Other Seminars

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Fri 1 Mar 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Innovations to improve outcome and patient safety in low and middle income countries

Professor Shafi Ahmed, Ms Sarah Kessler

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 1 Mar 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Examining pulmonary interstitial macrophage heterogeneity and self-renewal potential

Dr Laura Denney

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 1 Mar 2019 from 10:00 to 11:00

Single Cell Seminars at WHG

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room K, Headington OX3 7BN

Single cell genomics of multiple myeloma: reconstructing tumour evolution at high resolution

Naser Ansari-Pour

#SC-Exomes

#SC-Exomes

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fabiola Curion

Fri 1 Mar 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Attention: Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) might be important after all!

Professor David Bannerman

Marianne Fillenz Annual Lecture 2019 Several lines of evidence, including recent GWAS, have suggested that schizophrenia may be a disorder of impaired synaptic plasticity, particularly in the hippocampus. Traditionally, hippocampal synaptic plasticity (e.g. long-term potentiation) has been thought... Read more

Marianne Fillenz Annual Lecture 2019 Several lines of evidence, including recent GWAS, have suggested that schizophrenia may be a disorder of impaired synaptic plasticity, particularly in the hippocampus. Traditionally, hippocampal synaptic plasticity (e.g. long-term potentiation) has been thought to subserve the formation of associative memories. Yet schizophrenic subjects are often considered to be more, rather than less, likely to form associations, which is thought to underlie the generation of their false beliefs and delusions. I will present data showing that ablating key glutamate receptor subunits involved in hippocampal synaptic plasticity (and implicated in schizophrenia) leads to deficits in a form of non-associative short-term memory that underlies the habituation of attention. This generates aberrant salience, hyperdopaminergic responses and increased theta coherence, and an increased (rather than decreased) propensity to form associations, reminiscent of what is seen in schizophrenic patients. The implications of these results for understanding synaptic homeostasis during sleep will also be discussed.

Audience: Members of the University only

Sat 2 Mar 2019 from 14:00 to 16:00

History of Science Museum Events

History of Science Museum, Broad Street OX1 3AZ

Family Friendly: Women in Science

Not applicable

Get involved with some hands-on activities inspired by some of the fantastic women in our collection. You can also follow a trail that takes you from Elizabeth Herschel, comet-hunter to Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin, who discovered the structure of insulin.

Get involved with some hands-on activities inspired by some of the fantastic women in our collection. You can also follow a trail that takes you from Elizabeth Herschel, comet-hunter to Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin, who discovered the structure of insulin.

Audience: Public

Drop-in, all ages

Mon 4 Mar 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting Rooms 71a,b,c, Headington OX3 7DQ

The FANC (Fanconi anemia) pathway: far beyond the protection of DNA replication

Filippo Rosselli

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Amanda O'Neill

Mon 4 Mar 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

Inflammation induced tissue remodelling supports pulmonary germinal centre formation

Dr Michelle Linterman

Ectopic lymphoid structures form in a wide range of inflammatory conditions, including infection, autoimmune disease, and cancer. In the context of infection, this response can be beneficial for the host: influenza A virus infection–induced pulmonary ectopic germinal centers give rise to more... Read more

Ectopic lymphoid structures form in a wide range of inflammatory conditions, including infection, autoimmune disease, and cancer. In the context of infection, this response can be beneficial for the host: influenza A virus infection–induced pulmonary ectopic germinal centers give rise to more broadly cross-reactive antibody responses, thereby generating cross-strain protection. However, despite the ubiquity of ectopic lymphoid structures and their role in both health and disease, little is known about the mechanisms by which inflammation is able to convert a peripheral tissue into one that resembles a secondary lymphoid organ. Here, we show that type I IFN produced after viral infection can induce CXCL13 expression in a phenotypically distinct population of lung fibroblasts, driving CXCR5-dependent recruitment of B cells and initiating ectopic germinal center formation. This identifies type I IFN as a novel inducer of CXCL13, which, in combination with other stimuli, can promote lung remodeling, converting a nonlymphoid tissue into one permissive to functional tertiary lymphoid structure formation. ---- Michelle Linterman received her PhD in Immunology from the Australian National University in Canberra, where she investigated a novel mechanism of immunological tolerance. She is currently Group Leader at the Babraham Institute and her principle research focus is on how the immune system responds to vaccination.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 4 Mar 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, MRC WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Cellular plasticity, cellular heterogeneity and single cell sequencing

Prof Xin Lu

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Tue 5 Mar 2019 from 09:30 to 11:30

Saïd Business School, Park End Street OX1 1HP

Evaluating Public Engagement with Research: why, how and when to evaluate?

What are the reasons for evaluating public engagement with research (PER)? How can evaluation enhance engagement and how does evaluation work in practice? If you are new to evaluation, join us at the next PER Forum to hear practical advice on how to evaluate impact and learn from the experiences... Read more

What are the reasons for evaluating public engagement with research (PER)? How can evaluation enhance engagement and how does evaluation work in practice? If you are new to evaluation, join us at the next PER Forum to hear practical advice on how to evaluate impact and learn from the experiences of researchers who have evaluated PER. To book your place at the Forum, please complete this registration form https://goo.gl/forms/pKKHdLuTme2ZmpHh2 by 1 March. More information about the event here: http://bit.do/per-forum

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 5 Mar 2019 from 12:30 to 13:30

Oxford Martin School Public Lectures

Oxford Martin School, Corner of Catte and Holywell Streets, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Global maps of the spread of infectious diseases and their vectors

Dr Moritz Kraemer

Currently limited tools exist to accurately forecast the complex nature of disease spread across the globe. Dr Moritz Kraemer will talk about the dynamic global maps being built, at 5km resolution, to predict the invasion of new organisms under climate change conditions and continued unplanned urbanisation.

Currently limited tools exist to accurately forecast the complex nature of disease spread across the globe. Dr Moritz Kraemer will talk about the dynamic global maps being built, at 5km resolution, to predict the invasion of new organisms under climate change conditions and continued unplanned urbanisation.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Oxford Martin School

Tue 5 Mar 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar: Lifecourse economic evaluation - A microsimulation approach

Professor Richard Cookson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 5 Mar 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Dr Benjamin Fairfax

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 5 Mar 2019 from 14:00 to 15:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, NDMRB TDI seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Deep learning the geospatial complexity of the tumour microenvironment

Dr Yinyin Yuang

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Tue 5 Mar 2019 from 17:00 to 18:00

Oxford Martin School Public Lectures

Oxford Martin School, Corner of Catte and Holywell Streets, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

The ethics of vaccination: individual, collective, and institutional responsibilities

Dr Alberto Giubilini

Vaccination raises ethical issues about the responsibilities of individuals, communities, and states in preventing serious and potentially life-threatening infectious diseases. Such responsibilities are typically taken to be about minimising risks for those who are vaccinated and for those around... Read more

Vaccination raises ethical issues about the responsibilities of individuals, communities, and states in preventing serious and potentially life-threatening infectious diseases. Such responsibilities are typically taken to be about minimising risks for those who are vaccinated and for those around them. However, there are other ethical considerations that matter when defining the responsibilities of different actors with regard to vaccination. Such ethical considerations are not often given due considerations in the debate on vaccination ethics and policy. Thus, in this talk Dr Alberto Giubilini aims at offering a defence of compulsory vaccination taking into account not only the importance of preventing the harms of infectious diseases, but also the value of fairness in the distribution of the burdens entailed by the obligation to protect people from infectious diseases. He will offer a philosophical account of the key notions involved in the ethical debate on vaccination, of the types of responsibilities involved, of the possible types of vaccination policies ranked from the least to the most restrictive, and of the reasons why compulsory vaccination is, from an ethical point of view, the best policy available, as it is the most likely to guarantee not only protection from infectious diseases, but also a fair distribution of the burdens and responsibilities involved. The talk will be followed by a drinks reception, all welcome

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Oxford Martin School

Wed 6 Mar 2019 from 12:30 to 13:30

WHG Lunchtime Lab Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A & B , Headington OX3 7BN

Lewis and Todd Lunchtime Lab Talks

Daniel Rainbow, Dr Séan M O'Cathail

Lewis Group Speaker: Dr Séan O'Cathail Title: ‘Nrf2 pathway as a mediator of therapeutic resistance in colorectal cancer’ Todd Group Speaker: Daniel Rainbow Title: ‘Complex genetics and expression of the IL-2RA gene’

Lewis Group Speaker: Dr Séan O'Cathail Title: ‘Nrf2 pathway as a mediator of therapeutic resistance in colorectal cancer’ Todd Group Speaker: Daniel Rainbow Title: ‘Complex genetics and expression of the IL-2RA gene’

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Thu 7 Mar 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Autophagy and metabolism in cell death and cancer’

Professor Kevin Ryan

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 7 Mar 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Emergency Medicine / Clinical Biochemistry

Dr Brian Shine, Dr John Black

Emergency Medicine: "Adrenaline in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest - the findings of the Paramedic 2 Trial", Dr John Black -- Clinical Biochemistry: "Spots!", Dr Brian Shine -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Emergency Medicine: "Adrenaline in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest - the findings of the Paramedic 2 Trial", Dr John Black -- Clinical Biochemistry: "Spots!", Dr Brian Shine -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 7 Mar 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

A Human Liver Cell Atlas: Revealing Adult Liver Progenitors by Single-Cell RNA-sequencing

The human liver is an essential multifunctional organ, and liver diseases are rising with limited treatment options. However, the cellular composition of the liver remains poorly understood. Here, we performed single-cell RNA-sequencing of ~10,000 cells from normal liver tissue of 9 human donors to... Read more

The human liver is an essential multifunctional organ, and liver diseases are rising with limited treatment options. However, the cellular composition of the liver remains poorly understood. Here, we performed single-cell RNA-sequencing of ~10,000 cells from normal liver tissue of 9 human donors to construct a human liver cell atlas. Our analysis revealed previously unknown sub-types among endothelial cells, Kupffer cells, and hepatocytes with transcriptome-wide zonation of some of these populations. We reveal heterogeneity of the EPCAM+ population, which comprises hepatocyte-biased and cholangiocyte populations as well as a TROP2int bipotent progenitor population with strong potential to form liver organoids. As proof-of-principle, we utilized our atlas to unravel phenotypic changes in hepatocellular carcinoma cells and in human hepatocytes and liver endothelial cells engrafted into a mouse liver. Our human liver cell atlas provides a powerful resource enabling the discovery of previously unknown cell types in the normal and diseased liver.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Ed Morrissey

If you would like to speak to Dominic before his talk contact edward.morrissey@imm.ox.ac.uk

Fri 8 Mar 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

GI haemorrhage

Dr Raman Uberoi

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 8 Mar 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Hydrothermal vents, T cells and immunometabolism

Professor Hal Drakesmith, Joe Frost

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 8 Mar 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Health Economics Seminars

Big Data Institute, Lower Ground Floor Seminar Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Health Preference Research: past, present and possible future

Dr Benjamin Craig, Associate Professor

Abstract: This presentation will briefly cover three topics. First, it will introduce the history and breadth of health preference research. Apart from its scientific discoveries, the relevance of preference evidence derives from its applications in medical product development, health policy and... Read more

Abstract: This presentation will briefly cover three topics. First, it will introduce the history and breadth of health preference research. Apart from its scientific discoveries, the relevance of preference evidence derives from its applications in medical product development, health policy and clinical practice as well as helping individual patients faced with preference-sensitive decisions.Second, we will examine the design of discrete choice experiments for health valuation, including recent innovations in the calculation of QALY estimates for adult and child health outcomes.Third, the presentation will introduce ongoing initiatives within the International Academy of Health Preference Research (iahpr.org), including its textbook (with Oxford University Press), its journal (The Patient), the Health Preference Study and Technology Registry (hpstr.org), and its 10th Meeting in Basel, 13-14 July 2019 (directly prior to iHEA). The presentation will conclude with a few thoughts on what to expect in the coming years, such as the integration of patient preferences into economic evaluations and its methodological limitations. Biography: Benjamin M. Craig, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Economics at the University of South Florida. He received his MS in Economics at the University of Texas at Austin in 1999 and his PhD in Population Health from the University of Wisconsin in 2003. Trained as an econometrician, his research focuses on health preference research and the economics of cancer prevention, detection, and control. He is first author on 7 of the 8 US health valuation studies currently available (PROMIS-29, EQ-5D-5L, SF-6D, PRO-CTCAE, EQ-5D-Y, BPI, NS-CSHCN, not EQ-5D-3L). He is an active member of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR), the International Society for Quality of Life Research (ISOQOL), the International Academy of Health Preference Research (IAHPR), and the EuroQol Group.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: HERC

Fri 8 Mar 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Sympathetic Neuroimmunity for Obesity

Dr Ana Domingos

The brain controls adiposity via central and peripheral neural circuits. We used molecular genetic tools such as optogenetics to probe the connection between peripheral sympathetic neurons and adipocytes. Further, we found this neuro-adipose junction to drive lipolysis via norepinephrine (NE)... Read more

The brain controls adiposity via central and peripheral neural circuits. We used molecular genetic tools such as optogenetics to probe the connection between peripheral sympathetic neurons and adipocytes. Further, we found this neuro-adipose junction to drive lipolysis via norepinephrine (NE) signaling (1) and that the SNS is necessary and sufficient for fat mass reduction (1,2). As obesity is a chronic inflammatory state, we set to define neuroimmune mechanisms that link inflammation to SNS neurons (3). We report the discovery of Sympathetic neuron-Associated Macrophages (SAMs) that directly regulate the extracellular availability of norepinephrine (NE). We identified the molecular mechanism by which SAMs import and metabolize norepinephrine (NE). Abrogation of the mechanism for the uptake of NE by SAMs increases NE availability, which in turn promotes thermogenesis and browning, and long-term amelioration of obesity independently of food intake (3). These results suggested that blockade of NE uptake outside the brain is sufficient to promote weight loss role thus we chemically modified an amphetamine, which targets the NE transporter, such that it does not cross the BBB. The anti-obesity effect of this novel drug will be discussed.

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 8 Mar 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

NDM Seminar Series

Henry Wellcome Building of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Seminar Rooms A & B, Roosevelt Drive OX3 7BN

Circadian Regulation of Virus Replication & Are we prepared for the next pandemic?

Prof Jane McKeating, Dr Gail Carson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kathryn Smith

Fri 8 Mar 2019 from 17:00 to 18:30

AfOx insaka - a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research

St Cross College, Lecture Theatre West Wing, St Giles OX1 3LZ

AfOx insaka

Prof Malcolm McCulloch, Tolullah Oni

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Mon 11 Mar 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting Rooms 71a,b,c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Blocking DNA replication before it starts: insights on CDC7 kinase inhibition by chemical genetics and genome editing approaches

Prof Corrado Santocanale

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Amanda O'Neill

cancelled and will be rescheduled for later in the year

Mon 11 Mar 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

'Sympaythetic Neuroimmunity in Obesity'

Dr Ana Domingos

The brain controls weigh homeostasis via central and peripheral neural circuits. Domingos´lab has recently used optogenetics and two-photon microscopy to uncover a direct and functional connection between sympathetic neurons and adipocytes (1). Further, they found this neuro-adipose junction to... Read more

The brain controls weigh homeostasis via central and peripheral neural circuits. Domingos´lab has recently used optogenetics and two-photon microscopy to uncover a direct and functional connection between sympathetic neurons and adipocytes (1). Further, they found this neuro-adipose junction to drive lipolysis and fat mass reduction, and to be a peripheral effector of leptin action in the brain (1,2). As obesity is a chronic inflammatory state, the Domingos lab has started to define the molecular neuroimmune mechanisms that link inflammation to sympathetic neurons, in the context of obesity. The Domingos lab has recently discovered that the SNS neuro-adipose junction is subject to immune regulation, via specialized immune cells that possess a molecular machinery to handle sympathetic function.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Miss Abigail Ludlow

Mon 11 Mar 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

Discovery of two transcriptional states of neuroblastoma cells via the analysis of super-enhancer landscape

Valentina Boeva

ChIP-seq is used by thousands of research studies to profile histone modifications in cancer. However, methods developed for normal diploid genomes, when applied to cancer samples, can result in false discoveries due to the presence of copy number aberrations distorting the ChIP-seq signal. In... Read more

ChIP-seq is used by thousands of research studies to profile histone modifications in cancer. However, methods developed for normal diploid genomes, when applied to cancer samples, can result in false discoveries due to the presence of copy number aberrations distorting the ChIP-seq signal. In order to circumvent this issue, our group has developed a set of ChIP-seq data analysis methods for cancer (http://boevalab.com/tools.html), including • HMCan: a method to call ChIP-seq peaks and normalize read density profiles for copy number bias [1], • LILY: a method to identify super-enhancer regions in cancer [2]. We applied HMCan and LILY to detect super-enhancer regions in 25 neuroblastoma cell lines and 6 patient derived mouse xenografts. Analysis of super-enhancer landscape in these samples suggested that neuroblastoma cells can be in two different epigenetic and transcriptional states. Single cell analysis showed that both states can co-exist in the same patient. One state was associated with amplification or high expression of the MYCN oncogene and high activity of noradrenergic transcription factors: PHOX2B, GATA3 and HAND2. The second state was characterized by the high activity of the AP-1 transcription complex and transcription factors like PRRX1 and RUNX1. Furthermore, we demonstrated that cells in the second, neural crest-like state were more resistant to chemotherapy [2]. References: 1. Ashoor et al. Bioinformatics, 2013, 29(23): 2979-2986 2. Boeva et al. Nature Genetics, 2017, 49(9):1408-1413

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Mon 11 Mar 2019 from 13:30 to 15:00

ARUK Oxford Drug Discovery Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

ABAD or a good drug target for Alzheimer’s disease?

Dr Laura Aitken

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kate Humphrey

Mon 11 Mar 2019 from 14:15 to 15:15

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

Old Road Campus Research Building, Ludwig Seminar room , Headington OX3 7DQ

TNFR2 driven inflammation and pyroptosis in XIAP deficient cells

Professor Wei-Lynn Wong

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Tue 12 Mar 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Regulation of dormant hematopoietic stem cells

Dr Nina Cabezas-Wallscheid

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 13 Mar 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Identification of relevant antigenic targets for successful liver cancer immunotherapy

Professor Anna Pasetto

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 13 Mar 2019 from 14:30 to 15:30

The George Institute for Global Health UK Seminars

75 George Street (Hayes House), Seminar Room, 1st Floor, Hayes House. Lift and stair access., 75 George Street OX1 2BQ

Navigating the global workforce crisis in healthcare

Dr Mark Britnell, Professor Stephen MacMahon

The world faces a deficit of 18 million health workers. Overcoming this will be the single biggest challenge for healthcare over the next 10 years. That’s according to Dr Mark Britnell, who has dedicated his entire professional life to improving healthcare all over the world. In his new... Read more

The world faces a deficit of 18 million health workers. Overcoming this will be the single biggest challenge for healthcare over the next 10 years. That’s according to Dr Mark Britnell, who has dedicated his entire professional life to improving healthcare all over the world. In his new book, Human: Solving the Global Workforce Crisis in Healthcare, Britnell confronts the all-important question: How will we provide adequate healthcare for 8.5 billion people by 2030?  In the UK, the NHS faces an uphill struggle to fill a projected 190,000 clinical posts, an increase of over 15 per cent, by 2027. With no clear workforce strategy in the government’s recently published 10-year NHS plan, confusion around the impact Brexit will have on immigration, falling retention rates and low staff morale, the long-term sustainability of the nation’s beloved health system is under threat.  Join Dr Mark Britnell in conversation with Professor Stephen MacMahon, Principal Director of The George Institute for Global Health, to hear exclusive insights and findings from Human on the best ways to tackle this issue and avoid a global disaster.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 13 Mar 2019 from 17:00 to 18:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NDPH Inaugural Lecture: Clinical Trials 101 - Ask the right question, get the right answer

Professor Louise Bowman

Booking Recommended

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 14 Mar 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Combined Medical-Surgical Grand Round

Combined Medical-Surgical Grand Round -- Ophthalmology: "Gene therapy for retinitis pigmentosa", Prof Robert MacLaren -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Combined Medical-Surgical Grand Round -- Ophthalmology: "Gene therapy for retinitis pigmentosa", Prof Robert MacLaren -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 14 Mar 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar: Examining public health workers' perceptions toward response expectations in disasters

Associate Professor Daniel Barnett

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Fri 15 Mar 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Fri 15 Mar 2019 from 10:30 to 11:30

Single Cell Seminars at WHG

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room K, Headington OX3 7BN

POSTPONED - Dissecting and directing cerebellar ontogenesis – towards an organoid model for understanding disease of the cerebellum

Samuel Nayler

#10XGenomics #Cell-Hashing #Neurogenesis

#10XGenomics #Cell-Hashing #Neurogenesis

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fabiola Curion

Fri 15 Mar 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

Old Road Campus Research Building, Ludwig Seminar room, Lower Ground Floor, Headington OX3 7DQ

Model oesophageal neoplasia with stem cells and development.

Professor Jianwen Que

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Fri 15 Mar 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

TBA - Equality and Diversity seminar

Jo Pisani

Jo leads the U.K. pharma and Lifesciences consulting practice at PwC Strategy&. She advises industry, academia and governments on strategy and deals. She is a board member of the dementia research institute and advisory board member for MedCity and University of Strathcylde’s CMAC. She has a... Read more

Jo leads the U.K. pharma and Lifesciences consulting practice at PwC Strategy&. She advises industry, academia and governments on strategy and deals. She is a board member of the dementia research institute and advisory board member for MedCity and University of Strathcylde’s CMAC. She has a physics undergraduate degree, MBA and is a chartered engineer. Jo has had a diverse career covering engineering, commercial, IT and strategy with BP, GSK, Booz&Co and PwC. One of her roles at PwC was in talent management where she focused on diversity and inclusion topics. She is passionate about the Lifesciences sector, diversity and mentoring.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Danuta Jeziorska

Fri 15 Mar 2019 from 14:00 to 15:00

TDI Seminar Series

NDM Building, Seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Targeting DNA repair: from basic science to clinical trials

Professor Thomas Helleday

Thomas Helleday is director of the Weston Park Cancer Centre and Professor of Translational Oncology at University of Sheffield and the Söderberg Professor of Translational Medicine and Chemical Biology at Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Professor Helleday heads a multidisciplinary... Read more

Thomas Helleday is director of the Weston Park Cancer Centre and Professor of Translational Oncology at University of Sheffield and the Söderberg Professor of Translational Medicine and Chemical Biology at Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Professor Helleday heads a multidisciplinary translational research group focusing on understanding basic DNA repair and DNA-damage signaling pathways at replication forks and developing novel drugs for anti-cancer treatments. The group was first to demonstrate a novel concept for treating cancer called “synthetic lethality” established by the selective killing of BRCA mutated breast and ovarian cancers by PARP inhibitors. The research group is currently divided into teams focusing on basic science, biology, biochemistry, in vitro assays, medicinal chemistry and in vivo pharmacology. The work is focused on bench to bedside and the group motto is ‘turning cancer defects into cures’. Professor Helleday has been awarded numerous eminent international grants and awards in recognition of his research accomplishments including the Eppendorf-Nature Young European Investigator Award (2005) for outstanding contribution within the field of biomedical science by the journal Nature and the prestigious ERC advanced grants (2010,2016).

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Kilian Huber

Mon 18 Mar 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting Rooms 71a,b,c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Topoisomerase II acts on SMC complex dependent DNA topological stress during both S phase and M phase

Dr Jon Baxter

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Amanda O'Neill

Mon 18 Mar 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

Molecular dissection of a mesenchymal stem cell microenvironment

Prof Paul Sharpe

The activation of resident stem cells as a therapeutic approach to enhance tissue repair relies on a detailed understanding of the stem cell populations and their environments. Using the continuously growing mouse incisor as an easily accessible model system where mesenchymal stem cell behaviour is... Read more

The activation of resident stem cells as a therapeutic approach to enhance tissue repair relies on a detailed understanding of the stem cell populations and their environments. Using the continuously growing mouse incisor as an easily accessible model system where mesenchymal stem cell behaviour is highly polarised, we have identified distinct spatially-located sub-populations of stem cells that have specific roles during tissue homeostasis. In addition, the mechanisms that convert the self-renewing stem cells into non-self-renewing progenitors that can differentiate and their inter-communication are being uncovered. Tissue repair following tooth dentine damage in teeth is directed by Wnt/-catenin signalling-mediated mobilisation of pulp stem cells. A novel, clinically-applicable approach of enhancing this natural repair, called ReDent, has been developed that enables teeth to repair themselves following trauma or caries removal. ---- Paul Sharpe is the Dickinson Professor of Craniofacial Biology at Kings College London. He graduated with a degree in biology from York University and a PhD in biochemistry from Sheffield University. Following postdocs in Sheffield, Wisconsin and Cambridge he became lecturer in molecular embryology at the University of Manchester in 1987 where he established a research group working on the molecular control of tooth development. In 1991 he was recruited to his present Chair at the Dental Institute of Guy’s Hospital (later to merge with Kings College), where he established a new basic research department, the Department of Craniofacial Development and Stem Cell Biology. The department, of which he remains head, now consists of 15 academic research groups with over 80 research staff and in 2017 was awarded Centre of Excellence status: Centre for Craniofacial and Regenerative Biology. From 2002-2008 he was Director of Research for the Dental Institute. In 2004 he was awarded the Craniofacial Biology Research Award by the International Association for Dental Research in recognition of his contribution to the understanding of how teeth develop. In 2006 and 2018 he received the William J Gies award for best publication is Biomaterials and Bioengineering from the same organisation. His current research focusses on understanding dental pulp stem cell function and the development of stem cell-based approaches for new therapies in clinical dentistry.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

CANCELLED

Tue 19 Mar 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, NDMRB TDI seminar room , Headington OX3 7FZ

“Safeguarding the human genome”.

Dr Joanna Loizou

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Tue 19 Mar 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Exploring the role of RNA modifications in myeloid leukaemogenesis

Dr Konstantinos Tzelepis

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 20 Mar 2019 from 11:00 to 12:30

Ethox Centre and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox and WEH Seminar - Gender as structural and epistemic vulnerability in global health emergencies

Dr Agomoni Ganguli-Mitra

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christa Henrichs

Wed 20 Mar 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

“How to Write a Histone Code”

Professor David Shechter

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 21 Mar 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

From Cancer Systems Biology to Precision medicine

Dr Marie-Laure Yaspo

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 21 Mar 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Causal Inference in Epidemiology Seminar - Causal inference: acknowledging the third pillar of contemporary data science

Dr Peter Tennant

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 21 Mar 2019 from 14:00 to 15:00

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine,Headington OX3 9DS, Headington OX3 9DS

Re-evaluation of human skin dendritic cells using single cell RNAseq; a masquerade ball

Yi-Ling Chen (Graham Ogg group)

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Carolina Arancibia

Thu 21 Mar 2019 from 14:00 to 15:00

Infection and Disease Processes Seminar Series

Rodney Porter Building, Howard Schneiderman Room (third floor, call 75344 for entry), off South Parks Road OX1 3QU

Early events in dengue and chikungunya virus infection

Prof. Jolanda Smit

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Joanna Miller

Thu 21 Mar 2019 from 15:00 to 16:00

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Illusive benefits and treatment effect heterogeneity in cost-effectiveness analyses

Dr Joel Smith

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Carolina Arancibia

Fri 22 Mar 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

SIMON, an automated machine learning system reveals immune signatures of influenza vaccine responses

Dr Adriana Tomic

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 22 Mar 2019 from 10:30 to 11:30

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

Old Road Campus Research Building, Ludwig seminar room, basement, ORCRB, Headington OX3 7DQ

Big data analysis and integration for cancer research

Professor Joao Pedro Magalhaes

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Fri 22 Mar 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Dr. Jesse Toe - Business Development and Technology Transfer at Cancer Research UK

Dr. Jesse Toe

The Career Seminar Series aims to highlight a variety of career paths available to biomedical researchers. All welcome! Speaker - Dr. Jesse Toe (Cancer Research UK) Speaker biography: I am a Business Development Manager within the Commercial Partnerships team at Cancer Research UK (CRUK). CRUK is... Read more

The Career Seminar Series aims to highlight a variety of career paths available to biomedical researchers. All welcome! Speaker - Dr. Jesse Toe (Cancer Research UK) Speaker biography: I am a Business Development Manager within the Commercial Partnerships team at Cancer Research UK (CRUK). CRUK is a charity that annually funds over £400 million in oncology research in the UK and more recently abroad. My role is to identify, help develop and commercialise intellectual property arising from the funding, on behalf of the charity, inventors and originating institute, with any net revenue generated being passed back to the charity to fund more research. The charity undertakes it’s own drug discovery, conducts and funds early phase clinical trials, in addition to funding fundamental and translational academic, oncology research - therefore my role encompasses the commercialisation of a range of intellectual property rights that emerge from these diverse activities. Immediately preceding my role at CRUK, I worked briefly as an Intern at Imperial Innovations, the technology transfer office of Imperial College. Prior to the internship, I finished my immunology focused PhD at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research (affiliated with the University of Melbourne in Australia) in 2015.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Robert Beagrie

Mon 25 Mar 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

Signal transduction by caveolae mechanics

Prof Christophe Lamaze

We have established that caveolae are dynamic mechanosensors that buffer cell membrane tension variations to protect the cell against mechanical stress. We have now investigated the role of caveolae mechanics in cell signaling. We found that the mechanical disassembly of caveolae increases the... Read more

We have established that caveolae are dynamic mechanosensors that buffer cell membrane tension variations to protect the cell against mechanical stress. We have now investigated the role of caveolae mechanics in cell signaling. We found that the mechanical disassembly of caveolae increases the amount of non caveolar caveolin-1 at the plasma membrane and releases the EHD2 ATPase from the neck of caveolae. I will show how these two events are critically involved in the regulation of JAK/STAT signaling and gene transcription. Our data link for the first time caveolae mechanosensing to intracellular signaling and establish caveolae as key mechanosignaling devices. ---- Christophe Lamaze is a former resident in medical biology who graduated in Pharmacy (Paris V University) and in Cell Biology (Paris XI University). He is Director of Research, 1st Class at INSERM and Deputy Director of the "Cellular & Chemical Biology" Department at the Institut Curie, where he heads the laboratory "Membrane Mechanics and Dynamics of Intracellular Signaling". Early on, he focused his research on endocytosis and intracellular trafficking. As a post-doctoral fellow with Dr. SL Schmid at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California (1992-97), he established the key role of endocytosis in intracellular signaling (Science 1996; Nature 1996), a pioneering work opening a new field of investigation, and leading to the concept of the “signaling endosome”. In 1997, he joined the Institut Pasteur where he characterized the first clathrin-independent endocytosis known today as the FEME pathway (Mol. Cell 2001). He set up his own team at the Institut Curie in 2001 to study the role of cell membranes dynamics in signaling, focusing on the interferon receptor and JAK/STAT signaling (Cell, 2016, Nature Commun. 2016). In 2011, his team established that caveolae are mechanosensors that provide protection for cells under mechanical stress (Cell 2011).

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

CANCELLED

Tue 26 Mar 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

MHU Student Presentations

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 26 Mar 2019 from 17:30 to 18:30

Population Health Seminars

Sheldonian Theatre, Broad Street OX1 3AZ

NDPH special event: Women and Leadership: Fighting for an equal world

Julia Gillard

Julia Gillard was the prime minister of Australia from 2010-2013. She was the first woman to serve as Australia’s prime minister. In October 2012 she received worldwide attention for her speech in Parliament on the treatment of women in professional and public life. Julia Gillard has a... Read more

Julia Gillard was the prime minister of Australia from 2010-2013. She was the first woman to serve as Australia’s prime minister. In October 2012 she received worldwide attention for her speech in Parliament on the treatment of women in professional and public life. Julia Gillard has a longstanding commitment to expanding access and quality to education worldwide and to supporting girls and women fulfil their potential. Some of her current activities include serving as a patron of CAMFED, the Campaign for Female Education and chairing the Global Partnership for Education. She will be talking at the Sheldonian Theatre, Oxford, on Tuesday 26 March, at 5.30-6.30pm on “Women and Leadership - Fighting for an equal world“.

Booking Recommended

Audience: Public

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 27 Mar 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Dissecting the role of programmed cell death-1 receptor (PD-1) in the immune system

Dr Shoba Amarnath

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 27 Mar 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

LRRK2 Mediated Cellular Function from Vesicular Trafficking to Gene Expression

Professor Kirsten Harvey

My research has focused on two main aspects of neurobiology, the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s and trapping and accumulation of inhibitory receptors at synapses. In my laboratory, we employ cell biological, biochemistry and proteomic techniques in an effort to: i) discover how pathogenic mutations... Read more

My research has focused on two main aspects of neurobiology, the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s and trapping and accumulation of inhibitory receptors at synapses. In my laboratory, we employ cell biological, biochemistry and proteomic techniques in an effort to: i) discover how pathogenic mutations in PARK genes lead to neuronal death, ii) uncover new leads for genetic analysis, and iii) identify new therapeutic targets for disease modifying treatment. My current research focus is on the physiological and pathological role of the Parkinson’s protein LRRK2 in Wnt signalling and cytoskeletal function. In addition, I continue to research the role of proteins important for receptor clustering such as gephyrin and collybistin in inhibitory receptor clustering and intellectual disability.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Thu 28 Mar 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Causal Inference in Epidemiology Seminar - Statistical concepts: a grammar for research

Prof David Cox

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 28 Mar 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Organisation and turnover of developmental regulatory elements in Metazoan genomes

Prof. Boris Lenhard

Syntenic arrays of extremely conserved non-coding elements (CNEs) regulate key developmental genes in multiple diverse Metazoan lineages. Due to a lack of sequence conservation between CNEs across distant lineages, it has been proposed that this form of long-range gene regulation has been acquired... Read more

Syntenic arrays of extremely conserved non-coding elements (CNEs) regulate key developmental genes in multiple diverse Metazoan lineages. Due to a lack of sequence conservation between CNEs across distant lineages, it has been proposed that this form of long-range gene regulation has been acquired independently in multiple lineages. Our alternative hypothesis is that while these sequences are extremely conserved within a lineage, no sequence is totally indispensable and therefore given enough time, sequence turnover within CNEs would make their identification between lineages impossible. By analysing deeply and shallowly conserved arrays of CNEs, known as genomic regulatory blocks (GRBs), in three metazoan lineages, and find that in all three, deeply and shallowly conserved GRBs target distinct subsets of genes: the most conserved GRBs regulate mostly developmental transcription factors, and the least conserved regulating cell adhesion molecules and neural developmental genes. Even shallowly conserved GRBs often have CNEs in all three lineages, arguing in favour of their ancient origin and divergence by turnover rather than lineage-specific emergence. Deeply and shallowly conserved GRBs also differ in the timing of their expression during development, their chromatin state and their repeat content. This suggest that GRB-like gene regulation of animal development has an ancient origin, and that the rate of regulatory region turnover within GRBs is influenced by the pleiotropy of the gene under regulation.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Supat Thongjuea

If you would like to speak to Prof. Lenhard, please contact supat.thongjuea@imm.ox.ac.uk

Fri 29 Mar 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Deciphering Mechanisms of Perceptual Silencing: From Molecules to Neural Systems

Mani Ramaswami

We and our collaborators seek to understand molecular mechanisms of long-term memory in identified elements of a memory-encoding circuit in vivo. Our work on the Drosophila olfactory system has a) outlined a simple neural circuit that encodes habituation memory; b) identified likely components and... Read more

We and our collaborators seek to understand molecular mechanisms of long-term memory in identified elements of a memory-encoding circuit in vivo. Our work on the Drosophila olfactory system has a) outlined a simple neural circuit that encodes habituation memory; b) identified likely components and assembly mechanisms for neuronal ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granules; and c) shown how translational control mechanisms and RNP granules participate in mnemonic processes. Our studies indicate that olfactory habituation arises from the potentiation of inhibitory synapses from a sparse group of local interneurons onto excitatory output neurons in the antennal lobe. The underlying synaptic plasticity mechanism, scaled up from small to large circuits, can create negative images (or inhibitory engrams) of object-encoding cell assemblies and so potentially account for habituation across systems and species. This “negative-image model,” recently supported by observations in the mammalian auditory cortex, explains the key behavioral features of habituation (“gating” and “override”) better than any other current model. I will end by discussing arguments developed in collaboration with colleagues in Oxford, which suggest that inhibitory memory engrams, similar to those involved in habituation, can convert recently encoded memories into latent remote memories that remain accessible to recall, and speculate on possible implications for the function and physiology of sleep, atypical psychiatric states, and dreaming.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Fri 29 Mar 2019 from 12:30 to 13:30

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 1, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar - Interpretable machine learning with tensor models for healthcare

Haiping Lu

Big, multidimensional data such as brain/heart MRI is expected to transform healthcare. However, such data poses great challenges, particularly the need for interpretation and very high dimensionality accompanied by a relatively small sample size. Deep learning models are powerful but inadequate to... Read more

Big, multidimensional data such as brain/heart MRI is expected to transform healthcare. However, such data poses great challenges, particularly the need for interpretation and very high dimensionality accompanied by a relatively small sample size. Deep learning models are powerful but inadequate to address these problems, due to their opaque and data-hungry nature. This talk will present tensor-based machine learning models for extracting/selecting compact, interpretable features directly from tensor representations of multidimensional data. I will show their applications in prediction and interpretation of brain fMRI for neural decoding and cardiac MRI for disease diagnosis. Finally, I will discuss some ongoing and future research works on interpretable machine learning, transfer learning, and network embedding.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Fri 29 Mar 2019 from 15:30 to 16:15

TDI seminars (monthly)

NDM Building, Seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

The biochemical study and single molecular imaging of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kate Humphrey

Followed by the NDMRB Social, hosted by the Kessler Group