Other Seminars

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Wed 1 May 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, LG seminar room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

HERC seminar: The causal effect of adiposity on hospital costs: Mendelian Randomization analysis of over 300,000 individuals from the UK Biobank

Dr Padraig Dixon

Estimates of the marginal effect of measures of adiposity such as body mass index (BMI) on healthcare costs are important for the formulation and evaluation of policies targeting adverse weight profiles. Many existing estimates of this association are affected by endogeneity bias caused by... Read more

Estimates of the marginal effect of measures of adiposity such as body mass index (BMI) on healthcare costs are important for the formulation and evaluation of policies targeting adverse weight profiles. Many existing estimates of this association are affected by endogeneity bias caused by simultaneity bias, measurement error and omitted variables. The contribution of this study is to avoid this bias by using a novel identification strategy – random germline genetic variation in an instrumental variable analysis – to identify the presence and magnitude of the causal effect of BMI on inpatient hospital costs. We use genetic variant-level data to undertake much richer testing of the sensitivity of results to potential violations of the instrumental variable assumptions than is possible with existing approaches. Using data on over 300,000 individuals, we found effect sizes for the marginal unit of BMI over 50% as large as multivariable effect sizes. These effects attenuated under sensitivity analyses, but effect sizes remained larger than multivariable estimates for all but one estimator. There was little evidence for non-linear effects of BMI on hospital costs. Within-family estimates, intended to address dynastic biases, were null but suffered from low power. This paper is the first to use genetic variants in a Mendelian Randomization framework to estimate the causal effect of BMI (or any other disease/trait) on healthcare costs. This type of analysis can be used to inform the cost-effectiveness of interventions and policies targeting the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity, and for setting research priorities.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 1 May 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Protective and pathogenic effects of type I interferon: lessons from human genetics

Dr Christopher Duncan

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 2 May 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

The Ying and Yang of Diabetes & Cancer

Professor Anna Gloyn

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 2 May 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

New Career Development Series: The research journey and the importance of a supportive work environment in navigating the highs and lows

Professor Leanne Hodson

A career in academic research is seldom straightforward; it comes with many challenges which can be an emotional rollercoaster. I will discuss how I have navigated the many highs (successes) and lows (disappointments – of which there have been many!) that I have encountered during my academic... Read more

A career in academic research is seldom straightforward; it comes with many challenges which can be an emotional rollercoaster. I will discuss how I have navigated the many highs (successes) and lows (disappointments – of which there have been many!) that I have encountered during my academic career to date and what I have learnt in the process. I will also discuss how I have gone about creating a supportive research environment. A session for Principal Investigators, Managers as well as researchers more generally

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 2 May 2019 from 12:30 to 13:30

WHG Lunchtime Lab Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Channon and Lindgren Lunchtime Lab Talks

Cecilia Lindgren, Gillian Douglas, Jenny Censin, Chris Nellaker

Channon Group: Speaker: Gillian Douglas Title: ‘Defining the role of the GWAS hit JCAD in atherosclerosis’ Lindgren Group: Group Leader Prof. Cecilia Lindgren will be introducing her section with, ‘Obesity traits - from electronic phenotyping, to genetic variants, to function’. This talk... Read more

Channon Group: Speaker: Gillian Douglas Title: ‘Defining the role of the GWAS hit JCAD in atherosclerosis’ Lindgren Group: Group Leader Prof. Cecilia Lindgren will be introducing her section with, ‘Obesity traits - from electronic phenotyping, to genetic variants, to function’. This talk will be followed by: Speaker: Jenny Censin Title: ‘PCOS: the next step after genetic variant identification’ Speaker: Chris Nellaker Title: ‘Deep electronic phenotypes: the genetic underpinnings of adipocyte size’

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Thu 2 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Clinical Immunology / Dermatology

Dr Dhruvkumar Laheru, Dr Rachel Fisher, Dr Rashmi Jain, Dr Hadeil Morsi

Clinical Immunology: "Angioedema and its many masks", Dr Hadeil Morsi and Dr Rashmi Jain -- Dermatology: "Dermatology for the summer holidays", Dr Dhruvkumar Laheru and Dr Rachel Fisher -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Clinical Immunology: "Angioedema and its many masks", Dr Hadeil Morsi and Dr Rashmi Jain -- Dermatology: "Dermatology for the summer holidays", Dr Dhruvkumar Laheru and Dr Rachel Fisher -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 2 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

NDM Building, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Causal Inference in Epidemiology Seminar: Automating causal inference using Mendelian randomisation

Professor Tom Gaunt

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 2 May 2019 from 16:30 to 17:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, John Radcliffe Main Building, George Pickering Education Centre Level 3 Academic Centre, Room 2B, Headington OX3 9DU

The Genetics of IBD-An update

Dr Carl Anderson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Holm Uhlig

Fri 3 May 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

The discovery of the Epstein Barr Virus. A recorded interview of Denis Burkitt and Professor Tony Epstein in conversation

We are now live streaming the Surgical Grand Rounds! Please visit: https://streaming.oxfordmi.uk/surgicalgrandround.html

We are now live streaming the Surgical Grand Rounds! Please visit: https://streaming.oxfordmi.uk/surgicalgrandround.html

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 3 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Engineering brain activity patterns for therapeutics of disorders

Prof. Dr. Mehmet Fatih Yanik

Brain networks are disrupted in numerous disorders. We will first show how the aberrant brain-wide activity patterns can be corrected by targeting distinct network motifs with multiple neuromodulators using a zebrafish model of human epilepsy and autism. This systematic approach rescues behaviour... Read more

Brain networks are disrupted in numerous disorders. We will first show how the aberrant brain-wide activity patterns can be corrected by targeting distinct network motifs with multiple neuromodulators using a zebrafish model of human epilepsy and autism. This systematic approach rescues behaviour unlike any other treatment resulting from large-scale drug screens. With methods promising future therapeutic use, we will next show how specific molecular targets in different brain circuits in mammals can be non-invasively and spatially targeted, and discuss how cortex-wide activity patterns can be captured chronically at single neuron resolution with minimal invasiveness using neuromorphic microchips.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Cortex Club

Tue 7 May 2019 from 10:30 to 11:30

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NPEU Research Seminar: Postpartum Psychosis and bipolar disorder - who's at high risk?

Professor Ian Jones

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Goher Ayman

Tue 7 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Rewriting the mammalian cell ’source code’

Professor Tudor Fulga

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 7 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - Life expectancy and cardiovascular disease in Russia. New insights and outstanding issues

Professor David Leon

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 7 May 2019 from 14:30 to 16:00

Ethox Centre and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 1, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox and WEH Seminar - Rethinking Consent in Medical Education Panel

PANEL MEMBERS Robin Wilson, College of Law, University of Illinois Ashok Handa, Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford Michael Dunn, Ethox Centre, University of Oxford Phoebe Friesen, Ethox Centre, University of Oxford ABSTRACT This panel will consider challenging... Read more

PANEL MEMBERS Robin Wilson, College of Law, University of Illinois Ashok Handa, Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford Michael Dunn, Ethox Centre, University of Oxford Phoebe Friesen, Ethox Centre, University of Oxford ABSTRACT This panel will consider challenging ethical questions surrounding how to navigate informed consent within medical education. Robin Fretwell Wilson and Phoebe Friesen will speak about their work regarding the practice of non-consensual pelvic exams on women under anesthetic by medical students, which is forbidden by the GMC, but still takes place at many teaching hospital in the United States. Prof. Wilson, who has been instrumental in developing recent legislation requiring consent for educational pelvic exams, will speak about her experiences with public engagement and offer rebuttals to some of the common defenses of the practice that are given. Dr. Friesen will unpack the importance of consent for this practice, examining how autonomy, bodily rights, and trust, are each under threat when consent is not given for educational pelvic exams on women under anesthetic, and whether these threats extend to other forms of medical student involvement in care. Ashok Handa and Michael Dunn have both been involved in recent revisions to the guidelines surrounding consent in medical education at the University of Oxford and will offer reflections on their involvement in this process as well as the broader legal framework in England. Dr. Handa, who is currently the Director of Surgical Education, will consider the unique issues and challenges that arise in relation to medical students and consent within surgery, and the guidelines that shape students’ learning experiences and consent requirements by the bedside. Dr. Dunn, Director of Undergraduate Medical Ethics and Law in the Clinical School, will explore two specific elements of English medical law, and critically reflect on the application of these legal provisions in the educational setting. The focus here will be on a new standard for information provision concerning risk in the law of consent and established legal principles for substitute decision-making for patients lacking mental capacity. Each participant will speak for 10-15 minutes, followed by a lengthy question period.

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 7 May 2019 from 17:30 to 18:30

2019- Grand Challenges in Science

Christ Church, Sir Michael Dummett Lecture Theatre, St Aldates OX1 1DP

Communicating Science in the Age of Fake News

Fake news is dominating the public science discourse, from climate change denial to the anti-vaccination movement and the Flat Earth Society. As scientific knowledge proliferates, with two million new academic articles published every year, public perspectives are being warped. Online clickbait,... Read more

Fake news is dominating the public science discourse, from climate change denial to the anti-vaccination movement and the Flat Earth Society. As scientific knowledge proliferates, with two million new academic articles published every year, public perspectives are being warped. Online clickbait, echo chambers and social media filter bubbles created by computer algorithms have led to misinformation and ideological polarisation. How have the information age and rise of social media changed science communication? How dangerous is the rise of scientific misinformation? Why do people believe fake news? How can we communicate nuanced scientific results in the mainstream media? Who is responsible for ensuring accurate science communication? What role should government/media platforms/researchers play? We will explore these questions and more through the perspectives of journalism, policy and academia with our expert panelists. --- Prof Alice Roberts (Chair) - Author, broadcaster and Professor of Public Engagement in Science at the University of Birmingham Dr Magdalena Skipper (Panelist) - Editor in Chief of Nature Simon Singh (Panelist) - Author, journalist and TV producer Fiona Fox (Panelist) - Director of the Science Media Centre Emma Woods (Panelist) - Head of Policy, Wellbeing at the Royal Society --- Following the seminar, we would like to invite you to a free drinks reception with the speakers. The event will be part of the Oxford Environmental Research Partnership’s annual seminar series, focusing on the ‘Grand Challenges’ facing society today.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Marcus Buechel

Wed 8 May 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

"From Fragments to Pharmaceuticals"

Dr Harren Jhoti

Over the last 20 years Fragment-based drug discovery has developed as an alternative approach for the generation of novel small molecule drug candidates. This approach for lead generation has distinct advantages over conventional bioassay-based screening in that low-affinity but highly ligand... Read more

Over the last 20 years Fragment-based drug discovery has developed as an alternative approach for the generation of novel small molecule drug candidates. This approach for lead generation has distinct advantages over conventional bioassay-based screening in that low-affinity but highly ligand efficient fragments can be routinely identified using biophysical techniques such as X-ray crystallography, NMR and calorimetry. These “fragment hits” can then be rapidly optimized for potency and DMPK properties using iterative cycles of medicinal chemistry and structure-based drug design. Using this approach new drug candidates with good ligand efficiencies and optimal drug-like properties can be generated for a range of therapeutics targets, a selection of which will be described in this talk. Another major advantage of Fragment-based discovery resides in the ability to sample chemical space in a highly efficient manner. This has resulted in the discovery of novel allosteric pockets on key protein targets. In this talk I will also describe how fragments can probe the molecular complexity of a protein surface to identify such pockets, which may have a functional role.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Wed 8 May 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ethox Centre and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Richard Doll Building, Rosemary Rue Teaching Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox and WEH Seminar: Care and Control: An ethical analysis of parenting support within a UK prison mother and baby unit

Rose Mortimer, DPhil Student

In this talk I present some of the key findings from my DPhil project, entitled 'Care and Control: An ethical analysis of parenting support within a UK prison mother and baby unit.' I am grateful for this opportunity to share my work with you, and practice fielding questions in advance of my... Read more

In this talk I present some of the key findings from my DPhil project, entitled 'Care and Control: An ethical analysis of parenting support within a UK prison mother and baby unit.' I am grateful for this opportunity to share my work with you, and practice fielding questions in advance of my viva! In recent years, the idea of state provided ‘parenting support’ has gained prominence within the early intervention (EI) policy agenda. A central claim of EI policy is that poor parenting during the early years of life can lead to a range of bad outcomes for children, such as ill health, academic failure, poverty, and crime. Therefore, EI often involves identifying babies and children who are at risk of being ‘poorly parented,’ and intervening upon these parents in order to help them provide better care to their children. In the UK, female prisoners who are pregnant or who have a small child are able to apply to serve their sentence within a prison mother and baby unit (MBU). The baby can remain within the unit up until the age of 18 months, and whilst the mother serves her sentence she is provided with various kinds of parenting support. Some of these forms of parenting support look very similar to that which is provided to women enrolled in EI programs in the community. However, prison policy is unclear as to the goals of parenting support in this environment and it is possible to anticipate a number of ethical challenges that may arise in practice: how can prison provide a good start in life for children? What is the relationship – if any – between crime and being a good mother? To what extent can and should women exercise parental autonomy in a prison environment? How do the goals of the MBU as regards parenting support and childcare sit alongside the other goals of the prison: justice, security, and delivery of punishment? Over a period of 7 months I conducted interviews, focus groups, and participant observation within the MBU of a women’s prison in the North of England. In my thesis, I provide a rich ethical analysis of the practice of parenting support as it takes place within the ‘moral world’ of the MBU. In this presentation I focus particularly on the 'dual role' of parenting support as a form of both care and punishment/control. I discuss some of the ethical challenges that arise as a consequence of this 'dual role', and consider the extent to which women can or should be afforded parental autonomy in a prison environment.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christa Henrichs

Thu 9 May 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Aberrant chromatin changes in leukaemia

Professor Tom Milne

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 9 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Gastroenterology / Oncology

Dr Tom Thomas, Dr Holm Uhlig, Dr Simon Travis, Prof Mark Middleton

Gastroenterology: "Human and Machine learning in inflammatory bowel disease - understanding our patients over time", Dr Tom Thomas, Dr Holm Uhlig and Dr Simon Travis -- Oncology: "Expanding the range of immunotherapy targets in Cancer", Prof Mark Middleton -- Chair: Prof Chris Pugh

Gastroenterology: "Human and Machine learning in inflammatory bowel disease - understanding our patients over time", Dr Tom Thomas, Dr Holm Uhlig and Dr Simon Travis -- Oncology: "Expanding the range of immunotherapy targets in Cancer", Prof Mark Middleton -- Chair: Prof Chris Pugh

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 9 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Rob Beagrie

Thu 9 May 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

ARUK Oxford Drug Discovery Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

The role of the cadherin proteins in Alzheimer's disease

Professor Cornelia van Duijn

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kate Humphrey

Fri 10 May 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Once case, many lessons

Dr Jeremy Cobbold, Professor Bass Hassan, Dr Fernando Riego Gil, Professor Saul Myerson, Ms Maria Monteagudo-Vela

Programme Clinical Presentation: Dr Jeremy Cobbold Imaging: Professor Saul Myerson Oncological Management: Professor Bass Hassan Mechanical Circulatory Support—Overview: Dr Fernando Riego Gil Tumor, Transplant and the TAH - An unlikely Menage a Trois: Ms Maria Monteagudo-Vela

Programme Clinical Presentation: Dr Jeremy Cobbold Imaging: Professor Saul Myerson Oncological Management: Professor Bass Hassan Mechanical Circulatory Support—Overview: Dr Fernando Riego Gil Tumor, Transplant and the TAH - An unlikely Menage a Trois: Ms Maria Monteagudo-Vela

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 10 May 2019 from 10:00 to 18:00

Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Big Data Institute, Level 1 Ax Meeting Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

WEH Workshop - Ethics Oversight and Committees for AI: Towards a Future Research Agenda

Increasingly, concerns are being raised about the lack of ethics oversight in the development of technologies and tools utilizing artificial intelligence (AI) techniques within industry. In response, some companies have developed internal committees or processes of ethics oversight. Yet little is... Read more

Increasingly, concerns are being raised about the lack of ethics oversight in the development of technologies and tools utilizing artificial intelligence (AI) techniques within industry. In response, some companies have developed internal committees or processes of ethics oversight. Yet little is known about the varying forms of guidance, oversight, or spaces for ethical reflection that are emerging within the development and varying sites of application for AI and machine learning. Within the academic realm, detailed systems of oversight, including regulations and research ethics committees, are in place. However, these systems were developed in order to provide ethical guidance for those engaged in paradigmatic forms of medical research, such as clinical trials and laboratory research. Many have raised concerns that these systems are not appropriate for the ethical evaluation of research projects involving AI, given the distance of these projects from the clinical encounter, the ways in which traditional conceptions of ‘human subjects’ are challenged, and the unique ethical issues they bring to light. This workshop, which will bring together participants from both academia and industry, asks what the oversight of the development of AI / machine learning tools currently looks like, within industry, academia, and collaborations between the two, and what it ought to look like in the future. Taking inspiration from the model of research ethics committees (RECs, also called IRBs and REBs), although not limiting the discussion to this form, questions that will be considered include: What novel ethical issues arise within the use of these technologies? Who should be involved in such oversight and why? What kinds of expertise are necessary and desirable for those involved in ethics oversight of AI? What forms of oversight for AI are currently being developed within industry and academia and collaborations between the two? What are the benefits and shortcomings of traditional and novel systems of ethics oversight? Participants will be invited to briefly present themselves and their work, questions and perspectives. Much of the day will consist of discussion of the above questions, and others that arise throughout the workshop. We hope to collectively outline a set of primary concerns, current responses, and directions for future research, and publish a manuscript documenting these. The day will run from 10am - 6pm on May 10th. Lunch will be provided. Please contact Rachel Douglas-Jones (rdoj@itu.dk) or Phoebe Friesen (phoebe.friesen@ndph.ox.ac.uk) by May 5th if you are interested in taking part. Please briefly explain why you would like to participate, as spaces are limited.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christa Henrichs

Fri 10 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Neural mechanisms of information sampling in humans and non-human primates

Professor Jacqueline Gottlieb

In the 1950s, Daniel Berlyne pointed to our large ignorance about a core question in behavior and neural function: not the acquisition of knowledge per se, but the motivation underlying the quest for knowledge. Why do we exert so much effort to obtain knowledge, and why do some questions or sources... Read more

In the 1950s, Daniel Berlyne pointed to our large ignorance about a core question in behavior and neural function: not the acquisition of knowledge per se, but the motivation underlying the quest for knowledge. Why do we exert so much effort to obtain knowledge, and why do some questions or sources of information attract our attention, out of the practically infinite range we could potentially explore? Strangely, these questions remain as mysterious today as they were 70 years ago. But it is becoming increasingly apparent that we can no longer ignore them if we are to develop a true understanding of decision making and cognitive function. I will speak about our efforts develop empirical approaches for studying these questions from the point of view of attention control, in tasks that examine how humans and monkeys decide to which stimulus to attend based on curiosity (intrinsic motivation) or to obtain instrumental (extrinsic) goals. I will describe single neuron responses in monkeys and electroencephalography (EEG) correlates of sampling in humans that begin to reveal the intricate and distributed processes through which the brain implements active sampling policies based on cost-benefits estimates and links the decision to sample with the processing of the acquired information.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Kristine Krug

Mon 13 May 2019 from 10:00 to 12:00

Bodleian iSkills for the Medical Sciences Division and OUH staff - workshops in information discovery and reference management for the Medical Sciences

Health Care Libraries - Cairns Library, Beeson Room, Cairns Library, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington OX3 9DU

Bodleian iSkills for the Medical Sciences Division and OUH staff: Introduction to literature searching for DPhils and researchers

Catherine Hartley, Matthew Henry

In this practical workshop you will explore how to: formulate search strategies to address research questions; choose appropriate databases and search engines; store and manage references; keep up to date with new research over the life cycle of your DPhil. Intended Audience: All staff and students in the Medical Sciences Division

In this practical workshop you will explore how to: formulate search strategies to address research questions; choose appropriate databases and search engines; store and manage references; keep up to date with new research over the life cycle of your DPhil. Intended Audience: All staff and students in the Medical Sciences Division

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Helen Bond

Mon 13 May 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting Rooms 71a,b,c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Homologous recombination DNA repair is the major driver of PARPi sensitivity in breast cancer

Violeta Serra

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Amanda O'Neill

Mon 13 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

A genetic and structural basis for immune variation and the implications for vaccination

Prof Adrian Hayday

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Mon 13 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room B , Headington OX3 7BN

Population medical genomics in Latin America: The Mexican Biobank Project

Professor Andrés Moreno Estrada

Abstract: Genetic profiling and deep phenotyping are powerful tools that help better understand individuals’ variation associated with disease and tackle population-specific health problems. Moreover, population genetics research gives people a self-knowledge that is deep in both space and in... Read more

Abstract: Genetic profiling and deep phenotyping are powerful tools that help better understand individuals’ variation associated with disease and tackle population-specific health problems. Moreover, population genetics research gives people a self-knowledge that is deep in both space and in time. The Mexican Biobank will reveal the population history of the Mexican population as well as the role that the interplay between genetics, migration, mating patterns and the environment has played in shaping the current diversity of the Mexican population. Bio: Professor Estrada is a medical doctor and population geneticist deeply interested in molecular evolution and its implications in human population history and medical genomics. His research integrates genomics, evolution and precision medicine in many different projects involving large collections of populations, in particular from the Americas and the Pacific. His research group is interested in human evolution, adaptation, and population history as well as the biomedical implications of human genetic diversity in underserved populations of the world.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Mon 13 May 2019 from 15:00 to 16:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Phenome@BDI Seminar - Robust Research – A practical guide | Same Data - Different Software - Different Results? Analytic Variability of Group fMRI Results

Verene Heise, Alex Bowring

Robust Research – A practical guide - Verena Heise, DPhil, NDPH Intermediate Fellow, Nuffield Department of Population Health Are most published research findings false? Why should we care? And is there anything we can do about it? In this talk I will give an overview of some practical... Read more

Robust Research – A practical guide - Verena Heise, DPhil, NDPH Intermediate Fellow, Nuffield Department of Population Health Are most published research findings false? Why should we care? And is there anything we can do about it? In this talk I will give an overview of some practical solutions such as open science and good research practices that can help make our research findings more robust. While there are a number of solutions that can be implemented by individual researchers, there are wider issues, for example around skills training and incentives, that require cultural change. To lobby for this change we have started the cross-divisional initiative Reproducible Research Oxford and I will briefly outline our current and planned activities. Same Data - Different Software - Different Results? Analytic Variability of Group fMRI Results - Alex Bowring, DPhil student A wealth of analysis tools are available to fMRI researchers in order to extract patterns of task variation and, ultimately, understand cognitive function. However, this ‘methodological plurality’ comes with a drawback. While conceptually similar, two different analysis pipelines applied on the same dataset may not produce the same scientific results. Differences in methods, implementations across software, and even operating systems or software versions all contribute to this variability. Consequently, attention in the field has recently been directed to reproducibility and data sharing. In this work, our goal is to understand how choice of software package impacts on analysis results. We use publicly shared data from three published task fMRI neuroimaging studies, reanalyzing each study using the three main neuroimaging software packages, AFNI, FSL and SPM, using parametric and nonparametric inference. We obtain all information on how to process, analyze, and model each dataset from the publications. We make quantitative and qualitative comparisons between our replications to gauge the scale of variability in our results and assess the fundamental differences between each software package. Qualitatively we find similarities between packages, backed up by Neurosynth association analyses that correlate similar words and phrases to all three software package’s unthresholded results for each of the studies we reanalyze. However, we also discover marked differences, such as Dice similarity coefficients ranging from 0.000 - 0.684 in comparisons of thresholded statistic maps between software. We discuss the challenges involved in trying to reanalyse the published studies, and highlight our efforts to make this research reproducible.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 14 May 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

“Challenges and Opportunities for Automated Cryo Electron Microscopy”

Adj Prof Bridget Carragher

The dramatic improvements in the progress of cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) over the last five years has been accompanied by the adoption of a high level of automation. However, there are several automation challenges that remain to be addressed in the areas of specimen preparation, image... Read more

The dramatic improvements in the progress of cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) over the last five years has been accompanied by the adoption of a high level of automation. However, there are several automation challenges that remain to be addressed in the areas of specimen preparation, image acquisition, and analysis. In specimen preparation we need to address methods to ensure routine and robust preparation of particles embedded in a thin layer of vitreous ice. Our own group has developed a system that uses nanoliter droplets dispensed onto a self wicking grid that provides for a uniform and thin layer of vitreous ice and improves the efficiency of data collection. More importantly it also appears to ameliorate adverse effects caused by proteins interacting at the air-water interface. In the area of image acquisition we anticipate a 10 fold increase in throughput assisted by a new generation of direct detectors. Additional instrument advances that would improve data throughput include developing faster and more stable cryo stages and further automating some of the steps required for high resolution imaging. Finally in the area of image analysis, the software continues to rapidly improve both in terms of speed and in being able to sort out highly heterogeneous populations of molecular complexes. All of these advances are being driven by the urgent needs of structural biologists and increasingly by the needs of pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. The latter group in particular is driving the need for much higher levels of automation and much higher throughput.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Tue 14 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Asymmetric stem cell division to tissue engineering

Dr Shukry Habib

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 14 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - Intensive blood pressure lowering in multimorbid patients: too much of a good thing?

Associate Professor Kazem Rahimi

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 14 May 2019 from 14:00 to 15:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

"Editing the human genome with programmable and tunable zinc finger nucleases"

Adrian Woolfson, Ed Rebar

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: James Davis

Tue 14 May 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Unconventional Endoplasmic Reticulum Located Trophic Factor for Parkinson’s Disease

Professor Mart Saarma

Mart Saarma's work has focused on the in vivo roles, therapeutic effects and receptors of the neurotrophic factors including GDNF and the novel neurotrophic factor CDNF discovered by his research group. They have shown that CDNF very efficiently protects and repairs dopamine neurons in vivo. Prof.... Read more

Mart Saarma's work has focused on the in vivo roles, therapeutic effects and receptors of the neurotrophic factors including GDNF and the novel neurotrophic factor CDNF discovered by his research group. They have shown that CDNF very efficiently protects and repairs dopamine neurons in vivo. Prof. Saarma’s work has been instrumental in understanding the therapeutic potential of these neurotrophic factors for neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Parkinson’s disease. He has published more than 200 scientific articles. His group has characterized several new GDNF family receptors and demonstrated that RET receptor tyrosine kinase is the signaling receptor for GDNF. Mart Saarma's research group is investigating the signalling and biological functions of GDNF family ligands and endoplasmic reticulum located CDNF/MANF neurotrophic factor families, both within and outside of the nervous system. They are also interested in the therapeutic potential of these proteins in various diseases, so they are testing their efficacy in animal models of Parkinson’s, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke and diabetes mellitus. One of the highlights of their research has been, in 2017, the initiation of phase I-II clinical trials of CDNF protein in Parkinson’s disease patients by the Finnish company Herantis Pharma Plc.

Audience: Members of the University only

New date!

Wed 15 May 2019 from 11:00 to 12:30

Ethox Centre and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox and WEH Seminar - A can of worms: open data, replication and evidence-making in global health

Dr Lisa Hall

ABSTRACT For many, digital technologies and the practices of ‘open science’ that they enable – open data, open source, open access, open notebook – promise more efficient innovation and more inclusive and trustworthy science. More open scientific practices are also proffered as solutions to... Read more

ABSTRACT For many, digital technologies and the practices of ‘open science’ that they enable – open data, open source, open access, open notebook – promise more efficient innovation and more inclusive and trustworthy science. More open scientific practices are also proffered as solutions to the 'reproducibility crisis', antidotes to myriad questionable research practices that in part fuel the crisis. In this paper, I explore one stumbling block on the route to more open, speedy, reproducible science: interpretive flexibility in data analysis. My entry point is a controversy – dubbed Worm Wars in the media – surrounding the re-analysis of an influential global health study on the impacts of mass deworming. Through analysing the statistical (re)analyses and extensive public discussions about them, I trace some of the competing social, moral and political underpinnings of divergent analytic decisions. BIO Lisa Hall is an Assistant Professor in the Social & Behavioural Health Sciences Division, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto. A public health physician and epidemiologist by training, her current research centres on scientific knowledge practices and uses of science in policy contexts.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christa Henrichs

Wed 15 May 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Seminar room, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3SY, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

The MHC class-II HLA-DR receptor mediates bat influenza A-like H17N10 virus entry into mammalian cells

Efstathios Giotis

Bats are notorious reservoirs of diverse, potentially zoonotic viruses, exemplified by the evolutionarily distinct, influenza A-like viruses H17N10 and H18N11 (BatIVs). The surface glycoproteins [haemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N)] of BatIVs neither bind nor cleave sialic acid receptors,... Read more

Bats are notorious reservoirs of diverse, potentially zoonotic viruses, exemplified by the evolutionarily distinct, influenza A-like viruses H17N10 and H18N11 (BatIVs). The surface glycoproteins [haemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N)] of BatIVs neither bind nor cleave sialic acid receptors, which suggests that these viruses employ cell attachment and entry mechanisms that differ from those of classical influenza A viruses (IAVs). Identifying the cellular factors that mediate entry and determine susceptibility to infection will help assess the host range of BatIVs. Here, we investigated a range of cell lines from different species for their susceptibility to infection by pseudotyped viruses (PV) bearing bat H17 and/or N10 envelope glycoproteins. We show that a number of human haematopoietic cancer cell lines and the canine kidney MDCK II (but not MDCK I) cells are susceptible to H17-pseudotypes (H17-PV). We observed with microarrays and qRT-PCR that the dog leukocyte antigen DLA-DRA mRNA is over expressed in late passaged parental MDCK and commercial MDCK II cells, compared to early passaged parental MDCK and MDCK I cells, respectively. The human orthologue HLA-DRA encodes the alpha subunit of the MHC class II HLA-DR antigen-binding heterodimer. Small interfering RNA- or neutralizing antibody-targeting HLA-DRA, drastically reduced the susceptibility of Raji B cells to H17-PV. Conversely, over expression of HLA-DRA and its paralogue HLA-DRB1 on the surface of the unsusceptible HEK293T/17 cells conferred susceptibility to H17-PV. The identification of HLA-DR as an H17N10 entry mediator will contribute to a better understanding of the tropism of the virus and will elucidate its zoonotic transmission.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Proochista Ariana

Please arrive 5 minutes before the seminar starts to gain access to the building.

Wed 15 May 2019 from 12:30 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

New Career Development Series: Thinking of global health research? Think Ethics!

Maru Mormina

Working in low & middle income countries (LMICs) presents an exciting and fulfilling option for many health researchers. It allows them to address some of the most pressing development issues through interdisciplinary, collaborative and impact-driven research. Global health research, however, takes... Read more

Working in low & middle income countries (LMICs) presents an exciting and fulfilling option for many health researchers. It allows them to address some of the most pressing development issues through interdisciplinary, collaborative and impact-driven research. Global health research, however, takes place in very particular contexts and this gives rise to unique moral dilemmas that require going beyond the traditional approaches to ethics used in high income settings. Through practical examples, this workshop will explore some of these ethical challenges and the approaches that might be needed when engaging in global development research. It will give those attending a feeling for the issues and difficulties faced by researchers in the field and some tips to avoid common pitfalls. Workshop for all those interested in global health research

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 15 May 2019 from 12:30 to 13:30

WHG Lunchtime Lab Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Gilbert and Watkins Lunchtime Lab Talks

Suzi Black, Xiulian Yu, Anuj Goel, Andrew Harper

Gilbert Group Speaker: Suzi Black Title: ‘Impact of lipid clustering on membrane binding of pleckstrin homology domains' Speaker: Xiulian Yu Title: ‘Structure and mechanism of bactericidal mammalian perforin-2, an ancient agent of innate immunity’ Watkins Group Speaker: Andrew Harper Title:... Read more

Gilbert Group Speaker: Suzi Black Title: ‘Impact of lipid clustering on membrane binding of pleckstrin homology domains' Speaker: Xiulian Yu Title: ‘Structure and mechanism of bactericidal mammalian perforin-2, an ancient agent of innate immunity’ Watkins Group Speaker: Andrew Harper Title: ‘Exploring the genetic architecture of an inherited heart condition: hypertrophic cardiomyopathy’ Speaker: Anuj Goel Title: ‘Coronary artery disease genetics – double century not out’

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Thu 16 May 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Oxford Martin School, Old Indian Institute, 34 Broad Street, Oxford , 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Decoding Transcriptional Regulation in Drosophila

Alexander Stark

In higher eukaryotes, genes are expressed dynamically in complex spatial and temporal patterns, which are progressively refined to set up body plans and define specific cell types. The information about when and where each gene is to be expressed is encoded in the sequences of promoter and enhancer... Read more

In higher eukaryotes, genes are expressed dynamically in complex spatial and temporal patterns, which are progressively refined to set up body plans and define specific cell types. The information about when and where each gene is to be expressed is encoded in the sequences of promoter and enhancer regions and realized by transcription factor and cofactor proteins. Using an interdisciplinary approach in Drosophila, we functionally characterize regulatory sequences by enhancer screens and by assessing core promoter activities of large candidate libraries. We dissect the combinatorics of transcription factors and cofactors by directed tethering in enhancer complementation assays, which reveal functionally distinct classes of transcription factors. Finally, we study how enhancers and the cofactor proteins they recruit activate different types of core promoters, enabling distinct sets of genes and alternative promoters of the same genes to be regulated differently. The distinct compatibilities between cofactors and core promoters form the basis of specificity within and between gene regulatory programs.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Thu 16 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Clinical Genetics / Clinical Ethics

Dr Kate Wilson, Dr Kathryn Lubasch, Dr Aoife Lowney, Prof Dominic Wilkinson

Clinical Genetics: "Certain uncertainty in the Genomics Clinic", Dr Kate Wilson and Dr Kathryn Lubasch -- Clinical Ethics: "Call the ethicist… the role of ethics consultation in clinical medicine", Dr Aoife Lowney and Prof Dominic Wilkinson -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Clinical Genetics: "Certain uncertainty in the Genomics Clinic", Dr Kate Wilson and Dr Kathryn Lubasch -- Clinical Ethics: "Call the ethicist… the role of ethics consultation in clinical medicine", Dr Aoife Lowney and Prof Dominic Wilkinson -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 16 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Jenner Seminars

NDM Building, Seminar Room, Lower Ground Floor, Headington OX3 7FZ

Simplifying rabies pre- and post-exposure prophylaxis

Dr Patrick Soentjens

Audience: Public

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Thu 16 May 2019 from 14:00 to 15:00

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Kennedy Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

Delineating the pathogenesis of T-cell checkpoint-inhibitor associated colitis

Dr Sarah Sasson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Carolina Arancibia

Thu 16 May 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

POLE and POLD1 variants in hereditary cancer and evaluation of candidate colorectal cancer predisposing genes

Laura Valle

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Thu 16 May 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

Development & Cell Biology Theme Guest Speakers (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Nanoengineering for discovery and mechanism related to motility systems

Dr. Minhaj Sirajuddin

Eukaryotic biological motions across scales and orders of magnitude involve cytoskeleton elements. Because of their importance in cell division, motility and muscle contraction, mutations in cytoskeleton are frequently associated with human pathology e.g., cardiomyopathies, neurological syndromes... Read more

Eukaryotic biological motions across scales and orders of magnitude involve cytoskeleton elements. Because of their importance in cell division, motility and muscle contraction, mutations in cytoskeleton are frequently associated with human pathology e.g., cardiomyopathies, neurological syndromes and ciliopathies. Our lab is focused on understanding how cytoskeleton assemblies coordinate during physiological and their deregulation during disease conditions. In this talk I will highlight work from our lab, which utilizes the power of nanoengineering (protein and DNA engineering) and in vitro reconstitution to uncover new findings in motility systems mediated by cytoskeleton elements.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof Shankar Srinivas

Fri 17 May 2019 from 09:00 to 10:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Small intestinal neuro-endocrine tumours - surgery and science in Cambridge

Mr Simon Buczacki

Simon Buczacki is an academic consultant colorectal surgeon at Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge. His clinical practice focusses on laparoscopic colorectal cancer surgery and he also leads for small intestinal neuroendocrine tumour surgery. Buczacki leads the Aero-Digestive Cancer Programme for... Read more

Simon Buczacki is an academic consultant colorectal surgeon at Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge. His clinical practice focusses on laparoscopic colorectal cancer surgery and he also leads for small intestinal neuroendocrine tumour surgery. Buczacki leads the Aero-Digestive Cancer Programme for the Cambridge Cancer Centre and is a Group Leader at the Cambridge Stem Cell Institute. He currently holds a Cancer Research UK Advanced Clinician Scientist Fellowship. Buczacki is also Fellow and Director of Studies for medicine at Clare College. His lab is interested primarily in the role sub-clonal interactions play on colorectal cancer cell identity and behaviour. This focus is based on the premise that the behaviour of normal intestinal cells is often analogous to that seen in oncogenically transformed cells and thus, the lab studies the behaviour of progenitor and differentiated cells from normal intestinal tissues to provide insights into cancer cell behaviour. The lab is particularly interested in understanding the mechanisms and links behind cancer plasticity and identity switching and also studies the fundamental biology of neuro-endocrine tumours through organoid biology and mouse modelling.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 17 May 2019 from 09:00 to 17:00

AfOx insaka - a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research

Rhodes House, Milner Room , South Parks Road OX1 3RG

FORA Conference (Focus on Research Africa)

Dixon Chibanda, Arumna Oteh

FORA will bring together experts from both Oxford and our partner African institutions from multidisciplinary fields to share knowledge, ideas and solutions on varied Africa-related issues. The day will feature energetic keynote addresses and thought-provoking presentations from academics in the... Read more

FORA will bring together experts from both Oxford and our partner African institutions from multidisciplinary fields to share knowledge, ideas and solutions on varied Africa-related issues. The day will feature energetic keynote addresses and thought-provoking presentations from academics in the fields of health, politics, economics, astronomy, archaeology, philosophy and history among others. It will bring together interdisciplinary researchers to discuss the importance of equitable research collaborations and good practices that make a research collaboration successful.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Africa Oxford Initiative

Fri 17 May 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Stratifying Genetic Risk in Multiple Sclerosis

Dr Kathrine Attfield

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 17 May 2019 from 10:30 to 11:30

Single Cell Seminars at WHG

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room K, Headington OX3 7BN

Single-cell analysis of liver immune cells in primary sclerosis cholangitis

Calliope Dendrou

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fabiola Curion

Fri 17 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Next generation brain maps – concepts, challenges, collaboration

Prof. Dr. Med. Katrin Amunts

The human brain is a highly complex system, with different levels of spatial organisation. E.g., on a macroscopic level, the brain shows a highly variable folding pattern, while nerve cells on a microscopical level are arranged in layers and columns in a regionally specific way. Cytoarchitecture is... Read more

The human brain is a highly complex system, with different levels of spatial organisation. E.g., on a macroscopic level, the brain shows a highly variable folding pattern, while nerve cells on a microscopical level are arranged in layers and columns in a regionally specific way. Cytoarchitecture is a concept that itself encompasses different aspects of brain organization – the different cell types have distinct morphology, molecular, genetic and connectional fingerprints. Axons form complex networks at the level of microcircuits or large cognitive system. To capture the cellular and axonal architecture and to study the role of a specific brain region to function or behaviour requires to analyse the brain in 3D with microscopical resolution. Deep-learning offers new tools to 3D reconstruct images of histological sections at the microscopical scale, and convolutional neuronal networks support to automatize brain mapping. Considering the size of the brain with its nearly 86 billion nerve cells, HPC-based workflows play an increasing role for developing high-resolution brain models, to tame brain complexity. To develop such tools is key in the Human Brain Project. It is building a European research infrastructure for brain research, to collaborate towards a better understanding of the human brain.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Kristine Krug

Fri 17 May 2019 from 14:00 to 15:00

WHG High Profile Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A & B , Headington OX3 7BN

The new world of RNA biology

Professor John Mattick

The new world of RNA biology John Mattick Green Templeton College, Oxford The genomic programming of complex organisms appears to have been misunderstood. The human genome contains just ~20,000 protein-coding genes, similar in number and with largely orthologous functions as those in other... Read more

The new world of RNA biology John Mattick Green Templeton College, Oxford The genomic programming of complex organisms appears to have been misunderstood. The human genome contains just ~20,000 protein-coding genes, similar in number and with largely orthologous functions as those in other animals, including simple nematodes. By contrast, the extent of non-protein-coding DNA increases with increasing developmental complexity, reaching 98.5% in humans, presumably due to an expanded regulatory architecture. Moreover, it is now clear that the majority of the genome is differentially and dynamically transcribed to produce not only mRNAs but also tens if not hundreds of thousands of short and long non-protein-coding RNAs that show highly specific expression patterns and subcellular locations, with many shown to play important aetiological roles in development, brain function, cancer and other diseases. These ‘noncoding’ RNAs function at many different levels of gene expression and cell biology, including translational control, subcellular domain formation, and guidance of the epigenetic processes that underpin development, brain function and physiological adaptation, augmented by the superimposition of plasticity by RNA editing, RNA modification and retrotransposon mobilization. The evidence is now overwhelming that there is a massive hidden layer of RNA-mediated regulatory and architectural functions in humans and other complex organisms and that the current model of gene regulation is incomplete. The challenge now is to determine the structure-function relationships of these RNAs and their mechanisms of action, as well as their place in the decisional hierarchy that controls human development, physiology, cognitive function and susceptibility to disorders.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Fri 17 May 2019 from 15:00 to 16:00

TDI Seminar Series

NDM Building, Seminar room (basement), Headington OX3 7FZ

Chemical epigenetics – modulators of histone acetylation and methylation

Professor Manfred Jung

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Kilian Huber

Mon 20 May 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI semiinar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

HPV and alterations to the host genome structure and function

Dr Maura Gillison

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Mon 20 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

"Pooled CRISPR/Cas9 genetic screening: methods, applications and an unexpected finding"

Dr Bernhard Schmierer

Audience: Members of the University only

If you would like to speak to Bernhard, please contact Philip philip.hublitz@ndcls.ox.ac.uk

Mon 20 May 2019 from 17:00 to 18:15

Oxford Martin School Public Lectures

City region food systems: potential for impacting planetary boundaries and food security

Dr Mike Hamm

This is a joint event with the Oxford Martin Programme on the Future of Food Dr Mike Hamm will explore the opportunity for regional food systems in-and-around cities for mutual benefit. He will approach a number of issues - including vertical farming, bio-geochemical cycles, water use, new entry... Read more

This is a joint event with the Oxford Martin Programme on the Future of Food Dr Mike Hamm will explore the opportunity for regional food systems in-and-around cities for mutual benefit. He will approach a number of issues - including vertical farming, bio-geochemical cycles, water use, new entry farmers, and healthy food provisioning - embedded in the notion of city region food systems with reference to supply/demand dynamics. This talk will be followed by a drinks reception, all welcome

Booking Recommended

Audience: Public

Organisers: Oxford Martin School

Tue 21 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Genetic determinants of context specific gene expression and DNA methylation in primary human monocytes

Dr Benjamin Fairfax

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 21 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - DNA methylation and disease risk

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 21 May 2019 from 14:30 to 15:30

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 1, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Wed 22 May 2019 from 11:00 to 12:30

Ethox Centre and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox and WEH Seminar - Delaying and Withholding Interventions: Ethics and the Stepped Wedge

Ariella Binik

Ethics has been identified as a central reason for choosing a stepped wedge trial over other kinds of clinical trials. The stepped wedge design uses phased implementation, which means that all arms of the trial receive the active intervention over the course of the study. Some groups receive it... Read more

Ethics has been identified as a central reason for choosing a stepped wedge trial over other kinds of clinical trials. The stepped wedge design uses phased implementation, which means that all arms of the trial receive the active intervention over the course of the study. Some groups receive it later than others, but the intervention is not withheld from any group. This system of phased implementation has been identified as ethically advantageous in two instances: (1) when the intervention is thought to be especially likely to be effective and (2) in emergency situations, such as research conducted during emerging epidemics. But despite the increased use of the stepped wedge design and appeals to its ethical superiority as the motivation for its use, there has been little attention to the stepped wedge in the ethics literature. In this talk I will consider whether there are persuasive reasons to prefer or to require a stepped wedge trial. I will argue that while the stepped wedge is ethically permissible, it is not morally superior to other kinds of trials. To this end, I will examine the ethical justification for providing, withholding, and delaying interventions in research.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christa Henrichs

Wed 22 May 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Infection and Disease Processes Seminar Series

Rodney Porter Building, Howard Schneiderman Room (third floor, call 75344 for entry), off South Parks Road OX1 3QU

The Laos Central Nervous System Infection study

Dr Audrey Dubot-Peres

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Dina Foteinou

Wed 22 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, L1 Ax Meeting Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

CPNP Seminar - Ending the Pacific NCD Crisis: Insights from Tonga and New Zealand

Professor Louise Signal

Professor Signal will explore the challenge of ending the Pacific NCD crisis with compelling new data from Tonga and New Zealand (NZ). The obesogenic world of children will be revealed using data from cameras worn by a random sample of 36 Tongan and 168 NZ children. These findings set the scene for... Read more

Professor Signal will explore the challenge of ending the Pacific NCD crisis with compelling new data from Tonga and New Zealand (NZ). The obesogenic world of children will be revealed using data from cameras worn by a random sample of 36 Tongan and 168 NZ children. These findings set the scene for a discussion about global solutions to the crisis including taxation, trade policy and financing of the SDGs. Professor Louise Signal is a Director of the Health Promotion and Policy Research Unit at the University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand (NZ). She is a social scientist who has worked in public health for over 30 years. She is the out-going Regional Director of the South West Pacific Region of the International Union for Health Promotion and Education (IUHPE). Louise’s research focuses on identifying and addressing the determinants of health and health inequities. Her key areas of interest include obesity prevention, addressing harm from alcohol and gambling and tackling inequities in cancer treatment. Louise is the principal investigator of an innovative research project that studies the world children live in, Kids’Cam. It uses automated cameras to record children’s worlds in NZ. Currently, there are 17 projects underway or completed. Louise is currently leading similar research in Tonga in collaboration with Dr Viliami Puloka and the Tongan Government.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 22 May 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

The human leukaemia virus HTLV-1: chromatin structure, epigenetics and regulation of latency

Professor Charles Bangham

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 23 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Renal / Respiratory

Dr Rachel Hoyles, Dr Will Herrington, Dr Doreen Zhu

Renal: "Sweet Victory", Dr Doreen Zhu and Dr Will Herrington -- Respiratory: "Rough hands, dense lungs..sick patient", Dr Rachel Hoyles -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Renal: "Sweet Victory", Dr Doreen Zhu and Dr Will Herrington -- Respiratory: "Rough hands, dense lungs..sick patient", Dr Rachel Hoyles -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 23 May 2019 from 17:00 to 18:30

Lincoln College, Oakeshott Room , Turl Street OX1 3DR

How AI will transform human health

Craig J Mundie

About the speaker: Craig J. Mundie is President of Mundie & Associates. He joined Microsoft in 1992 and retired in 2014 as Chief Research and Strategy Officer (since 2007) and the Principal Technology-Policy Executive (since 1998). Previously he was the CEO and co-Founder of Alliant Computer... Read more

About the speaker: Craig J. Mundie is President of Mundie & Associates. He joined Microsoft in 1992 and retired in 2014 as Chief Research and Strategy Officer (since 2007) and the Principal Technology-Policy Executive (since 1998). Previously he was the CEO and co-Founder of Alliant Computer Systems. He was co-Executive Chairman of Bridgewater Associates (2015-2016). He is a Director of the Institute for Systems Biology. He advises Microsoft, Exicure, Ironnet Cybersecurity, SomaLogic, OpenAI, and the Cleveland Clinic. Craig Mundie served Presidents Clinton, Bush and Obama on the NSTAC and was on Obama’s PCAST.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Jo Peel

Fri 24 May 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Restoring bladder and bowel function by electrical stimulation after spinal cord injury

Professor Graham Creasey

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 24 May 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Proteasomal cut-and-pasting: a small splice of the class I peptide pie?

Dr Wayne Paes

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 24 May 2019 from 10:30 to 11:30

Single Cell Seminars at WHG

The PancrImmune study: Investigating the Adaptive Immune Responses in Pancreatic Pathologies

Dr Rachael Bashford-Rogers

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fabiola Curion

Fri 24 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Henry Wellcome Building of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Seminar Rooms A & B, Roosevelt Drive OX3 7BN

Human Antibody Responses in Dengue and Zika Virus Infections & Advances in antiparasitic chemotherapy

Prof Gavin Screaton, Prof Nick White

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kathryn Smith

Fri 24 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

The Heart of the Brain: the hypothalamus and its hormones

Gareth Leng

Most neurons in the hypothalamus make and secrete at least one peptide in addition to a conventional neurotransmitter and other intercellular messengers. Probably the most extensively characterized of these are the oxytocin and vasopressin neurones of the hypothalamus. Their evolution has been... Read more

Most neurons in the hypothalamus make and secrete at least one peptide in addition to a conventional neurotransmitter and other intercellular messengers. Probably the most extensively characterized of these are the oxytocin and vasopressin neurones of the hypothalamus. Their evolution has been traced back to a single multisensory multifunctional cell type in Urbilateria, wormlike marine organisms that are the last common ancestor of vertebrates, flies, and worms. In Urbilateria, peptide-secreting cells probably responded to cues from the ancient marine environment. These earliest neurons combined properties that we have thought of as separate properties of endocrine cells and neurons. They used a diversity of signaling mechanisms, made both peptides and neurotransmitters, and were endowed with a wide range of specialized senses. They had not a single role to which they were committed, but multiple behavioral and physiological functions. The neurons of the hypothalamus have retained the multifunctionality of their distant ancestors, and their multitude of sensory abilities (1). Magnocellular oxytocin neurons regulate milk ejection, parturition, and sodium excretion by what they secrete into the blood (2). They also govern reproductive and appetitive behaviors, and these are governed reciprocally, not by the oxytocin that is released into the blood but by oxytocin released from dendrites. They are sensitive to multiple chemical cues from the internal environment—they have receptors for glucocorticoids and gonadal steroids, and for leptin, prolactin, and insulin, as well as for many of the peptides released from the brain itself. But to make sense of how single cell populations can simultaneously regulate diverse functions we have to separate hype from hope (3), sense from nonsense (4), and understand the mechanistic basis of independent regulation of secretion from different neuronal compartments (1, 5). 1. Leng, G (2018) The Heart of the Brain: the hypothalamus and its hormones. MIT Press 2. Leng G, Pineda Reyes R, Sabatier N, Ludwig M (2015) 60 YEARS OF NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY: The posterior pituitary: from Geoffrey Harris to our present understanding. J Endocrinol 226:T173-85. 3. Leng G, Ludwig M (2016) Intranasal oxytocin: myths and delusions. BiolPsychiatry 79:243-50. 4. Leng G, Sabatier N (2016) Measuring oxytocin and vasopressin: bioassays, immunoassays and random numbers. J Neuroendocrinol. (10). 5. Leng G, Sabatier N (2017) Oxytocin - The Sweet Hormone? Trends Endocrinol Metab. 28:365-376

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Kristine Krug

Fri 24 May 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Joan Doll Teaching Suite, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Tue 28 May 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Tue 28 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Tue 28 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre , Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar: Are journals an endangered species?

Zoe Mullan

As an increasing number of funding bodies demand evermore-specific open access publishing models, research assessment exercises shift away from their reliance on impact factors, and open science and open peer review become more prevalent, do traditional scientific journals still have any... Read more

As an increasing number of funding bodies demand evermore-specific open access publishing models, research assessment exercises shift away from their reliance on impact factors, and open science and open peer review become more prevalent, do traditional scientific journals still have any relevance? Zoë Mullan is Editor-in-Chief of the open access journal, The Lancet Global Health. She is an Ex-Officio Board Member of the Consortium of Universities for Global Health and an International Advisory Board member of Sun-Yat Sen Global Health Institute, Guangzhou, China. Between 2013 and 2017 she was a Council Member and Trustee of the Committee on Publication Ethics. She trained in Biochemistry at the University of Bath, UK, before joining the publishing industry in 1997 as a Scientific Information Officer with CABI. She moved to The Lancet in 1999, where she has worked since, variously as a technical editor, section editor, and founding editor of The Lancet Global Health.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 28 May 2019 from 14:30 to 15:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, John Clegg Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Glycolipid-peptide vaccination induces liver-resident memory CD8+ T cells that protect against malaria

Professor Gavin Painter

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 29 May 2019 from 11:00 to 12:30

Ethox Centre and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox and WEH Seminar - Beyond Hype: Opportunities and Challenges in mHealth

Dr Tereza Hendl

Mobile Health (mHealth) technologies are increasingly becoming an essential part of healthy lifestyles, disease prevention and disease management. The field is developing at a rapid pace, with emerging mHealth technologies being met with enthusiasm and promoted as tools to revolutionize healthcare.... Read more

Mobile Health (mHealth) technologies are increasingly becoming an essential part of healthy lifestyles, disease prevention and disease management. The field is developing at a rapid pace, with emerging mHealth technologies being met with enthusiasm and promoted as tools to revolutionize healthcare. We believe that a wide implementation of mHealth technologies can have a transformative impact on health care provision and that it can significantly shape health care systems and public health outcomes. In this paper, we interrogate the major challenges accompanying such developments. Considering the hopes associated with mHealth technologies, we find it important to open a discussion about their challenging aspects, including the emphasis on self-monitoring, -management and -responsibility for health (implicit in and reinforced by mHealth) algorithmic biases, technological risks, increasing influence of the private IT-sector and new roles for health care professionals. The overall aim of our analysis is to support responsible, socially sustainable and user-centric innovation in mHealth.

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 29 May 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 Seminar room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Genomic Insights into Herpesviral evolution and pathogenesis

Professor Judith Breuer

Herpesvirus are ancient pathogens that have co-evolved with their cognate hosts. The use of pioneering enrichment methods to sequence herpesvirus genomes directly from clinical material has revealed unexpected insights into the evolution and pathogenesis of these DNA viruses . We find that... Read more

Herpesvirus are ancient pathogens that have co-evolved with their cognate hosts. The use of pioneering enrichment methods to sequence herpesvirus genomes directly from clinical material has revealed unexpected insights into the evolution and pathogenesis of these DNA viruses . We find that recombination is a dominant driver of herpesvirus evolution, with herpes simplex and cytomegalovirus recombining freely, other than in key hotspots. In contrast varicella zoster virus and Epstein Barr virus recombination is constrained leading to evidence of population structure. While the forces shaping the VZV and EBV population structure are unknown the data suggest possible hypotheses that will be explored. Mathematical modelling of sequence data recovered from clinical samples also provides insight into the natural history of these human-restricted viruses in their natural host, leading to new findings and testable hypotheses about pathogenesis and virulence.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof. Paul Klenerman

Please arrive 5 minutes before the talk is due to start to gain access to the building

Wed 29 May 2019 from 12:30 to 13:30

WHG Lunchtime Lab Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A & B , Headington OX3 7BN

Chapman & Dendrou Lunchtime Lab Talks

Peter Yeow, Victor Yeung, Melissa Grant-Peters

Chapman Group Speaker: Peter Yeow Title: ‘Exploiting TRIM37-driven centrosome dysfunction to eliminate 17q23-amplified breast cancer cells’ Dendrou Group Speaker: Melissa Grant-Peters Title: ‘Microspectroscopic and transcriptomic spatially-resolved tissue profiling’ Speaker: Victor... Read more

Chapman Group Speaker: Peter Yeow Title: ‘Exploiting TRIM37-driven centrosome dysfunction to eliminate 17q23-amplified breast cancer cells’ Dendrou Group Speaker: Melissa Grant-Peters Title: ‘Microspectroscopic and transcriptomic spatially-resolved tissue profiling’ Speaker: Victor Yeung Title: ‘Investigating the molecular mode of action of TYK2-mediated protection against immune-mediated diseases’

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Thu 30 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Haematology / Psychological Medicine

Dr Susan Shaw, Dr Andy Peniket

Haematology: "RSV and other viruses post bone marrow transplantation", Dr Andy Peniket -- Psychological Medicine: "Stones, Bones, Moans, and psychic Groans – the neuropsychiatric complications of hypercalcaemia", Dr Susan Shaw -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Haematology: "RSV and other viruses post bone marrow transplantation", Dr Andy Peniket -- Psychological Medicine: "Stones, Bones, Moans, and psychic Groans – the neuropsychiatric complications of hypercalcaemia", Dr Susan Shaw -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 30 May 2019 from 14:00 to 15:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

cGAS STING signalling in cancer

Dr Eileen Parkes

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Butler

Thu 30 May 2019 from 15:00 to 16:00

Manor Road Building, Manor Road OX1 3UQ

3 Minute Thesis Competition Heat

An 80,000 word thesis would take 9 hours to present; how about in just 3 minutes with the aid of a single slide? We are inviting DPhil students to do just that. The 3 Minute Thesis competition challenges doctoral candidates to present a compelling spoken presentation on their research topic and... Read more

An 80,000 word thesis would take 9 hours to present; how about in just 3 minutes with the aid of a single slide? We are inviting DPhil students to do just that. The 3 Minute Thesis competition challenges doctoral candidates to present a compelling spoken presentation on their research topic and its significance in just three minutes to a non-specialist audience. The competition will help you to develop your communication skills, vital to raise awareness of your work, seek support and obtain funding. You will be able to develop ways of explaining complex ideas in a way that is accessible and engaging for a non-specialist audience, raise the profile of your work, enhance your CV, and network with like-minded researchers. Oxford will run a two-stage competition, first the heat to select four finalists. Next the final to find the overall winner. The winner of the Oxford final will be entered into the national semi-finals, and if they are successful they will go on to the national final in Birmingham, with their expenses paid to attend. Up to 4 finalists will all be awarded a prize: 1st prize: £200 Runner-up prizes: £100 There are also prizes for winners in the national final: last year’s winner was awarded a £3,000 grant to spend on public engagement activity, sponsored by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) to promote their research and to enhance their professional development. At the heat you will deliver your Three Minute Thesis to a panel of judges. See rules below. Finalists will then be selected to present at the final on 19 June, 5-6pm at the Manor Road Building. By registering for the heat you confirm that you are available to attend the final on 19 June and are eligible: https://www.mpls.ox.ac.uk/public-engagement/latest/three-minute-thesis-competition-launched-deadline-25-may-training-sessions-available-in-march/#eligibility If you don’t want to compete or want to invite your colleagues, please just show up. Specialist training is available for all to help you develop your pitch. You will be taken through the key ingredients to craft a compelling three minute presentation, and have the chance to get feedback on your presentations. Simply register for a session to suit: 25 March, 09.30am-12.30pm Manor Road Building – register: https://cosy.ox.ac.uk/accessplan/clientinput/course/coursebooker.aspx?coursedateid=95410 OR 27 March, 1.30pm – 4.30pm, Manor Road Building – register: https://cosy.ox.ac.uk/accessplan/clientinput/course/coursebooker.aspx?coursedateid=95411

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

If you do not wish to compete and just want to watch, please just show up. If you wish to compete, please register.

Thu 30 May 2019 from 17:00 to 18:00

Oxford Martin School Lecture Series: Evolving economic thought

Oxford Martin School, Corner of Catte and Holywell Streets, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Is the human species slowing down?

Danny Dorling

In Origin of Species, Charles Darwin described how a population explosion occurs and called the time of population explosion “ favourable seasons", he was not to know it, but such circumstances arose for his own species at around the time of his own birth. However, the favourable seasons for... Read more

In Origin of Species, Charles Darwin described how a population explosion occurs and called the time of population explosion “ favourable seasons", he was not to know it, but such circumstances arose for his own species at around the time of his own birth. However, the favourable seasons for human population growth were not experienced favourably, with times of great social dislocation from small scale enclosure to global colonisation. Now those seasons are over, we have experienced the first ever sustained slowdown in the rate of global human population growth. This has been the case for at least one human generation. However, we are not just slowing down in terms of how many children we have, but in almost everything else we do, other than in the rise in global temperatures that we are recording and that we have to live with. It can be argued that there is even a slowdown in such unexpected areas as debt, publishing, and in the total amount useful information being produced. If this is true - that humanity is slowing down in almost everything that we do – what does this mean? What measurements suggest that slowdown is true? And if so much is still rising, albeit at slower and slower rates - is that such a great change? Finally how might the slowdown impact on economic thought. In many ways economics was the science of the great acceleration; a science that makes most sense when markets are expanding and demand is rising. What kind of an economics is needed in a world where enormous and accelerating growth has stopped being the normality?

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Oxford Martin School

Fri 31 May 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

'Building kids' hospitals in Africa: the need, the realities and the rewards', 'Medicalisation of female genital cutting: decision making dilemmas and competing priorities’ and 'FGM: a global perspective'

Professor Chris Lavy, Dr Katy Newell-Jones, Dr Anita Makins

Dr Katy Newell-Jones will present ‘Medicalisation of female genital cutting: decision making dilemmas and competing priorities’ Dr Anita Makins will present 'FGM: a global perspective' Professor Chris Lavy will present ‘Building kids' hospitals in Africa: the need, the realities and the rewards'

Dr Katy Newell-Jones will present ‘Medicalisation of female genital cutting: decision making dilemmas and competing priorities’ Dr Anita Makins will present 'FGM: a global perspective' Professor Chris Lavy will present ‘Building kids' hospitals in Africa: the need, the realities and the rewards'

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 31 May 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Novel Roles for Hyaluronan and its Receptors in Lymphatic Trafficking

Jackson Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer