Other Seminars

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Mon 1 Jul 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

Inflammation Shapes Lung Regeneration

Dr Joo-Hyeon Lee

In the lung, alveolar type II cells behave as stem cells by regenerating alveolar type I cells after injury. However, underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms that awake the quiescent stem cells and orchestrate the regeneration process remain unclear. Here, we use single-cell RNA sequencing, in... Read more

In the lung, alveolar type II cells behave as stem cells by regenerating alveolar type I cells after injury. However, underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms that awake the quiescent stem cells and orchestrate the regeneration process remain unclear. Here, we use single-cell RNA sequencing, in vivo lineage tracing, and ex vivo lung organoid co-cultures to define the functional impact of inflammatory niche on stem cell behaviours during regeneration process after injury.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Jo Silva

Mon 1 Jul 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Mon 1 Jul 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - The ASPREE Study: The use of aspirin in older people without cardiovascular disease

Professor Mark Nelson

Mark Nelson is Professor and Chair, Discipline of General Practice, School of Medicine and Senior Member Menzies Institute for Medical Research where he is also medical director of the Blood Pressure Clinic, both at the University of Tasmania, Hobart Australia. He is also an Adjunct Professor,... Read more

Mark Nelson is Professor and Chair, Discipline of General Practice, School of Medicine and Senior Member Menzies Institute for Medical Research where he is also medical director of the Blood Pressure Clinic, both at the University of Tasmania, Hobart Australia. He is also an Adjunct Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne Australia. His research interests are around large-scale clinical trials in in primary care. He has 265 peer reviewed scientific publications, has been awarded more than AU$80 million in competitive grants and is a principal investigator on the NIH sponsored ASPREE / ASPREE-XT study (N = 19,000) investigating if aspirin extends healthy active life, and the NHMRC sponsored STAREE (recruitment to date >5000) similarly investigating if statins extend healthy active life. He also has been an author on multiple guidelines for cardiovascular disease prevention and treatment and remains in clinical general practice in Hobart Australia. In this seminar he will discuss the recently published ASPREE Study.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 2 Jul 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

The 'Aspirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly' (ASPREE) Trial

Professor Mark Nelson

ASPREE was a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial of 100 mg enteric coated aspirin conducted 2010-2017 in community-dwelling men and women in Australia and the United States. It enrolled 19,114 community-dwelling participants, 16,703 in Australia and 2,411 in the United States.... Read more

ASPREE was a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial of 100 mg enteric coated aspirin conducted 2010-2017 in community-dwelling men and women in Australia and the United States. It enrolled 19,114 community-dwelling participants, 16,703 in Australia and 2,411 in the United States. Published in the NEJM, the trial found that using low-dose aspirin as a primary prevention strategy in older adults did not show a benefit for the composite primary outcome of disability free survival and suggested harm in a significantly higher risk of major hemorrhage and a higher all-cause mortality primarily due to cancer-related death. Mark Nelson is Professor and Chair, Discipline of General Practice, School of Medicine and Senior Member Menzies Institute for Medical Research where he is also medical director of the Blood Pressure Clinic, both at the University of Tasmania, Hobart Australia. He is also an Adjunct Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne Australia. His research interests are around large-scale clinical trials in in primary care. He has 265 peer reviewed scientific publications, has been awarded more than AU$80 million in competitive grants and is a principal investigator on the NIH sponsored ASPREE / ASPREE-XT study (N = 19,000) investigating if aspirin extends healthy active life, and the NHMRC sponsored STAREE (recruitment to date >5000) similarly investigating if statins extend healthy active life. He also has been an author on multiple guidelines for cardiovascular disease prevention and treatment and remains in clinical general practice in Hobart Australia.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Lucy Curtin

Updated time - starts at midday.

Tue 2 Jul 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Genetic engineering of human hematopoiesis for treating inherited diseases and cancer

Dr Luigi Naldini

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

SEMINAR CANCELLED DUE TO ILLNESS OF SPEAKER

Wed 3 Jul 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Deciphering the genetics of common immune diseases

Dr Gosia Trynka

Bio: Gosia is a group leader at the Wellcome Sanger Institute in Cambridge where her group combines immunologic assays and genomic approaches to identify and understand the role of genetic variants in modulating the immune system and in predisposing individuals to autoimmunity. Particularly, her... Read more

Bio: Gosia is a group leader at the Wellcome Sanger Institute in Cambridge where her group combines immunologic assays and genomic approaches to identify and understand the role of genetic variants in modulating the immune system and in predisposing individuals to autoimmunity. Particularly, her group studies the role of disease associated variants in regulating the adaptive immunity. During her PhD at Groningen University in the Netherlands, Gosia was a co-lead analyst of GWAS for coeliac disease which identified 57 risk variants. In her postdoc at the Broad Institute she developed statistical methods that integrated disease associated variants with epigenetic marks to identify disease pathogenic cell types. Abstract: Using broad genomic toolkit, from profiling chromatin landscape, through to measuring gene expression in bulk and at the single cell level, we are dissecting the role of immune disease variants in different contexts of CD4 T cell functions. In my talk I will present results from two of our recent studies. We stimulated T cells and macrophages in the presence of thirteen different cytokine cocktails linked to immune diseases and profiled active enhancers and promoters. We developed a new statistical method (CHEERS) to identify SNP enrichment across cell states. Our results point towards the role of immune disease variants in early rather than late activation of memory CD4+ T cells, and with modest differences across polarising cytokines. In the second project we mapped genetic regulation (QTL) of gene expression and chromatin activity in regulatory T cells (Tregs), cell type critical for immune homeostasis. We identified 123 loci where Treg QTLs colocalized with immune disease variants and showed that these effects resulted in impaired suppressive function of Tregs. Our results suggest that a proportion of immune disease variants can lead to escalated immune response by 1) promoting early activation of memory T cells and 2) impairing the suppressive capacity of Tregs, therefore leading to deregulation of CD4 T cell activation circuitry.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Wed 3 Jul 2019 from 17:00 to 19:00

The George Institute for Global Health UK Seminars

75 George Street (Hayes House), Seminar Room, 1st Floor, Hayes House. Lift and stair access., 75 George Street OX1 2BQ

Do high levels of risk factors in childhood predict likelihood of major cardiovascular events in middle age?

Prof. Terry Dwyer

The International Childhood Cardiovascular Cohort consortium (i3C) was established in 2002 with the aim of investigating whether risk factors known to predict cardiovascular disease (CVD) in adults had an impact if experienced in childhood. All global cohorts with measurement of CVD risk factors in... Read more

The International Childhood Cardiovascular Cohort consortium (i3C) was established in 2002 with the aim of investigating whether risk factors known to predict cardiovascular disease (CVD) in adults had an impact if experienced in childhood. All global cohorts with measurement of CVD risk factors in children from the 1970’s and 80’s were identified and included. The combined number of participants in seven global cohorts was just over 40,000, among whom 31,000 also had measurements in early adulthood. A number of high impact publications based on follow up of subjects into early adulthood for CVD/metabolic outcomes have been produced (http://www.i3cconsortium.org/background.html) By 2014 many cohort participants had passed the age of fifty where adult disease events start to accumulate. The i3C consortium was awarded a five year grant of US$13,000,000 from NHLBI to follow participants for CVD events. This follow-up is nearing completion, with an estimated 800 CVD incident events and 200 CVD deaths having been ascertained. This talk will cover the rationale for anticipating that childhood risk factors, including serum cholesterol, blood pressure, and obesity, might contribute importantly to the occurrence of these potentially life-threatening events in middle aged adults. The data from the follow up study on the associations we have identified between these childhood risk factors and CVD events in middle age will be presented, and the implications for CVD prevention discussed. A drinks and networking reception will be held directly after the talk from 6.15pm.

Booking Required

Audience: All welcome

Thu 4 Jul 2019 from 09:00 to 16:30

Blavatnik School of Government, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter OX2 6GG

The Good, the Bad and the Project: interdisciplinary ethics in development research and practice

Various Speakers

In recent years the UK has made unprecedented investments in cutting-edge research to address global development challenges through its Official Development Assistance (ODA) commitment. This has brought new development actors and partnerships, as well as novel approaches to research. In light of... Read more

In recent years the UK has made unprecedented investments in cutting-edge research to address global development challenges through its Official Development Assistance (ODA) commitment. This has brought new development actors and partnerships, as well as novel approaches to research. In light of this changing landscape, it seems fitting to ask: What ethical challenges emerge when crossing geographic boundaries to address global challenges gives way to new forms of interdisciplinary, inter-sectoral and international research? In this one-day workshop, interactive sessions combining concrete examples of 'ethics on the ground' with the 'thinking behind the practice' will provide a platform to explore questions of ethics and justice around key aspects of ODA-funded research: Impact and problem-led research: how do we negotiate research agendas that truly address local needs and leads to societal and/or economic benefits? Collaboration and capacity: How does commitment to strong, fair and long-term partnerships with the Global South translate in practice, and how does enhancing the research and innovation capacity of our partners meet the demands of distributive justice? Emergency and disaster response: What ethical challenges lie at the intersection of research and humanitarian intervention? The event seeks to bring people together to exchange views and experiences, and in this way catalyse the formation of small communities of practice around common themes. Ethics and justice issues are intrinsic to development research, but at present there are no guidelines specific to the particular ethical challenges arising from this type of research. We hope to harness the expertise of the development community in Oxford and beyond and feed these into the drafting of such guidelines. Programme The programme will include input from research funders and three sessions structured around the above topics. There will be a range of speakers from academia and international NGOs with extensive experience in development research. Voices from the Global South will be especially sought. In addition, break-out sessions will give participants the opportunity to coalesce around particular interests. Details of the programme will follow. Audience The event is aimed at those in receipt of or aspiring to obtain ODA-related research funds, from the postdoctoral level upwards. Due to funding restrictions, priority for participation will be tiered as follows: Oxford academics, researchers, and senior research managers Current partners in ODA projects that include an Oxford researcher and who are based at other UK and/or Global South institutions. Researchers from other institutions not currently associated with Oxford In all cases, researchers must be at a postdoctoral level or above.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Tristan Eagling

Thu 4 Jul 2019 from 16:30 to 18:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, George Pickering Education centre, Level 3 Academic centre, Room 2B, Headington OX3 9DU, Headington OX3 9DU

When the computer takes over: automated digital endoscopic scoring in IBD

Dr Peter Bossuyt

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Holm Uhlig

Fri 5 Jul 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Identification of CD8+ Peripheral T-cell Clonal Subsets that Predict Clinical Benefit from Immunotherapy for Melanoma

Dr Benjamin Fairfax

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 5 Jul 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

"Mechanistic and structural insights into protein complexes that regulate DNA repair and mRNA stability"

Dr Lori Passmore

Almost every eukaryotic mRNA has a poly(A) tail which is added by a 1 MDa multi-protein complex called Cleavage and Polyadenylation Factor (CPF/CPSF). There are four different enzymes in CPF (nuclease, polymerase and two protein phosphatases) but it is not understood how these are co-ordinated to... Read more

Almost every eukaryotic mRNA has a poly(A) tail which is added by a 1 MDa multi-protein complex called Cleavage and Polyadenylation Factor (CPF/CPSF). There are four different enzymes in CPF (nuclease, polymerase and two protein phosphatases) but it is not understood how these are co-ordinated to define mRNA 3′-ends and regulate transcription. In addition, it is not clear what makes the poly(A) RNA sequence unique. We use a combination of structural biology (cryo-EM, X-ray crystallography, NMR) and biochemical reconstitution to address these questions and to gain mechanistic insight.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Fri 5 Jul 2019 from 12:00 to 13:30

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Rom, Headington OX3 7FZ

GSK Tres Cantos Open Lab Foundation

Dr Félix Calderón, Dr Alfonso Mendoza

_Come along to this seminar to hear from Dr Félix Calderón, Tres Cantos Open Lab Head, and Dr Alfonso Mendoza, resident Tuberculosis expert at Tres Cantos, who will introduce the Open Lab Foundation._ h1. The Tres Cantos Open Lab: Enabling Innovation for Under-Researched Infectious Diseases h2.... Read more

_Come along to this seminar to hear from Dr Félix Calderón, Tres Cantos Open Lab Head, and Dr Alfonso Mendoza, resident Tuberculosis expert at Tres Cantos, who will introduce the Open Lab Foundation._ h1. The Tres Cantos Open Lab: Enabling Innovation for Under-Researched Infectious Diseases h2. Félix Calderón, Ph. D., Tres Cantos Open Lab Head, GSK Global Health R&D In the belief that partnership is essential in the fight against endemic infectious diseases, GSK launched in 2010 the Tres Cantos Open Lab Foundation (TCOLF). A non-for-profit organization (registered as a UK based charity) overseen by an independent Governing Board (GB) of world-leading scientists in the field. The TCOLF was conceived to address the translational and funding gap existing in global health between basic research and drug discovery by creating a project-based collaborative environment integrating third parties (academia, biotech, pharma, etc.) and GSK teams. Its uniqueness resides on enable the co-location of open lab fellows within an industry environment. This co-location has allowed an unprecedented degree of scientific exchange and has triggered numerous follow on grants and activities. To date, some key successes include: development of new platforms, discovery of novel new clinical candidates, identification of new sets of high value hits made available to the wider community and repurposing opportunities of antibiotics to treat drug resistant bacterial infections. Projects in scope include innovative approaches in the field of endemic infectious diseases that could offer a new solution to an existing gap that can benefit from collaboration with the pharma industry in the fields of gut health (including bacterial enteric infections and environmental enteric dysfunction, EED), malaria, tuberculosis, and kineto mediated infections. In April 2019, the Governing Board agreed to expand the focus of TCOLF to include translational and clinical activities (up to Ph2a), to support the development of advance leads and clinical assets towards their next phase. During this seminar, the collaborative model supported by the foundation as well as current scientific priorities and opportunities will be presented. In addition, a review of the science behind key programs in the TCOLF pipeline will be also covered. To find out more about the strategy, priorities and funding mechanisms of TCOLF, please click "here":https://drive.google.com/file/d/1TRMG2ed2D9ebvHOPAS1RJa026nPpvW3O/view?usp=sharing _*Félix and Alfonso will be available after the seminar from 13:30 – 15:00 to talk more to researchers whose work might have potential to benefit from the Open Lab Foundation. A networking lunch will be provided after the seminar between 13:00 - 13:30.*_ _*If you would like to arrange a meeting with Félix and Alfonso after the seminar, please contact Amira Burshan, Industry Engagement Facilitator - amira.burshan@medsci.ox.ac.uk*_

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Amira Burshan

If you would like to arrange a meeting with Félix after the seminar, please contact Amira Burshan, Industry Engagement Facilitator - amira.burshan@medsci.ox.ac.uk

Mon 8 Jul 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting Rooms 71a,b,c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Impaired ribosome biogenesis and diseases

Prof Sinisa Volarevic

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Amanda O'Neill

Mon 8 Jul 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms, Headington OX3 7BN

Hidden relatedness, natural selection and disease heritability in the UK Biobank

Pier Francesco Palamara

Accurate quantification of genomic relatedness across samples is a fundamental step for a wide range of analyses, but is challenging in large data sets such as the UK Biobank due to issues such as low density of markers and large sample size. I will present two new methods (ASMC and FastSMC) that... Read more

Accurate quantification of genomic relatedness across samples is a fundamental step for a wide range of analyses, but is challenging in large data sets such as the UK Biobank due to issues such as low density of markers and large sample size. I will present two new methods (ASMC and FastSMC) that enable to very efficiently estimating the time to most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) along the genome of a pair of genotyped individuals. We used ASMC and FastSMC to analyze relatedness using the genomes of 487,409 British individuals from the UK Biobank, with the goal of studying the landscape of genetic relatedness in the UK during the past two millennia. We looked for loci with unusually high density of low TMRCA, aiming to detect recent positive selection. We detected several genome-wide significant signals, including loci with previous evidence of positive selection (including LCT, HLA and TLR) and several novel loci (including the STAT4 autoimmune disease locus). We also applied ASMC to sequencing data from 498 Dutch individuals to detect background selection at deeper time scales. We observed highly significant correlations between average TMRCA inferred by ASMC and other measures of background selection (e.g. McVicker B-statistic, r = -0.28; nucleotide diversity, r = 0.50). We investigated whether this signal translated into an enrichment in disease and complex trait heritability by analyzing summary association statistics from 20 independent diseases and complex traits (86k samples on average) using stratified LD-score regression. Our background selection annotation based on average TMRCA was strongly enriched for heritability (p = 7×10-153) in a joint analysis conditioned on a broad set of functional annotations (including other background selection annotations), meta-analyzed across traits; SNPs in the top 20% of our annotation were 3.8x enriched for heritability compared to the bottom 20%. These results underscore the widespread effects of natural selection on genetic relatedness and on the heritability of disease and complex traits in the human genome.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Tue 9 Jul 2019 from 10:30 to 11:30

Population Health Seminars

NDM Building, Seminar room, basement, Headington OX3 7FZ

NPEU Research Seminar - Women and cardiovascular disease: an odd couple?

Professor Mark Woodward

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 9 Jul 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

TDI Seminar Series

NDM Building, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Metabolomics, the small & mighty- omic in clinical research

Dr. Cristina Legido-Quigley

I will present metabolomics & lipidomics methods touching on data accuracy and implications for biomarker discovery. Will show clinical examples in different tissues, ie. patient stratification with metabolomics (plasma in diabetes), biomarkers (liver tissue before transplantation) and the healthy... Read more

I will present metabolomics & lipidomics methods touching on data accuracy and implications for biomarker discovery. Will show clinical examples in different tissues, ie. patient stratification with metabolomics (plasma in diabetes), biomarkers (liver tissue before transplantation) and the healthy metabolic baseline (fecal samples). I will follow up with research designed to find early biomarkers (brain, CSF, plasma) and mechanisms in Alzheimer’s Disease, focusing on experimental design, data reduction examples, feature selection and validation together with integration with -omics (proteomics & genomics).

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Benedikt Kessler

Tue 9 Jul 2019 from 12:30 to 13:30

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Applying precision medicine to a third world country: an experience from Thailand

Professor Vip Viprakasit

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Please note earlier start time of 12.30 pm

Wed 10 Jul 2019 from 11:00 to 12:30

Bodleian iSkills for the Medical Sciences Division and OUH staff - workshops in information discovery and reference management for the Medical Sciences

Health Care Libraries - Knowledge Centre, Old Road Campus Research Building, Knowledge Centre Group Study Room, Headington OX3 7DQ

Bodleian iSkills for the Medical Sciences Division and OUH staff: Introduction to Mendeley

Carolyn Smith

An introduction to Mendeley, a free programme which can help you to store, organise and retrieve your references and PDFs,as well as cite references in documents and create bibliographies quickly and easily. This workshop is for postgraduate students, researchers, and university and OUH staff based... Read more

An introduction to Mendeley, a free programme which can help you to store, organise and retrieve your references and PDFs,as well as cite references in documents and create bibliographies quickly and easily. This workshop is for postgraduate students, researchers, and university and OUH staff based on the Old Road Campus or in Medical Sciences Division departments elsewhere in Headington. It will cover creating a Mendeley account and installing Mendeley Desktop; importing references from PubMed and databases such as Ovid Embase; annotating and managing PDFs; synchronising your desktop and web libraries; creating a bibliography and citing references in Word Documents.

Booking Required

Audience: Staff and students in the Medical Sciences Division; and OUH staff

Wed 10 Jul 2019 from 11:00 to 12:30

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox and WEH Seminar - New Zealand medical students and their involvement with patients in the context of sensitive examinations: what does consent have to do with it?

Phillipa Malpas

Between 1966–1987, a clinical trial led by O&G specialist Dr Herbert Green was undertaken at National Women’s Hospital in Auckland. Green theorised that carcinoma in situ identified in cervical smears was unrelated to cervical cancer. Many women had no knowledge they were part of the study,... Read more

Between 1966–1987, a clinical trial led by O&G specialist Dr Herbert Green was undertaken at National Women’s Hospital in Auckland. Green theorised that carcinoma in situ identified in cervical smears was unrelated to cervical cancer. Many women had no knowledge they were part of the study, many did not consent to their involvement and as a result of the study, some woman developed cervical cancer and a number of women died. A ministerial inquiry investigated the study and consequently found other unethical practices at National Women’s. As a result of the Cartwright Inquiry, a number of recommendations were made (and implemented) that changed medical practice and medical education in NZ forever. Over the past decade, the literature has published a number of studies highlighting the use of patients (both male and female) as learning tools for medical students – often without the patient’s knowledge or consent. University of Auckland senior medical students consistently report being asked to observe or perform sensitive examinations on both conscious and unconscious patients, without their consent, in the clinical environment. In my talk I’ll provide further context to the issue of consent in this particular context. I’ll reflect on changes made to medical education as a result of the Cartwright Inquiry, what’s currently happening, and where I believe we need to focus our attention going forward.

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 10 Jul 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

"Portals and DNA packaging in tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses"

Prof Miquel Coll

Tailed bacteriophages (order Caudovirales) are characterised by an icosahedral capsid, which encloses a double-stranded DNA genome. These phages and herpesviruses share a common assembly pathway for prohead formation and genome packaging. In both viruses, DNA incorporation and ejection is mediated... Read more

Tailed bacteriophages (order Caudovirales) are characterised by an icosahedral capsid, which encloses a double-stranded DNA genome. These phages and herpesviruses share a common assembly pathway for prohead formation and genome packaging. In both viruses, DNA incorporation and ejection is mediated by a machinery built by similar components, including the portal protein and a motor protein complex called terminase, which provides the energy for DNA translocation and has nuclease activity. The portal is a large oligomeric ring-shaped protein located at a unique pentameric vertex of the capsid. It acts as an initiator for capsid assembly and it is also a critical part of the DNA packaging and ejection machinery. In phages, the portal is also involved in tail assembly. Using X-ray crystallography and high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy, we have solved the structure of a bacteriophage portal, in different conformations, and a tail complex. Our findings point to a molecular mechanism for DNA retention and ejection. A herpesvirus terminase subunit and a portal have also been solved and will be compared with their phage equivalent parts.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Wed 10 Jul 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

"Portals and DNA packaging in tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses"

Prof Miquel Coll

Tailed bacteriophages (order Caudovirales) are characterised by an icosahedral capsid, which encloses a double-stranded DNA genome. These phages and herpesviruses share a common assembly pathway for prohead formation and genome packaging. In both viruses, DNA incorporation and ejection is mediated... Read more

Tailed bacteriophages (order Caudovirales) are characterised by an icosahedral capsid, which encloses a double-stranded DNA genome. These phages and herpesviruses share a common assembly pathway for prohead formation and genome packaging. In both viruses, DNA incorporation and ejection is mediated by a machinery built by similar components, including the portal protein and a motor protein complex called terminase, which provides the energy for DNA translocation and has nuclease activity. The portal is a large oligomeric ring-shaped protein located at a unique pentameric vertex of the capsid. It acts as an initiator for capsid assembly and it is also a critical part of the DNA packaging and ejection machinery. In phages, the portal is also involved in tail assembly. Using X-ray crystallography and high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy, we have solved the structure of a bacteriophage portal, in different conformations, and a tail complex. Our findings point to a molecular mechanism for DNA retention and ejection. A herpesvirus terminase subunit and a portal have also been solved and will be compared with their phage equivalent parts.

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 11 Jul 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Small Lecture Theatre (2nd Floor), off Parks Road OX1 3PT

The Quest for Neuroprotection in Parkinson’s disease: reversing synaptic dysfunction

Austen Milnerwood

Austen Milnerwood’s research centers on cell biological, electrophysiological and optical investigation of neural development, connectivity, transmission and plasticity. With a major focus on the early pathophysiology of adult-onset diseases such as movement disorders and dementia, his laboratory... Read more

Austen Milnerwood’s research centers on cell biological, electrophysiological and optical investigation of neural development, connectivity, transmission and plasticity. With a major focus on the early pathophysiology of adult-onset diseases such as movement disorders and dementia, his laboratory aims to develop neuroprotective treatments. A strong theme has emerged from studying several proteins harbouring mutations that are autosomal dominantly linked to Parkinson’s disease, in other words, genes transmitted down the family line that are highly predictive for developing PD. There are several proteins that cause “familial PD,” e.g. LRRK2, VPS35 and synuclein. Milnerwood's laboratory is finding that these proteins are involved in the same cellular functions. By learning more about what these proteins are supposed to do and what goes wrong with the mutations present, Milnerwood hopes to work out the common neuronal dysfunction of many forms of parkinsonism and then develop appropriate treatments.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Please note this talk is at noon in the small lecture theatre

Fri 12 Jul 2019 from 10:30 to 12:00

Bodleian iSkills for the Medical Sciences Division and OUH staff - workshops in information discovery and reference management for the Medical Sciences

Health Care Libraries - Knowledge Centre, Old Road Campus Research Building, Knowledge Centre Group Study Room, Headington OX3 7DQ

Bodleian iSkills for the Medical Sciences Division and OUH staff: Introduction to systematic reviews and evidence syntheses - searching for studies

Nia Roberts, Neal Thurley

In this workshop you will be introduced to the principles underpinning the conduct of literature searches for systematic reviews and evidence syntheses. We will look at how to formulate a search strategy to address research questions; applying methodological search filters to restrict by study... Read more

In this workshop you will be introduced to the principles underpinning the conduct of literature searches for systematic reviews and evidence syntheses. We will look at how to formulate a search strategy to address research questions; applying methodological search filters to restrict by study type; choosing appropriate databases and search engines; searching for grey literature and ongoing studies; documenting and reporting your search; storing and managing references. For postgraduate students, researchers and university staff in the Medical Sciences, and OUH staff.

Booking Required

Audience: All staff and students in the Medical Sciences Division; and OUH staff

Fri 12 Jul 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Ludwig Seminar Room, basement of ORCRB, Headington OX3 7DQ

Radiotherapy as Immunotherapy

Professor Alan Melcher

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Jade Schneiders

Mon 15 Jul 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

Six scissors: regulation of ADAM10 by tetraspanins

Dr Michael Tomlinson

The molecular scissor ADAM10 is critical for embryonic development and impacts on diseases such as cancer, Alzheimer’s and inflammation. ADAM10 functions by cleaving the extracellular regions from substrates including Notch cell-fate regulators, cadherin adhesion molecules and amyloid precursor... Read more

The molecular scissor ADAM10 is critical for embryonic development and impacts on diseases such as cancer, Alzheimer’s and inflammation. ADAM10 functions by cleaving the extracellular regions from substrates including Notch cell-fate regulators, cadherin adhesion molecules and amyloid precursor protein. We recently proposed the ‘six scissor’ hypothesis, whereby ADAM10 is not one scissor, but six different scissors with different substrate specificities. This is dictated by ADAM10 association with one of six regulatory tetraspanin membrane proteins. In future, it may be possible to treat human diseases by targetting individual tetraspanins, avoiding the toxicity of targetting ADAM10 on every cell in the body.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Jennifer Pope

Mon 15 Jul 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Tue 16 Jul 2019 from 09:30 to 10:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

The role of the acute-phase protein serum amyloid A in colitis-associated cancer

Dr Tanja Davis

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Tue 16 Jul 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Shining light on Parkinson’s disease by interrogating the LRRK2 kinase pathway

Esther Sammler

Esther is a programme leader in the MRC PPU and a practising neurologist at Ninewells Hospital in Dundee. Her interest is in Parkinson’s and neurogenetics with a main focus on unravelling the LRRK2 signalling network and LRRK2 kinase activation using human bio-samples and humans as a model system... Read more

Esther is a programme leader in the MRC PPU and a practising neurologist at Ninewells Hospital in Dundee. Her interest is in Parkinson’s and neurogenetics with a main focus on unravelling the LRRK2 signalling network and LRRK2 kinase activation using human bio-samples and humans as a model system in health and disease. A major contribution has been identifying neutrophils and monocytes as a suitable biomatrix for translational research into the LRRK2 signalling pathway with LRRK2 controlled Rab10 phosphorylation as a proxy for LRRK2 kinase activity. Esther’s talk will focus on ongoing research activities encompassing LRRK2 kinase activation as a biochemical tool to complement genetic and clinical phenotyping and the link between Parkinson’s disease and inflammatory bowel disease. Biography: Esther obtained her medical degree from the Ludwig Maximilan’s University in Munich in Germany and her neurology training from the University of Heidelberg, Germany and the Scottish neurology training programme. She has been working as a consultant neurologist in Dundee since 2016. Esther received her PhD supervised by Professor Dario Alessi FRS at the MRC PPU at the University of Dundee as a Wellcome Trust Clinical PhD fellow on “The signalling pathway of the E3 ligase subunit FBXO7 and its role in hereditary Parkinsonism” in 2014. She has been supported by a Starter Grant for Clinical lecturers and a SUSTAIN fellowship from the Academy of Medical Sciences, has obtained funding from local charities, Parkinson’s UK and the Michael J. Fox foundation and was awarded a Scottish Senior Clinical Fellowship to set up her own group in the MRC PPU at the beginning of the year.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Wed 17 Jul 2019 from 12:30 to 13:30

WHG Lunchtime Lab Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B , Headington OX3 7BN

Padilla-Parra & Tzima Lunchtime Lab Talks

Dr Vedanta Mehta, Charles Coomer

Padilla-Parra Group Speaker: Charles Coomer Title: ‘Single-cell glycolytic activity regulates membrane tension and HIV-1 fusion ’ Tzima Group Speaker: Vedanta Mehta Title: ‘The Moonlighting Mechanosensor’

Padilla-Parra Group Speaker: Charles Coomer Title: ‘Single-cell glycolytic activity regulates membrane tension and HIV-1 fusion ’ Tzima Group Speaker: Vedanta Mehta Title: ‘The Moonlighting Mechanosensor’

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Wed 17 Jul 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Antibody germline gene variation in the human population

Professor Gunilla B. Karlsson Hedestam

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 18 Jul 2019 from 14:30 to 15:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, John Radcliffe Main Building, Lecture Theatre 1, Academic Street , Headington OX3 9DU

Development of invasive and non-invasive markers for the early detection of GI neoplasia and risk stratification.

Dr Elizabeth Bird-Lieberman

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Carolina Arancibia

Fri 19 Jul 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Jenner Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

Fri 19 Jul 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

Chris Gignoux: “Leveraging human genetic diversity in our study of complex trait architecture”, Paul Norman: “Ancient and Modern Admixture Enhanced Natural Killer cell activity in Asia and Oceania”

Prof Chris Gignoux, Prof Paul Norman

Dr. Gignoux is a population geneticist by training interested primarily in the confluence of human evolution and epidemiology. Currently he is working on a range of topics from population structure and demographic inference to understanding the genomic architecture of complex traits. He is deeply... Read more

Dr. Gignoux is a population geneticist by training interested primarily in the confluence of human evolution and epidemiology. Currently he is working on a range of topics from population structure and demographic inference to understanding the genomic architecture of complex traits. He is deeply interested in broadening our understanding of human biology through understanding the role of human genetic diversity across the globe, and continue to perform field work with collaborators in South Africa and across Latin America. On the methods side, he is particularly interested in applications of population genetic theory, statistical modeling, and algorithmic development to improve large-scale, trans-ethnic, and biobank studies. Dr. Norman studies immunogenetics, which is the genetic variation that underpins our differential responses to infection and autoimmunity. His focus is on the co-evolution of HLA molecules that are expressed by most healthy cells, and the Natural Kill (NK) cell receptors that interact with HLA to control the immune response. This work has taken him from studying organ and tissue transplants, to examining the diversity in hunter-gatherers from Africa and South America, and mining ancient human genomes to trace their immune legacy in present-day populations. His aim is to establish genetic evidence through population and molecular analysis that then informs functional experiments to determine precisely how this variation can influence immunity.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Fri 19 Jul 2019 from 14:00 to 15:00

Jenner Seminars

NDM Building, Seminar Room, Lower Ground Floor, Headington OX3 7FZ

Spy and Snoop protein superglues applied to vaccine development

Prof Mark Howarth

Audience: Public

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Mon 22 Jul 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Mon 22 Jul 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

Changing neighbours: bone marrow HSC niche remodelling during ageing and age-related myeloproliferative disorders

Dr Simón Méndez-Ferrer

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Jennifer Pope

Wed 24 Jul 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 1, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar: Genetics studies for cardiometabolic traits facilitated by the Million Veterans Program

Benjamin J Voight

The Million’s Veterans Program was established in 2011 as a national research initiative to determine how genetic variation influences the health of the diverse population of US military veterans. The goal of the program is to generate genetic data on over one million veterans, through genotyping... Read more

The Million’s Veterans Program was established in 2011 as a national research initiative to determine how genetic variation influences the health of the diverse population of US military veterans. The goal of the program is to generate genetic data on over one million veterans, through genotyping and sequencing, connected to phenotype data extracted from electronic health records spanning a median of 10 years of follow-up. With over 500,000 individuals with genetic data available currently, this cohort enables a range of causal inference experiments and genetic analysis at scale in diverse ancestries. I will describe our ongoing work, focused on the genetic analysis for type 2 diabetes as well as studies for association with T2D complications. In addition, large-scale genetic analyses of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, enabled by an electronic health record definition of disease, including causal inference and genetic correlation studies for this trait.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Wed 24 Jul 2019 from 11:00 to 11:30

Ethox Centre and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

* CANCELLED * Ethox and WEH Seminar - Making Breathlessness Visible: a medical humanities approach

Professor Jane Macnaughton

Research in medical humanities is taking a radical new turn. Not content to be the ‘handmaiden’ of clinical practice, we are now getting engaged in the complexities of clinical science, aiming to work alongside colleagues who are seeking to answer some of the most difficult questions in... Read more

Research in medical humanities is taking a radical new turn. Not content to be the ‘handmaiden’ of clinical practice, we are now getting engaged in the complexities of clinical science, aiming to work alongside colleagues who are seeking to answer some of the most difficult questions in clinical practice. For example, the symptom of breathlessness presents a dilemma in that symptom experience does not correlate well with measured lung function. In this lecture I will describe how an interdisciplinary medical humanities project combines research and insights from across humanities, social science and clinical science to understand this problem. Avoiding destructive ‘two culture’ clashes we have developed collaborations that we hope will improve the lives of patients.

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 25 Jul 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71 a, b, c ground floor, Headington OX3 7DQ

Degrading activities: Regulation of cellular biology by the ubiquitous pathway

Professor David P. Toczyski

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Jade Schneiders

Fri 26 Jul 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

NDM Seminar Series

Henry Wellcome Building of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Seminar Rooms A & B, Roosevelt Drive OX3 7BN

Translating whole genome sequencing pathogens: will it become the new normal in practice & The role of genetics and evolution in Staphylococcus aureus infection.

Prof Derrick Crook, Associate Professor Daniel Wilson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kathryn Smith

Fri 26 Jul 2019 from 16:15 to 17:00

TDI seminars (monthly)

NDM Building, Seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Identification of an O2-sensing system that is conserved across biological kingdoms

Dr Norma Masson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kate Humphrey

Mon 29 Jul 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

A microbiome perspective on metabolic diseases.

Dr Jethro Johnson

The gut microbiome is a critical mediator in the interaction between an individual and their nutritional environment. As such, it has great potential as a target for the prevention and treatment of diet-related metabolic diseases. This talk reports recent large-scale, multi-omic studies of the... Read more

The gut microbiome is a critical mediator in the interaction between an individual and their nutritional environment. As such, it has great potential as a target for the prevention and treatment of diet-related metabolic diseases. This talk reports recent large-scale, multi-omic studies of the gut microbiome in type 2 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. In doing so, it addresses the role of microbially-mediated inflammation in the onset and development of both diseases. It also highlights the challenges inherent in microbiome studies, where causality may be attributed at the level of a single species, a clade, or a complex community.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Jennifer Pope

Mon 29 Jul 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Infections@BDI Seminar: Geostatistics for Survey Sampling

Michael Chipeta

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 29 Jul 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

“Stem cells for studying dendritic cell development and leukaemia”

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 30 Jul 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Radcliffe Humanities, Colin Matthew Room, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Answering policy questions with discrete choice experiments: applications in the US tobacco market

John joined HERC in May 2019 as a Senior Researcher from the Yale School of Public Health. He will be working with Philip Clarke on obesity, and with Sarah Wordsworth and James Buchanan on genomics. John’s interests include experimental approaches to understanding health behaviours and econometric modelling

John joined HERC in May 2019 as a Senior Researcher from the Yale School of Public Health. He will be working with Philip Clarke on obesity, and with Sarah Wordsworth and James Buchanan on genomics. John’s interests include experimental approaches to understanding health behaviours and econometric modelling

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 30 Jul 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

Toward rationale therapy for scleroderma

Prof John Varga

Audience: Public

Organisers: Jennifer Pope

Tue 30 Jul 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Patient positioning: How to take an oncology drug into the clinic

Dr Sarah Blagden

Sarah has been Associate Professor of Medical Oncology in Department of Oncology since 2015. She leads Oxford’s Early Phase Trials (Cancer) Clinical Unit, is the local Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre (ECMC) lead and runs a laboratory studying mRNA dysregulation. She has been chief or... Read more

Sarah has been Associate Professor of Medical Oncology in Department of Oncology since 2015. She leads Oxford’s Early Phase Trials (Cancer) Clinical Unit, is the local Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre (ECMC) lead and runs a laboratory studying mRNA dysregulation. She has been chief or principal investigator for a number of national and international clinical studies of novel cancer therapeutics. Sarah undertook her medical training in London, in Cambridge and the Royal Marsden Hospital. She was awarded a CRUK Junior Clinician Scientist PhD fellowship in 1999 at Cambridge University and later held a Clinical Fellowship at the Institute of Cancer Research’s Drug Development Unit. From 2006 -2015 she was Senior Lecturer at Imperial College where she founded and ran their Early Phase Cancer Trials unit. Sarah sits on a number of committees where she reviews the process by which new cancer drugs enter clinical trials and recognises that early clinical positioning is crucial to a study’s success. This is the focus of her talk.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Tue 30 Jul 2019 from 13:30 to 17:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

China Kadoorie Biobank Workshop: Enhancing research using big data from diverse populations

Various Speakers

Session 1: Chair ─ Zheng-Ming Chen, Oxford 13:30-13:40 Welcome and introduction Sir Richard Peto and Zheng-Ming Chen, NDPH, University of Oxford 13:40-14:00 China’s Big Data Initiative in Health Xin-Hua Li, China CDC 14:00-14:20 China Kadoorie Biobank: five key... Read more

Session 1: Chair ─ Zheng-Ming Chen, Oxford 13:30-13:40 Welcome and introduction Sir Richard Peto and Zheng-Ming Chen, NDPH, University of Oxford 13:40-14:00 China’s Big Data Initiative in Health Xin-Hua Li, China CDC 14:00-14:20 China Kadoorie Biobank: five key findings Zheng-Ming Chen, NDPH, University of Oxford 14:20-14:40 National health surveillance program in China Li-Min Wang, China CDC 14:40-15:00 UK Biobank: an open access resource Thomas Littlejohns, UK Biobank 15:00-15:15 General discussion 15:15-15:30 Tea break Session 2: Chair ─ Robert Clarke, Oxford 15:30-15:50 Long-term prognosis following first-ever stroke: CKB findings Yi-Ping Chen, NDPH, University of Oxford 15:50-16:10 Improving stroke management and care through big data Yong Jiang, Tiantan Hospital, Beijing, China 16:10-16:30 Global trends in NCD risk factors: expected and unexpected findings Bin Zhou, Imperial College London, UK 16:30-16:50 Using routine data for health policy research in diverse populations Philip Clarke, NDPH, University of Oxford 16:50-17:00 General discussion 17:00-17:10 Closing remarks Sir Richard Peto and Zhengming Chen, NDPH, University of Oxford 17:10-18:00 Drinks reception Please register to attend the event before Friday 26th July by visiting: https://oxford.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/ckb-big-data-workshop-30july

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 31 Jul 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

Development & Cell Biology Theme Guest Speakers (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Modelling congenital malformations in mice - why genetic background matters

Prof. Loydie Jerome-Majewska

In humans, fetal survival depends on proper patterning and morphogenesis of the embryo and its accompanying placenta. Abnormal morphogenesis in the embryo underlies developmental abnormalities such as DiGeorge syndrome and Mandibulofacial dysostosis with microcephaly (MFDM), and results in... Read more

In humans, fetal survival depends on proper patterning and morphogenesis of the embryo and its accompanying placenta. Abnormal morphogenesis in the embryo underlies developmental abnormalities such as DiGeorge syndrome and Mandibulofacial dysostosis with microcephaly (MFDM), and results in increased morbidity and mortality. We use the mouse model to study the genetic and cellular basis of morphogenesis during the embryonic period; furthermore, the availability of next generation sequencing has enabled the rapid identification of genes associated with developmental abnormalities. The goals of my research program are (1) to use forward genetics to identify the genes responsible for malformations in human and mouse during pregnancy; (2) to use reverse genetics in the mouse model to characterize the cellular pathways regulated by genes implicated in developmental syndromes.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof Shankar Srinivas