Other Seminars

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Mon 3 Jun 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

“Manipulating epigenetic regulators to enable immune checkpoint blockade”

Professor Yang Shi

Dr Yang Shi is a Professor of Cell Biology at Harvard Medical School and a noted leader in the field of histone demethylases. He discovered and characterized LSD1, the first histone demethylase to be identified, and has made key contributions to the understanding of epigenetic modifications, gene... Read more

Dr Yang Shi is a Professor of Cell Biology at Harvard Medical School and a noted leader in the field of histone demethylases. He discovered and characterized LSD1, the first histone demethylase to be identified, and has made key contributions to the understanding of epigenetic modifications, gene regulation and diseases such as X-linked mental retardation and cancer. He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2016.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Mon 3 Jun 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Mon 3 Jun 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Engineering genomes, karyotypes and the dark matter of the human genome

Dr Jef Boeke

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Tue 4 Jun 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Sweet Drug Delivery Systems: Heparosan-based Enhancers for Protein & Liposomal Therapeutics

Professor Paul DeAngelis

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Tue 4 Jun 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

MHU Student Presentations

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 4 Jun 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - Preconception health: what, why, how, when and for whom?

Professor Hazel Inskip

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 4 Jun 2019 from 17:30 to 18:30

2019- Grand Challenges in Science

Christ Church, Sir Michael Dummett Lecture Theatre, St Aldates OX1 1DP

Science, Ethics and Exploitation: the Things We Do in the Name of Science

In the film Jurassic Park, Dr. Ian Malcom summed up the status-quo relationship between science and ethics when he said, "[S]cientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn't stop to think if they should." This panel, bringing in perspectives from bioethics, Big Data, and... Read more

In the film Jurassic Park, Dr. Ian Malcom summed up the status-quo relationship between science and ethics when he said, "[S]cientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn't stop to think if they should." This panel, bringing in perspectives from bioethics, Big Data, and public policy, is a conversation about moral considerations in research where exploitation of people, organisms, and habitats is possible. Our goal with this symposium is to uphold current discussions about research and ethics. We hope to encourage greater discussions within universities and research groups about ethical considerations in research. --- Prof. Jonathan Wolff (Chair): Philosopher, academic, Blavatnik Professor of Public Policy, University of Oxford Dr. Sarah Chan (Panelist): Chancellor Fellow at Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh Prof. Doris Schroeder (Panelist): Director of the Centre for Professional Ethics and Professor of Moral Philosophy, University of Central Lancashire Prof. Nina Hallowell (Panelist): Ethox Centre, Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities, and Big Data Institute, University of Oxford Dr Mariarosaria Taddeo (Panelist): Oxford Internet Institute and Deputy Director of the Digital Ethics Lab --- Following the seminar, we would like to invite you to a free drinks reception with the speakers. The event will be part of the Oxford Environmental Research Partnership’s annual seminar series, focusing on the ‘Grand Challenges’ facing society today.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Marcus Buechel

Wed 5 Jun 2019 from 09:30 to 10:30

Tropical Medicine Seminars

NDM Building, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

AI in healthcare

Prof Ben Cooper, Dr Chris Paton

Ben Cooper (MORU) will tell us how they used machine learning to prescribe targeted and locally-tailored antibiotic in a children's hospital in Cambodia - Chris Paton (Oxford) will speak about his open science approach to artificial intelligence in healthcare

Ben Cooper (MORU) will tell us how they used machine learning to prescribe targeted and locally-tailored antibiotic in a children's hospital in Cambodia - Chris Paton (Oxford) will speak about his open science approach to artificial intelligence in healthcare

Audience: Members of the University only

The seminar will be shared via Zoom. Contact Claire-Lise Kessler if you want to join

Wed 5 Jun 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Old Road Campus Journal Club

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room B, Headington OX3 7BN

Genetic compensation triggered by mutant mRNA degradation

Thomas Nicol

Paper for discussion: Genetic compensation triggered by mutant mRNA degradation https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1064-z Abstract: Genetic robustness, or the ability of an organism to maintain fitness in the presence of harmful mutations, can be achieved via protein feedback loops.... Read more

Paper for discussion: Genetic compensation triggered by mutant mRNA degradation https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1064-z Abstract: Genetic robustness, or the ability of an organism to maintain fitness in the presence of harmful mutations, can be achieved via protein feedback loops. Previous work has suggested that organisms may also respond to mutations by transcriptional adaptation, a process by which related gene(s) are upregulated independently of protein feedback loops. However, the prevalence of transcriptional adaptation and its underlying molecular mechanisms are unknown. Here, by analysing several models of transcriptional adaptation in zebrafish and mouse, we uncover a requirement for mutant mRNA degradation. Alleles that fail to transcribe the mutated gene do not exhibit transcriptional adaptation, and these alleles give rise to more severe phenotypes than alleles displaying mutant mRNA decay. Transcriptome analysis in alleles displaying mutant mRNA decay reveals the upregulation of a substantial proportion of the genes that exhibit sequence similarity with the mutated gene's mRNA, suggesting a sequence-dependent mechanism. These findings have implications for our understanding of disease-causing mutations, and will help in the design of mutant alleles with minimal transcriptional adaptation-derived compensation.

Booking Recommended

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 5 Jun 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Seminar room, level 30, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

BBC Pandemic – informing infectious disease models with citizen science

Dr Petra Klepac

To mark the centenary of the 1918 influenza pandemic, the BBC have put together a feature-length documentary called ‘Contagion! The BBC Four Pandemic’. Central to the documentary is a nationwide citizen science experiment, during which volunteers in the United Kingdom could download and use a... Read more

To mark the centenary of the 1918 influenza pandemic, the BBC have put together a feature-length documentary called ‘Contagion! The BBC Four Pandemic’. Central to the documentary is a nationwide citizen science experiment, during which volunteers in the United Kingdom could download and use a custom mobile phone app called BBC Pandemic, and contribute their movement and contact data for a day. This talk explores the modelling work that went into building influenza epidemic simulations for this program and some insights from this incredibly rich data set.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Sunetra Gupta

Please arrive 5 minutes before the talk is due to start to gain access to the building

Wed 5 Jun 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

OCDEM Wednesday Seminar Series

Metabolic switching in pregnancy; relevance to maternal and offspring health

Professor Catherine Williamson

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 5 Jun 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Energy metabolism in macrophage plasticity and inflammatory disease

Dr Jacques Behmoaras

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 5 Jun 2019 from 14:30 to 15:30

The George Institute for Global Health UK Seminars

75 George Street (Hayes House), Seminar Room, 1st Floor, Hayes House. Lift and stair access., 75 George Street OX1 2BQ

Providing sustainable kidney care in the developing world - challenges and solutions

Professor Vivekanand Jha

Professor Jha is the Executive Director at The George Institute for Global Health, India, a James Martin Fellow at The George Institute for Global Health, University of Oxford, and the President-Elect of the International Society of Nephrology. His wide-ranging research interests include... Read more

Professor Jha is the Executive Director at The George Institute for Global Health, India, a James Martin Fellow at The George Institute for Global Health, University of Oxford, and the President-Elect of the International Society of Nephrology. His wide-ranging research interests include understanding the health and societal impact of kidney diseases around the world and development of affordable, scalable and sustainable primary and secondary prevention tools. He has worked with many organisations including with the World Health Organization to develop clinical practice guidelines and advocacy papers, has lectured extensively around the world, and is a prolific writer and editor. In this seminar, Vivek will draw on his experience to discuss the challenges and solutions to providing sustainable kidney care in the developing world.

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 6 Jun 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

RNA editors and DNA mutators: diverse biological roles for a tight-knit family of enzymes

Dr Nina Papavassiliou

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Thu 6 Jun 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Radiology / Cardiology

Prof Fergus Gleeson, Dr Gianluigi De Maria

Radiology: "The big AI, so it's finally here...?", Prof Fergus Gleeson -- Cardiology: "How can we optimise myocardial reperfusion after stenting for myocardial infarction?", Dr Gianluigi De Maria -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Radiology: "The big AI, so it's finally here...?", Prof Fergus Gleeson -- Cardiology: "How can we optimise myocardial reperfusion after stenting for myocardial infarction?", Dr Gianluigi De Maria -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 6 Jun 2019 from 16:30 to 18:00

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, John Radcliffe Hospital Main Building, George Pickering Education Centre Level 3 Academic Centre, Room 2B, Headington OX3 9DU, Headington OX3 9DU

Characterisation of intestinal T cell populations in coeliac disease using single-cell transcriptomic approaches

Dr Michael Fitzpatrick

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Holm Uhlig

Fri 7 Jun 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Robotic minimally invasive oesophagectomy

Dr Richard van Hillegersberg

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 7 Jun 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Host-microbial cross-talk in the intestine in health and disease

Dr Nicholas Ilott, Yisu Gu

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 7 Jun 2019 from 10:30 to 11:30

Single Cell Seminars at WHG

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room K, Headington OX3 7BN

Simultaneous mRNA and protein quantification in human CD4+ T cells using the BD Rhapsody platform

Ricardo Ferreria

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fabiola Curion

Fri 7 Jun 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Roles for Tbx5 in limb bud initiation and morphogenesis of limb tissues

Professor Malcolm Logan

My lab studies the mechanisms controlling vertebrate limb development and the origins and pathology of diseases affecting the musculoskeletal system. Congenital limb abnormalities are the second most common live birth defect and diseases that disrupt musculoskeletal system function place a... Read more

My lab studies the mechanisms controlling vertebrate limb development and the origins and pathology of diseases affecting the musculoskeletal system. Congenital limb abnormalities are the second most common live birth defect and diseases that disrupt musculoskeletal system function place a significant burden on affected individuals and healthcare systems. We are combining approaches that use animal models with analysis of human tissue samples. Our work focuses on two fundamental events: the early signals that recruit the initial cohort of limb bud progenitors and later morphogenesis events that organise these progenitor cells into mature limb tissues, with a particular focus on muscle and bone. We are interested in understanding how disruption of these events can explain the aetiology and pathology of certain congenital limb abnormalities and diseases affecting the musculoskeletal system. We are also trying to harness our knowledge of how tissues are constructed and maintained for regenerative strategies.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Kristine Krug

Mon 10 Jun 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Infections@BDI Seminar

Dr Timothy Lucas, Jason Hendry

Methods for estimating global malaria risk maps by combining aggregated incidence data and prevalence surveys The Mobile Malaria Project: Developing & deploying a mobile lab for malaria-focused nanopore sequencing in Africa.

Methods for estimating global malaria risk maps by combining aggregated incidence data and prevalence surveys The Mobile Malaria Project: Developing & deploying a mobile lab for malaria-focused nanopore sequencing in Africa.

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 10 Jun 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Changing Neighbours: bone marrow remodeling during ageing and age-related myeloproliferative disorders

Dr Simon Mendez-Ferrer

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Mon 10 Jun 2019 from 15:00 to 16:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Phenome@BDI

Stefania Benonisdottir

Joining genetic data with phenotype data creates an opportunity to put genetic information into context with observable characteristics. Both genetic and environmental sources can influence phenotypic variation in a given population. An important part of drawing conclusions about the genetic... Read more

Joining genetic data with phenotype data creates an opportunity to put genetic information into context with observable characteristics. Both genetic and environmental sources can influence phenotypic variation in a given population. An important part of drawing conclusions about the genetic contribution is specifying the phenotype and preparing the data in a suitable manner. That process involves various challenges since phenotypes often vary over time and are susceptible to external influences. In addition, measurement errors can add noise and/or bias to the data. I will discuss the process of specifying categorical and quantitative phenotypes and preparing the phenotype data for genetic studies. Topics include inverse normal transformation of quantitative phenotypes, adjusting (or not) for individual characteristics, clinical diagnoses vs research definitions, circumstantial datasets vs generated datasets and genotype-to-phenotype studies.

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 11 Jun 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - The Mobile Malaria Project

Dr George Busby, Dr Isaac Ghinai

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 12 Jun 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, Sherrington Library, 2nd floor Sherrington Building, DPAG, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

The toxic consequences of protein aggregation in Parkinson's disease

Dr Sonia Gandhi

Group Leader Sonia Gandhi has expertise in the process of protein misfolding, in which smaller proteins, monomers, joining together to form larger proteins, oligomers, and how this process may drive organellar dysfunction and cell toxicity in neurodegeneration.

Group Leader Sonia Gandhi has expertise in the process of protein misfolding, in which smaller proteins, monomers, joining together to form larger proteins, oligomers, and how this process may drive organellar dysfunction and cell toxicity in neurodegeneration.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Please note this talk is at noon.

Wed 12 Jun 2019 from 12:30 to 13:30

WHG Lunchtime Lab Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A & B , Headington OX3 7BN

Donnelly & Naismith Lunchtime Lab Talks

Dr Anjali Hinch

Donnelly Group Speaker: Dr Anjali Hinch Title: ‘Understanding the process of homologous recombination during mammalian meiosis’ Naismith Group Speaker: Dr Miriam Weckener Title: ‘Inside - Out: bacterial sugar polymer assembly’

Donnelly Group Speaker: Dr Anjali Hinch Title: ‘Understanding the process of homologous recombination during mammalian meiosis’ Naismith Group Speaker: Dr Miriam Weckener Title: ‘Inside - Out: bacterial sugar polymer assembly’

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Wed 12 Jun 2019 from 13:00 to 16:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 1, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Adaptive Designs Workshop

The Adaptive Designs Working Group (ADWG) of the MRC network of Hubs for Trials Methodology Research are visiting Oxford University on 12 June to conduct an Adaptive Designs Workshop to encourage and support the use of adaptive methods for clinical trials in practice. On the day, Professor Thomas... Read more

The Adaptive Designs Working Group (ADWG) of the MRC network of Hubs for Trials Methodology Research are visiting Oxford University on 12 June to conduct an Adaptive Designs Workshop to encourage and support the use of adaptive methods for clinical trials in practice. On the day, Professor Thomas Jaki, Dr Thomas Burnett and Dr Pavel Mozgunov (Lancaster University) shall begin by giving a broad introduction to adaptive designs for clinical trials, why you might consider them, what options are available and some examples of where they have been implemented in real studies. This will be followed by interactive discussions on the design and implementation of adaptive trials that may be of particular interest to you. We encourage participants to share details of any trials that may benefit from an adaptive design or particular methods they wish to discuss before the day, to assist in bringing the greatest benefit to you from this visit. Further to the planned activities members of the ADWG will be available after the main session should you wish to discuss any further collaboration with the group. PROGRAMME 1:00pm – 2:00 pm Introduction to adaptive designs We shall provide a broad introduction to adaptive designs for clinical trials, why you might consider them, what options are available and some examples of where they have been implemented in real studies. This will include designs for Phase I, Phase II and Phase III clinical trials. 2:00pm – 2:45pm Implementing adaptive designs In this interactive session, we discuss the practical elements of implementing adaptive designs, members of the Adaptive Designs Working Group will offer their insight into this topic. 2:45pm – 3:00pm Coffee Break 3:00pm – Open discussion session for anyone that has specific trials in mind This is an opportunity to discuss specific studies that may benefit from an adaptive design. If there are any adaptive designs implemented (or wanted to implement but decided not to) in the past but had some challenges with (or just want to share your experience with them and get our feedback on this); adaptive designs that you heard about but would like to learn more and to know how we can help with their implementation; trials that you are currently planning (or conducting) and that you believe could (potentially) benefit from adaptive designs Participants are encouraged to submit information on trials they wish to discuss or requests for particular designs in advance of the day to maximise benefit. BIOGRAPHIES Thomas Jaki is Professor of Statistics at Lancaster University and director of the Medical and Pharmaceutical research unit (MPS, www.mps-research.com) which has a long lasting tradition in the design and analysis of clinical trials. He is an NIHR Senior Research Fellow, Coordinator of the EU funded IDEAS network (www.ideas-itn.eu) and a Co-Investigator of the MRC’s North-West Hub for Trials Methodology Research. His methodological research to date has focused on adaptive designs and multiplicity, Bayesian methods and estimation with sparse data. He has worked on estimators for pharmacokinetic parameters, developed adaptive designs – in particular for multi-arm studies - and investigated Bayesian methods for dose-escalation. Pavel Mozgunov is a Lecturer in Medical Statistics at Lancaster University, UK. He was a Marie-Curie PhD Fellow and completed his PhD at Lancaster University where he was working on novel adaptive designs for complex dose-finding studies. Pavel's research to date is primarily focused on more efficient designs for Phase I and Phase II clinical trials. Specifically, he is interested in bringing information-theoretic concepts into response-adaptive designs, which can make trial designs more ethical for patients. Thomas Burnett is a researcher at Lancaster and the outreach officer of the Adaptive Designs Working group. His particular interest is in enrichment designs and designs with multiple treatment arms.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 12 Jun 2019 from 14:30 to 15:30

The George Institute for Global Health UK Seminars

75 George Street (Hayes House), Seminar Room, 1st Floor, Hayes House. Lift and stair access., 75 George Street OX1 2BQ

Towards health research transformation: influencing policy makers

Professor Göran Tomson

Göran Tomson is a Professor of International Health Systems Research and member of the Health Systems and Policy research group, linked to Medical Management Centre (MMC) at the Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics (LIME) at Karolinska Institutet. Since 2019, he has been a... Read more

Göran Tomson is a Professor of International Health Systems Research and member of the Health Systems and Policy research group, linked to Medical Management Centre (MMC) at the Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics (LIME) at Karolinska Institutet. Since 2019, he has been a Distinguished Fellow at The George Institute. This is a screening of a talk Göran first delivered at The George Institute for Global Health offices in Beijing, on 18 March 2019. During the talk, Tomson discusses the research to evidence gap and what evidence-informed policy-making actually is, and ways to overcome barriers and facilitators in knowledge transfer. The talk will draw on case studies and examples from his work with the WHO Secretariat of the Evidence-Informed Policy Network.

Audience: All welcome

Thu 13 Jun 2019 from 09:00 to 17:00

St Cross College, Lecture theatre, St Giles OX1 3LZ

Joint OUC-WEH conference: Rethinking Moral Status

Various Speakers

It is often assumed that human moral status is an all-or-nothing affair. Philosophical debate about the moral status of foetuses and the severely cognitively impaired is typically between those who argue that full moral status is possessed and those who argue that moral status is altogether... Read more

It is often assumed that human moral status is an all-or-nothing affair. Philosophical debate about the moral status of foetuses and the severely cognitively impaired is typically between those who argue that full moral status is possessed and those who argue that moral status is altogether lacking. The difficulty of knowing how to regard the moral status of a range of beings that we have recently created, or may soon be able to create, and which seem to blur the boundary between human and non-human, pushes us to reconsider widespread assumptions that we have made about human moral status. What is the moral status of a chimera, a cyborg or a brain organoid? What moral status should we attribute to post-humans, human minds that have been uploaded into a computer, or artificial intelligence that is designed to be similar to human intelligence? How are we to respond to this challenge? Should we rethink our assumptions about what it is to be human? Should we abandon the widespread assumption that there can be no humans with partial moral status? Should we accept that there will be many instances in which we will be unable to determine whether or not moral status is present? Or should we reconsider the very idea of moral status? If we are to revise our thinking about moral status, in response to these emerging challenges, then how should we now think about the moral status of foetuses, severely cognitively impaired humans, and also non-human animals? In this two-day workshop, leading philosophers and bioethicists from a range of different backgrounds are brought together to attend to the task of rethinking moral status. The conference is supported by the Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities and the Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics, at the University of Oxford. Find more information and a list of speakers on https://www.weh.ox.ac.uk/upcoming-events/rethinking-moral-status.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Dr Stephen Clarke

Thu 13 Jun 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Ludwig Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7DQ

Ubiquitin, signaling in normal and cancer cell cycles

Michael J. Emanuele

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Jade Schneiders

Thu 13 Jun 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Seminar room, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3SY, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Antigenic breadth - a missing component of an effective vaccine against herpes

The successful human papillomavirus (HPV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) subunit vaccines contain single viral proteins that represent 22% and 12%, respectively, of the total antigens encoded by these simple viruses. The herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) genome is 20 and 50 times larger, respectively.... Read more

The successful human papillomavirus (HPV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) subunit vaccines contain single viral proteins that represent 22% and 12%, respectively, of the total antigens encoded by these simple viruses. The herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) genome is 20 and 50 times larger, respectively. Thus, single protein subunit vaccines represent only 1% of HSV-2's total antigenic breadth. The concept of antigenic breadth offers a unifying explanation for why HSV-2 glycoprotein D subunit vaccines have repeatedly failed in human clinical trials, and why live HSV-2 vaccines that encode 99% of HSV-2's antigens are more effective in side-by-side tests. We believe that live HSV-2 vaccines represent an unexplored opportunity to stop the genital herpes epidemic.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Suki Kenth

Please arrive 5 minutes before the talk begins to gain access to the building

Thu 13 Jun 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Medical Director's Office / Stroke Medicine

Dr Ursula Schulz, Prof Meghana Pandit

Medical Director's Office: "Patient Safety at the OUH", Prof Meghana Pandit -- Stroke Medicine: "A tale from the TIA clinic: sometimes it is bl**dy difficult...", Dr Ursula Schulz -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Medical Director's Office: "Patient Safety at the OUH", Prof Meghana Pandit -- Stroke Medicine: "A tale from the TIA clinic: sometimes it is bl**dy difficult...", Dr Ursula Schulz -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 14 Jun 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

‘Development of a National Surveillance System for Congenital Anomalies in Paediatric Surgery’

Professor Paul Johnson, Ms Natalie Durkin, Dr Benjamin Allin

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 14 Jun 2019 from 09:00 to 17:00

Jenner Seminars

Wolfson College, Wolfson College, Linton Road OX2 6UD

UK Clinical Vaccine Network Conference, Wolfson College, 14th June 2019

The UK Clinical Vaccine Network Conference 2019 is a single day conference focusing on the future direction and challenges within the vaccine arena. The aim of the conference is to showcase the work of the UK clinical vaccine community and will be open to anyone who wants to learn more about... Read more

The UK Clinical Vaccine Network Conference 2019 is a single day conference focusing on the future direction and challenges within the vaccine arena. The aim of the conference is to showcase the work of the UK clinical vaccine community and will be open to anyone who wants to learn more about vaccines. Topics covered will range from correlates of protection, adjuvants, novel delivery and AMR, through to global vaccines and vaccine acceptance. As part of the event there will be a masterclass session for trainees and will have a plenary speaker talking about careers in vaccinology. The conference will cover recent vaccine development in RSV, typhoid, rabies, CMV, and the potential impact of vaccines on antimicrobial resistance, as well as discussion around vaccine uptake and hesitancy. The programme is targeted towards clinical and non-clinical staff alike.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Fri 14 Jun 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Dynamics of resident memory B cell responses in the lung

Andrew Maclean

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 14 Jun 2019 from 12:30 to 13:30

WHG High Profile Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B , Headington OX3 7BN

Unleashing the Potential of a Diverse Workforce

Dr Vivienne Ming

Bio: Frequently featured for her research and inventions in The Financial Times, The Atlantic, Quartz and the New York Times, Dr. Vivienne Ming is a theoretical neuroscientist, entrepreneur, and author. She co-founded Socos Labs, her fifth company, an independent think tank exploring the future of... Read more

Bio: Frequently featured for her research and inventions in The Financial Times, The Atlantic, Quartz and the New York Times, Dr. Vivienne Ming is a theoretical neuroscientist, entrepreneur, and author. She co-founded Socos Labs, her fifth company, an independent think tank exploring the future of human potential. Dr. Ming launched Socos Labs to combine her varied work with that of other creative experts and expand their impact on global policy issues, both inside companies and throughout our communities. Previously, Vivienne was a visiting scholar at UC Berkeley's Redwood Center for Theoretical Neuroscience, pursuing her research in cognitive neuroprosthetics. In her free time, Vivienne has invented AI systems to help treat her diabetic son, predict manic episodes in bipolar sufferers weeks in advance, and reunited orphan refugees with extended family members. She sits on boards of numerous companies and nonprofits including StartOut, The Palm Center, Cornerstone Capital, Platypus Institute, Shiftgig, Zoic Capital, and SmartStones. Dr. Ming also speaks frequently on her AI-driven research into inclusion and gender in business. For relaxation, she is a wife and mother of two.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Dr Vivienne Ming will be giving a seminar at the Wellcome centre on the 14th June. Her talk, covering inclusivity and diversity within in the workplace, will be of interest to the wider community and not just those involved in science.

Fri 14 Jun 2019 from 13:00 to 14:30

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Sherrington Talks

Presented by DPAG Graduate Students in their 3rd and final year of DPhil research study.

Presented by DPAG Graduate Students in their 3rd and final year of DPhil research study.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Mon 17 Jun 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

How human cells defend their cytosol against bacterial invasion

Dr Felix Randow

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Mon 17 Jun 2019 from 14:00 to 15:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar: A population genetic interpretation of GWAS findings

Associate Professor Guy Sella

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 18 Jun 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

* CANCELLED * Spatial enhancer-promoter networks in pluripotent stem cells

Dr Stefan Schoenfelder

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 18 Jun 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - Some contemporary insights into cardio-vascular risk

Professor Emanuele Di Angelantonio

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 19 Jun 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Airway Macrophage phenotypic and metabolic alterations during lung fibrosis

Dr Adam Byrne

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 19 Jun 2019 from 14:30 to 15:30

The George Institute for Global Health UK Seminars

75 George Street (Hayes House), Seminar Room, 1st Floor, Hayes House. Lift and stair access., 75 George Street OX1 2BQ

Mathematical modelling at different stages of an infectious disease outbreak

Dr Robin Thomspon

Infectious disease outbreaks are responsible for devastating consequences. As an example, the 2014-16 Ebola epidemic in West Africa led to more than 11,000 deaths, putting it at the centre of the news agenda. During this talk, using Ebola as a case study, Robin will discuss how epidemiological... Read more

Infectious disease outbreaks are responsible for devastating consequences. As an example, the 2014-16 Ebola epidemic in West Africa led to more than 11,000 deaths, putting it at the centre of the news agenda. During this talk, using Ebola as a case study, Robin will discuss how epidemiological models can be used at different stages of an infectious disease outbreak. At the beginning of an outbreak, key questions include: how can surveillance be performed effectively, and will the outbreak develop into a major epidemic? When a major epidemic is ongoing, decision makers often attempt to forecast the final epidemic size and plan control interventions to reduce the impact of the epidemic. And at the apparent end of an epidemic, an important question is whether the epidemic is really over once there are no new symptomatic cases. Mathematical modelling can be used to address these questions, and is a useful tool for decision makers throughout an outbreak. Dr Robin Thompson is a Junior Research Fellow at Christ Church, University of Oxford, UK. His research involves using mathematical models to represent the epidemiological or evolutionary dynamics of infectious disease outbreaks in human, animal or plant populations. This includes using statistical methods to estimate parameters associated with pathogen transmission and developing stochastic or deterministic models for generating outbreak forecasts. These forward projections can be used to predict the effects of proposed control interventions. He is also guest editor of two theme issues of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B about modelling outbreaks in humans, animals and plants.

Audience: All welcome

Wed 19 Jun 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

Manor Road Building, Manor Road OX1 3UQ

3 Minute Thesis Competition Final

An 80,000 word thesis would take 9 hours to present; how about in just 3 minutes with the aid of a single slide? We are inviting DPhil students to do just that. The 3 Minute Thesis competition challenges doctoral candidates to present a compelling spoken presentation on their research topic and... Read more

An 80,000 word thesis would take 9 hours to present; how about in just 3 minutes with the aid of a single slide? We are inviting DPhil students to do just that. The 3 Minute Thesis competition challenges doctoral candidates to present a compelling spoken presentation on their research topic and its significance in just three minutes to a non-specialist audience. Come along to watch the finalist's of Oxford's 3MT competition battle it out to be crowned the Oxford Winner. Oxford will run a two-stage competition, first the heat to select four finalists. Next the final to find the overall winner. The winner of the Oxford final will be entered into the national semi-finals, and if they are successful they will go on to the national final in Birmingham, with their expenses paid to attend. Up to 4 finalists will all be awarded a prize: 1st prize: £200 Runner-up prizes: £100 There are also prizes for winners in the national final: last year’s winner was awarded a £3,000 grant to spend on public engagement activity, sponsored by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) to promote their research and to enhance their professional development. More information about the competition: https://www.mpls.ox.ac.uk/public-engagement/latest/three-minute-thesis-competition-launched-deadline-25-may-training-sessions-available-in-march

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 20 Jun 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

“Chemical biology approaches to studying epigenetic regulation”

Dr Akane Kawamura

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Thu 20 Jun 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 1, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar - Genetic discovery in a million people, where do we go from here?

Dr Cristen J. Willer

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Thu 20 Jun 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Neurology / Acute General Medicine Firm C

Dr Calum McPherson, Dr Sanja Thompson, Dr Sarah Smith, Dr Charles Woodrow, Dr Jacqueline Palace, Dr Maria Isabel Leite, Dr Patrick Waters, Dr Silvia Messina, Dr Romina Mariano

Neurology: "Broadening the clinical spectrum of antibody mediated diseases of CNS - MOG antibody phenotypes", Dr Jacqueline Palace, Dr Maria Isabel Leite, Dr Patrick Waters, Dr Silvia Messina and Dr Romina Mariano -- Acute General Medicine Firm C: "Abdominal pain (without hepatitis) followed by... Read more

Neurology: "Broadening the clinical spectrum of antibody mediated diseases of CNS - MOG antibody phenotypes", Dr Jacqueline Palace, Dr Maria Isabel Leite, Dr Patrick Waters, Dr Silvia Messina and Dr Romina Mariano -- Acute General Medicine Firm C: "Abdominal pain (without hepatitis) followed by hepatitis (without abdominal pain)", Dr Calum McPherson, Dr Sanja Thompson, Dr Sarah Smith and Dr Charles Woodrow -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 20 Jun 2019 from 17:30 to 19:30

The George Institute for Global Health UK Seminars

75 George Street (Hayes House), Seminar Room, 1st Floor, Hayes House. Lift and stair access., 75 George Street OX1 2BQ

Creating healthy, sustainable, city food environments

Professor Corinna Hawkes, Dr Jacqui Webster, Dr Brian Cook, Dr Frances Hansford, Jamie Izzard

Levels of obesity in most cities are growing fast, as is the associated healthcare burden. Urban food provisioning – the way people in cities access food – is a significant part of the problem, but urban authorities around the world are starting to take a new approach; one that combines systems... Read more

Levels of obesity in most cities are growing fast, as is the associated healthcare burden. Urban food provisioning – the way people in cities access food – is a significant part of the problem, but urban authorities around the world are starting to take a new approach; one that combines systems thinking and coherent policies with a people-centred approach that engages with inhabitants’ lived experience. This event will consider the potential of this new way of working, and how researchers can support city leaders, businesses and advocates to deliver a healthier urbanfood environment. FORMAT: Keynote presentation followed by a moderated discussion

Booking Required

Audience: All welcome

Fri 21 Jun 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Towards 0% 90-day colorectal mortality: Accepting a low floor in the anastomotic leak rate plus safe rescue using an early warning integrated model

Mr Ravish Jootun, Dr William Perry

Mr Ravish Jootun will present "Towards 0% 90-day Colorectal mortality: Accepting a low floor in the anastomotic leak rate plus safe rescue using an early warning integrated model" Dr William Perry will present “University of Auckland’s Global Surgery Group: the Republic of Vanuatu - a growing collaboration”

Mr Ravish Jootun will present "Towards 0% 90-day Colorectal mortality: Accepting a low floor in the anastomotic leak rate plus safe rescue using an early warning integrated model" Dr William Perry will present “University of Auckland’s Global Surgery Group: the Republic of Vanuatu - a growing collaboration”

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 21 Jun 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Systematic co-stimulation of human CD8+ T cells through CD27, 4-1BB, GITR and OX40 differentially regulates cytokine production

John Nguyen, Dushek Group, University of Oxford

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 21 Jun 2019 from 13:00 to 14:30

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Sherrington Talks

Presented by DPAG Graduate Students in their 3rd and final year of DPhil research study.

Presented by DPAG Graduate Students in their 3rd and final year of DPhil research study.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Fri 21 Jun 2019 from 15:00 to 16:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 seminar room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

T cell control of HIV - Prospects for Cure

Professor Bruce Walker

Some persons with HIV infection have been infected for decades, are entirely well and have undetectable plasma HIV levels despite never having taken medication. Application of network theory to HIV structures reveals a mechanistic basis for this successful control of HIV by T cells, and a means to design rational T cell-based vaccines for highly variable pathogens.

Some persons with HIV infection have been infected for decades, are entirely well and have undetectable plasma HIV levels despite never having taken medication. Application of network theory to HIV structures reveals a mechanistic basis for this successful control of HIV by T cells, and a means to design rational T cell-based vaccines for highly variable pathogens.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof. Philip Goulder

Please arrive 5 minutes before talk starts to gain access to the building

Mon 24 Jun 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, room 71abc, Headington OX3 7DQ

Taking apart the nuclear envelope for open mitosis

Prof. Dr. Ulrike Kutay

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Amanda O'Neill

Mon 24 Jun 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ecology of emerging viruses: from host reservoir to disease

Dr Vincent Munster

Audience: Public

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Mon 24 Jun 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Cytokine interference in immunity to infection with a focus on tuberculosis

Prof Anne O'Garra

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Wed 26 Jun 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 Seminar room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Robust MAIT cell activation in response to interactions with primary human liver cell subsets

Magdalena Filipowicz Sinnreich, Martin Lett

Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells represent the most abundant T cell type in human liver. Activated MAIT cells are able to secrete IL-17, a cytokine known to exert pro-fibrotic functions. In order to understand which cells in the liver are involved in MAIT cell activation, we are applying... Read more

Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells represent the most abundant T cell type in human liver. Activated MAIT cells are able to secrete IL-17, a cytokine known to exert pro-fibrotic functions. In order to understand which cells in the liver are involved in MAIT cell activation, we are applying naturally occurring antigens (Ag) and defining Ag-presentation capacities of primary human liver cell subsets, both parenchymal and non-parenchymal, to human MAIT cells. We also study MAIT cell localization in human liver tissue, as assessed by immunofluorescence staining. Further, we are interested to explore occupancy of the Ag-presenting molecule MR1 with non-stimulatory ligands as a therapeutic strategy to prevent pro-fibrogenic properties of MAIT cells.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof. Paul Klenerman

Please arrive 5 minutes before the start of the talk to gain access to the building

Wed 26 Jun 2019 from 12:30 to 13:30

WHG Lunchtime Lab Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B , Headington OX3 7BN

Farrall & Owens Lunchtime Lab Talks

Christopher Grace, Adam Waring, Professor Ray Owens

Farrall Group Speaker: Chris Grace Title: ‘Mendelian randomization studies with coronary artery disease’ Speaker: Adam Waring Title: ‘Variant position as a predictor of variant pathogenicity in cardiomyopathy’ Owens Group - As they are a newly re-forming, Professor Owens will be giving... Read more

Farrall Group Speaker: Chris Grace Title: ‘Mendelian randomization studies with coronary artery disease’ Speaker: Adam Waring Title: ‘Variant position as a predictor of variant pathogenicity in cardiomyopathy’ Owens Group - As they are a newly re-forming, Professor Owens will be giving the talk for the group. Speaker: Professor Ray Owens Title: ‘Cows and camelids: production of recombinant antibodies for structural biology’

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Wed 26 Jun 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Regulation of adaptive immunity in viral infections

Professor Annette Oxenius

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 27 Jun 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

* CANCELLED * CANCELLED - Dissecting tumour heterogeneity by single cell RNA sequencing

Dr Itay Tirosh

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 27 Jun 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Metabolism & Endocrinology Theme Guest Speakers (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Identifying molecular and metabolic control nodes in fasting-mediated immuno-modulation

Professor Michael Sack

Fasting and caloric restriction confer beneficial effects against caloric excess linked disease risks, including conferring anti-inflammatory effects. However, the mechanisms underpinning fasting and fasting mimetic diet mediated reduction in inflammatory biomarkers and inflammatory diseases are... Read more

Fasting and caloric restriction confer beneficial effects against caloric excess linked disease risks, including conferring anti-inflammatory effects. However, the mechanisms underpinning fasting and fasting mimetic diet mediated reduction in inflammatory biomarkers and inflammatory diseases are poorly characterized. To delineate how fasting mediates immune regulation, we performed, a clinical study exploring the effect of a 24-hour fast compared to 3 hours of refeeding. Subsequent flow cytometry, RNA-seq, bioinformatics, metabolomics and biochemical/genetic validation studies were performed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and from serum extracted from the human subjects in response to fasting and refeeding. The combination of bioinformatic pipeline interrogation and genetic validation studies identified three novel nutrient-dependent transcription factors that modulate T helper cell immune responsiveness. Our data point to multiple additional regulatory pathways that may be operational in this biology and suggest that the nutrient-load serum metabolome governs circulating immune cell programing.

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 27 Jun 2019 from 12:00 to 13:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Theology Lecture Theatre, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

Developing and testing digital health interventions

Dr Nikki Newhouse, Sarah Payne-Riches, Dr Laura Armitage

SUMMiT-D: SuMMiT-D is a five-year NIHR programme grant which is focused on exploring new ways to link electronic health data to digital health interventions for people with type 2 diabetes. Interlinked formative work with patients and staff has been used iteratively, to develop and test a... Read more

SUMMiT-D: SuMMiT-D is a five-year NIHR programme grant which is focused on exploring new ways to link electronic health data to digital health interventions for people with type 2 diabetes. Interlinked formative work with patients and staff has been used iteratively, to develop and test a mobile-device based system 'in the wild', delivering automated, tailored brief messages to offer support for medicine use and self-management alongside usual care. This presentation will outline the system and key findings from feasibility work. Salt Swap: The Salt Swap study involves the development and feasibility evaluation of an intervention to enable people with high blood pressure reduce their salt intake. The Salt Swap intervention incorporates an app that helps people choose lower-salt alternatives when they are grocery shopping and provides feedback on the salt reduction they achieve through making these choices. A feasibility RCT investigating the intervention and trial design, will be completed in mid-June. SHINE: The SHINE project is about a digital, hospital to home service which uses routinely recorded in-hospital blood pressure measurements to stratify patients for follow up blood pressure assessment in the community, once they have been discharged from hospital. Its aim is to reduce the rates of undiagnosed hypertension in the community.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Chrysanthi Papoutsi

Fri 28 Jun 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Combined Medical-Surgical Grand Round

The Diabetic Foot MDT

Combined Medical-Surgical Grand Round OCDEM: "Diabetic Foot Disease: Stepping Forward Together", The Diabetic Foot MDT Chair: Prof Freddie Hamdy

Combined Medical-Surgical Grand Round OCDEM: "Diabetic Foot Disease: Stepping Forward Together", The Diabetic Foot MDT Chair: Prof Freddie Hamdy

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 28 Jun 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Leveraging GWAS for immune drug target discovery

Prof Julian Knight

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 28 Jun 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 1, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF