:30 to 18:00

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, John Radcliffe Hospital Main Building, George Pickering Education Centre Level 3 Academic Centre, Room 2B, Headington OX3 9DU, Headington OX3 9DU

Understanding Infection and Pathogenesis from the Epithelial Point of View

Dr Francesco Boccellato

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Holm Uhlig

Fri 8 Nov 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Setting up a public-private partnership in elective surgery in Zimbabwe

Professor Chris Lavy

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 8 Nov 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Circadian regulation of viruses

Dr Alan Zhuang

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 8 Nov 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Multiple Roles for CXCL12/CXCR4 Signalling in Cardiovascular Development

Professor Peter Scambler

The cytokine CXCL12 signals via receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7 and is involved in many processes including stem cell homing, metastasis, collective cell migration, neurogenesis, remote ischaemic preconditioning, and cardiovascular development. Our published work in the area explored the role of the... Read more

The cytokine CXCL12 signals via receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7 and is involved in many processes including stem cell homing, metastasis, collective cell migration, neurogenesis, remote ischaemic preconditioning, and cardiovascular development. Our published work in the area explored the role of the pathway downstream of TBX1, and also demonstrated that the pathway was essential for development of the coronary arteries beyond a capillary plexus. The seminar will describe our unpublished work focusing upon semilunar valve development. The cell types and mechanisms underpinning valve development will be summarised, followed by an indication of how CXCL12-CXCR4 signalling affects these processes and the different lineages. In particular, defects of cell migration and cell polarity disturbances will be described. Evidence will be given to show how early dysmorphogenesis may, via altered flow, feedback to exacerbate the problem. Varied roles have been ascribed to CXCR7 e.g. co-signalling with CXCR4, signalling independently of CXCR4 (and CXCL12), and acting as a sink for CXCL12 ligand. Additional analysis of mouse mutants will be described that indicate why apparently antagonistic processes may result in a similar phenotype. The data will be discussed in light of work being conducted elsewhere on neural progenitor migration and coronary vessel formation.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Paul Riley

Mon 11 Nov 2019 from 09:30 to 17:00

Population Health Seminars

Merton College, Merton Street OX1 4JD

Pharmaceutical policies in the long run: reflections on the 60th anniversary of the Hinchcliffe Report

A symposium organised by the Nuffield Department of Population Health to mark the 60th anniversary of the Hinchliffe Report - by a government committee which examined the rise in pharmaceutical expenditure following the introduction of the NHS. The report's far-reaching recommendations include: ... Read more

A symposium organised by the Nuffield Department of Population Health to mark the 60th anniversary of the Hinchliffe Report - by a government committee which examined the rise in pharmaceutical expenditure following the introduction of the NHS. The report's far-reaching recommendations include: Improvements in the training of GPs to understand evidence regarding the use of new drugs and the economics of prescribing Routinely conducting clinical trials to assess drugs and to publish results in an independent prescribers’ journal Development of an expert body that would be informed by research on economic and social aspects of the NHS An examination of the economics of drug development, marketing and pharmacy to ensure efficiency and equity in prescribing. The workshop will reflect on the degree to which we face similar challenges today, and the extent to which these challenges have been addresed. It will also consider whether if a report to look at pharmaceutical expenditure today were to be commissioned, what potential long-term recommendations could be made to address current challenges. CONFIRMED SPEAKERS INCLUDE Dr Amanda Adler, Chair of NICE Appraisal Committee and Consultant Physician Prof Louise Bowman, Professor of Medicine and Clinical Trials, Clinical Trials at the Clinical Trial Service Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford Prof Philip Clarke, Health Economics Research Centre, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford Prof Sir Rory Collins, Head of Nuffield Department of Population Health and BFH Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology Sir Andrew Dillon, CEO, National Institute for Health and Care Excellence Dr Elaine Kelly, Senior Research Economist, Institute of Fiscal Studies and the Health Foundation Prof Martin Landray, Big Data Institute, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford Mr Danny Palnoch, Head of Medicines Analysis, Strategy and Policy, NHS England Prof Adrian Towse, Office of Health Economics The conference will be followed by a drinks reception from 17.00 - 18.00 REGISTRATION FEES Corporate/Industry: £250, Academic/Public Sector: £125, Higher Degree Student: £55

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Mon 11 Nov 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Mon 11 Nov 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

The autoantibody-mediated diseases of the CNS: clinical and immunological observations

Dr Sarosh Irani

Human autoantibodies against the NMDA receptor, aquaporin-4 and CASPR2 cause a set of clinically-distinctive central nervous system illnesses. In this seminar, I aim to provide an overview of my lab’s work in aiming to deconstruct the clinically-relevant B cell immunology of these conditions.... Read more

Human autoantibodies against the NMDA receptor, aquaporin-4 and CASPR2 cause a set of clinically-distinctive central nervous system illnesses. In this seminar, I aim to provide an overview of my lab’s work in aiming to deconstruct the clinically-relevant B cell immunology of these conditions. First, I will discuss the potential contribution of germinal centres versus long-lived plasma cells in the generation of the autoantibodies, and show data supporting the patient tumours as ectopic germinal centres. Next, I will highlight our efforts to better characterise the relative roles of pre- versus post-germinal centre B cells in the generation of the autoantibodies, and, finally, describe our single cell techqniues which isolate cognate-paired, antigen-specific recombinant antibodies from these patients to better inform the sites of tolerance breakdown, and the relative pathogenicity of the patient antibodies through the B cell lineage.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Jennifer Pope

Mon 11 Nov 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Applying chemistry in regenerative medicine: from small molecule discovery to mechanism elucidation

Prof Angela Russell

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Mon 11 Nov 2019 from 16:00 to 17:30

Ethics in AI

Weston Library, Lecture Theatre

Launch of the Ethics in AI seminar series

Tom Douglas, Carissa Veliz, Vicki Nash, Sandra Wachter, Brent Mittelstadt, Gil McVean, Jess Morley, Professor Sir Nigel Shadbolt

A discussion of ethical challenges posed by AI involving experts from fields across Oxford. Open to students & staff at the University. Every day brings more examples of the ethical challenges posed by AI to fields ranging from medicine, technology and government. Some are fairly familiar (e.g.... Read more

A discussion of ethical challenges posed by AI involving experts from fields across Oxford. Open to students & staff at the University. Every day brings more examples of the ethical challenges posed by AI to fields ranging from medicine, technology and government. Some are fairly familiar (e.g. concerning privacy, information security, appropriate rules of automated behaviour) but many are quite new (e.g. concerning algorithmic bias, transparency, and wider impacts). The Ethics in AI seminars are intended to explore these questions in a truly interdisciplinary way that brings together students and academics from around the University. Initially, a major aim will be to familiarise participants with the landscape of Oxford research, building links and encouraging new connections. Hence early seminars will cover a range of topics with a variety of speakers from different centres, and will, we hope, attract a wide audience from across the University. The seminar will be followed by refreshments in the Blackwell Hall from 5.30pm, to encourage cross-disciplinary conversation and collaboration. Topics to be discussed at the first seminar will include: The place of Ethics in AI (Tom Douglas and Carissa Veliz, Uehiro Centre, Faculty of Philosophy) AI Ethics and legal regulation (Vicki Nash, Sandra Wachter and Brent Mittelstadt, Oxford Internet Institute) Ethics of AI in healthcare (Gil McVean from the Big Data Institute and Jess Morley from the Oxford Internet Institute) The seminar will be chaired by Peter Millican, Professor of Philosophy and host of the University’s Futuremakers podcast whose 2018-19 series focused on AI. It will begin with an introduction by Professor Sir Nigel Shadbolt, who is spearheading the early stage of the Institute for Ethics in AI.

Booking Recommended

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Oxford University Institute for Ethics in AI

Tue 12 Nov 2019 from 10:00 to 14:00

Oxford Martin School, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Policy engagement: an introduction

Some of the most policy engaged academics from across the University, the new policy engagement team and researcher developers are teaming up to deliver a new introduction to policy, those who make it, and the mutual benefits that researchers and policymakers can derive from closer engagement. The... Read more

Some of the most policy engaged academics from across the University, the new policy engagement team and researcher developers are teaming up to deliver a new introduction to policy, those who make it, and the mutual benefits that researchers and policymakers can derive from closer engagement. The course is open to early career researchers and Y3+ doctoral candidates, and will provide them with an introduction to the following: - What is policy? - Who makes and shapes policy? - Why engage with policy? - How do researchers engage with policy? Some of the University’s many policy engaged researchers and academics will also participate, sharing insights from their own experience. Following the course, participants will have a better understanding of the relevance of their research and expertise to policy and policymakers; and be more able to identify policymakers with an interest in the their area of research and to engage policymakers effectively.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eleanor Bayley

Tue 12 Nov 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, EPA Seminar Room, , South Parks Road OX1 3RE

NAD+ and Mitophagy in Brain Ageing and Neurodegenerative Disorders

Dr Evandro Fei Fang

Dr. Evandro F. Fang established his independent laboratory at The University of Oslo, Norway investigating the molecular mechanisms of one of the most fundamental and fascinating topics in current biology: human ageing. His laboratory (https://evandrofanglab.com/) is focusing on the molecular... Read more

Dr. Evandro F. Fang established his independent laboratory at The University of Oslo, Norway investigating the molecular mechanisms of one of the most fundamental and fascinating topics in current biology: human ageing. His laboratory (https://evandrofanglab.com/) is focusing on the molecular mechanisms of how cells clear their damaged and aged mitochondria, a process termed “mitophagy”, as well as the roles of mitophagy in Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson's disease.

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 12 Nov 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richar Doll Seminar - Calcium, vitamin D and older peoples’ health

Professor Ian Reid

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 12 Nov 2019 from 17:00 to 18:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Wed 13 Nov 2019 from 10:00 to 11:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Synaptic alterations in the indirect-pathway of the basal ganglia in experimental Parkinsonism

Jerome Baufreton

My laboratory is interested in understanding the synaptic and cellular mechanisms governing information transfer in the basal ganglia. This network is composed of a group of interconnected subcortical brain nuclei that are critical for voluntary movement, learning and motivation, and the primary... Read more

My laboratory is interested in understanding the synaptic and cellular mechanisms governing information transfer in the basal ganglia. This network is composed of a group of interconnected subcortical brain nuclei that are critical for voluntary movement, learning and motivation, and the primary site of dysfunction in motor-related disorders such as Parkinson´s disease (PD) and Huntington´s disease (HD). Our objectives are to define the principles underlying the normal and pathophysiological operation of the basal ganglia. Our hope is that this information will provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms contributing to PD and HD and will be useful in developing new therapeutic strategies that more effectively treat the symptoms of these disorders. We utilize multiple experimental approaches including electrophysiology (patch-clamp and extracellular multi-units recordings), calcium imaging, molecular profiling, optogenetics ex vivo and in vivo, neuronal tracing and immunohistochemistry. We combined all these approaches to decipher: 1) the role of specific neuronal subpopulations in motor control, 2) synaptic transmission and plasticity of GABAergic and glutamatergic synapses of the basal ganglia network, 3) the cellular and molecular mechanisms of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS). Our research is supported by the Agence National de la Recherche, the French Parkinson’s disease association and la Fondation de France.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Richard Wade-Martins

Wed 13 Nov 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Zoology Research and Administration Centre, Seminar room

CANCELLED - Protectors and killers: rapid evolution of microbe-mediated protection from infection

Kayla King

Many animal and plant species harbour microbes in their microbiota that protect them from parasite infection. These ‘protective microbes’ can be a significant component of host defence. Using experimental evolution of a novel, tripartite interaction, my group has demonstrated that a costly... Read more

Many animal and plant species harbour microbes in their microbiota that protect them from parasite infection. These ‘protective microbes’ can be a significant component of host defence. Using experimental evolution of a novel, tripartite interaction, my group has demonstrated that a costly bacterium living in worms can rapidly evolve to defend their animal hosts against infection by virulent parasites, thus crossing the parasitism-mutualism continuum. We also show that these protective microbes can drive major changes in host tolerance, parasite virulence and coevolutionary dynamics. Our results indicate that the host microbiome is important in shaping infection outcomes, now and over evolutionary time.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Suki Kenth

THIS SEMINAR HAS BEEN CANCELLED

Wed 13 Nov 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Oxford Martin School, Oxford Martin School, 34 Broad Street, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Prefrontal Network Dynamics for Cognition

Thomas Klausberger

Distributed temporal activity in neuronal circuits of the prefrontal cortex combines emotional information with episodic and spatial memory to guide behavioural action. Cortical neurons can be divided into excitatory pyramidal cells, which communicate through glutamate via both local and long-range... Read more

Distributed temporal activity in neuronal circuits of the prefrontal cortex combines emotional information with episodic and spatial memory to guide behavioural action. Cortical neurons can be divided into excitatory pyramidal cells, which communicate through glutamate via both local and long-range axonal projections, and inhibitory interneurons, which are GABAergic and control the activity and timing of pyramidal cells mainly through local axons. These neurons can be further subdivided on the basis of their distinct axo-dendritic arborisations, subcellular post-synaptic targets, and by their differential expression of signalling molecules. We aim to determine how distinct types of neuron support the computational operations of the prefrontal cortex. I will discuss how the temporal dynamics and firing pattern of distinct neurons in the prefrontal cortex evolve during working memory, decision-making, and gambling.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Wed 13 Nov 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

HERC Seminar: Sex, risk, and preferences: Using stated preference data to model behaviour in HIV prevention.

Matthew Quaife

Evidence suggests that economic factors play an important role in commercial sex work, in particular we see that condomless sex commands a price premium relative to condom protected sex. This paper explores whether the use of an effective new HIV prevention product, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP),... Read more

Evidence suggests that economic factors play an important role in commercial sex work, in particular we see that condomless sex commands a price premium relative to condom protected sex. This paper explores whether the use of an effective new HIV prevention product, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), could change the price and quantity of condomless commercial sex supplied. We collected stated preference data from 122 HIV negative female sex workers (FSWs) in urban South Africa, using a repeated choice experiment to simulate the impact of using PrEP on choices. Results suggest that the price premium for condomless sex would decrease by 73% with PrEP use (described as 100% effective in preventing HIV). Simulations suggest that the quantity of condomless sex supplied would double. We use these results to parameterise a dynamic HIV transmission model, which accounts for changes in the economics of sex work. We simulate the impact of PrEP on the HIV epidemic under different assumptions of how the market for commercial sex is affected by the introduction of PrEP. We estimate that without considering economic factors, PrEP use will result in an 8.3% reduction in HIV prevalence over 20 years. Accounting for risk compensation among product users, product impact is reduced by 2 percentage points. We also simulate how reducing risk and prices may change the supply mix of sex workers, both women using PrEP and their colleagues who do not but who are still affected by operating in a competitive market. When competition is considered between users and non-users, the impact of PrEP is fully negated.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 13 Nov 2019 from 14:30 to 15:30

The George Institute for Global Health UK Seminars

75 George Street (Hayes House), Seminar Room, 1st Floor, Hayes House. Lift and stair access, 75 George Street OX1 2BQ

Association between maternal infection during pregnancy and childhood leukaemia in the offspring

Jianrong He

Leukaemia is the most common cancer in children. Although its aetiology remains unclear, recent evidence strongly suggests that a substantial fraction of childhood leukaemias originate in utero. Infection of the mother during pregnancy, transmitted to the foetus, is an important potential cause of... Read more

Leukaemia is the most common cancer in children. Although its aetiology remains unclear, recent evidence strongly suggests that a substantial fraction of childhood leukaemias originate in utero. Infection of the mother during pregnancy, transmitted to the foetus, is an important potential cause of genetic or immunological abnormalities and may lead to childhood leukaemia. Over quite a lengthy period various groups around the world have examined the association between maternal infection and risk of childhood leukaemia, but the results were inconsistent and mainly derived from case-control studies with relatively low-quality data. In this seminar, Jeff will summarise the existing evidence and then present some preliminary results using prospective data from the International Childhood Cancer Cohort Consortium (I4C). A recording will be made available shortly after the event. Follow us on Twitter @georgeinstuk with #GeorgeSeminars to catch the release.

Audience: All welcome

Thu 14 Nov 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, (TDI) seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

'Tumor whole-genomes shed light into mutational processes and cancer vulnerabilities'

Professor Nuria Lopez-Bigas

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Thu 14 Nov 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Chief Medical Officer / Haematology

Dr Richard Wood, Dr James Davies

Chief Medical Officer: "Bridging the Gap Between Primary & Secondary Care: A Warts & Roses Description of What is and What is Likely to Be", Dr Richard Wood, CEO of the Berkshire, Buckinghamshire & Oxfordshire LMC -- Haematology: "Genome editing of haemopoietic stem cells for treating thalassaemia", Dr James Davies -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Chief Medical Officer: "Bridging the Gap Between Primary & Secondary Care: A Warts & Roses Description of What is and What is Likely to Be", Dr Richard Wood, CEO of the Berkshire, Buckinghamshire & Oxfordshire LMC -- Haematology: "Genome editing of haemopoietic stem cells for treating thalassaemia", Dr James Davies -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 15 Nov 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Burdette Lecture: Cases of complicated surgery for “high-risk” prostate cancer

Dr Shin Egawa

Dr Shin Egawa is the Professor and Chairman of the Jikei University School of Medicine located in the center of Tokyo. That place was established by Professor Kanehiro Takaki in 1881 and is one of the oldest universities of the country. Professor Takaki is known as the sincere researcher who... Read more

Dr Shin Egawa is the Professor and Chairman of the Jikei University School of Medicine located in the center of Tokyo. That place was established by Professor Kanehiro Takaki in 1881 and is one of the oldest universities of the country. Professor Takaki is known as the sincere researcher who attributed the cause of beriberi to the nutritional deficiency for the first time. He spent time in Guy’s Hospital in London. Dr Egawa is the 6th Chairman of the Department of Urology which was established in 1922 as the oldest department. Dr Egawa has been the research fellow and research associate with Drs. Peter T. Scardino and Timothy C. Thompson at Baylor College of Medicine from 1988-1992. His main interest is in the field of urologic oncology, particularly in prostate cancer and its biology. He has been on the board of JUA (Japanese Urological Association) as the International Affairs Committee Chairman for years. He has also been the Board of Director of SIU (Societe Internationale Urologie) as the Publications Committee Chair. He is currently the Director of Asian School of Urology with UAA (Urological Association of Asia). He was bestowed Honorary Membership with EAU (European Association of Urology) and Secretary Commendation of Global Leadership Award from AUA (American Urological Association) in 2016. He loves golf and hiking. He and his wife, Mariko, have two kids, a daughter and a boy. Their pet is a 14-year-old male Chiwawa.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 15 Nov 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

From the lung to the gut and back: Mucosal T cells impact health and disease

Dr Emily Thornton

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 15 Nov 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

The mechanical regulation of neuronal growth and regeneration

Dr Kristian Franze

During development and pathological processes, cells in the central nervous system (CNS) are highly motile. Despite the fact that cell motion is driven by forces, our current understanding of the physical interactions between CNS cells and their environment is very limited. We here show how... Read more

During development and pathological processes, cells in the central nervous system (CNS) are highly motile. Despite the fact that cell motion is driven by forces, our current understanding of the physical interactions between CNS cells and their environment is very limited. We here show how nanometer deformations of CNS tissue caused by piconewton forces exerted by cells contribute to regulating CNS development and pathologies. In vitro, growth and migration velocities, directionality, cellular forces as well as neuronal fasciculation and maturation all significantly depended on substrate stiffness. Moreover, when grown on substrates incorporating linear stiffness gradients, glial cells migrated towards stiffer, while axon bundles turned towards softer substrates. In vivo time-lapse atomic force microscopy revealed stiffness gradients in developing brain tissue, which axons followed as well towards soft. Interfering with brain stiffness and mechanosensitive ion channels in vivo both led to similar aberrant neuronal growth patterns with reduced fasciculation and pathfinding errors. Importantly, CNS tissue significantly softened after traumatic injuries. Ultimately, mechanical signals not only directly impacted neuronal growth but also indirectly by regulating neuronal responses to and the availability of chemical guidance cues, strongly suggesting that chemical and mechanical signaling pathways are intimately linked, and that their interaction is crucial for neuronal development and regeneration.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Maike Glitsch

Mon 18 Nov 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

Sugar is not just for tea! Sweet tasting fibroblasts in inflammatory Rheumatoid Arthritis.

Dr Miguel Pineda

In healthy joints, Synovial Fibroblasts (SFs) provide the required stromal support, but are recognized to adopt a pathological role in rheumatoid arthritis, delivering region-specific signals to infiltrating cells that perpetuate inflammation. Interventions targeting SFs would improve current... Read more

In healthy joints, Synovial Fibroblasts (SFs) provide the required stromal support, but are recognized to adopt a pathological role in rheumatoid arthritis, delivering region-specific signals to infiltrating cells that perpetuate inflammation. Interventions targeting SFs would improve current systemic therapies by directly modifying disease progression. Unfortunately, our collective understanding of stromal immunology has not been translated to the clinic and new strategies are needed to find novel therapeutic targets. The vast, and yet unexploited amount of information contained in cell glycomes could offer such molecular targets, as glycans - or carbohydrates - are being increasingly recognized as fundamental regulators of cellular interactions between stromal and immune cells. Our results show that transformation of SFs into pro-inflammatory cells in arthritis is associated with glycan remodelling in response to pro-inflammatory mediators, a process that involves regulation of terminal sialylation. Implications for changes in glycosylation pathways in disease progression and remission will be discussed.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Jennifer Pope

Mon 18 Nov 2019 from 12:30 to 13:30

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

HERC Seminar: A personalized screening strategy for diabetic retinopathy: a cost-effectiveness perspective

Talitha Feenstra

We examined the cost-effectiveness of three screening strategies for diabetic retinopathy (DR); using a personalized model, annual screening, and the most recent Dutch guideline. The Dutch guideline has variable intervals based on pre-existing retinopathy scores from immediate referring for... Read more

We examined the cost-effectiveness of three screening strategies for diabetic retinopathy (DR); using a personalized model, annual screening, and the most recent Dutch guideline. The Dutch guideline has variable intervals based on pre-existing retinopathy scores from immediate referring for treatment up to 3 years. For each individual, DR screening intervals were determined for personalized screening using different STR risk margins. Observational data (1998-2017) from the Hoorn Diabetes Care System cohort of people with type 2 diabetes, were used (N=5,514). In order to evaluate the performance of the model, the actual time to develop STR in the cohort was used and for missing values of this variable, two alternative scenarios were assumed: slow and fast STR progression. Missed cases, the outcome of each strategy, were determined by comparing model based screening intervals to observed time to develop STR. Costs were calculated based on screening and travel costs. Finally, outcomes and costs were compared for the different screening strategies. Comparing personalized screening with annual screening resulted in 11.0% and 11.6% more missed cases with €10.4 and €8.3 less cost per patient for slow and fast STR progression assumptions, respectively. The personalized screening strategy performed better in terms of diagnosing STR cases and it had 7.1% and 9.1% less missed cases compared to Dutch guideline screening strategy. While for a slow STR progression assumption, personalized screening strategy reduced costs with €0.2 per patient, assuming fast STR progression personalized screening was €1.9 per patient more expensive than current Dutch guideline strategy. Missing cases would be found at a later time, with a median delay of 19 months for personalized screeening, and 12 months for the Dutch guideline strategy. Personalized retinopathy screening is more cost-effective than the Dutch guideline screening strategy. Although the personalized screening strategy was less effective than annual screening, the number of late diagnosed STR patients is low and the saving is considerable. With around 1,000,000 people with type 2 diabetes in the Netherlands, implementing this personalized model could save 8.5 to 10.6 million euros

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Mon 18 Nov 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Using single cell RNA sequencing to investigate mechanisms of liver fibrosis and regeneration

Prof Neil Henderson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Mon 18 Nov 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

“Clonal hematopoiesis in human aging and disease”.

Siddhartha Jaiswal

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Emma Butterfield

Tue 19 Nov 2019 from 10:00 to 11:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar - Will big data deliver new drug targets?

Dr Andrew Leach, Dr Rob Finn

An ever-increasing volume and complexity of data is now available within the life sciences, much of it potentially relevant to drug discovery. Methods to integrate, analyse and visualise such data are key to making effective decisions in the discovery and development of new medicines. The European... Read more

An ever-increasing volume and complexity of data is now available within the life sciences, much of it potentially relevant to drug discovery. Methods to integrate, analyse and visualise such data are key to making effective decisions in the discovery and development of new medicines. The European Bioinformatics Institute, based on the Wellcome Genome Campus in Hinxton, develops and delivers many of these data resources and tools to the scientific community, freely available and without restriction on use. In this talk, we will describe some of the data resources and workflows that can be used to answer practical questions in drug discovery, with a particular focus on target selection. The Open Targets (OT) collaboration is an important project in this context; the OT informatics platform integrates data relevant to targets and diseases from multiple resources and provides an easy-to-use interface to help users explore and process the data. Complementing the target-disease evidence relationships within OT is a target tractability platform, which helps users assess the "do-ability' of a target, for both small molecule and antibody modalities. We will also describe our work to explore the composition of the human microbiome, and its potential role in health and disease. As the number and size of the datasets from the human gut microbiome have increased, a more elaborate picture is beginning to form about the complexity of the microbiota. The relevance of these new discoveries, the current limitations and the potential for novel drug discovery will be outlined.

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 19 Nov 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Recent progress towards understanding the molecular mechanism of X chromosome inactivation

Professor Neil Brockdorff

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 19 Nov 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Professor Tyler VanderWeele

Professor Tyler Vanderweele

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 19 Nov 2019 from 17:00 to 18:00

Oxford Martin School, Lecture Theatre, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Panel: (Inter)nationalising the antibiotic pipeline: public options for antibiotic R&D

Dr Andrew Singer, Dr Claas Kirchhelle, Dr Adam Roberts

The Oxford Martin School, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine and the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology invite you to a panel discussion during World Antibiotic Awareness Week on new solutions to the stalled antibiotic research and development (R&D) pipeline. This event is organised by the... Read more

The Oxford Martin School, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine and the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology invite you to a panel discussion during World Antibiotic Awareness Week on new solutions to the stalled antibiotic research and development (R&D) pipeline. This event is organised by the Oxford Martin Programme on Collective Responsibility for Infectious Disease. Over the past three decades, the rapid rise of antimicrobial resistance and the lack of new antibiotics have created a perfect storm for global health and food systems. Antibiotic effectiveness is an endangered global common resource in urgent need of new solutions to protect existing drugs and to develop novel compounds. This event brings together experts from the medical, natural, and social sciences to discuss both the status quo and new approaches to global drug development and stewardship. In addition to the current focus on using public money to reinvigorate private drug development, panellists will discuss alternatives such as a public buyout of existing patents and a long-term (inter)nationalisation of antibiotic development as well as solutions for the dilemma of curbing AMR and enhancing global access to effective antimicrobials. 5:00 - 5:15pm: (Inter)nationalising the antibiotic pipeline: public options for antibiotic R&D Dr Andrew Singer (microbiologist, UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology), Dr Claas Kirchhelle (historian, Oxford Martin School), Dr Adam Roberts (microbiologist, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) will introduce their new publication on public options for antibiotic development in Lancet Infectious Diseases. 5:15 - 6:00pm: Panel discussion with questions from the audience An expert panel will discuss the economic, social, and microbiological dimensions of drug development, stewardship, and infection control in the 20th and 21st centuries: Ellen Silbergeld (environmental and public health, Johns Hopkins University), Koen Pouwels (modeller and economist, University Oxford), Viviane Quirke (historian, Oxford Brookes University), Javier Lezaun (social scientist, Institute for Science, Innovation, and Society, Oxford) Nicola Elvis (microbiologist, Public Health England). More information can be found here: https://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/events/antibiotics-panel/

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Wed 20 Nov 2019 from 11:30 to 12:30

WHG Seminars

Old Road Campus Research Building, Ludwig Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7DQ

Global tumor transcriptional activity reveals aggressiveness across multiple cancers

Dr Wenyi Wang

The ability to determine whether a cancer is indolent or aggressive is highly desirable for clinical decision making. Current standard-of-care uses histological and pathological stages. Biologists have identified proliferative markers such as Ki67 to have prognostic significance across multiple... Read more

The ability to determine whether a cancer is indolent or aggressive is highly desirable for clinical decision making. Current standard-of-care uses histological and pathological stages. Biologists have identified proliferative markers such as Ki67 to have prognostic significance across multiple solid tumors. Interestingly, the canonical oncogene MYC has been shown to increase the global gene expression level in tumor cells. However, the total number of mRNA molecules is not directly measurable, either in bulk or single-cell RNA sequencing data. Here, using a joint deconvolution model with matching bulk RNA and DNA sequencing data, we propose a novel metric, transcriptional activity score (TAS), to measure the ratio of global gene expression levels in tumor cells to that in surrounding non-tumor cells. Using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas and from the International Cancer Genome Consortium, we found that higher TAS was associated with more aggressive behavior, as defined by survival outcomes, pathologic correlates, and genomic features known to associate with aggressive behavior (e.g. genomic instability, whole genome doubling) in multiple cancer types. We further applied TAS to annotate somatic mutational events for their impact on global rather than local expression changes. In this talk, I will present the development of our transcriptome deconvolution model, DeMixT, and the subsequent development of TAS and our biological findings using the consortial datasets. In summary, we have developed a new summary metric using sequencing data from patient tumor samples, to compute, in vivo and using deconvolution, the relative global gene expression level of tumor cells. TAS may serve as a tractable phenotype to help elucidate the biology that underlies metastasis, prognosis and response to treatment in cancer.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Wed 20 Nov 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

OCDEM Wednesday Seminar Series

Programming of cardio-metabolic disease by maternal over-nutrition: a developing crisis

Professor Susan Ozanne

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 20 Nov 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Big Data Institute, BDI/NDPH Building Seminar Rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Research Ethics for Researchers in the Medical Sciences Division

Dr Helen Barnby-Porritt

The aims of this session are to understand: • what Research Integrity means • why Oxford has an ethics review system for research involving human participants, human tissue and/or personal data • what research is reviewed by the Medical Sciences Interdivisional Research Ethics Committee (MS... Read more

The aims of this session are to understand: • what Research Integrity means • why Oxford has an ethics review system for research involving human participants, human tissue and/or personal data • what research is reviewed by the Medical Sciences Interdivisional Research Ethics Committee (MS IDREC) versus NHS Ethics Committees • where, and how, to apply for ethical approval • how to protect personal data obtained in research

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 20 Nov 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room B, Headington OX3 7BN

How can ethics add value for pathogen sequencing in research, clinical practice and public health?

Dr Stephanie Johnson

Genetic information derived from pathogens is an increasingly essential input for infectious disease control, public health and research. While the technical developments of sequencing technology are being implemented at a rapid pace, the non-technical aspects of implementing this technology are... Read more

Genetic information derived from pathogens is an increasingly essential input for infectious disease control, public health and research. While the technical developments of sequencing technology are being implemented at a rapid pace, the non-technical aspects of implementing this technology are still being broadly discussed. The successful implementation of this rapidly developing technology will, for example, require sharing of samples and metadata, interdisciplinary global collaborative partnerships, and will need to offer useful evidence for public health decision-making. Importantly, appropriately addressing these challenges will require the systematic identification, and analysis of a number of complex ethical, legal and social issues. A number of factors will contribute to the types of ethical issues that arise in different instances. These are likely to include characteristics of the disease, the environmental, political and geographical context, existing laws and policies, public attitudes, and cultural differences. This talk will identify the emerging ethical challenges; assess the gaps in ethical frameworks or thinking, and consider how ethics can help to solve practical challenges.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Wed 20 Nov 2019 from 14:30 to 15:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Overcoming constraints on adaptive immunity to HBV

Professor Mala Maini

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 20 Nov 2019 from 14:30 to 15:30

The George Institute for Global Health UK Seminars

75 George Street (Hayes House), Seminar Room, 1st Floor, Hayes House. Lift and stair access, 75 George Street OX1 2BQ

The double burden of diabetes and global infection

Susanna Dunachie

77% of people with diabetes mellitus now live in low and middle-income countries (LMIC), and the incidence of diabetes is accelerating in poorer communities. The majority of people with diabetes are thought to have Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) although further research on diabetes subtypes in... Read more

77% of people with diabetes mellitus now live in low and middle-income countries (LMIC), and the incidence of diabetes is accelerating in poorer communities. The majority of people with diabetes are thought to have Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) although further research on diabetes subtypes in LMIC is needed. Diabetes increases susceptibility to infection and / or worsens outcomes for major global infections such as tuberculosis (TB), dengue, influenza and Gram-negative sepsis including Salmonella species and the neglected tropical disease melioidosis. Melioidosis is caused by the soil bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, has a 40% hospitalised case fatality rate in LMIC, and an estimated 89,000 global death toll. People with diabetes have a twelve-fold increased risk of melioidosis compared to non-diabetics, and up to two-thirds of melioidosis patients have T2DM. There is a large overlap between populations at risk of diabetes and those at risk of melioidosis, resulting in an estimated 280 million people with diabetes now living in melioidosis-endemic countries across the world. In addition, people with diabetes bear a disproportionate burden of drug-resistant infections from bacteria with antimicrobial resistance (AMR). This talk will give an overview of what is known about the epidemiology of diabetes and infection, and discuss potential mechanisms for the increased risk of infection, and in particular for the exquisite susceptibility of people with diabetes to melioidosis. International treatment guidelines for T2DM are based on research conducted in high-income countries focussed on preventing adverse cardiovascular outcomes and early death. There is a lack of evidence on which to base treatment guidelines for people living in LMIC, where there is an increased burden of infectious diseases. The literature to date on the impact of treatment on infection risk and outcomes will be discussed. Finally, the role of vaccination of people with diabetes will be discussed. It is noted that a public health vaccine for melioidosis would be targeted at people with diabetes in the first instance, as this group represents a well-defined and accessible population for evaluation of a melioidosis vaccine.

Audience: All welcome

Wed 20 Nov 2019 from 16:00 to 17:30

Ethox Centre and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

WEH/Ethox Seminar - Archival Ethics from Below: The Case of the Uganda Cancer Institute's Records

Dr Marissa Mika

At the Uganda Cancer Institute, lines often blur between past and present, sickness and health, life and death. Founded in 1967 as a small chemotherapy clinical trials facility in Kampala, today the Institute’s 100+ beds serve a population catchment of over 40 million living in the Great Lakes... Read more

At the Uganda Cancer Institute, lines often blur between past and present, sickness and health, life and death. Founded in 1967 as a small chemotherapy clinical trials facility in Kampala, today the Institute’s 100+ beds serve a population catchment of over 40 million living in the Great Lakes region of Africa. The Institute houses the only continuous collection of patient records documenting cancer treatment and care on the African continent. As this Institute gets torn down and built back up, so too do longstanding practices of cancer research and care. And with all of these changes at the Institute, there are major questions about what to preserve, what to discard, and what to celebrate. And in particular, what should be “done” with the institutional records and patient records at this site? This talk considers the temporal, methodological, and ethical challenges of preserving patient records at the Uganda Cancer Institute.

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 20 Nov 2019 from 18:00 to 19:00

Centre for Personalised Medicine Seminars

St Anne's College, Tsuzuki Lecture Theatre, Woodstock Road OX2 6HS

Can education be personalised using pupils’ genetic data?

Dr Tim Morris

The predictive power of polygenic scores for some traits now rivals that of more classical phenotypic measures, leading to suggestions that polygenic scores offer a potentially useful tool for genetically informed policy. However, it is not well understood how much information polygenic scores... Read more

The predictive power of polygenic scores for some traits now rivals that of more classical phenotypic measures, leading to suggestions that polygenic scores offer a potentially useful tool for genetically informed policy. However, it is not well understood how much information polygenic scores convey for complex social traits such as education over and above phenotypic data that are available or easily measured. Using data from a UK cohort study we investigate the accuracy with which polygenic scores for education predict pupil’s realised attainment. We test their use as standalone predictors and conditional on phenotypic data that is available to or could be easily and cheaply collected by schools. In our sample, children’s polygenic scores predicted their educational outcomes almost as well as parent’s socioeconomic position or education. There was high overlap between the polygenic score and attainment distributions though, leading to weak predictive accuracy at the individual level. Conditional on prior attainment, polygenic scores were not predictive of later attainment. Our results suggest that while polygenic scores are informative for identifying group level differences in education, they currently have very limited use in predicting how well an individual will perform

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Catherine Lidbetter

There will be a drinks reception after Tim's talk. All welcome.

Thu 21 Nov 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Tropical Medicine Day

Dr Bernadette Young, Dr David Bonsall

Tropical Medicine: "You don't see that everyday", Dr Bernadette Young -- Tropical Medicine: "A lesson to Lyssa’n to: Prevention is Hobson's choice", Dr David Bonsall -- Chair: Prof Richard Cornall

Tropical Medicine: "You don't see that everyday", Dr Bernadette Young -- Tropical Medicine: "A lesson to Lyssa’n to: Prevention is Hobson's choice", Dr David Bonsall -- Chair: Prof Richard Cornall

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 21 Nov 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

The regulation of zeta-globin

Dr. Andrew King

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

VIVA SEMINAR

Thu 21 Nov 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

ARUK Oxford Drug Discovery Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

More than Bystanders in Dementia—Understanding What Microglia Do

Dr Soyon Hong

Genome-wide association studies implicate microglia in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis, but how microglia contribute to cognitive decline in AD is unclear. Emerging research suggest microglia, the resident macrophages of the central nervous system, to be active participants in brain... Read more

Genome-wide association studies implicate microglia in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis, but how microglia contribute to cognitive decline in AD is unclear. Emerging research suggest microglia, the resident macrophages of the central nervous system, to be active participants in brain wiring. One mechanism by which microglia help eliminate synapses is through the classical complement pathway (C1q, CR3/C3). Data from multiple laboratories collectively suggest that there may be an aberrant reactivation of the complement-dependent pruning pathway in multiple models of neurologic diseases including AD. These data altogether suggest that microglia participate in synaptic pathology. However, how and which synapses are targeted are unknown. Furthermore, whether microglia directly impair synaptic function is unknown. Mechanistic insight into local signals that regulate neuroglia interactions will be key to developing potential therapeutic avenues to target in disease.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kate Humphrey

Thu 21 Nov 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

The Haldane Lecture Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

A hundred years on: 21st Century Insights into Human Oxygen Homeostasis

Peter J Ratcliffe

In 1911, work by Haldane, Fitzgerald and colleagues revealed the extraordinary sensitivity of blood haemoglobin levels to reduced atmospheric oxygen levels, a finding that introduced the physiological concept of an oxygen sensor. This lecture will outline advances in the molecular understanding of... Read more

In 1911, work by Haldane, Fitzgerald and colleagues revealed the extraordinary sensitivity of blood haemoglobin levels to reduced atmospheric oxygen levels, a finding that introduced the physiological concept of an oxygen sensor. This lecture will outline advances in the molecular understanding of oxygen sensing mechanisms, including the remarkable finding that all eukaryotic kingdoms use enzymatic protein oxidations coupled to proteostasis to signal oxygen levels in their cells. The physiological implications of these advances will be discussed, together with the opportunities and challenges raised in the therapeutic modulation of human oxygen sensing systems.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor David Paterson

Please note the lecture theatre capacity is restricted to 190 and seating is first come first served (Oxford University members only).

Fri 22 Nov 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Image Consciousness in the Emergency Department - Developing and Evaluating Novel Radiological Pathways and Technologies in the Acute Healthcare Setting

Dr Alex Novak, Dr Lois Brand, Dr Phil Hormbrey

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 22 Nov 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Epigenetic regulation governs the differential response of cancer and T-cells to arginine starvation

Dr Nicholas Crump

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 22 Nov 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Architectural principles in central mammalian synapses

Prof. Dr. Christian Rosenmund

Synapses transduce action potentials into neurotransmitter release with extraordinary efficiency and temporal precision. To execute this function, it is imperative that the Ca2+ trigger signal is rapid and fast to efficiently activate the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery. Mechanistic analysis... Read more

Synapses transduce action potentials into neurotransmitter release with extraordinary efficiency and temporal precision. To execute this function, it is imperative that the Ca2+ trigger signal is rapid and fast to efficiently activate the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery. Mechanistic analysis revealed that both efficient fusion and efficient Ca2+ secretion coupling depends on closing the distances as much as possible between membranes and between Ca2+ channels and release machinery. Also, postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptors need to be close to sites of vesicle fusion to maximize postsynaptic responses. While most molecular players of synaptic function are known, whether and how they are spatially arranged are still poorly understood. I will present electron microscopy compatible live labelling approaches for pre- and postsynaptic players and analyzed their intrinsic position in the synapse in relationship to synaptic vesicle docking and fusion function. We demonstrate physical alignment of synaptic vesicles, Ca2+ channels and postsynaptic AMPA receptors and fusion sites. Moreover, we show that forced transsynaptic coupling of Ca2+ channel subunits with postsynaptic AMPA receptors are sufficient in rescuing loss of synaptic organization and function upon loss of RIM/RBP, arguing that the core executors of synaptic transmission can also act as organizer of the synaptic apparatus.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Zoltan Molnar

Fri 22 Nov 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

“Ontogeny of hematopoiesis: making blood before a blood stem cell”

James Palis, M.D

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Mon 25 Nov 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71a, b and c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Mon 25 Nov 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

‘A new paradigm for cartilage lubrication: towards development of novel therapies for osteoarthritis’

Professor Jacob Klein

The articular cartilage coating the major mammalian joints, such as hips or knees, presents the most efficiently lubricated surfaces known in nature. When this lubrication breaks down, however, the result can be degradation of the articular cartilage, and onset of osteoarthritis (OA). In recent... Read more

The articular cartilage coating the major mammalian joints, such as hips or knees, presents the most efficiently lubricated surfaces known in nature. When this lubrication breaks down, however, the result can be degradation of the articular cartilage, and onset of osteoarthritis (OA). In recent years we have elucidated the molecular origins of the remarkable reduction in friction at the cartilage surface. Our results indicate that it is due to boundary layers in which several components act synergistically, exposing lipids at the slip plane, and I describe how this understanding may lead to novel approaches to alleviate OA.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Jennifer Pope

Mon 25 Nov 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Using genetic association to understand human biology

Professor Gil McVean

Patterns of genetic association have revealed much about the biology underlying human traits and complex diseases. But how can we use such information systematically to learn about the processes - at molecular, cellular and tissue levels - that modulate risk? I will discuss some challenges,... Read more

Patterns of genetic association have revealed much about the biology underlying human traits and complex diseases. But how can we use such information systematically to learn about the processes - at molecular, cellular and tissue levels - that modulate risk? I will discuss some challenges, approaches, and solutions to the problems of integrating and interpreting data on such a vast scale. And how such information can be applied to diverse problems ranging from therapeutic target identification to quantifying individual risk.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Mon 25 Nov 2019 from 15:00 to 16:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Phenome@BDI Seminar

Xilin Jiang, Luca Ferretti

1) “How genetic risk for common disease changes with age” - Xilin Jiang - DPhil student, working with Professor Gil McVean and Professor Chris Holmes. Genetics risk scores have great potential for disease prediction. However, most methods for estimating genetic risk assume that the effect is... Read more

1) “How genetic risk for common disease changes with age” - Xilin Jiang - DPhil student, working with Professor Gil McVean and Professor Chris Holmes. Genetics risk scores have great potential for disease prediction. However, most methods for estimating genetic risk assume that the effect is constant over age. Here, we present a framework for estimating how genetic risk changes with age and demonstrate that for many common diseases there is both age-dependent heterogeneity in how genetic risk affects future disease and, for a subset of diseases, multiple components of risk with distinct longitudinal profiles. To analyse longitudinal patterns of genetic risk, we use the proportional hazards model to estimate genetics effect sizes within age groups, conditioning on survival (i.e. no mortality, censoring or disease). We show that this approach is needed to avoid biases that arise in naive GWAS approaches, which are affected by the depletion of risk alleles in unaffected individuals over time and changes in baseline risk. We apply this model to the UK Biobank dataset, analysing 30 ICD-10 disease codes with prevalence > 1% and at least 20 independent associated variants. We use a Bayesian clustering approach on summary statistics to estimate latent curves and their posterior distributions, using spline functions to encourage smoothness in risk profiles over age and permutation tests to assess the evidence for distinct groups of variants with different age-related profiles. We identify 7 diseases with evidence for age-specific heterogeneity, including heart disease, skin cancer and gall-bladder diseases, several of which show evidence for more than one curve. We discuss biological processes that can result in such age-specific risk, notably gene-environment interactions, and the implications of these results for genetic prediction of risk. 2) " Genotype-phenotype maps, fitness landscapes and higher-order epistasis in microorganisms "- Luca Ferretti- Fraser group In recent years, advances in experimental evolution of microorganisms has enabled exploration of the fine structure of local genotype-phenotype maps and especially of fitness landscapes, i.e. genotype-fitness maps. These landscapes have been experimentally probed to an unprecedented level, obtaining information on fitness effects and epistasis at a local scale. Unfortunately, the high-dimensional nature of gene- or genome-level maps hinders all efforts towards a systematic exploration of their global properties, which are key to understand evolution on longer time scales. Hence, it is key to understand how local measures can be used to assess global features of these maps. The theory of fitness landscapes suggests that the structure of epistatic interactions plays a crucial role in determining the global topography of the landscape. In this talk, we will give an overview of recent developments in relation to local measures and global properties of genotype-phenotype maps. For experimentally resolved landscapes, several global properties can be predicted from local measures of epistasis. However, it is still unclear which features of long-term evolutionary dynamics could be predicted by experimental measures on small or sparse landscapes.

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 25 Nov 2019 from 17:30 to 18:30

Ancient Medicine Seminar

Green Templeton College, Barclay Room, Woodstock Road OX2 6HG

Tue 26 Nov 2019 from 09:30 to 10:30

Psychiatry Seminars

Warneford Hospital, Seminar Room, Department of Psychiatry

The potential of repurposed drug treatments for severe mental illness

Dr Joseph Hayes

Drug repurposing is potentially cost-effective, low risk, and necessary in psychiatric drug development. The availability of large, routine data sets provides the opportunity to evaluate the potential for currently used medication to benefit people with serious mental illness. Using linked Swedish... Read more

Drug repurposing is potentially cost-effective, low risk, and necessary in psychiatric drug development. The availability of large, routine data sets provides the opportunity to evaluate the potential for currently used medication to benefit people with serious mental illness. Using linked Swedish register data we set out to determine whether hydroxylmethyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, L-type calcium channel antagonists, and biguanides are associated with reduced psychiatric hospitalisation and self-harm in individuals with severe mental illness.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Elizabeth Thomas

Tue 26 Nov 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Host-directed therapies for tuberculosis targeting macrophage activation and stress resilience

Prof Igor Kramnik

Igor Kramnik obtained his PhD from the Central Institute for Tuberculosis Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow, Russia. There he started his studies of lung-specific aspects of anti-tuberculosis immunity and discovered myeloid suppressor cells within pulmonary TB lesions. He... Read more

Igor Kramnik obtained his PhD from the Central Institute for Tuberculosis Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow, Russia. There he started his studies of lung-specific aspects of anti-tuberculosis immunity and discovered myeloid suppressor cells within pulmonary TB lesions. He continued to study host immunity to mycobacteria at the Center for the Study of Host Resistance at McGill University in Montreal and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, New York, with Emil Skamene and Barry Bloom, respectively. In 1999 he was recruited to the faculty at the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston. In 2009 he became an Investigator at the National Emerging Infectious Disease Laboratory and joined the Pulmonary Center at Boston University. During this period, he developed a mouse model of pulmonary TB that develop human-like necrotic TB granulomas and used this model to reveal the genetic control and mechanisms driving the necrotic pathology. His current research is focused on further dissecting the interplay of the host and bacterial factors leading to immunopathology in TB and the development of host-directed therapies to improve the outcomes of TB.

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 26 Nov 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Floor meeting - 2 groups will give an update on the research work in their laboratory

Dr Robert Beagrie, Dr Sarah Gooding

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 26 Nov 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - Inhalable microplastics: a new cause for concern

Professor Frank Kelly

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 27 Nov 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 10.71a, b and c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Wed 27 Nov 2019 from 12:30 to 13:30

WHG Lunchtime Lab Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Grünewald & Hill Lunchtime Lab Talks

Lindsay Baker, Vojtech Prazak, Kathryn Auckland, Amanda Chong

Grünewald Group (Strubi) Speaker 1: Lindsay Baker Title: Towards Native Membrane Structural Biology Speaker 2: Vojta Prazak Title: Insights into Cellular Structural Biology by Electron Cryo-Tomography Hill Group (Immunology & Infectious Disease, Tropical Medicine & Global Health) Speaker 1:... Read more

Grünewald Group (Strubi) Speaker 1: Lindsay Baker Title: Towards Native Membrane Structural Biology Speaker 2: Vojta Prazak Title: Insights into Cellular Structural Biology by Electron Cryo-Tomography Hill Group (Immunology & Infectious Disease, Tropical Medicine & Global Health) Speaker 1: Kathryn Auckland Title: Genetic susceptibility to Rheumatic Heart Disease Speaker 2: Amanda Chong Title: Infection and Inflammation in UK Biobank

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Wed 27 Nov 2019 from 14:30 to 15:30

The George Institute for Global Health UK Seminars

75 George Street (Hayes House), Seminar Room, 1st Floor, Hayes House. Lift and stair access, 75 George Street OX1 2BQ

Healthy and sustainable foods and diets (screening)

Professor Mike Rayner

Professor Rayner founded the Centre on Population Approaches for Non-Communicable Disease prevention in 1993 to focus on research into the promotion of healthier and more sustainable diets. The Centre is a World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre. In this seminar, he draws on his role with... Read more

Professor Rayner founded the Centre on Population Approaches for Non-Communicable Disease prevention in 1993 to focus on research into the promotion of healthier and more sustainable diets. The Centre is a World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre. In this seminar, he draws on his role with the Centre and as Chair of Sustain: the alliance for better food and farming in the UK, and as Chair of the Nutrition Expert Group for the European Heart Network to discuss healthy and sustainable foods and diets. Please note that this is a screening of a seminar delivered at The George Institute in Sydney in March 2019.

Audience: All welcome

Wed 27 Nov 2019 from 15:00 to 16:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar: Integrating genotype and phenotype for precision oncology

Ian Overton

The spread of cells from a primary tumour to a secondary site remains one of the most life-threatening pathological events. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) is a cell programme involving loss of cell-cell adhesion, gain of motility, invasiveness and survival; these properties are fundamental... Read more

The spread of cells from a primary tumour to a secondary site remains one of the most life-threatening pathological events. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) is a cell programme involving loss of cell-cell adhesion, gain of motility, invasiveness and survival; these properties are fundamental for metastasis. Epithelial remodelling is also crucial for development. Reactivation of a programme resembling EMT is a credible mechanism for key aspects of the invasion-metastasis cascade and an MET-like process may produce the differentiation frequently observed in secondary tumours. Indeed, oncofetal signalling pathways (e.g. Hedgehog, Wnt, TGF-beta) activate EMT, and promote metastasis in multiple cancers. Navigating from molecular measurements to phenotype implies understanding gene function. Many genes are poorly characterised, but coordinately regulated, and new functions continue to be discovered even for deeply studied genes. Thus, a substantial portion of gene function is uncharted. Data driven networks provide useful abstractions to fill these knowledge gaps. We have developed techniques for mapping context-specific cell process networks and applied these to study EMT/MET; including to identify new EMT players, pathway crosstalk, functional transcription factor targets and drivers of metastasis. Orthologues of predicted EMT transcription factor targets in fly discriminated human breast cancer molecular subtypes and our analysis predicted new gene functions; for example, evidencing networks that reshape Waddington’s epigenetic landscape in epithelial remodelling. Predicted invasion roles were followed up in a tractable cell model and a novel druggable target was validated in an organotypic invasion assay. I will also discuss a novel algorithm for causal network inference, applied to combine ex vivo immunohistochemical measurements with clinical data in order to gain mechanistic insight and to predict molecular control of clinical parameters. Multivariate modelling controlling for clinical variables demonstrates that causal network based risk groups have significant prognostic value.

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 28 Nov 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Dermatology / Radiology

Prof Fergus Gleeson, Dr Louise Bovijn, Dr Brogan Salence, Dr Alex Novak

Dermatology: "Creepy Crawlies", Dr Louise Bovijn and Dr Brogan Salence -- Radiology: "AI in Critical Care imaging, and it was the machine that missed it", Dr Alex Novak and Prof Fergus Gleeson -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Dermatology: "Creepy Crawlies", Dr Louise Bovijn and Dr Brogan Salence -- Radiology: "AI in Critical Care imaging, and it was the machine that missed it", Dr Alex Novak and Prof Fergus Gleeson -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 28 Nov 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

From nuclei to nuclei: transitioning from theoretical physics to biology

Dr Ed Morrissey

As part of the WIMM Science Career Seminar series, Dr. Ed Morrissey will tell us about his career in and out of academia and his transition from physics to biology.

As part of the WIMM Science Career Seminar series, Dr. Ed Morrissey will tell us about his career in and out of academia and his transition from physics to biology.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Robert Beagrie

Thu 28 Nov 2019 from 14:00 to 15:00

Jenner Seminars

NDM Building, Seminar Room, Lower Ground Floor, Headington OX3 7FZ

Pathology-based approaches to underpin vaccine development for leishmaniasis

Prof Paul Kaye

Audience: Public

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Thu 28 Nov 2019 from 14:00 to 15:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Thu 28 Nov 2019 from 17:00 to 18:00

Population Health Seminars

Mathematical Institute, Lecture Theatre 1, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

NDPH Inaugural lecture - Crossing the divide between genomics and epidemiology: the curious case of Alzheimer’s disease”

Professor Cornelia van Duijn

Alzheimer’s disease is the most important disorder underlying dementia. The epidemic of dementia not only has a major impact on patients, their relatives and caretakers but also on the health care system of the UK and elsewhere. The inaugural lecture will discuss the advances in our understanding... Read more

Alzheimer’s disease is the most important disorder underlying dementia. The epidemic of dementia not only has a major impact on patients, their relatives and caretakers but also on the health care system of the UK and elsewhere. The inaugural lecture will discuss the advances in our understanding of the genetic and epidemiologic determinants of Alzheimer’s disease and the interactions between these two fields. The lecture will address the opportunities and challenges in translating our current knowledge into successful preventive interventions. These include the discovery and validation of blood-based biomarkers using big data analysis and the discovery of new modifiable determinants such as the gut microbiome.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 28 Nov 2019 from 17:15 to 19:00

Centre for Personalised Medicine Seminars

Mathematical Institute, L2, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Developing the NHS Genomic Medicine Service: Underpinning Precision Medicine

Professor Dame Sue Hill

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Catherine Lidbetter

We are delighted to invite you to the Centre for Personalised Medicine’s Annual Lecture on Thursday 28th November 2019 in the Mathematical Institute (L2), Oxford. This year’s speaker is Professor Dame Sue Hill, Chief Scientific Officer for England, who will be delivering a lecture 'Developing the NHS Genomic Medicine Service: Underpinning Precision Medicine'. There will be a drinks reception at 17:15, followed by the lecture at 18:00.

Fri 29 Nov 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Facing the future with our eyes wide open. What does the future hold for (cardiac) surgery that will change the way we practice?

Mr George Krasopoulos

Mr George Krasopoulos has been a consultant cardiac surgeon since 2008 and joined the Oxford Heart Centre in July 2013. He holds the title of Hon. Professor in Cardiac Surgery and he is involved with the Universities of Oxford, Anglia Ruskin, Cumbria and Buckingham. In 2016, he joined the Liga... Read more

Mr George Krasopoulos has been a consultant cardiac surgeon since 2008 and joined the Oxford Heart Centre in July 2013. He holds the title of Hon. Professor in Cardiac Surgery and he is involved with the Universities of Oxford, Anglia Ruskin, Cumbria and Buckingham. In 2016, he joined the Liga College in Oxfordshire as a Non-Executive Director. His philosophy is based on providing surgical, medical and humanitarian services of the highest standards.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 29 Nov 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Strange E Things

Lucy Walters, Dr Simon Brackenridge, Dr Hongbing Yang

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 29 Nov 2019 from 09:30 to 10:30

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Immunology Disease Day

Immunology Disease Day Friday 29 November, Rooms A&B 09:30 – 09:40 Crash course (or recap!) in immunology Calli Dendrou 09:40 – 10:00 Methods for analysing antigen-specific B-cells in autoimmunity, a neuroscience perspective ... Read more

Immunology Disease Day Friday 29 November, Rooms A&B 09:30 – 09:40 Crash course (or recap!) in immunology Calli Dendrou 09:40 – 10:00 Methods for analysing antigen-specific B-cells in autoimmunity, a neuroscience perspective Bo Sun (Bashford-Rogers group) 10:00 – 10:20 Tissue biomarkers for adalimumab in inflammatory bowel disease and rheumatoid arthritis: A parallel observational study Tom Thomas (Dendrou group) 10:20 – 10:40 Reverse immunology applied to vaccine design against flaviviruses Jose Slon-Campos (Screaton group) 10:40 – 11:00 Mapping the tick - human interface to develop new therapeutics Shoumo Bhattacharya 11:00 – 11:20 – COFFEE BREAK – 11:20 – 11:40 Genetic susceptibility to Rheumatic Heart Disease Kate Auckland (Hill group) 11:40 – 12:00 Linking disease-associated variants to target genes in type 1 diabetes Tony Cutler (Todd group) 12:00 – 12:20 A chromatin state comparative study of primary blood cell epigenomes unveils the relation between non-coding enhancers and immune disease activity Gabriele Migliorini (Knight group) 12:20 – 12:40 Investigating pathophysiological mechanisms shared across immune- mediated diseases Victor Yeung (Dendrou group) 12:40 – 13:40 – LUNCH BREAK – 13:40 – 14:00 Infection and inflammation in UK Biobank Amanda Chong (Hill group) 14:00 – 14:20 B cells and T cells in sepsis: Understanding the adaptive immune response Lauren Overend (Bashford-Rogers group) 14:20 – 14:40 The sepsis plasma proteome: patient stratification and sub-endotype discovery Yuxin Mi (Knight group) 14:40 – 15:00 Malaria - A battle for survival Kirk Rockett (Kwiatkowski group)

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Calliope Dendrou

Fri 29 Nov 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Cell competition and the regulation of robustness of growth during early mouse development

Dr Tristan Rodriguez

During the early stages of mammalian embryonic differentiation a vast array of cellular changes take place, including a dramatic increase in the proliferation rate and a rewiring of the transcriptional, epigenetic, metabolic and signalling networks. The dimension of these changes and the... Read more

During the early stages of mammalian embryonic differentiation a vast array of cellular changes take place, including a dramatic increase in the proliferation rate and a rewiring of the transcriptional, epigenetic, metabolic and signalling networks. The dimension of these changes and the requirement for their timing to be carefully orchestrated implies that stringent quality control mechanisms must be in place to ensure the elimination of aberrant cells prior to the specification of the germline. Here I will discuss the work my laboratory has done to unravel the mechanism of elimination of non-lethally damaged cells during differentiation. I will present evidence to show that during embryonic differentiation, cells with mild forms of cellular damage, such as mis-patterning or karyotypical abnormalities are recognised as a less-fit by their neighbours that induce the elimination of these damaged cells. I will discuss how during this process the interplay of signalling and metabolic pathways governs the competitive interactions that ensue between cells with different fitness levels, as well as the implications of these interactions for the growth and patterning of the developing embryo.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof Shankar Srinivas