Other Seminars

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Mon 3 Sep 2018 from 14:00 to 15:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

Unleashing Chemical Power from Protein Sequence Space for Material Design

Dr Fei Sun

A central question facing the bottom-up approach toward material design is how to faithfully transfer the function at the molecular level to the material properties at the macroscopic level. In the past years, there has been a growing trend of designing functional materials with dynamically tunable... Read more

A central question facing the bottom-up approach toward material design is how to faithfully transfer the function at the molecular level to the material properties at the macroscopic level. In the past years, there has been a growing trend of designing functional materials with dynamically tunable properties. These 'smart' materials necessitate a new level of control over the structural and functional properties of macromolecules as well as their interactions with external stimuli. Although natural evolution has led to the creation of a vast number of protein molecules with extraordinary structural and functional diversity, such an ecological diversity has yet to be fully utilized to design and create macroscopic ‘smart’ materials. Taking advantage of a new category of protein chemistries—genetically encoded click chemistry, we focus on the development of protein materials through the combined use of cellular synthesis and directed assembly of recombinant protein molecules, which has led to a variety of applications ranging from tissue engineering to environmental remediation. (Dr. Fei Sun is currently an Assistant Professor at the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. He worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Chemical Engineering, Caltech from 2012 to 2014. He obtained Ph.D. degree in chemistry at the University of Chicago in 2012 and B.S. degree at Peking University in 2007 with the work recognized by several awards including Chicago Biomedical Consortium Scholar Award and The Everett E. Gilbert Memorial Prize in Organic Chemistry.)

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Wed 5 Sep 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

“Disentangling the interconnected roles between DNA repair, NAD+, and mitophagy in ageing and neurodegeneration”

Dr. Evandro F. Fang

Dr. Evandro F. Fang is investigating the molecular mechanisms of one of the most fundamental and fascinating topics in current biology: human aging. After finished his Ph.D training in Biochemistry at the Chinese University of Hong Kong in 2012, he started a 5-year postdoctoral fellowship at the... Read more

Dr. Evandro F. Fang is investigating the molecular mechanisms of one of the most fundamental and fascinating topics in current biology: human aging. After finished his Ph.D training in Biochemistry at the Chinese University of Hong Kong in 2012, he started a 5-year postdoctoral fellowship at the National Institute on Aging USA with Dr. Vilhelm Bohr, focusing on the roles of the “human power house” mitochondria in human aging and age-related diseases, especially the role of DNA damage in neurodegeneration. In September 2017, he established his independent laboratory at the University of Oslo, Norway. His laboratory is focused on the molecular mechanisms of how cells clear their damaged and aged mitochondria, a process called “mitophagy”, as well as the roles of mitophagy in Alzheimer’s disease. He is fascinated with and actively engaged in moving his laboratory findings to translational applications, with the overarching goal to establish novel and safe biological approaches to promote longer and healthier human lives. He has published over 55 papers in peer-reviewed journals with an H index of 23. He has received several awards including The NIH Fellows Award for Research Excellence 2014, 2015, and an awardee of the prestigious Butler-Williams Scholar on Aging 2016 (USA), an FRIMEDBIO Young Research Talent 2017(Norway), and a finalist of the 2017 ERC Starting grant.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Zameel Cader

Thu 6 Sep 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Room 3, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

PPI - Learning from colleagues

Anne-Marie Boylan

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Thu 6 Sep 2018 from 12:30 to 13:30

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

An epidemic: how key media players framed Zika

Dr Maria C. Esperidiao

Dr Maria Esperidião will discuss her paper on reporting Zika which is based on content analysis, interviews and literature review. She grounds her research in studies on framing and seeks to discuss what were the main narratives adopted by CNN, BBC and Al-Jazeera during the Zika outbreak, in 2016,... Read more

Dr Maria Esperidião will discuss her paper on reporting Zika which is based on content analysis, interviews and literature review. She grounds her research in studies on framing and seeks to discuss what were the main narratives adopted by CNN, BBC and Al-Jazeera during the Zika outbreak, in 2016, when shocking images of tiny-headed newborn babies were brought into living rooms across the world. This appeared to be the starting bell for yet another frightening epidemic in a tropical paradise preparing to host the Olympic Games. In this “exotic” scenario, a mosquito jeopardized pregnancy and therefore human reproduction. After analyzing the prevalence of 7 news frames on 211 videos posted in these media outlet websites, she concludes that in regards to Zika and Microcephaly (congenital Zika syndrome), Risk and Uncertainty was the most seen frame on news feeds. It also seems that the virus became irrelevant once it was no longer a global outbreak, but, above all, another disease of poverty.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Iveta Simera

Lunch provided

Mon 10 Sep 2018 from 11:30 to 12:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

“Elevation of D133p53b isoform expression - a mechanism for wild type p53 to cause cancer”

Professor Antony Braithwaite

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Adrian Harris

Mon 10 Sep 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

The bone: stromal cell interface in arthritis

Dr Amy Naylor

The link between stromal cells that control inflammation and tissue damage remains unclear. To this end we have endeavoured to identify stromal cell markers that are upregulated in rheumatoid arthritis and then assess their function. This seminar will discuss one such marker, CD248/Endosialin, and... Read more

The link between stromal cells that control inflammation and tissue damage remains unclear. To this end we have endeavoured to identify stromal cell markers that are upregulated in rheumatoid arthritis and then assess their function. This seminar will discuss one such marker, CD248/Endosialin, and our finding that it acts as a negative regulator of bone formation under resting conditions. We have recently identified a novel, endothelial-specific complex (Multimerin-CLEC14A) for CD248 and demonstrated that this complex is required for sprouting angiogenesis. Given that the vasculature plays a crucial role in controlling osteoblast trafficking and maturation we are now exploring the implications of manipulating this pathway during synovial inflammation and bone damage.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 10 Sep 2018 from 13:45 to 14:45

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Tue 11 Sep 2018 from 08:30 to 18:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

Examination Schools, University Examination Schools, Oxford, 75-81 High Street OX1 4BG

Oxford IBD Masterclass

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Professor Simon Travis

Tue 11 Sep 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

NPEU Seminar - SIFT: The Speed of Increasing milk Feeds Trial

Oliver Hewer

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 11 Sep 2018 from 14:00 to 15:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar: Public health data science to investigate and improve migrant health

Dr Rob Aldridge

Migration is a defining political challenge of our time and a global health priority. And yet internationally there is a lack of epidemiological data on migrant health including estimates of morbidity, mortality and risk factors for disease. In this talk, Rob will describe three studies he... Read more

Migration is a defining political challenge of our time and a global health priority. And yet internationally there is a lack of epidemiological data on migrant health including estimates of morbidity, mortality and risk factors for disease. In this talk, Rob will describe three studies he currently conducting that aim to generate new evidence that will improve the health of migrants. The first is a recently completed systematic review and meta-analysis of mortality data in international migrants. The second is the Million migrant study - an electronic cohort that will establish national rates of age-specific morbidity and risk factors for disease in migrants to the UK. The third is a migrant eCohort that will be created using a mobile health app to generate data allowing examination of how risk factors for disease in migrants change after arriving in the UK.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Wed 12 Sep 2018 from 08:30 to 13:00

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

Examination Schools, Examination Schools 75-81 High Street OX1 4BG, 75-81 High Street OX1 4BG

Oxford IBD Masterclass

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Professor Simon Travis

Thu 13 Sep 2018 from 16:30 to 18:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, George Pickering Education Centre, Level 3 Academic Centre, Room 2B, Headington OX3 9DU

* CANCELLED * Optimising Biologic treatments in IBD - Treat to Target

Dr Alessandro Armuzzi

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Holm Uhlig

Mon 17 Sep 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting Rooms 71a,b,c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Title TBC

Sabine Tejpar

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 17 Sep 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

Neuronal Regulation of Innate Lymphocytes

Dr Henrique Veiga-Ferndandes

Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) are the most recently defined cell family to be included to the increasingly complex atlas of the immune system. ILC have a lymphoid morphology, lack rearranged antigen receptors and are abundantly present at mucosal surfaces. The combined expression of lineage-specific... Read more

Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) are the most recently defined cell family to be included to the increasingly complex atlas of the immune system. ILC have a lymphoid morphology, lack rearranged antigen receptors and are abundantly present at mucosal surfaces. The combined expression of lineage-specific transcription factors with discrete cytokine profiles led to the identification of distinct ILC subsets. ILC development and function have been widely perceived to be programmed. However, emerging evidence indicates that ILC are also controlled by complex environmental signals. Here, we will discuss how ILC perceive, integrate and respond to their environment, notably to nutritional and neuronal cues. ---- Henrique Veiga-Fernandes studied Veterinary Medicine at Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal and at Università degli Studi di Milano, Italy. In 2002, he obtained a PhD in Immunology from Université René Descartes, Paris, France, before moving to the National Institute for Medical Research, London, UK, as a postdoc. In 2009, he returned to Portugal to set up his independent research group at Instituto de Medicina Molecular, where he became member of the direction team in 2014. In 2016, Henrique Veiga-Fernandes joined the Champalimaud Center for the Unknown, Portugal, where he is currently a Senior Group Leader. Henrique Veiga-Fernandes was elected a member of the European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO) in 2015, and he was made Commander of the Order of Sant’Iago da Espada by Portugal in the same year. He secured several European Research Council (ERC) awards (2007, 2013, 2015 and 2017) and has previously won the Pfizer Prize for basic Science (2014 and 2016), the senior research award from the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America, USA (2014), the Innovator and Breakthrough Awards from the Kenneth Rainin Foundation, USA (2013 and 2014), the National Blood Foundation Scholar, USA (2012), and he integrated the EMBO Young Investigator Programme in 2008.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 17 Sep 2018 from 15:00 to 16:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Phenome@BDI Seminar: Rare diseases & convolution neural networks

Dr. Christoffer Nellåker, Michael Ferlaino

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Tue 18 Sep 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Employing CRISPR to understand neurodegenerative disease in human induced pluripotent stem cells

Dr Andrew Bassett

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 18 Sep 2018 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, Sherrington Library, 2nd floor, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Behaviour and synaptic plasticity in a model of early Parkinson's: the role of alpha-synuclein

Dr Barbara Picconi

The Neurophysiology group, under the supervision of Dr. Picconi, has been studying the various pharmacological, molecular and cellular aspects of neurodegenerative disorders through a multidisciplinary approach. In collaboration with the Laboratory of Pharmacological Sciences of the University of... Read more

The Neurophysiology group, under the supervision of Dr. Picconi, has been studying the various pharmacological, molecular and cellular aspects of neurodegenerative disorders through a multidisciplinary approach. In collaboration with the Laboratory of Pharmacological Sciences of the University of Milan (Prof Gardoni), she has characterized the role of alterations in the synaptic localization of NMDA receptors associated to altered synaptic plasticity in animal models of PD. Using cell-permeable TAT peptides, both in vitro and in vivo, it was possible to modulate the GluN2A and GluN2B subunits in synaptic sites and restore the correct synaptic plasticity in MP models. These studies have shown that TAT cell-permeable peptides by modulating the localization of the GluN2A subunit in synaptic sites lead to a significant decrease in L-DOPA dyskinesias. Recently, electrophysiological and behavioral studies in parkinsonian animals have also been performed in hippocampal cognitive areas such as CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG).

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Wed 19 Sep 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

AURKA KINASE ACTIVITY FRET BIOSENSOR: HCS-FLIM FOR DRUG SCREENING AND OTHER REFINEMENTS

Dr Marc Tramier

AURKA gene encodes a multifunctional serine/threonine kinase involved in the cell cycle and plays a key role during cell division. The protein is one of the most upstream activator of the mitosis and is involved in the maturation of the centrosomes, the formation of the mitotic spindle and the... Read more

AURKA gene encodes a multifunctional serine/threonine kinase involved in the cell cycle and plays a key role during cell division. The protein is one of the most upstream activator of the mitosis and is involved in the maturation of the centrosomes, the formation of the mitotic spindle and the central spindle. Overexpression of AURKA is a major hallmark of several solid tumors rising from epithelial tissues. So far, no inhibitor of this oncogene has been FDA-approved and therefore it is of great importance to identify new molecules. To be functional, AURKA switch to an activated form through autophosphorylation on the T288 residue leading to a change of conformation. Our team has developed a FRET (Forster Resonance Energy Transfer) based biosensor for Aurora A consisting of the whole kinase flanking by two fluorophores (Figure 1). We showed that the change of conformation of Aurora A when activated brings closer the fluorophores increasing FRET efficiency and that the biosensor is as functional as the endogenous protein [1]. We have also developed a fast-FLIM prototype (Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy) that allows us to image and measure fluorescence lifetime with a higher speed than conventional techniques [2]. As fluorescence lifetime is inversely correlated with FRET efficiency, we are able to track and to image the activation of AURKA within the cells. Based on this biosensor, we have already investigated new roles of the AurkA kinase in G1 phase for the establishment of the interphase spindle [1] but also at the mitochondria to control organelle dynamics and energy production [3]. Moreover, our project aims to establish a new method to use AURKA FRET biosensor in a HCS-FLIM manner. We have developed an innovative way to perform a rapid and automated drug screening on a 96-well plate to discover new inhibitors of AURKA. Finally, we have also made effort to improve our biosensor both by changing FRET pairs of fluorescent proteins and by using unconventionally two-color FCS to measure FRET at very low level of expression. [1] Bertolin, G., Sizaire, F., Herbomel, G., Reboutier, D., Prigent, C., and Tramier, M. (2016). A FRET biosensor reveals spatiotemporal activation and functions of aurora kinase A in living cells. Nature Communications 7, 12674. [2] Leray A, Padilla-Parra S, Roul J, Héliot L, Tramier M. (2013). Spatio-temporal quantification of FRET in living cells by fast Time-Domain FLIM: a comparative study of non-fitting methods. PLOS One 8:e69335. [3] Bertolin G, Bulteau AL, Alves-Guerra MC, Burel A, Lavault MT, Gavard O, Le Bras S, Gagné JP, Poirier GG, Le Borgne R, Prigent C, Tramier M. (2018). Aurora kinase A localises to mitochondria to control organelle dynamics and energy production. Elife Aug 2;7. pii: e38111.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Wed 19 Sep 2018 from 12:30 to 13:30

WHG Lunchtime Lab Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Oxford Genomics Centre Lunchtime Lab Talk

Mariateresae de Cesare, Fabiola Curion, Hannah Roberts, Amy Trebes

Four speakers from the Oxford Genomics Centre: Speaker: Mariateresae de Cesare Email: decesare@well.ox.ac.uk Web: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mariateresa-de-cesare-46196826/ Title: “Genomics going viral: sequencing-based solutions for HIV and other pathogens” Speaker: Fabiola... Read more

Four speakers from the Oxford Genomics Centre: Speaker: Mariateresae de Cesare Email: decesare@well.ox.ac.uk Web: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mariateresa-de-cesare-46196826/ Title: “Genomics going viral: sequencing-based solutions for HIV and other pathogens” Speaker: Fabiola Curion Email: curion@well.ox.ac.uk Web: https://www.linkedin.com/in/fabiola-curion-902644114/ Title: “Multiplexing: Increasing sample throughput while optimising single cell experimental design on 10X” Speaker: Hannah Roberts Email: hroberts@well.ox.ac.uk Web: https://www.emdis.ox.ac.uk/people/hannah-roberts/ Title: “The long view: WGS and RNA-seq on the MinION and PromethION” Speaker: Amy Trebes Email: amy@well.ox.ac.uk Web: http://www.well.ox.ac.uk/ogc/amy-trebes/ Title: “Improving Services within the Oxford Genomics Centre”

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Wed 19 Sep 2018 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Ebola: Molecular epidemiology, transcriptomics, acquired immunity & vaccines

Professor Miles Carroll

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 20 Sep 2018 from 11:00 to 11:30

Ethox Centre and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox and WEH Seminar: What gives them the right? Legal privilege and waivers of consent for research

Jon Merz

Waivers of informed consent for research participation are permitted in the United States under the Common Rule, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act regulations, and the FDA's Exception from Informed Consent (EFIC) rule for emergency research. We assess the novel question... Read more

Waivers of informed consent for research participation are permitted in the United States under the Common Rule, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act regulations, and the FDA's Exception from Informed Consent (EFIC) rule for emergency research. We assess the novel question regarding what legal right researchers have to carry out research procedures on or about another person, be it experimental medical intervention, psychological or social manipulation, or invasion of privacy, without the permission of their subjects. Our analysis frames waivers of consent as a species of presumed consent, and we address the underlying empirical question of whether it is reasonable to believe that subjects from whom no consent is sought would in fact agree, if asked. A scoping review of what is known about participation and refusal rates in US-based research suggests that a large minority, on average, do not agree to take part in research. Refusal rates vary widely. This suggests that, while researchers may assert the social utility of their studies are high enough to justify waivers, there is reason to suspect that many who would be enrolled under a waiver of consent would not want to be enrolled. We conclude that waivers should be rare, and that IRBs and researchers must explicitly address study acceptability in the community at large and the target population of their proposed research.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christa Henrichs

Thu 20 Sep 2018 from 14:30 to 15:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, John Radcliffe Main Building, Lecture Room 1, Academic Street , Headington OX3 9DU

PRISE study: Investigating Cancer Immunotherapy Colitis

Dr Oliver Brain

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Carolina Arancibia

Thu 20 Sep 2018 from 16:00 to 17:00

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

The organization and function of immune cell plasma membranes

Dr Ilya Levental

The plasma membrane is the interface between a cell and its environment, and is therefore responsible for a myriad of parallel processing tasks that must be tightly regulated to avoid aberrant signaling. To achieve this functional complexity, mammalian cells produce hundreds of lipid species that... Read more

The plasma membrane is the interface between a cell and its environment, and is therefore responsible for a myriad of parallel processing tasks that must be tightly regulated to avoid aberrant signaling. To achieve this functional complexity, mammalian cells produce hundreds of lipid species that are actively turned over and trafficked to produce spatial and temporal gradients between cellular compartments. In addition to the plethora of regulatory roles performed by individual lipid molecules, membrane physiology is strictly dependent on the biophysical phenotypes – including membrane fluidity, rigidity, lipid packing, and lateral organization – arising from the collective behaviors of lipids. A key feature of metazoan membranes is their partitioning into functional lateral domains, e.g. membrane rafts. Although such domains have been implicated in a large variety of processes occurring at the plasma membrane, their properties, compositions, and precise functional roles in cells remain elusive. I will present the results of two distinct projects that attempt to address (1) the diverse lipid composition of cellular plasma membranes, how this composition is dependent on dietary fats, and how these determine the biophysical and signaling properties of cellular membranes; and (2) the structural determinants and functional consequences of protein association with ordered membrane domains. Both projects explore the relationship between membrane organization and cellular function, ultimately demonstrating that membrane phenotypes are central regulators of cell physiology.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 21 Sep 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Regulation of natural killer T cell responses in bacterial infection and rheumatoid arthritis

Professor Mitch Kronenberg

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 21 Sep 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

"Catch me if you can: understanding innate immune evasion by HIV and how to drug it"

Professor Greg Towers

Cells are very hostile places for viruses. The intracellular innate immune system typically protects cells from infection and successful viruses must evade, avoid or antagonise innate immune defenses in order to infect their host. The host-virus interactions involved in innate evasion dictate... Read more

Cells are very hostile places for viruses. The intracellular innate immune system typically protects cells from infection and successful viruses must evade, avoid or antagonise innate immune defenses in order to infect their host. The host-virus interactions involved in innate evasion dictate species and cell type specific replication. A key feature of innate immune sensing is detection of foreign nucleic acids. For example, cytoplasmic DNA is sensed as a danger signal leading to production of inflammatory cytokines and cell death. Our central research question is: How do retroviruses infect cells without activating innate immune defenses when they synthesise viral DNA in the cytoplasm? We hypothesise that HIV DNA synthesis is contained within the protective shell of the viral capsid, which protects it from nucleases and DNA sensors, in a process we call cloaking. We have discovered that the capsid hexamers form channels through which we propose nucleotides are transported to fuel encapsidated DNA synthesis. We find that breaking cofactor interactions by depleting cofactors, or by mutation of CA cofactor binding sites, causes virus to trigger innate immune sensors and suppresses replication in innate immune competent cells. We have also compared the capsids of pandemic HIV isolates and their less successful non-pandemic counterparts. We find that non-pandemic HIV are much less effective at innate evasion and have quite different capsid structures. We propose that adapting to evade innate sensing in myeloid cells is a key feature driving HIV-1 pandemicity. We have used this new knowledge to develop capsid and host cofactor-targeting inhibitors, which uncloak virus and cause innate immune activation, as a novel paradigm for prophylaxis and treatment of viral infection.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Sun 23 Sep 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Tropical Medicine Seminars

Keble College, Parks Road OX1 3PG

Medicine Quality & Public Health Conference

A pioneering academic conference that aims to bring together, for the first time, people from all over the world dealing with the problem of poor quality medicines and their impact on public health. The conference will provide a unique opportunity for health authorities, scientists, pharmacists,... Read more

A pioneering academic conference that aims to bring together, for the first time, people from all over the world dealing with the problem of poor quality medicines and their impact on public health. The conference will provide a unique opportunity for health authorities, scientists, pharmacists, lawyers and international organisations to discuss the problem and outline the necessary steps to tackle the issue on a global scale.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 24 Sep 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

TNF signalling in T cells - RIPping yarns of new survival pathways

Prof Benedict Seddon

The role that NF-kB signalling plays in the development and function of T cells has been much studied, but remains poorly understood. Our work reveals that the T cell receptor is not the dominant receptor triggering NF-kB signalling during development of T cells, contrary to accepted dogma, but is... Read more

The role that NF-kB signalling plays in the development and function of T cells has been much studied, but remains poorly understood. Our work reveals that the T cell receptor is not the dominant receptor triggering NF-kB signalling during development of T cells, contrary to accepted dogma, but is rather TNF. We also reveal that TNF regulates survival and development of T cells by both NF-kB dependent and independent mechanisms and identify a new survival pathway in T cells, dependent on RIPK1. ---- I had the good fortune to undertake a PhD with Prof Don Mason at the former Medical Research Council's Cellular Immunology Unit, at the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology in Oxford University. We studied the role and mechanisms of regulatory T cells in the control of autoimmunity in rats. I then moved to the MRCs National Institute for Medical Research where I worked first as a post-doc with Dr Rose Zamoyska in the Division of Molecular Immunology, and then started my independent research group as a Programme Leader in the Division of Immune Cell Biology. 10 years at NIMR allowed me to establish a research programme investigating the mechanisms of T cell homeostasis, generating novel genetic models of TCR and cytokine signalling, employing mathematical approaches to gain systems level understanding and identifying novel roles for inflammatory signalling for T cell maturation. In 2013, I relocated the lab to the Institute of Immunity and Transplantation at the Royal Free Hospital Campus of University College London, where I am investigating the role of TNFSFR signalling and NF-kappaB transcription factors in the maturation and function of T cells in health and disease.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Tue 25 Sep 2018 from 12:30 to 19:00

Centre for Personalised Medicine Seminars

St Anne's College, Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre (MOLT), Woodstock Road OX2 6HS

Personalised Neuroscience: from Molecules to Medicine

Professor Richard Gilbertson, Professor Robert McLaren, Professor Andrea Németh, Dr Sally Cowley, Dr Brent Ryan, Professor Caleb Webber, Professor Jeffrey Golden

The Centre for Personalised Medicine is proud to host a symposium on personalised neuroscience with the very generous support of the Dr Stanley Ho Medical Development Foundation. The symposium will feature three internationally recognised leaders in the field. Professor Robert McLaren will describe... Read more

The Centre for Personalised Medicine is proud to host a symposium on personalised neuroscience with the very generous support of the Dr Stanley Ho Medical Development Foundation. The symposium will feature three internationally recognised leaders in the field. Professor Robert McLaren will describe gene correction in blindness, Professor Richard Gilbert will speak on personalised medicine and brain cancer and Professor Jeffrey Golden will discuss the integration of personalised medicine and neuropathology. The symposium will also feature short talks on induced pluripotential stem cells in brain disease modelling, how individual mutations can lead to neurological symptoms and the use of bioinformatics in patient stratification. http://www.well.ox.ac.uk/cpm/personalised-neuroscience-from-molecules-to-medicine

Booking Required

Audience: All interested people are invited to attend.

Organisers: Catherine Lidbetter

Wed 26 Sep 2018 from 10:00 to 11:00

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Human Challenge Studies in Endemic Settings - Malaria and Dengue

Dr Melissa Kapulu, Professor Bridget Wills

Title: Unravelling the course of malaria infections: Controlled Human Malaria Infection in Semi-Immune Adults Speaker: Dr Melissa Kapulu Melissa Kapulu is a post-doc based at the KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme in Kilifi. Before taking up the post, she read for a DPhil on malaria... Read more

Title: Unravelling the course of malaria infections: Controlled Human Malaria Infection in Semi-Immune Adults Speaker: Dr Melissa Kapulu Melissa Kapulu is a post-doc based at the KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme in Kilifi. Before taking up the post, she read for a DPhil on malaria transmission-blocking vaccines in Adrian Hill's lab, Jenner Institute, University of Oxford. Prior to this, she had attended the University of Zambia where she undertook a BSc in Molecular Biology and Genetics and an MSc in Immunology of Infectious Diseases at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. She is currently involved in establishing, conducting and leading work on controlled human malaria infection studies to study blood-stage growth and transmissibility to msoquitoes. Her main interests are in understanding and characterising signatures of malaria transmission by looking for molecular and immunological markers that can be developed as tools for detecting and preventing human-to-mosquito malaria transmissibility potential. Title: The Challenges of Developing a Dengue Human Infection Model in an Endemic Setting Speaker: Professor Bridget Wills Bridget Wills is Professor of Tropical Medicine at the University of Oxford and Head of the Dengue Research Group at the Oxford University Clinical Research Unit in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Her work focuses primarily on clinical studies designed to improve diagnosis and management of dengue, together with research to understand the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Georgina Humphreys

Wed 26 Sep 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

Ethox Centre and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Fri 28 Sep 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

The lymphatics: a gateway to immune responses and cancer metastasis

Dr Louise Johnson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 28 Sep 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

NDM Seminar Series

Henry Wellcome Building of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Seminar Rooms A & B, Roosevelt Drive OX3 7BN

Tropical Medicine Seminar: First Seminar: Malaria Models and Policy: Letters from Thailand. 2nd Seminar: Data sharing: easier said than done!

Prof Lisa White, Professor Phaik Yeong Cheah

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kathryn Smith

Fri 28 Sep 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Embracing Fear and Rejection – How I become an Editor

Dr Carolina Perdigoto

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: WIMM Postdoc Association