Other Seminars

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Fri 1 Feb 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

Stent assisted coiling of broad based intracranial aneurysms

Dr Wilhelm Kueker

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 1 Feb 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

Fri 1 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Understanding the pathways underlying residual visual function after damage to primary visual cortex

Associate Professor Holly Bridge

Damage to the primary visual cortex leads to loss of the visual field contralateral to the damaged cortex. However, in spite of this loss, some patients are still able to detect visual information about stimuli presented within their blind field. A growing area of research aims to exploit this... Read more

Damage to the primary visual cortex leads to loss of the visual field contralateral to the damaged cortex. However, in spite of this loss, some patients are still able to detect visual information about stimuli presented within their blind field. A growing area of research aims to exploit this residual visual function to try to improve visual performance through rehabilitation programmes stimulating the blind field. However, to optimise such programmes it is important to understand the pathways through which this information is conveyed. Here I will present a series of magnetic resonance imaging studies in which we attempted to elucidate these pathways in a group of hemianopic patients. Firstly I will explain how our functional MRI studies use the specific pattern of response to visual stimulation in different visual areas to uncover candidate pathways. I will use diffusion-weighted data to provide support for a pathway between the lateral geniculate nucleus and motion area MT that is consistently intact only in patients showing blindsight abilities. Finally, I will present our most recent data in which we find further support for this pathway using functional connectivity analysis.

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 1 Feb 2019 from 17:00 to 19:00

AfOx insaka - a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research

Mon 4 Feb 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Cardiovascular Inflammation – Models and Mechanisms

Prof Professor Keith Channon

Inflammation is a central mechanism in cardiovascular disease pathogenesis, including prominently-studied roles in atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction. Recent clinical trials and GWAS confirm a causal role for inflammation, and for specific inflammatory mechanisms, but the clinical benefit of... Read more

Inflammation is a central mechanism in cardiovascular disease pathogenesis, including prominently-studied roles in atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction. Recent clinical trials and GWAS confirm a causal role for inflammation, and for specific inflammatory mechanisms, but the clinical benefit of targeting inflammation remains limited, in part due to inadequate mechanistic understanding that is required to stratify and stage cardiovascular disease. Local opportunities for mechanistic clinical studies include the Oxford Acute Myocardial Infarction (OxAMI) study and the Oxford Heart, Vessels and Fat (HVF) cohort, that have yielded new biomarkers for clinical phenotyping. In experimental models, new mouse models have revealed links between cellular metabolism and redox signalling in inflammation.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 4 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

Chromosome Replication: From Mechanism to Misregulation in Cancer

Prof John Diffley

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Mon 4 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

TDI Seminar Series

A multi-purpose in-memory database for life science research

Dr. Mathias Wilhelm

ProteomicsDB (https://www.ProteomicsDB.org) is an in-memory database initially developed for the exploration of large collections of quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics data. To date it contains data across hundreds of human tissues, body fluids and cell lines including but not limited... Read more

ProteomicsDB (https://www.ProteomicsDB.org) is an in-memory database initially developed for the exploration of large collections of quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics data. To date it contains data across hundreds of human tissues, body fluids and cell lines including but not limited to transcriptomics data, protein-protein interaction information, functional annotations, viability results, drug selectivity data and synthetic and predicted reference mass spectra. Accompanied with a rich user interface for real-time exploration, the extended data foundation transformed ProteomicsDB into a multi-purpose resource for life science research.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Benedikt Kessler

Tue 5 Feb 2019 from 10:00 to 11:00

TDI Seminar Series

Big Data Institute, LG1 seminar room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Translating Biobanks into Targets

Quin Wills

The molecular phenotyping (transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) of biobanked tissues helps dissect disease traits into underlying biomolecular processes. With high-throughput gene editing of in vitro models, and developments such as spatial and single-cell sequencing, this data-intensive... Read more

The molecular phenotyping (transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) of biobanked tissues helps dissect disease traits into underlying biomolecular processes. With high-throughput gene editing of in vitro models, and developments such as spatial and single-cell sequencing, this data-intensive study of molecular traits is increasingly called 'cellular genomics'. After ten years of modelling molecular traits in the academe and industry, I will reflect on methods I believe are bearing fruit or need attention as genomic big data shapes drug discovery. I will present unexpected developments in collaborative studies of liver 'rejuvenation' between my team at the Novo Nordisk Research Centre, the Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolism, and the Oxford Transplant Centre. As the metabolic traits studied are typically age-related, one side effect of this work is the illumination of broader pre-clinical ageing processes. I will conclude by sharing my long term vision for big data studies in healthy ageing, because as Stella taught us: age should just be a number

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Benedikt Kessler

Tue 5 Feb 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

Redox differences between the Heart and Tumour could provide a Selective Therapeutic Approach for Chemotherapy-Induced Cardiotoxicity

Dr Gopinath Sutendra

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Tue 5 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Seminar: Controversial topics in the epidemiology of chronic lung disease

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 6 Feb 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

How trypanosomatid parasites drive their swimming: New lessons from new light microscopy approaches

Dr Richard Wheeler

Trypanosomes and Leishmania are two groups of important neglected human pathogens. They are single cell eukaryotes and are active swimmers for many of their life cycle stages. This swimming is vital for the life cycle - inability to swim gives a range of defects, from the dramatic cell death of... Read more

Trypanosomes and Leishmania are two groups of important neglected human pathogens. They are single cell eukaryotes and are active swimmers for many of their life cycle stages. This swimming is vital for the life cycle - inability to swim gives a range of defects, from the dramatic cell death of trypanosomes in the host bloodstream to the inability of Leishmania to transmit through the sandfly vector. A single flagellum drives swimming motility and the flagellum beats at around 40 times per second, demanding camera frame rates upward of 200 frames per second to analyse its movement. Analysing the flagellum by fluorescence microscopy is therefore a significant challenge, but would confer great advantages by allowing the analysis of individual proteins and structures within the cell. We have developed synchronous multi-channel and multi-focal plane widefield fluorescence microscopy capable of visualising endogenously tagged proteins within the flagellum at 200 to 400 frames per second. The ability to visualise multiple channels and multiple focal planes using fluorescence in a live beating flagellum is opens up new opportunities to understand how parasites and other flagellated/ciliated organisms control their motility.

Audience: The scientific community

Organisers: Dr Proochista Ariana

Please arrive 5 minutes before the seminar begins to gain access to the building

Wed 6 Feb 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

Cellular mechanics of B cell responses

Dr Pavel Tolar

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 7 Feb 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

Chromatin Conformation in Development and Disease

Dr. Juanma Vaquerizas

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 7 Feb 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Health Economics Seminars

Title TBC

Dr Dan Howdon, Senior Research Fellow in Health Ecomonics

Further information to come

Further information to come

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 7 Feb 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

HERC Seminar: Implications of non-marginal budgetary impacts in health technology assessment

This paper introduces a framework with which to conceptualise the decision-making process in health technology assessment for new interventions with high budgetary impacts. In such circumstances, the use of a single threshold based on the marginal productivity of the health care system is... Read more

This paper introduces a framework with which to conceptualise the decision-making process in health technology assessment for new interventions with high budgetary impacts. In such circumstances, the use of a single threshold based on the marginal productivity of the health care system is inappropriate. The implications of this for potential partial implementation, horizontal equity and pharmaceutical pricing are illustrated using this framework. Under the condition of perfect divisibility and given an objective of maximising health, a large budgetary impact of a new treatment may imply that optimal implementation is partial rather than full, even at a given incremental costeffectiveness ratio that would nevertheless mean the decision to accept the treatment in full would not lead to a net reduction in health. In a one-shot price-setting game, this seems to give rise to potential horizontal equity concerns. When the assumption of fixity of the ICER (arising from the assumed exogeneity of the manufacturer’s price) is relaxed, it can be shown that the threat of partial implementation may be sufficient to give rise to an ICER at which cost the entire potential population is treated, maximising health at an increased level, and with no contravention of the horizontal equity principle.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 7 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Geratology / GU Medicine

Dr Emily Lord, Dr Fiona Windsor

Geratology: "When a crisis HITS: an unusual cause of abdominal pain", Dr Fiona Windsor -- GU Medicine: "“SUPER STRENGTH GONORRHOEA STRAIN EMERGES” - But is there a new ‘SUPER-BUG’ on the horizon?”, Dr Emily Lord -- Chair: Chris O'Callaghan

Geratology: "When a crisis HITS: an unusual cause of abdominal pain", Dr Fiona Windsor -- GU Medicine: "“SUPER STRENGTH GONORRHOEA STRAIN EMERGES” - But is there a new ‘SUPER-BUG’ on the horizon?”, Dr Emily Lord -- Chair: Chris O'Callaghan

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 7 Feb 2019 from 16:30 to 17:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

Metabolomics for IBD - are the answers in the blood?

Dr Fay Probert

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Holm Uhlig

Fri 8 Feb 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

Brain tumour surgery - awake and novel imaging

Mr Puneet Plaha

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 8 Feb 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

A re-examination of B-cell receptor triggering

Martin Wilcock

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 8 Feb 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar: Malaria Elimination Trials and Simulations

Prof Lisa White

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Fri 8 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Medial Temporal Lobe networks and Memory: processing spatial and non-spatial information overtime

Prof. Dr Magdalena Sauvage

Although the contribution of the hippocampus to episodic memory is well-established, much remains to be known about the network mechanisms underlying memory retrieval at this level and the specific involvement of each hippocampal subfield in this process. I will present recent data based on... Read more

Although the contribution of the hippocampus to episodic memory is well-established, much remains to be known about the network mechanisms underlying memory retrieval at this level and the specific involvement of each hippocampal subfield in this process. I will present recent data based on activity-dependent gene mapping, optogenetics and behavioral techniques showing that dissociating CA1’s from CA3‘s contribution and the contribution of their proximal from that of their distal parts, are essential for a better understanding of spatial and non-spatial information processing in the medial temporal lobe for recent (few min) to very remote (1 year-old) memories (Nakamura et al, J. Neurosc., 2013; Lux et al, Elife, 2017; Beer and Vavra, Plos Biology, 2018).

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 11 Feb 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Regulation of ribosome biogenesis by RNA localisation

Faraz Mardakheh

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Amanda O'Neill

Mon 11 Feb 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Tracking immune cell migration in vivo: revealing ILC migration and the dynamics of the anti-tumour T cell response

Dr David Withers

Costimulatory signals are critical for the success of T cell responses. For CD4 Th1 effector and memory responses, OX40 signals are essential, however, our understanding of the key cellular sources of OX40L in vivo, alongside how expression of OX40L is regulated, is lacking. Here we demonstrate... Read more

Costimulatory signals are critical for the success of T cell responses. For CD4 Th1 effector and memory responses, OX40 signals are essential, however, our understanding of the key cellular sources of OX40L in vivo, alongside how expression of OX40L is regulated, is lacking. Here we demonstrate that provision of OX40L by DC, but not T cells, B cells nor ILC3 is required and determine how DC expression of OX40L is regulated through cross-talk with NK cells. We then contrast cellular provision of OX40L in systemic Th1 responses with the requirments for Th17 responses in the intestine. ---- David Withers qualified with a BSc (Hons) in Virology and Microbiology from the University of Warwick in 2000. He went on to study for a PhD in Immunology at the Institute for Animal Health in conjunction with the University of Bristol. After obtaining his PhD, David continued his studies in the laboratory of Peter Lipsky at NIAMS, NIH, Bethseda (2004-2006). He then returned to the UK to study with Peter Lane at the University of Birmingham, cementing his interest in secondary lymphoid tissue development/structure and how this controlled CD4 T cell responses. Research in the Withers Lab is supported by the Wellcome Trust. In 2011 he was awarded a Wellcome Trust Research Career Development Fellowship to establish his own research group investigating the role of lymphoid tissue inducer cells in lymph nodes. In 2016 he was awarded a Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellowship in Basic Biomedical Science.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 11 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

* CANCELLED * Sex chromosome functions in development and disease

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Mon 11 Feb 2019 from 14:30 to 15:30

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

The role of extrachromosomal oncogene amplification in cancer

Paul Mischel

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Mon 11 Feb 2019 from 16:30 to 17:30

Heatley Lecture

Harnessing the power of evolution for making new medicines: phage display of peptides and antibodies

Sir Gregory Winter

Sir Gregory Paul Winter CBE FRS FMedSci is a molecular biologist best known for his work on developing technologies to make therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Previously, it had proved impossible to make human mAbs against human self-antigen targets, as required for treatment of... Read more

Sir Gregory Paul Winter CBE FRS FMedSci is a molecular biologist best known for his work on developing technologies to make therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Previously, it had proved impossible to make human mAbs against human self-antigen targets, as required for treatment of non-infectious diseases such as cancer or rheumatoid arthritis - and the corresponding rodent mAbs had provoked immune responses when given to patients. Winter is credited with inventing techniques both to humanise rodent mAbs (1986) and to create fully human mAbs (1990). For his work on "harnessing the power of evolution" Winter was awarded the 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry along with George Smith and Frances Arnold. Winter was cited specifically "for the phage display of peptides and antibodies”, the technology that led to the fully human antibody “Humira”, and which is now the world’s top-selling pharmaceutical drug. He founded three Cambridge-based start-up companies to help develop therapeutic drugs based on his inventions, and his research career has been based almost entirely at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology and the MRC Centre for Protein Engineering, in Cambridge, England. He has been a Fellow of Trinity College Cambridge, and is now Master of the College.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Jo Peel

Although booking is not required this lecture is likely to be very popular so please arrive in good time to secure a seat. Lecture theatre capacity is 300 people. The lecture will be followed by a drinks reception in the main gallery. Please note filming and audio recording of this lecture are prohibited.

Mon 11 Feb 2019 from 17:00 to 18:15

Oxford Martin School Public Lectures

Why do we spend so little on preventing ill-health and so much on treating it?

Professor Chris Dye

“Prevention is better than cure”, and yet only 3% of health expenditure in OECD countries is spent on prevention and public health while more than 90% is spent on curative, rehabilitative and long-term care. How can that paradox be explained? What are the obstacles and opportunities for greater investment in staying healthy?

“Prevention is better than cure”, and yet only 3% of health expenditure in OECD countries is spent on prevention and public health while more than 90% is spent on curative, rehabilitative and long-term care. How can that paradox be explained? What are the obstacles and opportunities for greater investment in staying healthy?

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Oxford Martin School

Wed 13 Feb 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Molecular pathways to Parkinson's disease: more than neurons?

Dr. Elisa Greggio

Dr. Elisa Greggio is a molecular physiologist in the Department of Biology at the University of Padova, Italy. RESEARCH INTERESTS: Genetic forms of dominant Parkinson's. Mitochondrial function, axonal transport and cellular pathways in Parkinson's. Biochemical properties of Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2). Oxidative stress in Parkinson's.

Dr. Elisa Greggio is a molecular physiologist in the Department of Biology at the University of Padova, Italy. RESEARCH INTERESTS: Genetic forms of dominant Parkinson's. Mitochondrial function, axonal transport and cellular pathways in Parkinson's. Biochemical properties of Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2). Oxidative stress in Parkinson's.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Note earlier time

Wed 13 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

SGC Seminars

Iterative Stochastic Elimination Algorithm for drug discovery by targeting and multitargeting

Prof Amiram Goldblum

Bio: Prof. (Emeritus) Goldblum is head of Molecular Modeling and Drug Discovery at the Institute for Drug Research, School of Pharmacy. Goldblum studied Chemistry and Physics and received his PhD in Organic Chemistry at the Hebrew University, followed by Postdoctoral studies of Quantum Biochemistry... Read more

Bio: Prof. (Emeritus) Goldblum is head of Molecular Modeling and Drug Discovery at the Institute for Drug Research, School of Pharmacy. Goldblum studied Chemistry and Physics and received his PhD in Organic Chemistry at the Hebrew University, followed by Postdoctoral studies of Quantum Biochemistry at CNRS Paris, QSAR at Pomona College California and Computational Chemistry at Stanford. Prof. Goldblum joined the Medicinal Chemistry department of the Hebrew University in 1979 and developed and applies since then theoretical approaches and algorithms for drug discovery. In 2000, Goldblum won the first award of the ACS Computers in Chemistry division in a contest of "Emerging technologies" for his novel algorithm to solve extremely complex combinatorial problems. Abstract: Our heuristic algorithm, Iterative Stochastic Elimination (ISE), produces models which are large sets of excellent solutions to highly complex combinatorial problems with very many variables that have, each, many values. This generic algorithm has already been applied to many problems in protein and peptide conformations, to ligand docking, and has recently been applied mainly for molecular discovery in medicinal chemistry related projects. A model of molecular activity is normally constructed of many filters of physico-chemical property ranges, and is useful for virtual screening of huge molecular libraries from commercial sources or from virtual combinatorial libraries. Each screened molecule is scored as it passes (or fails to pass) filters successfully. Top scored molecules compose our "discovery set", usually a few dozens and sometimes more, depending on our experimental collaborators. Our models are highly enriched and result in the discovery of novel and diverse molecular scaffolds, amenable to apply for Intellectual Property for all types of bioactivity for more than 95% of the active molecules discovered. It is easy to combine models for different targets as one can combine filters. Multitargeted molecules are those that get higher scores in more than a single model. We focus also on modeling of anti-targets for our screenings. In addition to ligand based modeling by ISE, which is our main method, structure based modeling (docking) is used if crystal structures are available. Although data collection and curation constitute a bottleneck of the process, model building with ISE is a matter of a few hours, and virtual screening of huge databases requires less than a few days.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Thu 14 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Infection/Microbiology / Renal

Prof Chris Pugh, Dr Catharine Morgan, Dr David Eyre

Infection/Microbiology: "Love in the Time of Gonorrhoea", Dr Catharine Morgan and Dr David Eyre -- Renal: "Management by correspondence; an illustration of strengths and weaknesses!", Prof Chris Pugh -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Infection/Microbiology: "Love in the Time of Gonorrhoea", Dr Catharine Morgan and Dr David Eyre -- Renal: "Management by correspondence; an illustration of strengths and weaknesses!", Prof Chris Pugh -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 14 Feb 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

ARUK Oxford Drug Discovery Institute Seminar Series

Mapping Synaptic Contacts: From Dendrites to the Axon Initial Segment

Professor Juan Burrone

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kate Humphrey

Thu 14 Feb 2019 from 14:00 to 17:30

Jenner Seminars

Childhood Immunisation in the UK

The British Society for Immunology's Vaccine Affinity Group is pleased to bring you a new event 'Childhood immunisation in the UK' in collaboration with the Jenner Institute, University of Oxford. This is a half-day meeting taking place on the afternoon of Thursday 14 February 2019 in Oxford, UK. ... Read more

The British Society for Immunology's Vaccine Affinity Group is pleased to bring you a new event 'Childhood immunisation in the UK' in collaboration with the Jenner Institute, University of Oxford. This is a half-day meeting taking place on the afternoon of Thursday 14 February 2019 in Oxford, UK. The meeting will review childhood vaccines in the UK, focusing on the issues, prospects and promises. We aim to stimulate interest on the extent to which scientific advances and changes in societal attitudes both affect control and prevention of childhood diseases in the UK through vaccination. A full programme will be online shortly. The event will start at 14:00 and will finish with a networking reception at 17:30. Confirmed speakers include Kate Cuschieri (University of Edinburgh), Adam Finn (University of Bristol), Mark Jit (London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine/Public Health England), Heidi Larsson (London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine), and Helen McShane (University of Oxford).

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Fri 15 Feb 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

Oxford Bariatric Surgery Unit: from the lab to the operating theatre

Mr Bruno Sgromo, Dr Carolina Arancibia, Dr Niall Dempster, Dr Alessandra Geremia, Cr Claudia Guida

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 15 Feb 2019 from 09:00 to 10:00

TDI Seminar Series

Big Data Institute, LG0 seminar room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Computational Workflows for Molecular Analytics: Integrating and Contextualizing Omics Data

Dr. Magnus Palmblad

Reproducible and high-throughput data analyses in the omics domains require combination of software tools in automated workflows. A complete workflow captures the experimental design and guides the analysis from raw data all the way to final statistical analysis and visualization. In mass... Read more

Reproducible and high-throughput data analyses in the omics domains require combination of software tools in automated workflows. A complete workflow captures the experimental design and guides the analysis from raw data all the way to final statistical analysis and visualization. In mass spectrometry based proteomics, a typical workflow may contain steps such as format conversion, retention time alignment, calibration, feature extraction, peptide identification, validation, protein inference, peptide and protein quantitation, enrichment analysis and projecting the results on biological networks. The data can be integrated with existing datasets in public repositories and contextualized by mining the biomedical literature. This talk will focus on the software tools performing these operations, how to find those fit-for-purpose, assemble them into workflows, and benchmark the individual tools and workflows. Applications include integration of genome-wide SNP, RNA-Seq and proteomics data, optimizing targeted mass spectrometry assays, identification of biological species and tissues, and visualizations based on machine learning that provide novel insights into proteomics or metabolomics data.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Benedikt Kessler

Fri 15 Feb 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

Identifying HLA-E and CD94/NKG2a as an inhibitory receptor-ligand in cancer'

Megat Bin Abd Hamid

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 15 Feb 2019 from 10:30 to 12:00

Single Cell Seminars at WHG

Regulation of human tendon cell sub-types in degenerative disease.

Adrian Kendal

#10X #CITESeq #CellHashing

#10X #CITESeq #CellHashing

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 15 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Navigating in a three-dimensional world

Associate Professor Theresa Burt de Perera

The ability to navigate efficiently is fundamental to animals’ survival and success; enabling them to find mates, avoid predators and find their way home. To orient around their local environment, animals must recognise their own position with respect to a goal. This task can be achieved through... Read more

The ability to navigate efficiently is fundamental to animals’ survival and success; enabling them to find mates, avoid predators and find their way home. To orient around their local environment, animals must recognise their own position with respect to a goal. This task can be achieved through a representation of space in their brain, built upon learning and remembering environmental features that are inputted through multiple sensory systems. A substantial research effort has sought to understand how animals navigate, but this has been focused on horizontal movement, despite the real world being three-dimensional. Indeed, most animals have some kind of vertical component to their movements, and there are both quantitative and qualitative reasons why navigating through environments with a vertical axis might be different to navigating purely in 2D. This is pushed to the extreme in volumetric environments, such as those inhabited by many fish. By using experimental and theoretical approaches, we consider how pelagic and benthic fish deal with 3D navigation; from the sensory input, to what information is learned and remembered. This not only allows us to unpick the mechanisms that underpin this important behaviour, but can also inform us about the processes behind learning and memory themselves.

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 15 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

"Living with uncertainty: The joy of being wrong”

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 18 Feb 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Mechanisms linking DNA replication to cell fate determination under normal and stressful conditions

Dr Vincenzo Costanzo

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Amanda O'Neill

Mon 18 Feb 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Homing and migration dynamics of lymph-borne immune cells

Prof Reinhold Förster

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 18 Feb 2019 from 17:00 to 18:00

Population Health Seminars

Inaugural Lecture - Halving premature death: Thinking big, keeping it simple

Booking Recommended

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 19 Feb 2019 from 10:00 to 11:00

TDI Seminar Series

New Big Data Tools for Single-Cell Omics

Dr Marcin Tabaka

Recent progress in developing high-throughput single-cell methods allows researchers to study cell types and states of a tremendous number of cells. Further advances and focused international initiatives, such as the Human Cell Atlas, will likely allow the number of cells that can be analyzed to... Read more

Recent progress in developing high-throughput single-cell methods allows researchers to study cell types and states of a tremendous number of cells. Further advances and focused international initiatives, such as the Human Cell Atlas, will likely allow the number of cells that can be analyzed to grow even further, to hundreds of millions of cells and beyond. Deriving biological insights from such massive datasets requires new tools for big data visualization and exploration. In particular, understanding the molecular programs that guide differentiation during development is a major challenge. I will describe two projects that tackle different challenges within single-cell data analysis: Waddington-OT and scSVA. My colleagues and I applied Waddington-OT to reconstruct the landscape of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from 315,000 single-cell RNA-Seq profiles. The analysis predicts transcription factors and paracrine signals that affect cell fates, and experiments validate that the transcription factor Obox6 and the cytokine GDF9 enhance reprogramming efficiency. scSVA (single-cell Scalable Visualization and Analytics) relies on advances from diverse data-heavy areas, especially astronomy, to scale up most of its capabilities to a billion cells with real time interactivity. To reduce memory usage, scSVA supports efficient retrieval of cell features from massive expression matrices stored on a disk. To facilitate reproducible research, scSVA supports interactive analytics in the cloud with containerized tools. Thus, scSVA should enable users to interact with large datasets and complex analytics to yield novel insights and discoveries.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Benedikt Kessler

Tue 19 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

Stem cells and differentiation in myelodysplastic syndromes

Professor Eva Hellstrom Lindberg

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 19 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Seminar: Social determinants of health, health behaviours and health inequalities

Professor Kate Hunt

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 20 Feb 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Cell-autonomous and Circuit-level Mechanisms of Circadian Timekeeping in Mammals: Genes, Neurons and Astrocytes

Michael Hastings

In mammals the cell-autonomous circadian clock pivots around a transcriptional/post-translational feedback loop. However, we remain largely ignorant of the critical molecular, cell biological, and circuit-level processes that determine the precision and robustness of circadian rhythms: what keeps... Read more

In mammals the cell-autonomous circadian clock pivots around a transcriptional/post-translational feedback loop. However, we remain largely ignorant of the critical molecular, cell biological, and circuit-level processes that determine the precision and robustness of circadian rhythms: what keeps them on track, and what determines their period, which varies by less than 5 minutes over 24 hours? The origin of this precision and robustness is the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the basal hypothalamus, the principal circadian pacemaker of the brain. The SCN sits atop a circadian hierarchy that sustains and synchronises the innumerable cell-autonomous clocks of all major organs to solar time (and thereby to each other), by virtue of direct retinal innervation that entrains the transcriptional oscillator of the 20,000 or so component cells of the SCN. I shall describe real-time imaging approaches to monitor circadian cycles of gene expression and cellular function in the SCN, and intersectional genetic and pharmacological explorations of the cell-autonomous and circuit-level mechanisms of circadian timekeeping. A particular focus will be on “translational switching” approaches to controlling clock function and the surprising discovery of a central role for SCN astrocytes in controlling circadian behaviour.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Wed 20 Feb 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Historical and modern rabbit populations reveal parallel adaptation to myxoma virus across two continents

Dr Joel Alves

In the 1950s the myxoma virus was deliberately released into wild European rabbit populations in Australia and Europe. The subsequent pandemic decimated populations and resulted in a remarkable natural experiment, where rabbits in both continents rapidly evolved resistance to the virus. We... Read more

In the 1950s the myxoma virus was deliberately released into wild European rabbit populations in Australia and Europe. The subsequent pandemic decimated populations and resulted in a remarkable natural experiment, where rabbits in both continents rapidly evolved resistance to the virus. We investigated the genetic basis of this resistance by comparing the exomes of modern individuals with the exomes of historical rabbit specimens collected before the virus release. By replicating our analyses in Australia, France and the United Kingdom we found a strong pattern of parallel selection across the three countries, with the same genetic variants changing in frequency over the last 60 years. Notably, these occurred in genes involved in antiviral immunity and viral replication, and support a polygenic basis of resistance. We experimentally validated the functional role of these genes as viral modulators and showed that selection acting on three amino acids in an interferon protein increased its antiviral effect.

Audience: The scientific community

Organisers: Dr Proochista Ariana

Please arrive 5 minutes before the seminar begins to gain access to the building

Thu 21 Feb 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

Engineering the cellular microenvironment with functional and living materials

Professor Manuel Salmeron-Sanchez

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 21 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Respiratory / Gastroenterology

Dr Chris Turnbull, Professor Richard Hunt

Respiratory: "An unusual case of breathlessness", Dr Chris Turnbull -- Gastroenterology: "The long term safety of PPIs", Prof Richard Hunt, Emeritus Professor of Medicine at McMaster University -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Respiratory: "An unusual case of breathlessness", Dr Chris Turnbull -- Gastroenterology: "The long term safety of PPIs", Prof Richard Hunt, Emeritus Professor of Medicine at McMaster University -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 21 Feb 2019 from 14:30 to 15:00

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

IL-23 signalling as a putative novel therapeutic target in human colorectal cancer

Dr Elizabeth Mann

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Carolina Arancibia

Thu 21 Feb 2019 from 15:00 to 15:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

Microbiota, Intestinal Inflammation and Arthritis - Lessons from a Novel Immunodeficiency.

Dr Dominik Aschenbrenner

Mendelian disorders can inform on key pathogenic mechanism in humans. The analysis of a human immunodeficiency disorder suggests a novel link between intestinal microbiota, epithelial barrier function and the immune system leading to intestinal inflammation and arthritis.

Mendelian disorders can inform on key pathogenic mechanism in humans. The analysis of a human immunodeficiency disorder suggests a novel link between intestinal microbiota, epithelial barrier function and the immune system leading to intestinal inflammation and arthritis.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Carolina Arancibia

Fri 22 Feb 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

Latest surgical developments in ultra-radical surgery for the management of advanced ovarian cancer

Mr Hooman Soleymani majd

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 22 Feb 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

Autophagy, hematopoietic stem cells, and amino acids

Dr Sandrine Obba

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 22 Feb 2019 from 15:30 to 16:30

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

“Roles of Pol Epsilon in genetic and epigenetic stability”

Dr Roberto Bellelli

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Mon 25 Feb 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Strubi seminars

THE STRUCTURAL BASIS FOR RELEASE FACTOR ACTIVATION DURING TRANSLATION TERMINATION REVEALED BY TIME-RESOLVED CRYOGENIC ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

Dr Ziao Fu

When the mRNA translating ribosome encounters a stop codon in its aminoacyl site (A site), it recruits a class-1 release factor (RF) to induce hydrolysis of the ester bond between peptide chain and peptidyl-site (P-site) tRNA. This process, called termination of translation, is under strong... Read more

When the mRNA translating ribosome encounters a stop codon in its aminoacyl site (A site), it recruits a class-1 release factor (RF) to induce hydrolysis of the ester bond between peptide chain and peptidyl-site (P-site) tRNA. This process, called termination of translation, is under strong selection pressure for high speed and accuracy. Class-1 RFs (RF1, RF2 in bacteria, eRF1 in eukarya and aRF1 in archaea), have structural motifs that recognize stop codons in the decoding center (DC) and a universal GGQ motif for induction of ester bond hydrolysis in the peptidyl transfer center (PTC) 70 Å away from the DC. The finding that free RF2 is compact with only 20 Å between its codon reading and GGQ motifs came therefore as a surprise. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) then showed that ribosome-bound RF1 and RF2 have extended structures, suggesting that bacterial RFs are compact when entering the ribosome and switch to the extended form in a stop signal-dependent manner. FRET, cryo-EM and X-ray crystallography, along with a rapid kinetics study suggesting a pre-termination conformational change on the millisecond time-scale of ribosome-bound RF1 and RF2, have lent indirect support to this proposal. However, direct experimental evidence for such a short-lived compact conformation on the native pathway to RF-dependent termination is missing due to its transient nature. Here we use time-resolved cryo-EM to visualize compact and extended forms of RF1 and RF2 at 3.5 and 4 Å resolution, respectively, in the codon-recognizing complex on the pathway to termination. About 25% of ribosomal complexes have RFs in the compact state at 24 ms reaction time after mixing RF and ribosomes, and within 60 ms virtually all ribosome-bound RFs are transformed to their extended forms.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Mon 25 Feb 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Population Health Seminars

NDPH Seminar: Methods for handling missing data and adjusting for non-adherence in cluster-randomised trials

Dr Karla Diaz-Ordaz

Cluster randomised trials (CRTs) often face issues with missing data and treatment non-adherence. Guidelines such as CONSORT require that the numbers of clusters and individuals randomised, receiving treatment and analysed are reported, while newer guidelines go further (see for example the ICH 9... Read more

Cluster randomised trials (CRTs) often face issues with missing data and treatment non-adherence. Guidelines such as CONSORT require that the numbers of clusters and individuals randomised, receiving treatment and analysed are reported, while newer guidelines go further (see for example the ICH 9 addendum on estimands), suggesting that an adherence-adjusted estimand is reported alongside an intention-to-treat estimate. For both analyses, missing data in covariates and outcome need to be handled appropriately as failure to do so can introduce bias in treatment effect estimates, leading to invalid inferences. Multiple imputation has become a popular method to handle missing data, and instrumental variables methods can be used to obtain adherence-adjusted average treatment estimates (CACE). Both of these statistical techniques should reflect the hierarchical nature of CRT data. In this talk, I will present multilevel multiple imputation for continuous and binary data, and then present two approaches to obtain CACE for CRTs: (1) cluster-level analysis two-stage least square method, with inferences at the cluster level, and (2) mixture models with random effects for individual level CACE. I will illustrate these methods by re-analysing a CRT in UK primary health settings. The OPERA study trial, which studied the effect of a physiotherapist-led exercise intervention on depression and physical health in elderly residents of nursing home.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Mon 25 Feb 2019 from 11:30 to 12:30

Jenner Seminars

Development of Subunit Vaccines for Immunization Against Melioidosis

Prof Paul Brett

Audience: Public

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Mon 25 Feb 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

New Insights into Mucosal Antibody Responses

Prof Andrea Cerutti

I will discuss our recent frindings on the ontogeny of secretory IgM responses, which emerge from gut plasma cells clonally affiliated to IgM+ memory B cells and some IgA+ memory B cells. I will also discuss new evidence on the biology of human IgA2 and IgD, two largely neglected mucosal... Read more

I will discuss our recent frindings on the ontogeny of secretory IgM responses, which emerge from gut plasma cells clonally affiliated to IgM+ memory B cells and some IgA+ memory B cells. I will also discuss new evidence on the biology of human IgA2 and IgD, two largely neglected mucosal antibodies. Differences between humans and mice will be emphasized. ---- Dr. Cerutti earned his MD in 1990 and specialized in Hematology in 1997 at Padua School of Medicine (Padua, Italy). He joined Weill Medical College of Cornell University (New York, NY) in 1996 as a Postdoctoral Fellow to do research in immunology. After finishing his post-doctoral studies, he climbed the academic ladder at Weill Medical College of Cornell University and was promoted to Assistant Professor in 2001 and Associate Professor in 2006. In 2009 he obtained Tenure and moved to Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (New York, NY) as a Professor. He also took an ICREA Professor position in IMIM (Barcelona, Spain). He published some 130 articles. The major focus of his research relates to the biology of systemic and mucosal B cells, including the regulation of antibody class switching and production. He serves as a reviewer for ERC, NIH, and other national agencies as well as all of the major immunology/biomedicine journals.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 25 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

Utilising the totality of mutagenesis for clinical purposes

Dr Serena Nik-Zainal

A cancer genome carries the historic mutagenic activity that has occurred throughout the development of a tumour1. While driver mutations were the main focus of cancer research for a long time, passenger mutational signatures - the imprints of DNA damage and DNA repair processes that have been... Read more

A cancer genome carries the historic mutagenic activity that has occurred throughout the development of a tumour1. While driver mutations were the main focus of cancer research for a long time, passenger mutational signatures - the imprints of DNA damage and DNA repair processes that have been operative during tumorigenesis - are also biologically informative1,2. In this lecture, I provide a synopsis of this concept, describe the insights that we have gained through combinations of computational analysis3,4 and experiments in cell-based systems5, and showcase how we have developed the concept into applications that we hope to translate into clinical utility in the near future3,4. I describe our efforts in a population-derived cohort as well as in individual patients, emphasizing the need for us to be more precise in analyses and interpretation in human cancer genomics. References: 1. Helleday T, Eshtad S, Nik-Zainal S. Mechanisms underlying mutational signatures in human cancers.Nat Rev Genet. 2014 Sep;15(9):585-98. doi: 10.1038/nrg3729. Epub 2014 Jul 1. Review. PubMed PMID: 24981601; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6044419. 2. Alexandrov LB, Nik-Zainal S, et al. Signatures of mutational processes in human cancer. Nature. 2013 Aug 22;500(7463):415-21. doi: 10.1038/nature12477. Epub 2013 Aug 14. Erratum in: Nature. 2013 Oct 10;502(7470):258. Imielinsk, Marcin [corrected to Imielinski, Marcin]. PubMed PMID: 23945592; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3776390. 3. Nik-Zainal S, Davies H, et al. Landscape of somatic mutations in 560 breast cancer whole-genome sequences. Nature. 2016 Jun 2;534(7605):47-54. doi: 10.1038/nature17676. Epub 2016 May 2. PubMed PMID: 27135926; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4910866. 4. Davies H, Glodzik D, et al. and Nik-Zainal S. HRDetect is a predictor of BRCA1 and BRCA2 deficiency based on mutational signatures. Nat Med. 2017 Apr;23(4):517-525. doi: 10.1038/nm.4292. Epub 2017 Mar 13. PubMed PMID: 28288110; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5833945. 5. Zou X, Owusu M, Harris R, Jackson SP, Loizou JI, Nik-Zainal S. Validating the concept of mutational signatures with isogenic cell models. Nat Commun. 2018 May 1;9(1):1744. doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-04052-8. PubMed PMID: 29717121; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5931590.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Tue 26 Feb 2019 from 09:30 to 16:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Leading a productive research group

Focuses on how the effective management of staff impacts productivity. The aims/objectives for this workshop are: · To explore what research says about what makes a research group productive; · To identify what the PI can do to create a productive research environment; · ... Read more

Focuses on how the effective management of staff impacts productivity. The aims/objectives for this workshop are: · To explore what research says about what makes a research group productive; · To identify what the PI can do to create a productive research environment; · To identify key factors in the way research staff are managed that affect productivity; · To identify quick wins and changes that could make a difference to productivity.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Maria Granell-Morano

Tue 26 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

Spatial In Vivo Transcription Profiling with Single-Molecule Imaging

Dr Antti Lignell

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 26 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Seminar: Progress in the management of breast cancer: Trials and tribulations

Professor David Dodwell

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 26 Feb 2019 from 14:30 to 15:30

Population Health Seminars

NPEU Seminar: Using qualitative research to shape, inform, and implement global guidelines in maternity care.

Prof. Soo Downe OBE

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 27 Feb 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Insights into the epidemiology of dengue and Zika from maps and models

Dr Oliver Brady

The mosquito-borne viral diseases of dengue and Zika are one of the fastest growing public health threats in the tropics. Mathematical models that describe how these diseases are spread are powerful tools for understanding their global emergence and their impact on affected populations. In this... Read more

The mosquito-borne viral diseases of dengue and Zika are one of the fastest growing public health threats in the tropics. Mathematical models that describe how these diseases are spread are powerful tools for understanding their global emergence and their impact on affected populations. In this talk I will show how spatial models fit to epidemiological data have allowed us to better understand ZIKV outbreaks, improve our understanding of the burden they impose in endemic areas and help us better plan for future spread.

Audience: The scientific community

Organisers: Dr Proochista Ariana

Please arrive 5 minutes before seminar begins to gain entry to the building

Wed 27 Feb 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

Inferring epitope-specific T-cell receptor sequence motifs from immune repertoire sequencing data

Dr Mikhail Shugay

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 27 Feb 2019 from 17:30 to 19:00

Getting to Zero: A Doctor and a Diplomat on the Ebola Frontline

Dr Oliver Johnson, Dr Sinead Walsh

In 2014, Oliver Johnson, a 28-year old British doctor found himself co-running the Ebola isolation unit in Sierra Leone’s main hospital after the doctor in charge had been killed by the virus. Completely overwhelmed and wrapped in stifling protective suits, he and his team took it in turns to... Read more

In 2014, Oliver Johnson, a 28-year old British doctor found himself co-running the Ebola isolation unit in Sierra Leone’s main hospital after the doctor in charge had been killed by the virus. Completely overwhelmed and wrapped in stifling protective suits, he and his team took it in turns to provide care to patients while removing dead bodies from the ward. Against all odds he battled to keep the hospital open, as the queue of sick and dying patients grew every day. Only a few miles down the road Dr Sinead Walsh, the Irish Ambassador and Head of Irish Aid, worked relentlessly to rapidly scale up the international response. At a time when entire districts had been quarantined, she travelled around the country, and met with UN agencies, the President and senior ministers so as to be better placed in alerting the world to the catastrophe unfolding in front of her. In this event, they will talk about their book Getting to Zero, a blow-by-blow account that exposes the often shocking shortcomings of the humanitarian response to the outbreak, both locally and internationally, and call our attention to the immense courage of those who put their lives on the line every day to contain the disease. Informed by over eighty interviews and two hundred written reports, they draw out five key lessons for the future, which Dr Sinead Walsh is now applying first-hand in her new role as EU Ambassador to South Sudan, a country that neighbours the current DRC Ebola Outbreak.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Thu 28 Feb 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

Analyzing T cells infiltrating tumours or other diseased tissues.

Professor Pierre Coulie

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Thu 28 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Palliative Care / Neurology

Dr Michele Hu, Dr Mary Miller

Palliative Care: "Does High Flow nasal Oxygen delay death?", Dr Mary Miller -- Neurology: "Prodromal Parkinson’s: what’s it all about?", Dr Michele Hu -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Palliative Care: "Does High Flow nasal Oxygen delay death?", Dr Mary Miller -- Neurology: "Prodromal Parkinson’s: what’s it all about?", Dr Michele Hu -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 28 Feb 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

Development & Cell Biology Theme Guest Speakers (DPAG)

Functional dynamics of chromatin topology in human cardiogenesis and disease

Alessandro Bertero

Dr. Alessandro Bertero is a Senior Fellow in the Dept. of Pathology at the University of Washington in Seattle, USA. During his undergraduate studies he trained with the late Prof. Guido Tarone at the University of Turin in Italy, where he contributed to elucidate the Melusin-ERK1/2 signalling... Read more

Dr. Alessandro Bertero is a Senior Fellow in the Dept. of Pathology at the University of Washington in Seattle, USA. During his undergraduate studies he trained with the late Prof. Guido Tarone at the University of Turin in Italy, where he contributed to elucidate the Melusin-ERK1/2 signalling pathway in cardiac hypertrophy, and obtained a BSci (2009) and an MSci (2011). Having being awarded a British Heart Foundation Graduate Fellowship, he joined the laboratory of Prof. Ludovic Vallier at the University of Cambridge in the UK, where he obtained an MRes (2012) and a PhD (2016) by revealing the epigenetic and epitransciptional effects of TGFbeta-SMAD2/3 signalling during early differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). In 2016, Dr. Bertero moved to the University of Washington for his postdoctoral training with Prof. Charles Murry. He was awarded an EMBO Long-Term Fellowship in 2017. His current focus is the study of three-dimensional chromatin organization, and of its importance both during human cardiogenesis and in the context of familiar cardiomyopathies. This work relies on stage-wise differentiation of hPSCs into cardiomyocytes, CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing, generation of 3D engineered heart tissues, analysis of cardiac physiology, and genomic approaches to probe nuclear architecture and function.

Audience: Members of the University only

Please contact Katie McNeil if you would like to meet with Alessandro during his visit

Thu 28 Feb 2019 from 16:00 to 18:00

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

Precision Medicine in Inflammatory Bowel Disease - Hype or Hope?

Professor Jack Satsangi

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Holm Uhlig