Other Seminars

seminar-banner

Tue 2 Apr 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Repression of gene expression by Groucho/TLE family proteins during development and disease

Dr Barbara Jennings

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Thu 4 Apr 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

NDM Building, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Thu 4 Apr 2019 from 16:30 to 18:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, John Radcliffe Main Building, George Pickering Education Centre Level 3 Academic Centre, Room 2B, Headington OX3 9DU

Lymphocyte activation gene (LAG)-3 is associated with mucosal inflammation and disease activity in ulcerative colitis

Dr Stephanie Slevin

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Holm Uhlig

Fri 5 Apr 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

* CANCELLED * Regulation of endogenous retroviruses

Prof Akiko Iwasaki

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Fri 5 Apr 2019 from 10:30 to 11:30

Single Cell Seminars at WHG

Dissecting and directing cerebellar ontogenesis – towards an organoid model for understanding disease of the cerebellum

Samuel Nayler

#10X #NeuronalDevelopment #Cell-hashing

#10X #NeuronalDevelopment #Cell-hashing

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 5 Apr 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, NDMRB TDi seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

“NOD-like receptors: From pathogen recognition to surveillance of cellular homeostasis perturbation”

Dr. Gang Pei

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Fri 5 Apr 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

NDM Seminar Series

Henry Wellcome Building of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Seminar Rooms A & B, Roosevelt Drive OX3 7BN

Selective Targeting of Transcriptional Scaffolding & Investigating Shared Immunopathology of immune-mediated diseases

Dr. Panagis Filippakopoulos, Dr Calliope A Dendrou

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kathryn Smith

Mon 8 Apr 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

Innate Immune Control Of Thymus Regeneration

Prof Graham Anderson

Steady-state production of naïve T-cells depends upon T-cell development in the thymus. Multiple scenarios can influence thymus function, including ‘natural’ (pregnancy, ageing) and ‘pathological’ processes (infection, stress, -irradiation). While the thymus is very sensitive to... Read more

Steady-state production of naïve T-cells depends upon T-cell development in the thymus. Multiple scenarios can influence thymus function, including ‘natural’ (pregnancy, ageing) and ‘pathological’ processes (infection, stress, -irradiation). While the thymus is very sensitive to these stimuli, it possesses effective endogenous regenerative properties that restore T-cell production. In the absence of such recovery, T-cell development and the incorporation of new naïve T-cells into the peripheral pool is slow. Thus, thymus regeneration represents an important process in restoring homeostasis in the immune system. Here, we identify eosinophils as new regulators of thymus regeneration, and present data on the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which they influence thymus function. ---- Graham gained a BSc in Anatomical Studies from the University of Birmingham in 1990. He studied for a PhD in Immunology as a Wellcome Prize PhD student, supervised by Eric Jenkinson and John Owen. His PhD studies developed the reaggregate thymus organ culture system. Since then he has continued his career in Birmingham, firstly as a Wellcome Prize Fellow until 1994, and since then as member of academic staff. He was appointed to a Chair in T-Lymphocyte Biology in 1995, and then Professor of Experimental Immunology in 2016. Throughout his career he has been been interested in how thymic stromal cells guide the development and selection of self-tolerant T-cells in the thymus. Graham is currently a member of the Wellcome Trust Expert Review Group ‘Immune System In Health and Disease’, and a Scientific Advisory Board member for activities in The Universities of Glasgow and Oxford, and the KG Jebsen Centre for Autoimmune Disorders, in Norway.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Tue 9 Apr 2019 from 14:30 to 15:30

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NDPH Seminar Investigating genetic contributions to stroke: The journey to beyond today

Professor Bradford Worrall

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 9 Apr 2019 from 15:00 to 16:00

Rodney Porter Memorial Lecture

Biochemistry Building, Main Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3QU

"Towards Design of Universal Influenza Vaccines and Therapeutics"

Professor Ian A. Wilson, D.Phil, D.Sc, FRS, FRSE

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah-jane Scard

Wed 10 Apr 2019 from 11:30 to 12:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Democratising Live-Cell Compatible High-Speed Super-Resolution Microscopy

Professor Ricardo Henriques

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 11 Apr 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

ARUK Oxford Drug Discovery Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Discovery and characterisation of new lipid mediators of innate immunity generated by circulating blood cells

Professor Valerie O'Donnell

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kate Humphrey

Fri 12 Apr 2019 from 10:30 to 11:30

Single Cell Seminars at WHG

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room K, Headington OX3 7BN

Exploring cell heterogeneity in a mutant mouse exhibiting fetal gonadal sex reversal

Richard Reeves

#SingleCellChemicalDemultiplexing

#SingleCellChemicalDemultiplexing

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fabiola Curion

Fri 12 Apr 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

"Challenges to understanding the lateral organization and mobility of plasma membrane components"

Prof. Ken Jacobson

Ken has a long history of working on membrane dynamics using FRAP and single particle tracking, cell motility, and more recently the mechanism of how dengue virus bound to the cell surface moves laterally to sites of internalization and the subsequent internal trafficking of virus and receptor that... Read more

Ken has a long history of working on membrane dynamics using FRAP and single particle tracking, cell motility, and more recently the mechanism of how dengue virus bound to the cell surface moves laterally to sites of internalization and the subsequent internal trafficking of virus and receptor that will finally produce infection. (see e.g. https://www.med.unc.edu/cellbiophysio/directory/kenneth-jacobson-phd/. ) Ken will give an ad-hoc seminar (attached announcement) titled "Challenges to understanding the lateral organization and mobility of plasma membrane components" in the WIMM seminar room at 1PM on Friday April 12th. Please also let me know if you are interested in talking with Ken this Friday April 12th. christoffer.lagerholm@imm.ox.ac.uk

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr. B. Christoffer Lagerholm

Tue 16 Apr 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting Rooms 71a,b,c on the ground floor, Headington OX3 7DQ

The Triple Win: how the UK can achieve personalised medicine, a growing life science sector, and an affordable NHS

Lord James O'Shaughnessy

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Jade Schneiders

Tue 16 Apr 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Pathway to Parkinson’s Disease: A Tale of Two Genes

Darren Moore

The Moore Laboratory investigates the molecular pathophysiology of Parkinson’s. The majority of Parkinson’s cases occur in a sporadic manner although 5 to 10 percent of cases are inherited, with causative mutations identified in at least eight genes. The Moore Laboratory studies the normal... Read more

The Moore Laboratory investigates the molecular pathophysiology of Parkinson’s. The majority of Parkinson’s cases occur in a sporadic manner although 5 to 10 percent of cases are inherited, with causative mutations identified in at least eight genes. The Moore Laboratory studies the normal biology and pathobiology of gene products that cause inherited Parkinson’s, including the common leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2, PARK8), the retromer component VPS35 (PARK17), the E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin (PARK2), and the lysosomal P5-type ATPase ATP13A2 (PARK9).

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Wed 17 Apr 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Oxford Martin School, Oxford Martin School, 34 Broad Street, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Nearly Isotropic 3D-Imaging of Mouse Brains, Fly Brains and Human Tumors with Light Sheets Beyond the Diffraction Light - Please note new date and time.

Hans-Ulrich Dodt

Optics involving extremely long, thin sheets of light and a vastly increased Rayleigh range (achieved by breaking the diffraction limit of light sheets of low numerical aperture) allow an elegant application of ultramicroscopy to large samples, such as whole mouse brains or Drosophila. Due to the... Read more

Optics involving extremely long, thin sheets of light and a vastly increased Rayleigh range (achieved by breaking the diffraction limit of light sheets of low numerical aperture) allow an elegant application of ultramicroscopy to large samples, such as whole mouse brains or Drosophila. Due to the extremely low divergence of the light sheets, brains can be reconstructed from a single stack of optical sections with nearly isotropic resolution that reaches the single-spine level at higher magnification. Ultramicroscopy can be applied to samples of ever-increasing size. Large pieces of human tumors that have been cleared and stained by a new superfast clearing procedure can be imaged intraoperatively in three dimensions. Optically identified malignancies were subsequently confirmed by standard histological sectioning. We predict that ultramicroscopy of cleared tumors will play an increasingly important role in pathological diagnostics.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Thu 18 Apr 2019 from 10:00 to 11:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

Old Road Campus Research Building, Ludwig Seminar room, lower ground floor, Headington OX3 7DQ

“Metabolic interventions to enhance the anti-tumor T cell response”

Dr Roger Geiger

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Thu 18 Apr 2019 from 14:30 to 15:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, John Radcliffe Main Building, Lecture Theatre 1, Academic Centre, level 3, Headington OX3 9DU

Current Clinical Trials in IBD

Professor Simon Travis

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Carolina Arancibia

Thu 18 Apr 2019 from 15:30 to 16:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, John Radcliffe Main Building, Lecture Theatre 1, Academic Centre, level 3, Headington OX3 9DU

A 21st century toolkit for clinical pharmacology: Plans for the Centre for Clinical Therapeutics

Professor Duncan Richards

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Carolina Arancibia

Tue 23 Apr 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Functional dissection of the 3D genome

Elzo de Wit

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 23 Apr 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NPEU Research Seminar - Principles and Practice of Prevention in Anxiety Related Problems

Professor Paul Salkovskis

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 24 Apr 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, John Radcliffe Hospital Main Building, John Radcliffe Main Building, George Pickering Education Centre Level 3 Academic Centre, Room 2A, Headington OX3 9DU, Headington OX3 9DU

Iron and the infant gut microbiome

Prof. Michael Zimmermann

Michael B. Zimmermann received his M.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, USA and did his postgraduate training at the University of California in San Francisco and in Berkeley, USA. He is currently Professor in the Department of Health Sciences and Technology, at the Swiss Federal... Read more

Michael B. Zimmermann received his M.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, USA and did his postgraduate training at the University of California in San Francisco and in Berkeley, USA. He is currently Professor in the Department of Health Sciences and Technology, at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich, Switzerland. He is jointly a Visiting Professor in Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition at the University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland. He has published over 250 papers and has received several awards, including the 2013 International Endocrinology Award from the American College of Endocrinology, and is a 2018 Highly Cited Researcher (top 1%), Web of Science, Cross-Field Category.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Holm Uhlig

A TGU Lecture series Special

Thu 25 Apr 2019 from 09:30 to 10:30

Tropical Medicine Seminars

NDM Building, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

World Malaria Day seminar 2019 - Antimalarial treatments for vulnerable groups

Prof Joel Tarning, Dr Makoto Saito

Professor Joel Tarning, Head of Clinical Pharmacology at MORU, and Head WWARN's Pharmacometrics Group will present highlights on population PK/PD modelling to assess the dosing of antimalarial drugs in vulnerable groups. Dr Makoto Saito will share highlights from his research on antimalarial treatment efficacy during pregnancy

Professor Joel Tarning, Head of Clinical Pharmacology at MORU, and Head WWARN's Pharmacometrics Group will present highlights on population PK/PD modelling to assess the dosing of antimalarial drugs in vulnerable groups. Dr Makoto Saito will share highlights from his research on antimalarial treatment efficacy during pregnancy

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Claire-Lise Kessler

Thu 25 Apr 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Mitochondria and cancer: metabolism and beyond

Dr Christian Frezza

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Thu 25 Apr 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Infection/Microbiology / Acute General Medicine Firm D

Dr Alex Mentzer, Dr Harjit Bains, Prof Nick White, Prof Nick Day

Infection/Microbiology: "Blackwater Fever", Prof Nick White and Prof Nick Day -- Acute General Medicine Firm D: "Diagnosing fever without a fever?", Dr Alex Mentzer and Dr Harjit Bains -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Infection/Microbiology: "Blackwater Fever", Prof Nick White and Prof Nick Day -- Acute General Medicine Firm D: "Diagnosing fever without a fever?", Dr Alex Mentzer and Dr Harjit Bains -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 25 Apr 2019 from 15:00 to 16:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Hidden treasures of the RNA World: from moonlighting to riboregulation

Prof Matthias Hentze

Short Bio: Matthias Hentze is currently the Director of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) and Co-Director of the Molecular Medicine Partnership Unit (MMPU) in Heidelberg (Germany). Following medical studies in Germany and the U.K., and his qualification as a medical doctor, he... Read more

Short Bio: Matthias Hentze is currently the Director of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) and Co-Director of the Molecular Medicine Partnership Unit (MMPU) in Heidelberg (Germany). Following medical studies in Germany and the U.K., and his qualification as a medical doctor, he obtained his postdoctoral training at the NIH (USA) in the late eighties, when he and his colleagues discovered “iron-responsive elements” initiating his interests in RNA biology (translation, mRNA stability, NMD, miRNAs) and diseases of iron metabolism (anemias, hemochromatosis, degenerative diseases). Recent work by the Hentze group has uncovered hundreds of new RNA-binding proteins, including many metabolic enzymes. Their current work uncovers new functions for RNA in the direct regulation of protein function (‘riboregulation’) and elucidates connections between metabolism and gene regulation. Prof. Hentze is a co-founder of the MMPU, a joint interdisciplinary and translational research unit of the Medical Faculty of Heidelberg University and the EMBL, which bridges between medicine and molecular biology. Matthias Hentze’s research contributions have been recognized in numerous ways including Germany’s most prestigious scientific award, the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize in 2000, the 2007 Lautenschläger Research Prize of Heidelberg University, and the 2015 Feodor Lynen Medal of the German Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. In 2017, he was awarded the Doctor of Science honoris causa by the Australia National University (ANU) in Canberra. He is an elected member of the European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO), the German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, and the Academia Europaea. In 2016, he became the first German scientist elected as a Corresponding Member of the Australian Academy of Science. In 2018, he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Matthias Hentze was a co-founder of Anadys Pharmaceuticals (San Diego), and serves on numerous international scientific advisory and editorial boards. Current activities in science administration include innovative approaches to international collaborations and to academia-industry partnerships.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Fri 26 Apr 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Oxford Martin School, Old Indian Institute, 34 Broad Street, Oxford , 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Cocaine Place Conditioning Strengthens Location-Specific Hippocampal Inputs to the Nucleus Accumbens

Luke Sjulson

Conditioned place preference (CPP) is a widely used model of addiction-related behavior whose underlying mechanisms are not understood. We used dual-site silicon optoprobe recordings in freely moving mice to examine interactions between the hippocampus and nucleus accumbens in cocaine CPP. We found... Read more

Conditioned place preference (CPP) is a widely used model of addiction-related behavior whose underlying mechanisms are not understood. We used dual-site silicon optoprobe recordings in freely moving mice to examine interactions between the hippocampus and nucleus accumbens in cocaine CPP. We found that CPP was associated with recruitment of D2-positive nucleus accumbens medium spiny neurons to fire in the cocaine-paired location, and this recruitment was driven predominantly by selective strengthening of coupling with hippocampal place cells that encode the cocaine-paired location. These findings suggest that the synaptic potentiation in the accumbens caused by repeated cocaine administration preferentially affects inputs that were active at the time of drug exposure and provide a potential physiological mechanism by which drug use becomes associated with specific environmental contexts.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Mon 29 Apr 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Infections@BDI Seminar: Using Mathematical models to predict the impact of vaccines of antibiotic resistance

Dr Katherine Atkins

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Mon 29 Apr 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

* CANCELLED * Neurodegeneration: mechanism to medicines

Prof Giovanna Mallucci

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Mon 29 Apr 2019 from 15:00 to 16:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 1, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Phenome@BDI Seminar Series: Inside the Cranial Vault: Tracking Fetal Brain Development from Ultrasound Images

Ana Namburete

Ultrasound (US) imaging is one of the first steps in a continuum of pregnancy care. During the fetal period, the brain undergoes dramatic structural changes, which are informative of healthy maturation. The resolution of modern US machines enables us to observe and measure brain structures in... Read more

Ultrasound (US) imaging is one of the first steps in a continuum of pregnancy care. During the fetal period, the brain undergoes dramatic structural changes, which are informative of healthy maturation. The resolution of modern US machines enables us to observe and measure brain structures in fetuses from as early as 14 weeks. Capitalizing on recent breakthroughs in machine learning, my group develops bespoke methods to automatically align brain images and track spatiotemporal patterns of intra-uterine brain development. In this talk, I will summarise our work on the design of data-driven techniques to build the first US-based atlas of the fetal brain. We envision that this atlas will serve as a population reference against which individuals can be compared, and hence enable detection of developmental deviations in routine clinical care.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Tue 30 Apr 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

MHU Student Presentations

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose