Other Seminars

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Thu 1 Nov 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

The role of post-transcriptional regulation in neural stem cells and synaptic plasticity

Professor Ilan Davis

During learning, repetitive neuronal activity, or lack of it, causes strengthening or weakening, respectively, of specific synaptic connections between axons and dendrites. This process of remodelling synapses is known as synaptic plasticity and forms the cellular and molecular basis of memory and... Read more

During learning, repetitive neuronal activity, or lack of it, causes strengthening or weakening, respectively, of specific synaptic connections between axons and dendrites. This process of remodelling synapses is known as synaptic plasticity and forms the cellular and molecular basis of memory and learning. It has been known for over 50 years that long-term plasticity requires new protein synthesis immediately after the learning stimulus. Clearly, a rapid local translational response must depend upon the availability of specific RNAs at the synapse. However, how most mRNAs are directed to the synapse is poorly understood, as is the mechanism by which synaptic RNA abundance is regulated. We have been systematically characterising the distributions of several hundred randomly chosen mRNAs as well as their rates of synthesis and decay near synapses using the powerful Drosophila neuromuscular model junction (NMJ) system. We find that approximately 10% of individual types of RNA present in neurones are located at the tips of synapses and in some cases we have shown that they encode proteins required for synaptic plasticity. Our genome wide analysis of RNA stability has identified a wide variation in cytoplasmic stability and in some cases we show that regulating stability determines the distribution of RNA across different cell types in the nervous system.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 1 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Medical Director's Office / Dermatology

Dr Tess McPherson, Prof Helen McShane, Dr Alissa Walsh

Medical Director's Office: "The BRC Rainbow", Prof Helen McShane and Dr Alissa Walsh -- Dermatology: "Works of art", Dr Tess McPherson -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Medical Director's Office: "The BRC Rainbow", Prof Helen McShane and Dr Alissa Walsh -- Dermatology: "Works of art", Dr Tess McPherson -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 1 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

UBVO Seminar: Revealing later life vulnerabilities through the study of food practices

Wendy Wills

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 1 Nov 2018 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Epithelial damage and tissue gd T cells promote a unique tumour-protective IgE response

Dr Greg H Crawford

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 1 Nov 2018 from 16:30 to 18:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, John Radcliffe Main Building, George Pickering Education Centre Level 3 Academic Centre, Room 2B, Headington OX3 9DU

* CANCELLED * Metabolomics for IBD - are the answers in the blood?

Dr Alissa Walsh, Fay Probert

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Holm Uhlig

Fri 2 Nov 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Metformin’s effects of breast cancer metabolism

Dr Simon Lord

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 2 Nov 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

MAITs at work: tales from down under

Prof. Paul Klenerman, Dr Timothy Hinks, Dr Sarah Sasson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 2 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Acylcarnitines - From Metabolism to Heart Function: A Focus on Their Role in Human Heart Failure

Dr Christine Des Rosier

There has been a resurgence of interest for the field of cardiac metabolism catalysed by the increased need for new therapeutic targets for patients with heart failure. Traditionally, the focus of research in this area has been on the impact of substrate selection – carbohydrates vs. fatty acids... Read more

There has been a resurgence of interest for the field of cardiac metabolism catalysed by the increased need for new therapeutic targets for patients with heart failure. Traditionally, the focus of research in this area has been on the impact of substrate selection – carbohydrates vs. fatty acids - for mitochondrial oxidative energy metabolism. The use of recently emerging metabolomic technologies - which aim at systematically measure all low-molecular weight compounds within a biological system - has provided some novel insight into the global metabolic perturbations prevailing in several cardiovascular diseases. Acylcarnitines (ACs) are among metabolites that have been the focus of many recent metabolomics-based studies, particularly in human heart failure. Profiling of circulating ACs has commonly been used for diagnosis of inborn errors of metabolism, particularly mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FA) defects. Beyond being proxies of fatty acid metabolic dysregulation, ACs - primarily long-chain ACs (LCACs) – are, however, increasingly being recognized as “actors”, modulating cell functions, as well as being linked to adverse cardiac events such as arrhythmias. This presentation aims to provide an overview of metabolic pathways generating ACs and of studies reporting elevated circulating levels of ACs, particularly LCACs, in human heart failure. It will also discuss proposed molecular mechanisms for the potential adverse effects of LCACs on cardiac function.

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 2 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

DNA repair mechanisms required for meiotic progression involving SWS1-SWSAP1 and BRCA2

Dr Carla Abreu

Abstract: During meiotic recombination, homology search and DNA-strand invasion ensure faithful homolog pairing and segregation, to avoid the formation of aneuploidy gametes. These central meiotic steps are catalyzed by two highly conserved recombinases, RAD51 and DMC1, which are assisted by... Read more

Abstract: During meiotic recombination, homology search and DNA-strand invasion ensure faithful homolog pairing and segregation, to avoid the formation of aneuploidy gametes. These central meiotic steps are catalyzed by two highly conserved recombinases, RAD51 and DMC1, which are assisted by mediator proteins such as BRCA2. RAD51 paralogs are another class of mediator proteins that have been implicated in homologous recombination, but their role in meiosis is poorly understood. I will present our novel findings uncovering a critical role for the recently identified RAD51 paralog complex, SWS1-SWSAP1, in the early steps of mouse meiotic recombination. In addition, I will show data supporting that this complex has overlapping functions with BRCA2, regulating meiotic RAD51/DMC1 recombination intermediates. Finally, I will present evidence of a switch to a mitotic-like recombination pathway at late meiotic stages that ensures the timely repair of double-stranded breaks before homologs segregate. Bio: Carla did her PhD work in Prof. Noel Lowndes lab at the National University of Ireland Galway. Her dissertation focused on the interplay between cell cycle regulation by the cyclin-dependent kinases and the activation of the DNA damage signaling pathway. Carla then joined the lab of Professor Maria Jasin at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in USA. As a postdoctoral fellow, she investigated the homologous recombination proteins that regulate the activity of the repair recombinases RAD51 and DMC1, focusing on the functions of BRCA2, RAD51 paralogs and RAD54. Carla is now transitioning to the IBMC/i3S in Portugal where she will start her own line of research.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Mon 5 Nov 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting Rooms 71a,b,c, Headington OX3 7DQ

FAN1: a Fanconi anaemia (FA) protein but not a FA gene

Professor Josef Jiricny

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 5 Nov 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Target identification for host directed therapy in leishmaniasis

Prof Paul Kaye

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 5 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

* CANCELLED * The Genomic Epidemiology of Emerging Viruses: Disease X, Yellow Fever, and Zika

Prof Oliver Pybus

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Mon 5 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WHG Lunchtime Lab Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

McCarthy and Zhang Lunchtime Lab Talks

Marta Pérez Alcántara, Agata Wesolowska-Andersen, Luiza Mendonça, Tao Ni

McCarthy Group Speaker: Marta Pérez Alcántara Title: ‘Human islet differentiation model highlights developmental mechanisms contributing to type 2 diabetes pathology’ Speaker: Agata Wesolowska-Andersen Title: ‘Genomic variation modulates pancreatic islet regulatory landscape: deep learning... Read more

McCarthy Group Speaker: Marta Pérez Alcántara Title: ‘Human islet differentiation model highlights developmental mechanisms contributing to type 2 diabetes pathology’ Speaker: Agata Wesolowska-Andersen Title: ‘Genomic variation modulates pancreatic islet regulatory landscape: deep learning model’ Zhang Group Speaker: Luiza Mendonça Title: ‘Using multimodal imaging to study HIV structures' Speaker: Tao Ni Title: ‘How does Cyclophilin A interact with HIV capsid: insights from cryoEM reconstruction of CypA-capsid complex’

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Please note a slightly later time than usual.

Tue 6 Nov 2018 from 10:00 to 11:00

Tropical Medicine Seminars

NDM Building, Tropical Medicine Meeting Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Community engagement within health research for infectious disease outbreaks in Sub Saharan Africa

Manya Van Ryneveld

Manya is a recent graduate of the MSc in International Health and Tropical Medicine (2017-18) and has a BA in Social Anthropology from the University of Cape Town. She is currently working on a literature review for the African Coalition for Epidemic Research, Response and Training (ALERRT), which... Read more

Manya is a recent graduate of the MSc in International Health and Tropical Medicine (2017-18) and has a BA in Social Anthropology from the University of Cape Town. She is currently working on a literature review for the African Coalition for Epidemic Research, Response and Training (ALERRT), which is a multi-disciplinary consortium building a patient-centred clinical research network to respond to epidemics across Sub-Saharan Africa. The review question is looking at what comprises effective community engagement in health research for infectious disease outbreaks in Sub-Saharan Africa. The review aims to “ensure that the actions of the network are relevant to, accepted and supported by local communities and that the results of the network’s efforts have a sustainable impact on health through improved clinical practice and public health policy”.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Georgina Humphreys

Tue 6 Nov 2018 from 10:00 to 11:00

Tropical Medicine Seminars

NDM Building, Tropical Medicine Meeting Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Holistic health care - how engagement can support hospital health care in Vietnam.

Mary Chambers

Mary Chambers has a PhD in entomology and disease transmission dynamics from the University of Cambridge. She has worked at OUCRU Vietnam for over 18 years. Ten years ago she developed the public and community engagement programme for OUCRU HCMC and sister units in Hanoi, Nepal and Indonesia. The... Read more

Mary Chambers has a PhD in entomology and disease transmission dynamics from the University of Cambridge. She has worked at OUCRU Vietnam for over 18 years. Ten years ago she developed the public and community engagement programme for OUCRU HCMC and sister units in Hanoi, Nepal and Indonesia. The PE group now has over 15 members who work on a diverse range of engagement projects including a focus on schools engagement, communities such as farmers affected by zoonotic diseases and patients in clinical research trials. She will speak about how engagement with patients and health care workers is essential to support the health care systems in which clinical research is conducted in Vietnam.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Georgina Humphreys

Tue 6 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Wed 7 Nov 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Using the UK Biobank Study for biomedical research

Dr Carmen Piernas

The UK Biobank study has recruited 500,000 volunteers from all around the UK aged 40-69 at enrolment. This age group is being studied because it involves people at risk over the next few decades of developing a wide range of important diseases (including cancer, heart disease, stroke, diabetes,... Read more

The UK Biobank study has recruited 500,000 volunteers from all around the UK aged 40-69 at enrolment. This age group is being studied because it involves people at risk over the next few decades of developing a wide range of important diseases (including cancer, heart disease, stroke, diabetes, dementia). The purpose of this talk is to provide an introduction to this resource for health research and guidance on how to access and handle this data. I will also show preliminary results from current studies we are doing within the Health Behaviours team in the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Wed 7 Nov 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

Ethox Centre and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox and WEH Seminar: The Embassy of Good Science: A European Initiative to strengthen research integrity and research ethics

Dr Natalie Evans

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christa Henrichs

Wed 7 Nov 2018 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Pathologically distinct fibroblast subsets drive inflammation and tissue damage in arthritis

Professor Christopher Buckley

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 8 Nov 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Live and let die: the untold story of caspases

Dr Alberto Baena

The evolutionarily conserved proteases referred to as caspases have been studied over the years for being the major regulators of cell death via apoptosis. However, recent investigations are starting to highlight their key role in the regulation of other basic cellular tasks without causing cell... Read more

The evolutionarily conserved proteases referred to as caspases have been studied over the years for being the major regulators of cell death via apoptosis. However, recent investigations are starting to highlight their key role in the regulation of other basic cellular tasks without causing cell death (e.g. cell proliferation, cell differentiation and cell signalling). Although the regulation and function of caspases during apoptosis is well characterised their non-apoptotic roles are yet poorly understood. The research efforts of my group are focused on shedding light into these fundamental biological problems by using Drosophila and mammalian cellular models. Our findings illustrate the highly tissue-specific and instrumental role of caspases in the regulation of stem cell properties and tumour microenvironment. This data can decisively contribute not only to change our current understanding of caspase biology but also the origin/course of multiple diseases, including cancer. Beyond the biological interest, in the long-term, our findings could be also relevant from a therapeutic perspective. (www.caspaselab.com)

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 8 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting room A , Headington OX3 7BN

Bioinformatics and CryoEM

Dr Jon Agirre

Abstract The introduction of intuitive graphical software has enabled structural biologists who are not experts in crystallography to build complete protein or nucleic acid models rapidly. In contrast, carbohydrates are in a completely different situation: scant automation exists, and users... Read more

Abstract The introduction of intuitive graphical software has enabled structural biologists who are not experts in crystallography to build complete protein or nucleic acid models rapidly. In contrast, carbohydrates are in a completely different situation: scant automation exists, and users building models manually frequently trip over legacy issues such as incorrect dictionaries or non-standard atom naming, which evidence a historical lack of methodological support for carbohydrates. Sugars are stereochemically complex and, as pyranose rings, have clear conformational preferences. And despite this, all refinement programs may produce high-energy conformations at medium to low resolution, without any support from the electron density; this problem renders the affected structures unusable in glyco-chemical terms. Bringing structural glycobiology up to ‘protein standards’ is thus requiring a total methodological overhaul. Time is of the essence, as the community is steadily increasing the production rate of glycoproteins, and electron cryo- microscopy has just started to image them in precisely that resolution range where crystallographic methods falter most. In this talk, I will introduce our latest methodological developments, designed to streamline and automate hitherto error-prone processes, effectively aiding crystallographers and electron microscopists alike in producing correct atomic models with confidence. Some references in chronological order - Agirre, J., Davies, G., Wilson, K., & Cowtan, K. (2015). Carbohydrate anomalies in the PDB. Nature chemical biology, 11(5), 303. - Agirre, J., Iglesias-Fernández, J., Rovira, C., Davies, G. J., Wilson, K. S., & Cowtan, K. D. (2015). Privateer: software for the conformational validation of carbohydrate structures. Nature Structural and Molecular Biology, 22(11), 833. - Hudson, K. L., Bartlett, G. J., Diehl, R. C., Agirre, J., Gallagher, T., Kiessling, L. L., & Woolfson, D. N. (2015). Carbohydrate–aromatic interactions in proteins. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 137(48), 15152-15160. - Agirre, J., Davies, G. J., Wilson, K. S., & Cowtan, K. D. (2017). Carbohydrate structure: the rocky road to automation. Current opinion in structural biology, 44, 39-47. - McNicholas, S., & Agirre, J. (2017). Glycoblocks: a schematic three-dimensional representation for glycans and their interactions. Acta Crystallographica Section D: Structural Biology, 73(2), 187-194. - Agirre, J. (2017). Strategies for carbohydrate model building, refinement and validation. Acta Crystallographica Section D, 73(2), 171-186. Biography Jon Agirre did a degree in Computer Engineering (San Sebastian, Spain) and received a PhD in Biochemistry (Bilbao, Spain) from the University of the Basque Country in 2009, and after short stages in the Institut de Biologie Structurale Jean-Pierre Ebel in Grenoble and Institut Pasteur in Paris (2011), went on to postdoctoral research in the Department of Chemistry of the University of York, where he continued the longtime tradition of crystallographic method development at York Structural Biology Laboratory (YSBL). In 2017 he received a Royal Society University Research Fellowship to work on new methodologies for carbohydrate structure modelling, refinement, validation and representation. He is the lead author of the Privateer, Sails and Glycoblocks software, and a major contributor to CCP4i2, the new graphical user interface for the CCP4 suite of programs.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Thu 8 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Acute General Medicine Firm A / WIMM

Dr Bahram Jafar-Mohammadi, Dr Andrew King

Acute General Medicine Firm A: "Pituitary apoplexy and the acute medical take", Dr Bahram Jafar-Mohammadi -- WIMM: "Flicking the switch: developing potential new therapies for severe alpha-thalassaemia", Dr Andrew King -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Acute General Medicine Firm A: "Pituitary apoplexy and the acute medical take", Dr Bahram Jafar-Mohammadi -- WIMM: "Flicking the switch: developing potential new therapies for severe alpha-thalassaemia", Dr Andrew King -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 8 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting room A , Headington OX3 7BN

'Computational methods for carbohydrate structure determination, validation and analysis’

Dr Jon Agirre

Abstract The introduction of intuitive graphical software has enabled structural biologists who are not experts in crystallography to build complete protein or nucleic acid models rapidly. In contrast, carbohydrates are in a completely different situation: scant automation exists, and users... Read more

Abstract The introduction of intuitive graphical software has enabled structural biologists who are not experts in crystallography to build complete protein or nucleic acid models rapidly. In contrast, carbohydrates are in a completely different situation: scant automation exists, and users building models manually frequently trip over legacy issues such as incorrect dictionaries or non-standard atom naming, which evidence a historical lack of methodological support for carbohydrates. Sugars are stereochemically complex and, as pyranose rings, have clear conformational preferences. And despite this, all refinement programs may produce high-energy conformations at medium to low resolution, without any support from the electron density; this problem renders the affected structures unusable in glyco-chemical terms. Bringing structural glycobiology up to ‘protein standards’ is thus requiring a total methodological overhaul. Time is of the essence, as the community is steadily increasing the production rate of glycoproteins, and electron cryo- microscopy has just started to image them in precisely that resolution range where crystallographic methods falter most. In this talk, I will introduce our latest methodological developments, designed to streamline and automate hitherto error-prone processes, effectively aiding crystallographers and electron microscopists alike in producing correct atomic models with confidence. Some references in chronological order - Agirre, J., Davies, G., Wilson, K., & Cowtan, K. (2015). Carbohydrate anomalies in the PDB. Nature chemical biology, 11(5), 303. - Agirre, J., Iglesias-Fernández, J., Rovira, C., Davies, G. J., Wilson, K. S., & Cowtan, K. D. (2015). Privateer: software for the conformational validation of carbohydrate structures. Nature Structural and Molecular Biology, 22(11), 833. - Hudson, K. L., Bartlett, G. J., Diehl, R. C., Agirre, J., Gallagher, T., Kiessling, L. L., & Woolfson, D. N. (2015). Carbohydrate–aromatic interactions in proteins. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 137(48), 15152-15160. - Agirre, J., Davies, G. J., Wilson, K. S., & Cowtan, K. D. (2017). Carbohydrate structure: the rocky road to automation. Current opinion in structural biology, 44, 39-47. - McNicholas, S., & Agirre, J. (2017). Glycoblocks: a schematic three-dimensional representation for glycans and their interactions. Acta Crystallographica Section D: Structural Biology, 73(2), 187-194. - Agirre, J. (2017). Strategies for carbohydrate model building, refinement and validation. Acta Crystallographica Section D, 73(2), 171-186. Biography Jon Agirre did a degree in Computer Engineering (San Sebastian, Spain) and received a PhD in Biochemistry (Bilbao, Spain) from the University of the Basque Country in 2009, and after short stages in the Institut de Biologie Structurale Jean-Pierre Ebel in Grenoble and Institut Pasteur in Paris (2011), went on to postdoctoral research in the Department of Chemistry of the University of York, where he continued the longtime tradition of crystallographic method development at York Structural Biology Laboratory (YSBL). In 2017 he received a Royal Society University Research Fellowship to work on new methodologies for carbohydrate structure modelling, refinement, validation and representation. He is the lead author of the Privateer, Sails and Glycoblocks software, and a major contributor to CCP4i2, the new graphical user interface for the CCP4 suite of programs.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Fri 9 Nov 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Cricket to clinic via the lab

Professor Giles Toogood

This is about combining sport and surgery, and the advances in hepatobiliary surgery.

This is about combining sport and surgery, and the advances in hepatobiliary surgery.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 9 Nov 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

When hitting one affects many - The expanding spectrum of GP130-associated Mendelian diseases

Dr Hebe Chen

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 9 Nov 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

Ethox Centre and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Fri 9 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Stronger together: understanding pancreatic beta-cell connectivity in health and disease

Professor Guy Rutter

Persistently elevated levels of glucose and fatty acids are known to contribute to failed insulin secretion during the development of Type 2 diabetes. We have shown that glucolipotoxic conditions impair cell-cell communication (“connectivity”) to impair insulin secretion (Hodson et al, 2013).... Read more

Persistently elevated levels of glucose and fatty acids are known to contribute to failed insulin secretion during the development of Type 2 diabetes. We have shown that glucolipotoxic conditions impair cell-cell communication (“connectivity”) to impair insulin secretion (Hodson et al, 2013). Recently (Johnston et al, 2016) we have combined optogenetics and rapid Ca2+ imaging across the islet syncytium to demonstrate that a subset (~5%) of beta cells (“hubs”) coordinate the activity of “follower” cells. Photo-painting using a light sensitive-RFP revealed that hub cells are enriched for glucokinase, but show low levels of Nkx6.1 and insulin gene expression. These cells also display enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential in response to high glucose. Interrogation of single β cell RNASeq data (Xin et al PNAS, 2016) confirms the existence of a subset of cells with a similar transcriptomic configuration. Hub cells are unusually susceptible to metabolic stresses including high fatty acid/glucose levels, and cytotoxic cytokines, suggesting that they may be targeted in diabetes. Since deletion of GWAS genes for diabetes including ADCY5 and TCF7L2 affect cell-cell communication, future work will explore the possibility that genes at other loci, including STARD10 (Carrat et al, 2017) also act in part by altering hub cell-led β cell connectivity. Recent findings exploring the existence of β cell sub-populations in islets in the living animal, including zebra fish and after engraftment into the anterior chamber of the mouse eye, will also be discussed.

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 9 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

CANCELLED - Inspiring the young generation of scientists - Equality and Diversity Seminar

Professor Marianne Bronner

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Catherine Porcher

Mon 12 Nov 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM seminar room , Headington OX3 9DS

Fidelity of DNA double strand break repair is embedded in 3D structure of the neighboring chromatin

Dr Fena Ochs

Since the discovery of the first DNA damage-induced histone modification by Bill Bonner in 1998, we know that DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) trigger accumulation of proteins that read these modifications and navigate repair pathways to restore DNA integrity with high fidelity and with minimum... Read more

Since the discovery of the first DNA damage-induced histone modification by Bill Bonner in 1998, we know that DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) trigger accumulation of proteins that read these modifications and navigate repair pathways to restore DNA integrity with high fidelity and with minimum collateral damage to healthy genome. Although the recent addition of shieldin on the list of proteins that carry out this function was a major step forward, we are still lacking a unifying concept to explain how this vital mode of genome maintenance operates in three-dimensional (3D) space of mammalian nucleus. The conundrum is that while active sites of DNA repair are confined to tiny nuclear volumes, the accompanying chromatin responses spread out to megabase distances. Despite this has been noticed already two decades ago in the Bonner study, we do not understand how repair reactions benefit from remote chromatin modifications. Likewise, we do not know how these modifications reflect, and impact on, chromatin architecture. Furthermore, the abundance of chromatin-bound genome caretakers can vary by an order of magnitude for reasons that remain unclear. To answer these questions, we applied super-resolution microscopy to interrogate spatio-temporal chromatin features after DNA breakage. We will provide evidence that chromatin architecture at DSB sites is actively stabilized and that topological integrity of DSB-flanking chromatin lays down a physical fundament for repair fidelity. We will support this by showing that 53BP1 and RIF1, two proteins that sequentially accumulate at DSB sites, form an autonomous functional module that actively maintains globular chromatin structure. We will show that depletion of 53BP1 or RIF1 phenocopies malfunction of cohesin, the key organizer or chromatin architecture, by causing distortion of chromatin topology accompanied by DSB hyperresection. Unexpectedly, we will also show that stabilization of higher-order chromatin structure after DNA breakage operates independently of repair. We will integrate these findings to a conceptual framework suggesting that 53BP1 and RIF1 primarily evolved to safeguard information stored in 3D chromatin and only later were harnessed to foster repair fidelity by locally concentrating ultralow-abundant antagonists of DSB resection such as shieldin.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Amanda O'Neill

Mon 12 Nov 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

* CANCELLED * Perivascular Macrophages in Health and Disease: Their Emerging Roles in Cancer

Professor Claire Lewis

Evidence has emerged recently for a specialised subset of macrophages, those lying on the abluminal surface of blood vessels, performing an array of essential functions in steady state tissues. These include the phagocytosis of pathogens, tight control of both vascular permeability and tissue... Read more

Evidence has emerged recently for a specialised subset of macrophages, those lying on the abluminal surface of blood vessels, performing an array of essential functions in steady state tissues. These include the phagocytosis of pathogens, tight control of both vascular permeability and tissue integrity, and dampening on inappropriate inflammation. Alternatively, the aberrant activity of these perivascular sentinels contributes to the onset and/or progression of various diseases including cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis and type I diabetes. In my talk, I will outline their multifunctional role in cancer, especially their promotion of tumour repair after various forms of anti-cancer treatment (Hughes et al. 2015. Cancer Res. 75: 3479-91. Lewis et al. 2016. Cancer Cell 30:18-25). ---- After completing her DPhil in the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics in Oxford in 1986, Claire held two postdoctoral positions and a Research Lectureship in the Medical School in Oxford before moving to the Medical School in Sheffield in 1996. She currently holds a Personal Chair in Molecular & Cellular Pathology and heads a research team focussed mainly on the role of macrophage subsets in tumour responses to various anti-cancer treatments. They have also developed ways of using macrophages to target therapeutic genes and viruses to tumours (as reported by the BBC: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-20795977). Her work is currently funded by grants from Cancer Research UK, Prostate Cancer UK, Breast Cancer Now, and the EU, and she sits on the editorial boards of Cancer Research, Blood, Oncoimmunology and J. Clin Invest Insight. She is a new member of the MRC’s Molecular & Cellular Medicines Board and was awarded a DSc by Oxford University in 2006 for her contribution to the field of tumour inflammation.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 12 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

Molecular mechanisms to cope with endoplasmic reticulum stress

Prof David Ron

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Mon 12 Nov 2018 from 15:00 to 16:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Phenome@BDI Seminar: Parental genotypes influencing the environment

Professor Augustine Kong, Alex Young

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Tue 13 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Floor meeting - 2 groups will give an update on the research work in their laboratory

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 13 Nov 2018 from 14:30 to 15:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Targeting subcellular trafficking behaviour for the design of therapeutic antibodies

Professor E. Sally Ward

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 14 Nov 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

Ethox Centre and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox and WEH Seminar: Political Bioethics

Dr Benjamin Gregg

How should members of a liberal democratic political community, open to value pluralism, decide bioethical issues that generate deep disagreement? All too often, reasoned debate yields no answer equally acceptable to all participants and affected persons. One political means of reaching binding... Read more

How should members of a liberal democratic political community, open to value pluralism, decide bioethical issues that generate deep disagreement? All too often, reasoned debate yields no answer equally acceptable to all participants and affected persons. One political means of reaching binding because authoritative decisions are majoritarian democratic institutions. A core feature of this means is proceduralism, the notion both that no rule is acceptable apart from a formal method, and that the acceptable method yields an acceptable rule. I argue that two procedures in particular can deliver “legitimate” bioethical decisions. I advance this argument in three steps. (1) I develop the thesis with the example of human germline gene editing. (2) I propose a general understanding of proceduralism, toward coping with the bioethical questions raised by germline engineering. (3) I combine two types of proceduralism toward deciding difficult bioethical issues: expert bioethics committees and deliberative democracy. I call this approach political bioethics on the claim that bioethics belongs to the political sphere where issues of regulation, legislation, and public policy are decided. Resolving such issues often involves decisions that cannot be “correct” but can be “procedurally legitimate.”

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 14 Nov 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Parallel Evolution and the Emergence of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A Viruses

Dr Marina Escalera Zamudio

Surveillance of avian influenza is crucial for early detection of outbreaks in bird populations. Although virulent phenotypes are complex traits, several molecular determinants of virulence have been well characterised, such as a polybasic proteolytic cleavage site within the Hemagglutinin (HA)... Read more

Surveillance of avian influenza is crucial for early detection of outbreaks in bird populations. Although virulent phenotypes are complex traits, several molecular determinants of virulence have been well characterised, such as a polybasic proteolytic cleavage site within the Hemagglutinin (HA) protein that allows a systemic spread of the infection. We hypothesise that the parallel evolution of highly pathogenic viral lineages from low-pathogenic ancestors may have been facilitated by permissive or compensatory secondary mutations occurring anywhere in the viral genome. We developed a computational method to detect mutations associated to an evolving trait within a given phylogeny (in this case, virulence) and applied it to a phylogenetically informed sample dataset of H7NX viruses (n>300). A panel of over 30 sites strongly associated with the HP phenotype were detected. This panel may function as an early detection system for transitions between LP to HP avian viruses.

Audience: Members of the scientific community

Organisers: Professor Sunetra Gupta

please arrive 5 minutes early to gain access to the building

Thu 15 Nov 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Sympathetic Neuroimmunity in obesity

Dr Ana Domingos

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 15 Nov 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Oxford Martin School, Oxford Martin School, 34 Broad Street, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

The Neuromodulatory Connectome: Wire and Wireless Networks

William Schafer

The synaptic connectome of the nematode C. elegans has been mapped completely, and efforts are ongoing to map the connectomes of other animals. However, chemical synapses represent only one of several types of signaling interaction in the nervous system. In particular, neuromodulation by... Read more

The synaptic connectome of the nematode C. elegans has been mapped completely, and efforts are ongoing to map the connectomes of other animals. However, chemical synapses represent only one of several types of signaling interaction in the nervous system. In particular, neuromodulation by monoamines, neuropeptides, or classical neurotransmitters is widespread and often occurs extrasynaptically between neurons not connected by wired synapses. In C. elegans, it is feasible to map these neuromodulatory networks comprehensively and at a single-cell level and examine how wired and wireless signaling interact. In this talk, I will describe what we have learned about the functional organisation of neuromodulatory circuitry involved in the control of behavioural states such as arousal, as well as our ongoing efforts to map extrasynaptic connectome networks comprehensively in the worm. In addition, I will discuss our identification of new ionotropic receptors for monoamines and other neuromodulators, which may represent novel targets for anti-parasitic drugs.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Thu 15 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Radiology / Psychological Medicine

Dr Luke Solomons, Dr Ursula Schulz, Prof Fergus Gleeson

Radiology: "The National Consortium of Intelligent Medical Imaging is open for business", Prof Fergus Gleeson -- Psychological Medicine: "STROKE (I63.3) OR NOT (F44.4)? What is WDZZ22?", Dr Luke Solomons and Dr Ursula Schulz -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Radiology: "The National Consortium of Intelligent Medical Imaging is open for business", Prof Fergus Gleeson -- Psychological Medicine: "STROKE (I63.3) OR NOT (F44.4)? What is WDZZ22?", Dr Luke Solomons and Dr Ursula Schulz -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 15 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

UBVO Seminar: Psychosocial inequality, insecurity and overweight/obesity in a Danish youth cohort

Per Høgh Poulsen

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 15 Nov 2018 from 14:00 to 15:00

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Microbial-host interactions involved in obesity and the response to bariatric surgery

Dr Carolina Arancibia, Dr Alessandra Geremia, Dr Valentina Greto

Obesity has reached alarming levels in the UK. According to a government report, one in four adults are obese in the UK. Medical and dietary interventions are often ineffective at inducing weight loss and the best outcomes are obtained after weight loss surgery (also known as bariatric surgery).... Read more

Obesity has reached alarming levels in the UK. According to a government report, one in four adults are obese in the UK. Medical and dietary interventions are often ineffective at inducing weight loss and the best outcomes are obtained after weight loss surgery (also known as bariatric surgery). These surgical procedures were initially thought to work mechanistically through stomach restriction and lower calorie absorption through the shortened intestine. However, recent evidence has challenged this concept and it has been suggested that changes in the gut microbial flora could affect metabolism contributing to weight loss and increased insulin response. Gut flora is beneficial to the host in many ways, contributing to for example, nutrient absorption and a healthy immune system. Abnormalities in the composition of the gut microbes are thought to contribute to the pathology of certain diseases, including obesity and diabetes. The aim of this project is to find out how altered host and microbial functions affect weight loss and metabolism after bariatric surgery. Understanding more about the microbial flora and how this impacts patient’s health will hopefully make way for new approaches in the treatment of obesity and diabetes.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Carolina Arancibia

Thu 15 Nov 2018 from 15:00 to 16:00

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Evaluation of the stromal compartment activation in therapy-refractory inflammatory bowel disease patients that require surgical intervention

Dr Matthias Friedrich

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), in its manifestations Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, is a chronic inflammatory disease that can affect all parts of the digestive tract. Environmental factors, genetic predisposition and an abnormal function of the immune system are thought to cause... Read more

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), in its manifestations Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, is a chronic inflammatory disease that can affect all parts of the digestive tract. Environmental factors, genetic predisposition and an abnormal function of the immune system are thought to cause IBD.
Standard therapies aim at controlling intestinal inflammation and prolonging the time between disease flare-ups. Although significant progress has been made over the last decades, a high proportion of patients still do not respond to these anti- inflammatory therapies, or become resistant during the course of treatment. Failure to therapeutically control chronic inflammation can lead to severe complications in IBD patients, such as fibrosis, which requires surgical intervention. Fibrotic changes in the intestine are driven by an activation of a particular cell type, the fibroblast. The aim of this project is to find out whether IBD patients that go on to require surgery display an activation of fibroblasts, and which changes in the tissue are associated with this activation. For this, differences in the way the surgically removed fibrotic tissue is programmed will be compared to the programming of non-inflamed ‘normal’ tissue. We believe that certain alterations in this programming, which is controlled by a network of signals, can lead to changes that are specifically associated with inflammation and the requirement for surgery. Differences in the networks of signals which make up this program of inflamed and non-inflamed tissue will help us identify novel, fibroblast-targeting, therapies which will disrupt the inflammation program and hopefully reduce the requirement for surgery.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Carolina Arancibia

Fri 16 Nov 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Hearing Loss and Public Health - is anybody listening?

Professor Gerry O'Donoghue

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 16 Nov 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Follicular connections: bloody Tfh cells in sight

Elena Brenna

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 16 Nov 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

An immunogenetics approach to studying immune-cell involvement in ankylosing spondylitis

Aimee Hanson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Fri 16 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Macrophage contribution to Insulin Resistance independently of Inflammation

Dr Myriam Aouadi

Since the discovery of macrophages in adipose tissue, many laboratories have focused their effort on understanding the contribution of these immune cells to metabolic diseases. Despite great progress in characterizing obesity as a state of low-grade inflammation, very little is known about the... Read more

Since the discovery of macrophages in adipose tissue, many laboratories have focused their effort on understanding the contribution of these immune cells to metabolic diseases. Despite great progress in characterizing obesity as a state of low-grade inflammation, very little is known about the multiple phenotypes and functions of macrophages in metabolic tissues. The lack of methods to carefully investigate cell-to-cell variability in macrophage phenotype and to manipulate gene expression in a cell-specific manner has delayed answering these crucial questions. Our lab takes advantage of sophisticated methods, such as next generation sequencing, CytOF and gene silencing in a cell specific manner, to investigate macrophage subpopulations and their function in obesity-associated metabolic complications.

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 19 Nov 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting Rooms 71a,b,c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Developing T cell receptor therapies to target cancer

Marco Lepore, David Cole

Immunotherapies that activate patient’s T cells to attack cancer cells have a potential to eradicate tumours. Although therapies using monoclonal antibodies have been proven effective, they are limited to targeting cell surface proteins. This limitation is overcome by T cell receptor (TCR) based... Read more

Immunotherapies that activate patient’s T cells to attack cancer cells have a potential to eradicate tumours. Although therapies using monoclonal antibodies have been proven effective, they are limited to targeting cell surface proteins. This limitation is overcome by T cell receptor (TCR) based approaches, as TCRs recognize a broad range of peptides presented in the context of human leukocyte antigens (HLAs). At Immunocore, we have developed Immune mobilizing monoclonal TCRs Against Cancer (ImmTAC™), a new class of soluble bi-specific biologics comprising affinity-enhanced TCR fused to an anti-CD3 effector domain. ImmTAC molecules recognize a specific target peptide presented by HLA on tumour cells and redirect the patient’s T cells to carry out potent tumour cell killing. Development of ImmTAC molecules is a multi-step process where safety and specificity are the key considerations. Key is affinity maturation of the TCR through mutagenesis of CDR loops. The highest-affinity mutants are further screened for specificity and cross-reactivity using a range of cellular assays. This process has been successfully applied to produce ImmTAC molecules for a number of targets, demonstrating the robustness of the platform. As an example, IMCgp100, an ImmTAC recognizing melanoma associated protein gp100, is currently undergoing clinical trials in patients suffering from advanced malignant melanoma.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Amanda O'Neill

Mon 19 Nov 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, Sherrington Library, 2nd floor, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Using transcriptomics to understand neurodegenerative disorders

Dr Mina Ryten

As an MBPhD graduate (Cambridge University & University College London) and Academic Clinical Fellow in Neurology (London Deanery), I have been lucky enough to receive training in basic research as well as clinical medicine. I have thoroughly enjoyed both and am committed to pursuing a joint... Read more

As an MBPhD graduate (Cambridge University & University College London) and Academic Clinical Fellow in Neurology (London Deanery), I have been lucky enough to receive training in basic research as well as clinical medicine. I have thoroughly enjoyed both and am committed to pursuing a joint clinical and research career in neuroscience. However, I am fully aware that the gap between clinical realities and basic research can be hard to bridge. During my PhD I investigated the role of a specific signalling system, purinergic signalling, in skeletal muscle development and regeneration under the supervision of Professor Geoffrey Burnstock (University College London). Using techniques such as cell culture, RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, I was able to dissect out the role of an individual signalling pathway. I demonstrated that activation of the P2X5 receptor for ATP potentiated muscle stem cell differentiation and that this process was dependent on activation of the p38 MAP kinase pathway. Since my PhD the advent of high through-put microarray and sequencing-based technologies have made it possible to take a systems approach and so have the potential to provide exciting insights into complex neurological diseases. With this is in mind I have sought to develop new skills in biomedical informatics and currently hold an MRC Post-doctoral Training Fellowship in Biomedical Informatics. This fellowship has given me the opportunity to pursue my interest in the pathophysiological basis of risk genetic loci for neurodegenerative diseases and that is the focus of my current research.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

PLEASE NOTE NEW TIME!

Mon 19 Nov 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Tertiary lymphoid structures: autoimmunity goes local

Dr Francesca Barone

Detection of germinal center-like structures within tertiary lymphoid organs (TLS) in the salivary glands of patients with Sjogren’s syndrome (SS) is associated with increased risk of lymphoma. Moreover, histological analysis of salivary glands is currently used as a prognostic tool in clinical... Read more

Detection of germinal center-like structures within tertiary lymphoid organs (TLS) in the salivary glands of patients with Sjogren’s syndrome (SS) is associated with increased risk of lymphoma. Moreover, histological analysis of salivary glands is currently used as a prognostic tool in clinical practice and the disaggregation of TLOs in post-treatment biopsies is considered a valid measure of positive outcome in ongoing clinical trials. Nonetheless, the biological role of TLS in inflammation remains unclear. How do these structures form and how do they differ from a physiological secondary lymphoid organ? Are those differences at the core of the autoimmune process in SS? ---- During her undergraduate course in Italy, Francesca developed a strong interest in research and, after obtaining her degree, decided to suspend her clinical training to undertake a PhD. She relocated to London to investigate the mechanisms that regulate the acquisition of lymphoid organ features in salivary gland inflammatory infiltrates of Sjogren’s Syndrome patients, with particular focus on the factors that regulate lymphocyte organization and survival within the gland. She obtained her Specialization as a rheumatologist in 2007 followed by her PhD in 2008. At Kings College London, she embarked on a period of post-doctoral studies examining the physiological biology of mucosal B cells, whilst also working as an honorary rheumatology consultant at Guy’s Hospital. In 2010 Francesca moved to Birmingham to study the mechanisms regulating leukocyte/stromal cell interaction in humans and animal models of inflammatory diseases. She obtained a Wellcome Trust Clinician Scientist fellowship in July 2010 to develop her research interest and start her own independent group. Francesca currently works as a consultant rheumatologist in both the University Hospitals Birmingham (UHB) and also the Sandwell and West Birmingham Trusts, with a main clinical interest in inflammatory arthritis and Sjogren’s syndrome. Since 2014 she has been the Head of the eSSential – EULAR Sjogren’s Syndrome Experimental aNd Translational Investigative Alliance (EULAR) study group. In 2016 Francesca obtained a Senior Research Fellowship from ARUK (now Versus Arthritis) to exploit the mechanisms enabling the persistence of tertiary lymphoid structures (TLS) in inflamed tissue and to investigate the pathogenicity of stromal cells in TLS-associated diseases.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 19 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

The Role of Protein Complexes in Human Genetic Disease

Dr Joe Marsh

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Tue 20 Nov 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre , Headington OX3 7LF

Stroma Focus Group Meeting

Thomas Layton, Mathilde Pohin

Our 2 speakers are: Thomas Layton - Single cell analysis of the cellular landscape in human fibrosis. Mathilde Pohin - OSM a major role in myeloid cells – fibroblast cross talk

Our 2 speakers are: Thomas Layton - Single cell analysis of the cellular landscape in human fibrosis. Mathilde Pohin - OSM a major role in myeloid cells – fibroblast cross talk

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Stephanie Dakin

If you have any enquiries please contact stephanie.dakin@ndorms.ox.ac.uk or matthias.friedrich@kennedy.ox.ac.uk. All are welcome and we look forward to seeing you there

Tue 20 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Balancing cell potency and specification in stem cells and in the early embryo

Dr Veronique Azuara

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 20 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Wed 21 Nov 2018 from 09:15 to 10:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

“How does leukaemia disrupt hematopoiesis?” Viva Seminar

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Butler

Viva Seminar

Wed 21 Nov 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Neo-antigen based cancer vaccines

Prof Alfredo Nicosia

Audience: Public

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Wed 21 Nov 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

Ethox Centre and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox and WEH Seminar: Punishing the innocent and other riddles of moral responsibility scepticism

Dr Hazem Zohny

Moral responsibility scepticism, understood as taking seriously the possibility that we lack the kind of control in our actions to be truly deserving of blame and praise, raises concerns about how we can justify punishing criminals. If no one deserves blame, on what basis can we sanction criminals?... Read more

Moral responsibility scepticism, understood as taking seriously the possibility that we lack the kind of control in our actions to be truly deserving of blame and praise, raises concerns about how we can justify punishing criminals. If no one deserves blame, on what basis can we sanction criminals? The Quarantine Model by Derk Pereboom is one proposal that offers a possible justification. It draws on an analogy between carriers of severe infectious diseases and dangerous criminals: in the same way that we may be able to justifiably quarantine blameless individuals carrying dangerous diseases for the purpose of self-protection and the prevention of harm to others, we could similarly justifiably “quarantine” dangerous criminals for the purpose of self-defence and defence of others, even though such individuals are blameless according to moral responsibility sceptics. In other words, this model appeals to the right to harm offenders in self-defense and defence of others to justify criminal sanctions. But there are questions about whether such a model can adequately deter criminal behaviour. In fact, some have argued it might incentivize crime. I explore the limits of the right to harm defensively and argue that it could be used to justify deterring punishments under some circumstances.

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 21 Nov 2018 from 11:30 to 12:30

WHG Lunchtime Lab Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Lunter and Stuart Lunchtime Lab Talks

Richard Brown, Daniel Cooke, Dr Luigi De Colibus, Helen Duyvesteyn

Lunter Group Speaker: Richard Brown Title: ‘A Deep Learning Model for Splice Site Prediction’ Speaker: Daniel Cooke Title: ‘A unified haplotype-based method for accurate and comprehensive variant calling’ Stuart Group Speaker: Luigi De Colibus Title: ‘Assembly of complex viruses... Read more

Lunter Group Speaker: Richard Brown Title: ‘A Deep Learning Model for Splice Site Prediction’ Speaker: Daniel Cooke Title: ‘A unified haplotype-based method for accurate and comprehensive variant calling’ Stuart Group Speaker: Luigi De Colibus Title: ‘Assembly of complex viruses exemplified by a halophilic euryarchaeal virus’ Speaker: Helen Duyvesteyn Title: ‘Structural Studies of Picornaviridae’

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Please note this has changed to an earlier slot of 11:30-12:30 due to a clash with Sir Mike Ferguson's seminar at the JR https://www.nds.ox.ac.uk/events/litchfield-lecture-2018-19

Wed 21 Nov 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Adapting protein quality control for intervention in immunity and neurodegenerative diseases

Heidi Olzscha

Protein folding is tightly regulated by molecular chaperones and other protein quality control mechanisms such as the ubiquitin proteasome system and autophagy to ensure the integrity of the proteome. However, these systems can fail to prevent protein misfolding, leading to protein aggregation and... Read more

Protein folding is tightly regulated by molecular chaperones and other protein quality control mechanisms such as the ubiquitin proteasome system and autophagy to ensure the integrity of the proteome. However, these systems can fail to prevent protein misfolding, leading to protein aggregation and amyloidosis. They are underlying reasons for many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease or Huntington’s disease. Interfering with protein quality control systems and modulating posttranslational modifications of proteins can reduce aggregation, ameliorate amyloidosis and can have profound effects on the immune system.

Audience: Members of the scientific community

Organisers: Professor Sunetra Gupta

please arrive 5 minutes before the seminar to gain entry to the building

Wed 21 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 2, Academic Centre

Litchfield Lecture 2018: Basic to Clinical: A translational journey in parasitology and beyond

Professor Mike Ferguson

Audience: All Academic, clinical and support staff, all Graduate and Medical students

Organisers: Kathryn Smith

Wed 21 Nov 2018 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

A Ready Made killer: Preconfiguration of the chromatin landscape and fate determination for virus-specific CD8+ killer T cells

Professor Stephen Turner

A consequence of naive CD8+ T cell activation is specific changes in phenotype, proliferation and acquisition of lineage-specific function. The precise gene regulatory mechanisms that control these changes are largely unknown. Using a combination of genome wide sequencing approaches we have... Read more

A consequence of naive CD8+ T cell activation is specific changes in phenotype, proliferation and acquisition of lineage-specific function. The precise gene regulatory mechanisms that control these changes are largely unknown. Using a combination of genome wide sequencing approaches we have examined the wholesale changes in both 3D structure and biochemical modifications associated with virus-specific CD8+ T cell differentiation in response to infection. Our data suggests that lineage-specific fate determination is largely preconfigured, or poised, within mature naive virus-specific CD8+ T cells. More importantly our data suggest that effector differentiation is in fact actively restrained within the naive state by specific molecular mechanisms, with T cell activation resulting in release of this molecular handbrake that triggers transcriptional activation of a highly regulated differentiation program that underpins induction of an optimal effector killer T cell response. Understanding these mechanisms is key for understanding not only how optimal CD8+ T cell effector function is established but it has implications for our understanding of how immunological memory is established, and how we may modulate this process for therapeutic gain.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 22 Nov 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Theology Board Room, 2nd Floor, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

Thu 22 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Tropical Medicine Day

Tropical Medicine: "Be(a)ware of shape shifters", Dr David Eyre, Dr Nicola Jones and Dr Hanif Esmail -- Chair: Prof Chris O'Callaghan You are all welcome to join for the Tropical Medicine and Global Health Day lecture programme which will start straight after grand round in Lecture Theatre 2. We... Read more

Tropical Medicine: "Be(a)ware of shape shifters", Dr David Eyre, Dr Nicola Jones and Dr Hanif Esmail -- Chair: Prof Chris O'Callaghan You are all welcome to join for the Tropical Medicine and Global Health Day lecture programme which will start straight after grand round in Lecture Theatre 2. We are delighted to have 3 external speakers (Prof Chris Dye, Dr Jake Dunning and Dr Pippa Pett) and 2 internal speakers (Prof Sarah Rowland-Jones and Prof Susie Dunachie) providing a wide range of talks. Chris Dye is a visiting fellow at All Souls College and a Fellow of the Royal Society. Between 2014 and 2018 he was Director of Strategy at the World Health Organization serving as scientific adviser to the Director General. He was also the 35th Professor of Physic at Gresham College a post dedicated to giving public lectures. He will provide the keynote talk on "Public Health from AIDS to Zika" 14.10-14.50 Sarah Rowland-Jones is a Professor in the Nuffield Department of Medicine focusing on HIV research and recently has been elected as President of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine. She will talk on "Tropical Medicine - Past, Present, Future" 14.50-15.15 Susie Dunachie is an Associate Professor in the Nuffield Department of Medicine focusing on research into melioidosis and other intracellular pathogens and will talk on "The interaction of Diabetes and Global Infection" 15.15-15.40 Jake Dunning is Consultant in Infectious Diseases and Virology for the National Infection Service, Public Health England, focusing on response to High Consequence Infectious Diseases such as Ebola, MERS, Pandemic Flu and Monkey Pox. He is also an Infectious Diseases consultant at the Royal Free Hospital which houses the main High Security ID Unit for the UK. He will talk on "Tackling Emerging Threats at Home and Away" 15.50-16.15 Pippa Pett is a Junior Doctor at St Thomas's Hospital who has recently returned from MSF placements in South Sudan and Syria and will discuss her very varied experiences in a talk entitled "Humanitarian Aid in a Shifting Geopolitical Climate" 16.15-16.40

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 22 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

UBVO Seminar: Assessing the reformulation efforts of soft drinks companies in the UK

Lauren Bandy

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 22 Nov 2018 from 17:00 to 19:00

Centre for Personalised Medicine Seminars

Mathematical Institute, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

CPM Annual Lecture 2018 - Professor Charles Swanton

Professor Charles Swanton

We are delighted to invite you to the Centre for Personalised Medicine’s Annual Lecture on 22 November 2018 in the Mathematical Institute, Oxford. This year’s speaker is Professor Charles Swanton of the Francis Crick Institute, talking on cancer chromosomal evolution in metastases and immune... Read more

We are delighted to invite you to the Centre for Personalised Medicine’s Annual Lecture on 22 November 2018 in the Mathematical Institute, Oxford. This year’s speaker is Professor Charles Swanton of the Francis Crick Institute, talking on cancer chromosomal evolution in metastases and immune escape - insights from Tracerx. There will be a drinks reception at 17:00, followed by the lecture at 18:00. All interested persons are invited to attend. www.well.ox.ac.uk/cpm/2018-annual-lecture

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Catherine Lidbetter

Fri 23 Nov 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Avoiding obsolescence as a cancer surgeon - a few survival tips

Professor Declan Murphy

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 23 Nov 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Spontaneous and targeted disruption of thymus development and function: Lessons learnt

Wei Wu, Ioanna Rota, Prof Georg Holländer, Stanley Cheuk

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 23 Nov 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

NGS of Immune Repertoire for biomarker discovery

Dr Jian Han

Since 2007, we have been working on developing technologies and software tools to study immune repertoires. We have studied more than 40,000 samples and accumulated the most complete set of database on normal and patient repertoires. Based on deep knowledge and vast data, we have developed many... Read more

Since 2007, we have been working on developing technologies and software tools to study immune repertoires. We have studied more than 40,000 samples and accumulated the most complete set of database on normal and patient repertoires. Based on deep knowledge and vast data, we have developed many clinical applications, for example: (1) Sharing Index, describing a person repertoire overlapping with a disease signature, therefore, can be used for disease diagnoses; (2) Delta Index, describing the repertoire turn over rate and can be used to monitor treatment; (3) Essential and Diversity Indexes, evaluating repertoire diversity and provide an estimate of a person’s immune reserve; (4) Response Index, evaluate potential of responding to immune therapies. There are many technical challenges for sequencing immune repertoires. The method of library construction need to be inclusive, quantitative, and noise free. We have developed several multiplex PCR technologies (tem-PCR, arm-PCR, and dam-PCR) that allow us to amplify all 7 chains of T and B cell receptors from one sample, quantitatively. It also allowed us to study single cell to pair multiple chains of receptors and providing phenotype information at the same time. Sequencing immune repertoire is quite different from sequencing genomic DNA: Rather than re-sequencing a pubic genome, we perform de novo sequencing of private repertoires; the size of genome is known, while the size of repertoire universe is unknown; the genome is static, the repertoire is dynamic and changing every day; sequencing genome is to learn about genotype and physiology, pathways, sequencing repertoire is to learn about interactions with the environment, and is more about pathology and biomarkers. Genome sequencing can predict the future risks of having diseases; repertoire sequencing is trying to find out what our immune system is working on today.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Fri 23 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

GL Brown Lecture (PhySoc) - Seeing depth with two eyes: the binocular physiology of 3D space

Professor Andrew Parker

Neurons that are specifically tuned to binocular depth were discovered in seminal work published 50 years ago by Horace Barlow, Colin Blakemore and Jack Pettigrew in the Journal of Physiology. Their study in the primary visual cortex opened up the era of understanding the physiology of 3-D... Read more

Neurons that are specifically tuned to binocular depth were discovered in seminal work published 50 years ago by Horace Barlow, Colin Blakemore and Jack Pettigrew in the Journal of Physiology. Their study in the primary visual cortex opened up the era of understanding the physiology of 3-D perception. Thanks to more recent work, we now know that large areas of the extrastriate visual cortex are involved. Sites where binocular stereoscopic depth is integrated with other visual information can be identified and physiological signals related to active perceptual decisions about depth can be isolated. At some sites, a causal role of physiological signals for the perception of depth can be demonstrated by showing that weak electrical microstimulation of the cortex can alter behavioural reports of depth perception. However, there seems to be no single brain module that is responsible for computing stereoscopic depth. This lecture will trace these paths of discovery in human and animal studies. Andrew Parker will show how a better understanding of the physiology of depth perception changes our view of how the brain constructs a representation of the space around us. Findings from this neurophysiological research have implications for the growing popularity of 3-D cinema and immersive virtual reality.

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 23 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Studying drug effects on the Proteome

Marcus Bantscheff

Over the past decade, our ability to identify molecular mechanisms underlying disease and study drug action by mass spectrometry-based proteomics has progressed remarkably. Improved instrumentation and new experimental approaches allow studying cellular and tissue phenotypes in a disease context,... Read more

Over the past decade, our ability to identify molecular mechanisms underlying disease and study drug action by mass spectrometry-based proteomics has progressed remarkably. Improved instrumentation and new experimental approaches allow studying cellular and tissue phenotypes in a disease context, as well as upon modulation by bioactive molecules, with unprecedented resolution and dimensionality. Furthermore, the diversification of direct and indirect target identification methodologies allows for comprehensive analysis of cellular targets of bioactive compounds in live cells and the correlation between target engagement and proteotype effects. This talk focusses on the emerging role of mass spectrometry based proteomics in drug discovery and highlights experimental approaches and applications with impact for understanding efficacy and safety of drug candidates. Short Bio: Marcus Bantscheff graduated in Chemistry at the University of Konstanz and obtained his PhD degree from the University of Rostock working with Prof. Glocker on structure-function correlation of bacterial response regulator proteins utilizing mass spectrometric and protein chemistry methods. As a postdoctoral fellow at the Proteome Center in Rostock, Marcus was involved in setting up a proteomics unit and focused on the analysis of synovial fluids and tissue samples derived from rheumathoid arthritis patients and CIA mice. At Cellzome since 2002, he focuses on the development and application of proteomics and chemical biology approaches to characterize targets and mechanism-of-action of bioactive molecules. Marcus is an inventor on several patents including Cellzome’s Kinobeads™ technology, has co-authored more than 70 publications (h-index 38), and serves as a reviewer for reputed journals and funding bodies. He is a member of the scientific advisory board of Denator AB, the industry advisory board of Hochschule Mannheim and editorial board of Molecular and Cellular Proteomics. In 2016 his research was awarded with the Life Science price of the German Society for Mass Spectrometry. Marcus is a Senior Scientific Director at GSK and a Senior Fellow and in his current position, he leads the proteomics platform at Cellzome, A GSK company.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Fri 23 Nov 2018 from 14:30 to 15:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Molecular intricacies of T-cell receptor autoreactivity towards CD1 molecules presenting self-lipids

Dr Adam Shahine

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 23 Nov 2018 from 15:30 to 16:30

Health Economics Seminars

Richard Doll Building, 1st Floor Main Meeting Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

A Direct Regression Approach to Decomposing Socioeconomic Inequality of Health

Dr Guido Erreygers

In recent years several regression-based decomposition methods have been developed in order to identify the main determinants of socioeconomic inequality of health. In this paper we present a new regression approach that decomposes the correlation between socioeconomic conditions and health... Read more

In recent years several regression-based decomposition methods have been developed in order to identify the main determinants of socioeconomic inequality of health. In this paper we present a new regression approach that decomposes the correlation between socioeconomic conditions and health outcomes more directly than has been done so far. The method can be applied to both rank-dependent and level-dependent indicators of socioeconomic inequality of health. The response variable of our model measures the overall performance of individuals in the health and socioeconomic domains, and is regressed on a set of explanatory variables using OLS. The core of our composite response variable consists of the product of an individual's health outcome and the rank or level the individual attains in the socioeconomic distribution, depending on whether a rank-dependent or level-dependent indicator is decomposed. This simple reformulation of the indicator does not require the explanatory variables to be exclusively related to either health or the socioeconomic variable, but allows for a combined relationship. Regression results are described in terms of the marginal effects of the explanatory variables, but also in terms of their logworths or importance values. We illustrate our method by means of an empirical study using Australian health and income data. We compare our decomposition results to those obtained by other methods, such as the recently proposed recentered influence function (RIF) regression approach.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: HERC

This seminar is taking place at the Nuffield Department of Population Health, in the Richard Doll Building. Please report to reception on arrival who can direct you to the room.

Fri 23 Nov 2018 from 17:00 to 19:00

AfOx insaka - a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research

St Cross College, Lecture Theatre, West Wing, St Giles OX1 3LZ

AfOx insaka

Suzanne Wanjaria, Paris Stefanoudis

The AfOx insaka is a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research with speakers from diverse and varied academic disciplines. There are two events each term. On Friday of Week 3, and Friday of Week 7. Each event will feature two talks by speakers from different disciplines, followed by questions and discussion. Drinks will be served afterwards.

The AfOx insaka is a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research with speakers from diverse and varied academic disciplines. There are two events each term. On Friday of Week 3, and Friday of Week 7. Each event will feature two talks by speakers from different disciplines, followed by questions and discussion. Drinks will be served afterwards.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Mon 26 Nov 2018 from 12:30 to 13:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Mon 26 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

JAK/STAT signalling, stem cell subversion

Professaor Tony Green

Audience: Public

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Mon 26 Nov 2018 from 15:00 to 16:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Phenome@BDI Seminar: Leveraging whole genomes to discover aggressive phenotypes of prostate cancer

Dr David Wedge, Dan Woodcock

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Tue 27 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar: Using naturally randomized genetic evidence to inform the design of randomized trials

Professor Brian Ference

Brian is a cardiologist and genetic epidemiologist who was educated and trained at Harvard, Yale, Oxford and Cambridge Universities. He graduated from Yale Medical School, and trained in clinical epidemiology and genetic epidemiology at Yale. He then trained in cardiology and interventional... Read more

Brian is a cardiologist and genetic epidemiologist who was educated and trained at Harvard, Yale, Oxford and Cambridge Universities. He graduated from Yale Medical School, and trained in clinical epidemiology and genetic epidemiology at Yale. He then trained in cardiology and interventional cardiology at Harvard Medical School where he also completed the Program in Clinical Effectiveness at Harvard School of Public Health, and was an NHLBI Cardiovascular (Genetic) Epidemiology Fellow. He is currently Director of Research in Translational Therapeutics, and Head of the Centre for Naturally Randomized Trials in Cambridge having moved from Wayne State University School of Medicine in Detroit where he was Clinical Chief of Cardiology and Director of the Cardiovascular Genomic Research Centre. His research focuses on using Mendelian randomization to design ‘naturally randomized trials’ to generate evidence that can be used to improve the drug discovery and development process; inform the optimal design of trials; fill evidence gaps when a randomized trial is not possible or practical; and define the practice of precision cardiovascular medicine.

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 27 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Floor meeting - 2 groups will give an update on the research work in their laboratory

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 28 Nov 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

Ethox Centre and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

How can we make health care better? Developing an approach to quality and quality improvement.

Professor Alan Cribb

Vikki Entwistle and I are about to start a 5 year project – “But why is that better?” - on the potential contribution of bioethics/applied philosophy to health care quality improvement. The project will involve our own theoretical and empirical research but will also seek to draw others into... Read more

Vikki Entwistle and I are about to start a 5 year project – “But why is that better?” - on the potential contribution of bioethics/applied philosophy to health care quality improvement. The project will involve our own theoretical and empirical research but will also seek to draw others into this area including by developing a network that brings together bioethics and QI colleagues. In this seminar I hope to begin to stimulate some interest in this work by outlining the background to, and some of the hopes for, the project. As well as explaining the origins of the project in our previous work, and exploring some other related literatures, I will sketch out a few themes and topics that we have identified as starting points for an investigation of conceptual and ethical dimensions of QI research and practice.

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 28 Nov 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Host MHC and genomic diversity retards experimental evolution of viral virulence

Professor Wayne Potts

Experimental evolution of a mouse-specific retrovirus in various host genotypes reveal increases in fitness and virulence by 50- and 20-fold respectively. The virus adapts to specific host genotypes as indicated by its’ reduced ability to infect other host genotypes, including those that differ... Read more

Experimental evolution of a mouse-specific retrovirus in various host genotypes reveal increases in fitness and virulence by 50- and 20-fold respectively. The virus adapts to specific host genotypes as indicated by its’ reduced ability to infect other host genotypes, including those that differ only at histocompatibility loci. Three round serial passages where the host genotype is alternated once, dramatically reduces viral fitness and virulence. Full genome sequencing of these evolved viral lines reveal surprising results where no mutations have become fixed despite strong selection operating over 240 generations.

Audience: Members of the scientific community

Organisers: Professor Sunetra Gupta

Please arrive 5 minutes before the seminar to gain access to the building

Wed 28 Nov 2018 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

The transcriptional regulation of mucosal tolerance

Professor Graham Lord

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 29 Nov 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre , Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar: Can we transform perinatal care through larger, more efficient, collectively prioritised international trials?

Professor William Tarnow-Mordi

William is an academic neonatologist, who graduated with first class Honours in Cambridge. He has a globally recognised record of translational research via international multicentre RCTs and cohort studies in >30,000 patients and >200 neonatal units worldwide. Having trained in neonatal medicine... Read more

William is an academic neonatologist, who graduated with first class Honours in Cambridge. He has a globally recognised record of translational research via international multicentre RCTs and cohort studies in >30,000 patients and >200 neonatal units worldwide. Having trained in neonatal medicine in the UK, he moved to Sydney in 1999 as inaugural Chair of Neonatology at Westmead Hospital, University of Sydney and Director of Neonatology. He has been a strong advocate of large multicentre neonatal and perinatal studies to answer key clinical questions and has conducted multiple landmark collaborative studies such as the International Neonatal Immunotherapy Trial, the ECSURF Study, the UK Neonatal Staffing Study, INIS, BOOST II Australia, the Australian Placental Transfusion Study (APTS) of delayed cord clamping and the NeOProM Collaboration of oxygen saturation. Each has contributed to evidence that is likely to save millions of lives in coming years. This raises a new challenge: “In the next decade, can parents, patients, professionals, researchers, policymakers, providers, funders and the public collaborate to embed international trials in routine care that are ten times larger and faster, at one tenth the cost?”

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 29 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Jenner Institute / Silver Star

Prof Adrian Hill, Dr Samantha Chessell, Dr Lauren Green, Dr Charlotte Frise

Jenner Institute: "Therapeutic Vaccines", Prof Adrian Hill -- Silver Star: "Baby, you take my breath away: A presentation on breathlessness in pregnancy", Dr Samantha Chessell, Dr Lauren Green and Dr Charlotte Frise -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Jenner Institute: "Therapeutic Vaccines", Prof Adrian Hill -- Silver Star: "Baby, you take my breath away: A presentation on breathlessness in pregnancy", Dr Samantha Chessell, Dr Lauren Green and Dr Charlotte Frise -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 29 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

UBVO Seminar: Genomics of common obesity

Cecilia Lindgren

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Fri 30 Nov 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Normothermic preservation – a new dawn or optimistic hyperbole?

Professor Peter Friend, Dr David Nasralla

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 30 Nov 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Translational impact of single cell studies of the skin

Dr Yi-Ling Chen

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 30 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Coping with a stressful start in life

Professor Alex Gould

Joint Seminar with the Dunn School Environmental stresses experienced during development (early-life) exert both short and long-term influences upon health and disease. In most cases, however, the underlying biological response mechanisms remain mysterious. The goal of our research is to... Read more

Joint Seminar with the Dunn School Environmental stresses experienced during development (early-life) exert both short and long-term influences upon health and disease. In most cases, however, the underlying biological response mechanisms remain mysterious. The goal of our research is to understand the molecular nuts and bolts of how early-life environmental stresses alter gene expression, metabolism and physiology. Much of our research uses the powerful genetics of the fruit fly Drosophila, together with analytical techniques such as metabolomics and mass spectrometry imaging. Using this combined approach, we identified molecular mechanisms that protect neural stem cells in the developing CNS from the immediate harmful effects of malnutrition and hypoxia. For example, we found that hypoxia induces lipid droplets in the local microenvironment (niche) of the neural stem cells. Droplets function to protect neural stem cells from lipid peroxidation damage, likely by sequestering potentially vulnerable polyunsaturated fatty acids in their core. We have also begun investigating the longer-term impact of early-life stresses upon longevity. Recent work shows that developmental exposure to mild oxidative or nutritional stress can, in some cases, extend rather than shorten lifespan. I will discuss the surprising mechanisms that account for stress-induced longevity and the degree to which they may be conserved between flies and mammals.

Audience: Members of the University only