Other Seminars

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Thu 1 Aug 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WHG Seminars

NDM Building, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

In vivo functions and targets of the hub protein DYNLL1

Jörg Heierhorst

In vivo functions and targets of the hub protein DYNLL1 Synopsis: DYNLL1 is a sequence-specific chaperone that promotes the ordered homo-oligomerization of more than a hundred target proteins. To define the physiologically relevant targets and mechanisms involved in its in vivo functions, my... Read more

In vivo functions and targets of the hub protein DYNLL1 Synopsis: DYNLL1 is a sequence-specific chaperone that promotes the ordered homo-oligomerization of more than a hundred target proteins. To define the physiologically relevant targets and mechanisms involved in its in vivo functions, my laboratory has generated a range of germline and conditional Dynll1 KO mouse models. In this talk, I will provide an overview of the roles DYNLL1 plays in normal development as well as in the onset of cancer, with particular emphasis on its function in B cells, including unpublished data on its importance as a signal-specific regulator of NF-kB signaling and antibody responses in vivo.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Thu 8 Aug 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

Transcription factor TCF-1 enforces commitment to the innate lymphoid cell lineage

Professor Avinash Bhandoola

Audience: Public

Organisers: Jennifer Pope

Professor Bhandoola will be available for 1:1 meetings, please contact Sabrina Harris (Sabrina.harris@paediatrics.ox.ac.uk) to arrange.

Mon 12 Aug 2019 from 12:30 to 13:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

"Mechanism of improved human hematopoietic stem cell engraftment in NSGW41 mice"

Dr Susann Rahmig

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Emma Butterfield

Tue 13 Aug 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Development & Cell Biology Theme Guest Speakers (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

An intersectional genetic approach to deciphering cell fates in mammals

Professor Bin Zhou, MD, PhD

Abstract: Unravelling stem cell fate plasticity is significant for understanding pathophysiology and exploring new therapeutic targets. The Cre-loxP genetic system is commonly used for cell lineage tracing. However, this conventional approach has limitations that have led to controversies in... Read more

Abstract: Unravelling stem cell fate plasticity is significant for understanding pathophysiology and exploring new therapeutic targets. The Cre-loxP genetic system is commonly used for cell lineage tracing. However, this conventional approach has limitations that have led to controversies in multiple fields. In recent years, there has been growing interest in a dual genetic approach based on Cre-loxP and another orthogonal recombinase. The dual genetic approach permits cell tracking at a significantly higher resolution and enables a more precise method for gene manipulation and cell fate control. Some examples will be shown to demonstrate how the application of these approaches advances our understanding of stem cell fate plasticity for tissue repair and regeneration. Biography: Dr. Bin Zhou obtained his Bachelor degree from Zhejiang University School of Medicine in 2002, and received Ph.D. degree from Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences in 2006. From 2006-2010, Dr. Zhou had postdoctoral training with Dr. William Pu at Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. In 2010, Dr. Zhou became professor and group leader in Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Science. The major goal of his lab is to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of cardiovascular development, diseases and regeneration. His lab develops more precise genetic lineage tracing and gene targeting technology by dual recombinases to better understand the origin and fate of cardiovascular cells in development, diseases and tissue regeneration.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Nicola Smart

Thu 15 Aug 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

"The long non-coding RNA CRNDE regulates growth of multiple myeloma cells via an effect on IL6 signalling"

Antoine David

Student from INSERM Unité 976, Université Paris Diderot, France.

Student from INSERM Unité 976, Université Paris Diderot, France.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Fri 23 Aug 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Cardiac Metabolism Research Group Seminars (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

A Physicist's Adventures in Magnetic Resonance or Crossing Disciplines is (mostly) rewarding!

Dr David Hoult, M.A., D.Phil

If you have ever had an MRI, you can thank in part the research that my colleagues and I performed at Oxford in the 1970's. As a physics undergraduate at St. Catz, I received a superb grounding in electromagnetism that has been a vital, consistent and reliable anchor throughout my career,... Read more

If you have ever had an MRI, you can thank in part the research that my colleagues and I performed at Oxford in the 1970's. As a physics undergraduate at St. Catz, I received a superb grounding in electromagnetism that has been a vital, consistent and reliable anchor throughout my career, generating numerous research opportunities in unrelated fields. However, if someone had told me then that I would journey first into biochemistry to obtain my doctorate, then into biomedical engineering and radiology, and in the process live in the United States, the Netherlands and finally Winnipeg, Canada, I would have questioned their sanity. Notwithstanding, my offbeat voyage has been, for the most part, deeply rewarding, sometimes pivoting on seemingly minor observations, a case of cognitive dissonance and twice an unhealthy dollop of abject political ignorance. The essence of crossing disciplines is the very different perspective it brings. In my talk I shall therefore discuss how carrying physics across boundaries influenced the development of both in-vivo NMR (MRS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but also led to disagreement that ultimately advanced understanding of the origins of the MR signal itself. David Hoult has an international reputation in magnetic resonance (MR) research and is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Gold Medal of the International Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, of which he is a founding member. He has published over eighty papers, is co-author of a well-received book on MR technology and has delivered internationally over 100 lectures. He has been both an Associate Editor and on the Editorial Board of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, and a member of the editorial boards of several other journals, including The Review of Scientific Instruments. His most recent research has focussed on the quantum origins of the MR signal and the design of calibrated MR instrumentation using radio-frequency feedback techniques.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Kieran Clarke

Wed 28 Aug 2019 from 11:00 to 12:30

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox/WEH Seminar - Regulation of AI in Healthcare: what should we expect

Matt Fenech

AI hold tremendous promise for healthcare. Technologists frequently talk about ‘disrupting’ healthcare in the same way that technology has disrupted retail, communication, entertainment, and many other spheres of life. We are now seeing a culture clash, between the ‘move fast’ world of... Read more

AI hold tremendous promise for healthcare. Technologists frequently talk about ‘disrupting’ healthcare in the same way that technology has disrupted retail, communication, entertainment, and many other spheres of life. We are now seeing a culture clash, between the ‘move fast’ world of technology, and the ‘safety first’ world of medicine. What is the role of regulation in striking the right balance? How do we ensure that digital health products are safe, yet still dynamic and responsive to individual users’ needs? What’s on the horizon? What should we, as patients, clinicians, and researchers, expect?

Audience: Members of the University only