Other Seminars

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Fri 1 Jun 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

The white heat of surgical technology

Professor Dion Morton

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 1 Jun 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Screening human genome to dissect mechanisms of susceptibility to mycobacterial infection and tuberculosis

Dr Sergey Nejentsev

With more than 10 million new cases annually, tuberculosis remains a global health problem. Drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are spreading and new therapeutic approaches are urgently needed. Host-directed therapies (HDT) target the host rather than the pathogen, aiming to... Read more

With more than 10 million new cases annually, tuberculosis remains a global health problem. Drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are spreading and new therapeutic approaches are urgently needed. Host-directed therapies (HDT) target the host rather than the pathogen, aiming to improve immune mechanisms by augmenting the ability of host cells to kill M. tuberculosis or modulating the immune response to prevent excessive inflammation and tissue damage. Progress with HDT development is slowed down by the limited understanding of the host-pathogen interactions during tuberculosis. Whole genome screens can identify human genes involved in responses to mycobacterial infection and suggest potential targets for HTD. I will describe our approach to such human genome screens, covering studies of rare patients with Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial infections, genome-wide association studies in cohorts of tuberculosis patients, transcriptome analyses of macrophages infected with mycobacteria and CRISPR-Cas9-mediated screens aiming to dissect macrophage responses to mycobacterial infection.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Fri 1 Jun 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Modeling Human Brain Development in Cerebral Organoids

Dr Madeline Lancaster

Human brain development exhibits a number of unique characteristics, such as dramatic size expansion and variation in relative abundance of specific neuron populations. Until very recently, model organisms were the only experimental tools available to functionally examine brain developmental... Read more

Human brain development exhibits a number of unique characteristics, such as dramatic size expansion and variation in relative abundance of specific neuron populations. Until very recently, model organisms were the only experimental tools available to functionally examine brain developmental mechanisms on the whole organ scale. This has obvious limitations when it comes to human-specific features. In an effort to better understand human brain development, we developed a human model system, called cerebral organoids. Cerebral organoids, or “mini-brains”, are 3D tissues generated from human pluripotent stem cells that allow modelling of brain development in vitro. Through a process of directed differentiation and a supportive 3D microenvironment, neural precursor tissue can spontaneously self-organize to form the stereotypic organization of the early human embryonic brain. We were able to show that cerebral organoids can also model a neurodevelopmental disorder, microcephaly, characterised by a significantly reduced brain size. This makes brain organoids particularly powerful for not only examining human specific mechanisms, but also pathogenesis of neurological disease. We have now performed extensive characterization of brain organoids and their potential uses, as well as improvements to better control their differentiation. Current findings reveal the timed generation of excitatory neurons and inhibitory interneurons as well as their proper migration and positioning. This method provides a tractable system for studying human brain development, evolution and neurodevelopmental disorders.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sally Collins

Fri 1 Jun 2018 from 15:30 to 18:30

Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Oxford Martin School, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Human Brain Organoids: the Science, the Ethics

Prof Hank Greely, Professor Julian Savulescu, Dr Madeline Lancaster

Human brain organoids,miniature ‘brain structures’ can be generated fromstemcells. These have the capacity to produce new, complex and developing neuronal tissue and have the potential to provide neuroscientists with a different and maybe more useful model of parts of a functioning human brain... Read more

Human brain organoids,miniature ‘brain structures’ can be generated fromstemcells. These have the capacity to produce new, complex and developing neuronal tissue and have the potential to provide neuroscientists with a different and maybe more useful model of parts of a functioning human brain than has ever before been possible. Join us to find outmore about how human brain organoids are being used in research, now and in the future. Contribute to discussions on the scientific, ethical and legal challenges that scientists and society must confront. The event is organised jointly by the Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities at Oxford University and the International Neuroethics Society, with support from the European Dana Alliance for the Brain.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Mon 4 Jun 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting rooms 71a, b and c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Unusual DNA/RNA structures in health and disease

Natalia Gromak, PhD

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 4 Jun 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Manipulating co-regulators of RUNX and SOX9 to enhance the chondrogenic potential of chondrogenic progenitor cells in osteoarthritis

Prof Nicolai Miosge

The regeneration of diseased hyaline cartilage continues to be a great challenge, mainly because degeneration overtaxes the tissue's self-renewal capacity. Recently, we demonstrated that repair tissue from human articular cartilage during the late stages of osteoarthritis harbors a unique... Read more

The regeneration of diseased hyaline cartilage continues to be a great challenge, mainly because degeneration overtaxes the tissue's self-renewal capacity. Recently, we demonstrated that repair tissue from human articular cartilage during the late stages of osteoarthritis harbors a unique progenitor cell population, termed chondrogenic progenitor cells (CPCs). Down-regulation of the osteogenic transcription factor RUNX2 enhanced the expression of the chondrogenic transcription factor SOX9. This, in turn, increased the matrix synthesis potential of the CPCs without altering their migratory capacity (Koelling et al., 2009, Cell Stem Cell). We now present unpublished data on the role of co-regulators of SOX9 and RUNX2 to enhance the chondrogenic potential of CPCs. Candidate molecules for example, RAB5C, YWHAE or DDX5, identified in an elaborated knock-down and pull down experiment have been overexpressed or knocked-out via CRISPR/Cas9 to elucidate their influence on the chondrogenic behavior of CPCs. The results indicate, that the chondrogenic potential of CPCs can be enhanced via the manipulation of co-regulators of SOX9 and RUNX2.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 4 Jun 2018 from 12:30 to 13:30

WHG Lunchtime Lab Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Church and Padilla Lunchtime Lab Talks

Emily Rayner, Matthew Brown, Dr Luis Alvarez

Church Group Speaker 1: Matthew Brown Title: FBXW7 Mutation in Endometrial Cancer Development Speaker 2: Emily Rayner Title: Functional characterisation of POLE proofreading domain mutations in cancer Padilla Group (Cellular Imaging) Speaker: Dr Luis Alvarez Title: Super-resolution vs Number & Brightness: Myths and truths in quantitative microscopy

Church Group Speaker 1: Matthew Brown Title: FBXW7 Mutation in Endometrial Cancer Development Speaker 2: Emily Rayner Title: Functional characterisation of POLE proofreading domain mutations in cancer Padilla Group (Cellular Imaging) Speaker: Dr Luis Alvarez Title: Super-resolution vs Number & Brightness: Myths and truths in quantitative microscopy

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Mon 4 Jun 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Origins, Evolution and treatment of childhood leukaemia

Professor Tariq Enver

Audience: Public

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Tue 5 Jun 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Asynchronous T and B lineage priming condition commitment in fetal hematopoietic progenitors

Professor Ana Cumano

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 5 Jun 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - The COSMOS international prospective cohort study: Lessons for the design and set-up of cohort studies in the digital era and some preliminary findings

Dr Mireille Toledano

Dr Mireille B. Toledano is a Reader in Epidemiology at Imperial College London and an investigator of the MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health specializing in environmental and spatial epidemiology. She has extensive expertise in the design and set up of large prospective cohort studies... Read more

Dr Mireille B. Toledano is a Reader in Epidemiology at Imperial College London and an investigator of the MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health specializing in environmental and spatial epidemiology. She has extensive expertise in the design and set up of large prospective cohort studies including COSMOS, SCAMP, and BEED. Much of her work to date has focused on early life environmental exposures such as water disinfection by-products, air pollution/noise, non-ionizing radiation epidemiology, and waste incineration, including assessment of environmental exposure at individual level through questionnaire data, biomarkers, and metabonomic profiling. She also has a special interest in spatial epidemiology and the use of routinely collected data and GIS for national small area health studies.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 5 Jun 2018 from 14:00 to 15:00

ARUK Oxford Drug Discovery Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Seminar room (basement), Headington OX3 7FZ

Two surprises in canonical Wnt signalling

Professor Trevor Dale

Audience: Public

Organisers: Dr John Davis

Wed 6 Jun 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Adapting protein quality control for intervention in neurodegenerative diseases (CANCELLED)

Heidi Olzscha

Protein folding is tightly regulated by molecular chaperones and other protein quality control mechanisms such as the ubiquitin proteasome system and autophagy to ensure the integrity of the proteome. However, these systems can fail to prevent protein misfolding, leading to protein aggregation and... Read more

Protein folding is tightly regulated by molecular chaperones and other protein quality control mechanisms such as the ubiquitin proteasome system and autophagy to ensure the integrity of the proteome. However, these systems can fail to prevent protein misfolding, leading to protein aggregation and amyloidosis. They are underlying reasons for many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease or Huntington’s disease. Interfering with protein quality control systems and modulating posttranslational modifications of proteins in neuronal cells can reduce aggregation and ameliorate amyloidosis.

Audience: The scientific communnity

Organisers: Dr Proochista Ariana

Unfortunately due to unforseen circumstances, this seminar has had to be cancelled

Wed 6 Jun 2018 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Litchfield Lecture - "MR1-Restricted T Cells and Mycobacterium tuberculosis"

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 7 Jun 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Thu 7 Jun 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

The determinants of GP referrals and elective hospital admissions: a practice level study

Dr Catia Nicodemo

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Catia Nicodemo

Thu 7 Jun 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Palliative Care / Stroke Medicine

Dr Mary Miller

Palliative Care: "Were those 2222 calls necessary?" Dr Mary Miller -- Stroke Medicine: -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Palliative Care: "Were those 2222 calls necessary?" Dr Mary Miller -- Stroke Medicine: -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 7 Jun 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Metabolism & Endocrinology Theme Guest Speakers (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Stress, Genetics, and Epigenetics vs. Human Evolution and Development

Professor George Chrousos

Nowadays, we frequently associate the fields of Evolution, aka Genetics and Phylogeny, and Development, aka Epigenetics and Ontogeny, and use the abbreviated term Evo-Devo to refer to both fields. The human organism and the societies it forms are complex systems that, given the enormous impact of... Read more

Nowadays, we frequently associate the fields of Evolution, aka Genetics and Phylogeny, and Development, aka Epigenetics and Ontogeny, and use the abbreviated term Evo-Devo to refer to both fields. The human organism and the societies it forms are complex systems that, given the enormous impact of human cognitive and emotional empathy, should be considered together. As such systems, humans and their societies are in a relatively stable disequilibrium or homeostasis, that is maintained by extrinsic energy. Complex systems respond adaptively to exogenous or endogenous threats, the stressors, and the state of disturbed homeostasis, or stress, represents a condition that has the power to shape the ability of a species or individual to survive and reproduce. Hence, both evolution and development are influenced by stress. Major evolutionary and developmental stressors include starvation, dehydration or hemorrhage, injurious agents, presence of adversaries, tissue injury and social disintegration. We have adapted our physiology and behavior, both as a species and as individuals, to respond to these stressors as successfully as possible. Now, we have the benefit of the stupendous progress in biology and genetics to understand the mechanisms through which our species has evolved by adapting to and surviving through major evolutionary and developmental stressors. These selective pressures explain, to a great extent, the appearance of the modern chronic diseases of humanity, such as obesity, the metabolic syndrome, hypertension, allergies, autoimmune disorders, anxiety, depression, the pain and fatigue syndromes and sociopathic behaviors. The term Epigenesis was first employed by Aristotle to suggest the process of de novo changes in organismal responses to environmental conditions, as opposed to the inner preformation theory of Plato, who had proposed that all developmental processes were predetermined and unfolded over time. The modern definition of Epigenetics was proposed by C. H. Waddington in 1942, as “the causal interactions between genes and their products to bring the phenotype into being”. Even though epigenetics represent acquired properties that are obtained by the organism over its lifetime, i.e., during ontogeny, some may cross generations or even lead to epigenetically or genetic inheritable changes. The epigenetic process is effected by covalent bonds on the DNA without changes in the base sequence of the molecule, post-translational modification of chromatin proteins, DNA-binding proteins or protein complexes, miRNAs, piRNAS, lncNAs and other noncoding RNAs, as well as by formation of super-enhancers, which appear to play major organizational roles in tissue differentiation. Methylation vs. demethylation, as well as acetylation vs. deacetylation, of DNA and chromatin proteins represent key molecular changes in epigenesis. Epigenetic functions include embryonic cell differentiation, genomic imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, retrotransposon repression, somatic cell differentiation, immune function, puberty, sexual orientation, right/left handedness, labor and delivery, maternal and perinatal stress, brain plasticity, memory formation and stress-related behaviors. Behavioral disorders, such as depression and schizophrenia, have a strong epigenetic component. We should note that epigenetic control mechanisms evolve, there is a Lamarckian dimension in evolution, and imprints and methylation marks are erased and reestablished de novo stochastically twice, at the gamete and blastocyst stage, in each generation. Dr. Chrousos is Professor of Pediatrics and Endocrinology and Chairman of the First Department of Pediatrics at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens School of Medicine, Athens, Greece, and former Chief of the Pediatric and Reproductive Endocrinology Branch of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. Since 2010, Dr. Chrousos holds the UNESCO Chair on Adolescent Health Care, while he held the 2011 Distinguished John Kluge Chair on Society and Technology of the US Library of Congress. Dr. Chrousos pioneered studies that elucidated the effects of stress on the organism at the behavioral, neuroendocrine, cellular and molecular levels and made fundamental contributions to the understanding, diagnosis and treatment of pituitary, adrenal and stress-related pathologies, i.e., major depression, obesity/metabolic syndrome, and autoimmune/inflammatory, reproductive and sleep disorders. He made seminal observations in the glucocorticoid signaling system and deciphered some of its key clinical implications. Dr. Chrousos is universally regarded as one of the most prominent paediatricians and endocrinologists. His work has been cited over 133,000 t2mes (H-index >179), making him the top cited clinical pediatrician or endocrinologist in the world. He has received numerous major awards, including the Fred Conrad Koch Award, the highest honor of the US Endocrine Society. He is a member of the Academia Europaea and the US National Academy of Medicine (Institute of Medicine).

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sally Collins

Fri 8 Jun 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Fri 8 Jun 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

IL-23 responsive, commensal-reactive T cells promote barrier immunity; Uncovering microbial drivers of inflammatory disease

Dr Emily Thornton, Dr Lilian Lam

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 8 Jun 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

From vision to navigation: a journey across mouse cortex

Professor Matteo Carandini

Vision provides crucial signals to guide navigation, and guiding navigation is one of vision’s main functions. The transformation of visual signals into estimates of position, however, is not understood. To study this transformation we recorded from large populations of neurons in the cortex of... Read more

Vision provides crucial signals to guide navigation, and guiding navigation is one of vision’s main functions. The transformation of visual signals into estimates of position, however, is not understood. To study this transformation we recorded from large populations of neurons in the cortex of mice that navigated in environments in virtual reality. Contrary to textbook expectations, we found that neurons as early as primary visual cortex exhibit preferences for spatial position. These preferences strengthen as signals proceed towards parietal cortex, where responses become entirely related to navigation, coding for combinations of the animal's position and heading direction. Navigation signals in visual cortex correlate strongly with signals in hippocampus, where cells have well-known preferences for spatial position, and are closely related to the animal’s subjective estimate of location. Signals related to navigation, therefore, appear remarkably early in the visual system, and are intimately related to the animal’s own estimate of position in the world.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sally Collins

Fri 8 Jun 2018 from 17:00 to 18:30

AfOx insaka - a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research

St Cross College, Lecture Theatre, West Wing, St Giles OX1 3LZ

AfOx insaka - a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research

Dr Faith Osier, Chimwemwe Phiri, H.E. Mr Kena Mphonda

The AfOx insaka is a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research with speakers from diverse and varied academic disciplines. There are two events each term. On Friday of Week 3, and Friday of Week 7. Each event will feature two talks by speakers from different disciplines, followed by questions and discussion. Drinks will be served afterwards.

The AfOx insaka is a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research with speakers from diverse and varied academic disciplines. There are two events each term. On Friday of Week 3, and Friday of Week 7. Each event will feature two talks by speakers from different disciplines, followed by questions and discussion. Drinks will be served afterwards.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Africa Oxford Initiative

Fri 8 Jun 2018 from 17:00 to 18:00

Population Health Seminars

Mathematical Institute, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

NDPH Inaugural Lecture: Is Big Epidemiology Better Epidemiology?

Professor David Hunter

The lecture is from 17:00 – 18:00 and will be followed by drinks and canapes at Green Templeton College. Please register to attend using this link: https://oxford.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/professor-david-hunters-inaugural-lecture-friday-8-june2

The lecture is from 17:00 – 18:00 and will be followed by drinks and canapes at Green Templeton College. Please register to attend using this link: https://oxford.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/professor-david-hunters-inaugural-lecture-friday-8-june2

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Mon 11 Jun 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Lymphoid tissue organizer cells

Prof Ludewig Burkhard

The central paradigm underlying lymphoid organ development predicts the existence of a dedicated mesenchymal lymphoid tissue organizer cell that integrates signals via LTbR, RANK and/or TNFR1/2 pathways from embryonic type 3 innate lymphoid cells or B cells. However, the lymphoid tissue organizer... Read more

The central paradigm underlying lymphoid organ development predicts the existence of a dedicated mesenchymal lymphoid tissue organizer cell that integrates signals via LTbR, RANK and/or TNFR1/2 pathways from embryonic type 3 innate lymphoid cells or B cells. However, the lymphoid tissue organizer concept is currently undergoing a major revision based on our recent findings that both endothelial and mesenchymal cells contribute to the formation and structural organization of lymph nodes. In this seminar, I will present a fresh view on the lymph node organogenesis paradigm with inclusion of lymphatic endothelial organizer cells that determine the location and drive the initial steps of lymph node formation. ---- Burkhard Ludewig is currently acting as the head of the Medical Research Center and the Institute of Immunobiology at the Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Switzerland. His research interests are focused on the interaction of viruses with the innate and adaptive immune system. Furthermore, his laboratory has established transgenic mouse model for in vivo stromal cell targeting. He is affiliated with the Life Science Faculty of the University of Zürich.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 11 Jun 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Exploring non-coding variants at two loci associated with developmental abnormalities of the macula

Prof Veronica van Heyningen

The macula is the central part of the retina, densely packed with cone photoreceptors that are required for acute daytime vision in colour. The macular includes the avascular foveal region. Our fovea is a critical late primate innovation. North Carolina Macular Dystrophy (NCMD) is a developmental... Read more

The macula is the central part of the retina, densely packed with cone photoreceptors that are required for acute daytime vision in colour. The macular includes the avascular foveal region. Our fovea is a critical late primate innovation. North Carolina Macular Dystrophy (NCMD) is a developmental abnormality of the central retina with a generally non-progressive phenotype, but of variable severity even within families. However it is fairly readily diagnosed by ophthalmologists and was shown to be inherited in a clear Mendelian dominant manner, allowing it to be mapped unequivocally, many years ago, to two distinct loci. Until the advent of whole genome sequencing no gene could be identified. Interestingly non-coding variants have been identified at both loci: on chromosome 6 upstream of PRDM13, and on chromosome 5 between IRX1 and ADAMTS16. The phenotypes caused by variants at both loci are indistinguishable currently. Single nucleotide variants (SNVs) are found near PRDM13 and we have identified two overlapping duplications downstream of IRX1 (PMID 28790370). Although mice do not have a fovea, they are reported to have developing retina cells expressing IRX1 (ganglion cells) and PRDM13 (amacrine cells). Using CRISPR/Cas9 editing, we have created a mouse model of the duplication and are currently exploring in detail the phenotype created. There are many challenges to understanding how disease is caused and how normal development may be perturbed. One intriguing feature is that at both loci ancestral haplotypes are found in multiple families (ie they share the same original mutation(s)). Very recently we have identified additional SNVs not far from the original PRDM13 SNV region in somewhat more severe disease phenotypes, which were however recognized clinically to be related to NCMD. Piecing together the puzzle of all these findings is the exciting adventure we shall discuss.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Mon 11 Jun 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

A journey of metabolic discovery: from rare disease and rare variant, to common trait and common variant

Dr Ines Barroso

Throughout my career my lab has been focused on studying rare syndromes of insulin resistance, early onset childhood obesity, as well as much common conditions such as “garden variety” obesity, type 2 diabetes, and associated glycaemic traits. During my talk I will focus on recent studies... Read more

Throughout my career my lab has been focused on studying rare syndromes of insulin resistance, early onset childhood obesity, as well as much common conditions such as “garden variety” obesity, type 2 diabetes, and associated glycaemic traits. During my talk I will focus on recent studies ranging from rare variant and rare disease to common variant/ common trait highlighting three different vignettes which demonstrate the multidisciplinary approach in the group and the relation between the various diseases and approaches we have taken. I will discuss: a. modelling a rare pancreatic agenesis syndrome; b. exome sequencing studies of early onset obesity; and recent progress in identifying distinct genomic and expression signatures among different glycaemic traits.

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 12 Jun 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Targeting autophagy and metabolic dependencies in leukaemic stem cells

Vignir Helgason

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 12 Jun 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - New insights for patients with, or at risk of, diabetes - the EXSCEL and ACE trials

Prof Rury Holman

Rury Holman founded the University of Oxford Diabetes Trials Unit (DTU) in 1985, and was appointed as the first Professor of Diabetic Medicine at the University of Oxford in 1998. He runs an active Translational Research Group undertaking investigator-led early phase trials of novel therapeutic... Read more

Rury Holman founded the University of Oxford Diabetes Trials Unit (DTU) in 1985, and was appointed as the first Professor of Diabetic Medicine at the University of Oxford in 1998. He runs an active Translational Research Group undertaking investigator-led early phase trials of novel therapeutic agents, new medical devices and complex interventions. He also designs and runs investigator-led global cardiovascular outcome trials. In addition, has a major interest in risk prediction and has co-produced the UKPDS Risk Engine and the UKPDS Outcomes Model, which is used by NICE to assess the potential impact of antidiabetic therapies. Professor Holman has received 16 national and international awards and has published over 325 peer-reviewed papers that have been cited more than 55,000 times. In this seminar he will discuss results from the recently completed EXSCEL and ACE trials. EXSCEL tested the addition of once weekly exenatide (GLP-1 receptor agonist) therapy to standard diabetes treatment in high risk diabetic individuals, while the ACE trial investigated whether lowering post-prandial glucose in people at high risk of diabetes was beneficial.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 12 Jun 2018 from 15:00 to 16:30

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

The history and use of DNA-Encoded Libraries in drug discovery

Dr Barry Morgan

DNA Encoded Libraries (DELs) have become an important and efficient approach for identifying novel chemical entities targeting a range of biomolecular architectures. Barry Morgan led the development of the DEL platform at Praecis Pharmaceuticals, Boston, joining GSK to lead its continued investment... Read more

DNA Encoded Libraries (DELs) have become an important and efficient approach for identifying novel chemical entities targeting a range of biomolecular architectures. Barry Morgan led the development of the DEL platform at Praecis Pharmaceuticals, Boston, joining GSK to lead its continued investment in DEL screening after GSK bought Praecis in 2007. Since that time GSK has gone on to publish several novel chemical entities, now in late phase clinical development. What started as a theory from Sydney Brenner & Richard Lerner has truly come of age as a powerful drug-discovery approach. Barry is now CSO at HitGen, who continue to build a strong DEL platform based in Chengdu, China.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Tue 12 Jun 2018 from 16:00 to 17:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar: Hospital patient time series data: Statistical models for associations and decision making

Professor Barbara Engelhardt

In-patient hospital data presents unique challenges for time series analysis, including the sparsity and irregularity of observations for each patient and the heterogeneous patient responses to interventions. In this talk, I will present a multi-output Gaussian process regression model for patient... Read more

In-patient hospital data presents unique challenges for time series analysis, including the sparsity and irregularity of observations for each patient and the heterogeneous patient responses to interventions. In this talk, I will present a multi-output Gaussian process regression model for patient time series data that captures the state of a patient and uncertainty in this state across four vital signs and 20 lab tests in a patient-specific way. We build on top of this model a reinforcement learning approach to assist doctors to wean patients from a mechanical ventilator. Finally, I show how prior work with time series associations may be used with these data to identify patients with genetically-mediated responses to specific interventions. I will conclude with directions for future work.

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 13 Jun 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Meeting Room 3, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

Care pathways in under-5 deaths in sub-Saharan Africa: a comprehensive literature review

Jessica Price

I am going to presenting the results from a comprehensive literature review looking at care pathways in under-5 deaths in Sub-Saharan Africa. The majority of child deaths on the African continent happen at home, outside of formal healthcare services. However, increasingly studies have shown that a... Read more

I am going to presenting the results from a comprehensive literature review looking at care pathways in under-5 deaths in Sub-Saharan Africa. The majority of child deaths on the African continent happen at home, outside of formal healthcare services. However, increasingly studies have shown that a majority of children were taken to a healthcare provider for care during their final illness. This literature review summarises the findings from studies across sub-Saharan Africa to describe the care pathway for under-5 deaths using the "Pathways to Survival" framework. By understanding where in the pathway children drop out of the formal healthcare system we are better able to direct future interventions to reduce under-5 mortality.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Daniel Long

Wed 13 Jun 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Small Lecture Theatre - 2nd floor, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Mitophagy modulation as a potential therapeutic target for neurodegenerative diseases

Dr Hélène Plun-Favreau

Mitophagy and neurodegeneration In recent years, it has become clear that even in clinically distinct neurodegenerative conditions, there are common underlying themes in how the neurons become sick and die. One such theme is a breakdown in the maintenance of mitochondria, which plays a central role... Read more

Mitophagy and neurodegeneration In recent years, it has become clear that even in clinically distinct neurodegenerative conditions, there are common underlying themes in how the neurons become sick and die. One such theme is a breakdown in the maintenance of mitochondria, which plays a central role in Parkinson’s disease and in other neurodegenerative conditions. Mitochondria are the ‘energy powerhouses’ of cells. Their function is vital in long-lived neurons, where mitochondria must be maintained for an entire lifetime, and where a great deal of energy is required for them to function and survive. The selective autophagy of damaged mitochondria (mitophagy) is critical for cell survival as it maintains optimal cellular energy production whilst avoiding the toxic accumulation of damaged mitochondria. Important information about the control of mitophagy has come from the study of the genes associated with autosomal recessive Parkinson’s disease. Of particular interest, PINK1 (mitochondrial kinase) and Parkin (E3-ubiquitin ligase) have been found to play crucial roles in mitophagy. Against this background, our lab focuses on the following themes: - Understanding further the mitophagy process - Identifying the major molecular players in PINK1-induced mitophagy. - Unravelling the upstream pathways that regulate the mitophagy process. - Assessing mitophagy and other mitochondrial dysfunctions in iPSC-derived neurons from patients with Parkinson’s disease, and with other neurodegenerative diseases (E.g Alzheimer’s disease, Frontotemporal Dementia, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, mitochondrial DNA disease etc). Our ultimate goal is to identify compounds that are able to modulate mitophagy and rescue mitochondrial pathophysiology and neuronal death.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Please note this talk is now at NOON in the Small Lecture Theatre

Wed 13 Jun 2018 from 15:30 to 16:30

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 1, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Big Data Ethics Forum: The rights and wrongs of data sharing - Should there be any limit on data sharing?

Professor Jane Green

The Big Data Ethics Forum (BDE Forum) is an innovative approach to the identification of ethical issues in the day-to-day practice of big data research. The BDE Forum provides a regular opportunity for scientists working in the BDI to discuss practical ethical problems arising in the development and conduct of their research and an opportunity for the sharing of models of good practice.

The Big Data Ethics Forum (BDE Forum) is an innovative approach to the identification of ethical issues in the day-to-day practice of big data research. The BDE Forum provides a regular opportunity for scientists working in the BDI to discuss practical ethical problems arising in the development and conduct of their research and an opportunity for the sharing of models of good practice.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Thu 14 Jun 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Neurology / Medical Director's Office

Dr Tony Berendt, Dr Paul Altmann, Dr Patrick Waters

Neurology: "Novel antibody detection methods in demyelination beyond multiple sclerosis", Dr Patrick Waters -- Medical Director's Office: "Going Digital for Quality", Dr Tony Berendt and Dr Paul Altmann -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Neurology: "Novel antibody detection methods in demyelination beyond multiple sclerosis", Dr Patrick Waters -- Medical Director's Office: "Going Digital for Quality", Dr Tony Berendt and Dr Paul Altmann -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 14 Jun 2018 from 15:00 to 16:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 1, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar - Three principles of data science: Predictability, computability, and stability (PCS)

Bin Yu

In this talk, I'd like to discuss the importance and connections of three principles of data science in the title and introduce the PCS workflow for the data science life cycle.PCS will be demonstrated in the context of two collaborative projects in neuroscience and genomics, respectively. The... Read more

In this talk, I'd like to discuss the importance and connections of three principles of data science in the title and introduce the PCS workflow for the data science life cycle.PCS will be demonstrated in the context of two collaborative projects in neuroscience and genomics, respectively. The first project in neuroscience uses transfer learning to integrate fitted convolutional neural networks (CNNs)on ImageNet with regression methods to provide predictive and stable characterizations of neurons from the challenging primary visual cortex V4. Our DeepTune characterization provides a rich description of the diverse V4 selection patterns. The second project proposes iterative random forests (iRF) as stabilized Random Forests (RF) to seek predictable and interpretable high-order interactions among biomolecules. For an enhancer status prediction problem for Drosophila based on high-throughput data, iRF was able to find 20 stable gene-gene interactions, of which 80% had been physically verified in the literature in the past few decades. Last but not least, the data results from both projects provide experimentally testable hypotheses and hence PCS can also serve as a scientific recommendation system for follow-up experiments.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Fri 15 Jun 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Recent Advances in Cell and Tissue Therapy for Children

Professor Paul Johnson, Miss Kokila Lakhoo

There will be two talks: ‘Pancreatic Islet Transplantation – realising the goals’ by Paul Johnson ‘Ovarian Preservation – the big freeze‘ by Natalie Durkin and Kokila Lakhoo

There will be two talks: ‘Pancreatic Islet Transplantation – realising the goals’ by Paul Johnson ‘Ovarian Preservation – the big freeze‘ by Natalie Durkin and Kokila Lakhoo

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 15 Jun 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Iron, infants and adaptive immunity

Dr Andrew Armitage, Joe Frost

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Mon 18 Jun 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting rooms 71a, b and c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Stres-Induced Dynamic Regulation of Mitochondrial STAT3 and Its Association with Cyclophilin D

Professor Andrew Larner

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 18 Jun 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Principles in Vascular Patterning – from Cells to Networks

Dr Holger Gerhardt

Formation, expansion and functional adaptation of vascular networks are critical for development and physiology in vertebrates. How endothelial cells orchestrate their behavior to form the shape and size of individual vessels and establish the hierarchical branching pattern of functional networks... Read more

Formation, expansion and functional adaptation of vascular networks are critical for development and physiology in vertebrates. How endothelial cells orchestrate their behavior to form the shape and size of individual vessels and establish the hierarchical branching pattern of functional networks remains poorly understood. Using a combination of in vivo cell biology experimentation and generative computational modelling, our lab uncovered a series of fundamental principles of endothelial cell behavior driving the first steps of branching and lumen formation, as well as subsequent remodeling to achieve functional patterning. The surprising dynamics of endothelial rearrangements in already perfused vessels suggest that vessel adaptations rely on differential migration of cells to reshape vessels in response to changing flow conditions. I will discuss concepts and insights into how and when these mechanisms switch from adaptive to maladaptive, leading to vessel dysmorphia in disease. ---- Holger Gerhardt completed his PhD in Cell Biology in 2000 in Tübingen, Germany. During his post-doctoral research with Christer Betsholtz at Gothenburg University, Sweden, Dr. Gerhardt conceptualized the endothelial tip and stalk cells; a discovery that kick-started his work on endothelial guidance and vascular patterning. His primary research aim is to unravel fundamental principles and molecular regulation of functional blood vessel network formation in health and disease. In 2004, he became a group leader at the London Research Institute-Cancer Research UK. He is an EMBO Young Investigator and recipient of the prestigious Lister Prize, Walter Fleming Medal, Judah Folkman Award of the North American Vascular Biology organization and Hooke Medal of the British Society of Cell Biology. In 2010 he opened a second lab at the VIB Vesalius Research Center at KU Leuven in Belgium to integrate basic discovery science on angiogenesis with disease models in oncology. Since 2014, Dr. Gerhardt is a research group leader at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine and Professor of Experimental Cardiovascular Research at the Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin. He further holds professorships at the Berlin Institute of Health and the German Center for Cardiovascular Research

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 18 Jun 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

New Levels of complexity in Arp2/3 driven actin polymerisation

Dr Michael Way

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Tue 19 Jun 2018 from 08:30 to 17:30

Centre for Personalised Medicine Seminars

St Anne's College, Tsuzuki Lecture Theatre, Woodstock Road OX2 6HS

Resource Allocation in Personalised Medicine: Evaluation, Translation & Ethics

Ellen Graham, Dean Regier, Sarah Wordsworth, James Buchanan, Katherine Payne, Jayne Spink, Nick Fahy, Tom Fowler, Inês Amado

Welcome to the third in the series Personalised Medicine, Ethics and the Market, a collaboration between the Centre for Personalised Medicine and the Ethox Centre, University of Oxford. This year we welcome the Health Economics Research Centre as co-collaborators. It is evident that healthcare... Read more

Welcome to the third in the series Personalised Medicine, Ethics and the Market, a collaboration between the Centre for Personalised Medicine and the Ethox Centre, University of Oxford. This year we welcome the Health Economics Research Centre as co-collaborators. It is evident that healthcare services need to utilise advances in genomic technology and knowledge for the benefit of patients. The availability of new genetic tests as well as their use in healthcare is expanding rapidly and is being expedited by the 100,000 Genomes Project in the UK, however national coverage decisions for the integration of genomic medicine into the National Healthcare Service have been slow, complex and fraught with controversy. The future delivery of genomic and personalised medicine within the NHS is integrally related to the health system process of priority setting and resource allocation within commissioning arrangements. The fair, equitable and appropriate commissioning of genomic medicine services requires rigorous exploration of the ethical, policy and practical implications. Achieving appropriate integration of genomic medicine into healthcare will require full and proper consideration of multiple ethical and economic factors such as cost, opportunity cost, clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, need, ability to benefit and procedural fairness. The challenge in priority setting and resource allocation is to find a way forward giving these conflicting considerations appropriate weight in each case. We invite you to join us at this conference, which will consider three broad themes: · The Clinical Context: How should we understand current and future developments in clinical commissioning structures, organisation and delivery? · The Health Economic Context: What are the current developments and trends in assessing economic evidence relating to personalised medicine? · The International Ethics and Policy Context: What is the international ‘direction of travel’ in thinking about resource allocation related to genomic medicine? Further information can be found at: http://www.well.ox.ac.uk/cpm/resource-allocation-in-personalised-medicine-conference

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Catherine Lidbetter

Tue 19 Jun 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Using single-cell technologies and planarians to study stem cells, their differentiation and their evolution

Jordi Solana

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 20 Jun 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Room 3, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

Wed 20 Jun 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

The Hippo pathway in cell growth, organ size, and Tumorigenesis

Professor Kun-Liang Guan

The Hippo pathway is crucial in organ size control and its dysregulation contributes to tumorigenesis. Core components of the Hippo pathway include the protein kinases of MST1/2, MAP4Ks, LATS1/2, the transcription co-activators YAP/TAZ and their DNA binding partners TEADs. LATS phosphorylates... Read more

The Hippo pathway is crucial in organ size control and its dysregulation contributes to tumorigenesis. Core components of the Hippo pathway include the protein kinases of MST1/2, MAP4Ks, LATS1/2, the transcription co-activators YAP/TAZ and their DNA binding partners TEADs. LATS phosphorylates YAP/TAZ to promote cytoplasmic localization and degradation, thereby inhibiting YAP/TAZ and cell growth. The Hippo pathway is regulated by a wide range of signals, including cell density, GPCR, cellular energy levels, and mechanical cues. We recently discovered that TEAD shuttles to cytoplasm in a Hippo independent manner. Moreover, the Hippo pathway also plays a critical role in suppressing cancer immunity. The emerging role of the Hippo pathway in tumorigenesis suggests potential therapeutic value of targeting this pathway for cancer treatment.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Wed 20 Jun 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox Seminar: Saving decision making from itself

Zackary Berger

In the past decades, at the same time as the theory and practice of Shared Decision Making have achieved increasing prominence, threads of epistemological, ethical and political concern have converged to render the concept itself problematic. How does the “evidence based medicine” purveyed by... Read more

In the past decades, at the same time as the theory and practice of Shared Decision Making have achieved increasing prominence, threads of epistemological, ethical and political concern have converged to render the concept itself problematic. How does the “evidence based medicine” purveyed by the clinician differ from the evidence used by the patient? Whose values and preferences are meant to take precedence, and how does the social and political milieu impinge upon, or determine, the exercise of decision making (if indeed that is the main point of the health care encounter)? In this exploratory, conceptual, and deliberately provocative talk, I will seek to blow up and then reconstruct shared decision making along both more defensible yet more ambitious lines, arguing that saving SDM as an approach to health care means saving our system from moral and empirical blindness. If you would like to attend, please e-mail Jane Beinart at jane.beinart@ethox.ox.ac.uk.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Wed 20 Jun 2018 from 12:30 to 13:30

WHG Lunchtime Lab Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Green and Siebold Lunchtime Lab Talks

Lihao Wang, Tomas Malinauskas

Green Group: Speaker: Lihao Wang Title: A novel mechanism for PARP inhibitor sensitivity: insights from a rare human DNA repair disorder Siebold Group: Speaker: Tomas Malinauskas Title: Signalling by the Repulsive Guidance Molecule Family Speaker: Rachel Woolley Title: Understanding the oncoprotein Smoothened, a key player in Hedgehog signalling

Green Group: Speaker: Lihao Wang Title: A novel mechanism for PARP inhibitor sensitivity: insights from a rare human DNA repair disorder Siebold Group: Speaker: Tomas Malinauskas Title: Signalling by the Repulsive Guidance Molecule Family Speaker: Rachel Woolley Title: Understanding the oncoprotein Smoothened, a key player in Hedgehog signalling

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Thu 21 Jun 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Combined Medical-Surgical Grand Round

Mr Richard Guy, Dr Tim Betts, Dr David Holdsworth

Surgery: “Kili or cure? High altitude hazards”, Mr Richard Guy, Dr Tim Betts and Dr David Holdsworth -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Surgery: “Kili or cure? High altitude hazards”, Mr Richard Guy, Dr Tim Betts and Dr David Holdsworth -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 21 Jun 2018 from 16:30 to 18:00

Centre for Personalised Medicine Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1, Academic Centre

Talk by Professor Joseph Sung; 'Microbes and GI Cancers: implications in management'

Professor Joseph Sung

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Catherine Lidbetter

The CPM is pleased to invite you to a talk by Professor Joseph Sung, The Chinese University of Hong Kong; 'Microbes and GI Cancers: implications in management'

Fri 22 Jun 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Genetic association analysis across tree-structured routine healthcare data

Dr Adrian Cortes

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 22 Jun 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 seminar room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Molecular Epidemiology of HIV-1 in the United States

Joel Wertheim

HIV molecular epidemiology is the use of viral genetic sequence data in a public health setting, and it has the potential to improve public health surveillance and prevention efforts. My research focuses on the use of molecular epidemiology in U.S. public health departments, particularly in New... Read more

HIV molecular epidemiology is the use of viral genetic sequence data in a public health setting, and it has the potential to improve public health surveillance and prevention efforts. My research focuses on the use of molecular epidemiology in U.S. public health departments, particularly in New York City. To conduct this research, we developed a tool to construct HIV molecular transmission networks: HIV-TRACE (HIV Transmission Cluster Engine). Using HIV-TRACE, we have investigated the dynamics of these transmission networks to evaluate both their epidemiological significance and their utility in identifying potential targets of HIV intervention and prevention efforts. We have also explored the dynamics of transmitted drug resistance across these networks. Our findings make a strong case for the expanded use of HIV molecular epidemiology in the United States.

Audience: Scientific Community

Organisers: Thomas Johnson

Please arrive 5 minutes before the seminar begins to gain access to the building

Mon 25 Jun 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting rooms 71a, b and c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Roles and Regulation of the eukaryotic replisome

Professor Karim Labib

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 25 Jun 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Joint-resident mesenchymal stem cells

Dr Anke Roelofs

In recent years, skeletal stem cell populations have been identified in bone marrow and genetic lineage tracing models in mice have provided important insights in their roles in bone homeostasis, fracture repair, and haematopoiesis. More recently, the stem and progenitor cells that are resident in... Read more

In recent years, skeletal stem cell populations have been identified in bone marrow and genetic lineage tracing models in mice have provided important insights in their roles in bone homeostasis, fracture repair, and haematopoiesis. More recently, the stem and progenitor cells that are resident in synovial joints are also beginning to be defined and their functions elucidated. Work in our lab has focused on stem and progenitor cells in the synovial membrane, and has identified progeny of the Gdf5-expressing cells of the embryonic joint interzones as key players in joint homeostasis, repair and pathophysiology. ---- Anke Roelofs completed her MSc in Medical Biology at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands in 2003 cum laude. She then moved to the Botnar Research Centre at the University of Oxford to study for a PhD under the guidance of Prof Graham Russell and Drs Claire Edwards and Philippa Hulley, focussing on the mechanisms of action of bisphosphonates and related compounds. After completing her PhD in 2007 and following a number of post-doctoral research posts, she was appointed Lecturer at the University of Aberdeen in 2012, where she is part of the Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine laboratory within the Aberdeen Centre for Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Health. Her current research focusses on the study of the endogenous mesenchymal stromal cell lineages and their niches in the joint in health, after joint injury, and in osteoarthritis.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 25 Jun 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Infections@BDI Seminar

Jason Hendry, Will Probert

Will Probert (Fraser): Artificial intelligence to aid decision-making in emergency disease outbreaks: reinforcement learning methods for the control of foot-and-mouth disease Jason Hendry (McVean): Estimating malaria prevalence from genomic data

Will Probert (Fraser): Artificial intelligence to aid decision-making in emergency disease outbreaks: reinforcement learning methods for the control of foot-and-mouth disease Jason Hendry (McVean): Estimating malaria prevalence from genomic data

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Tue 26 Jun 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NPEU Seminar - SIFT The Speed of Increasing milk Feeds Trial

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Manisha Nair

Tue 26 Jun 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

Ethox Centre and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

The Challenges of Total Joint Replacement in Obese Individuals: Clinical and Ethical Issues

Casey Humbyrd

Total joint replacement is a surgical procedure with profound impact on patients’ activity and quality of life, and this surgical procedure is highly utilized on both sides of the Atlantic. Due to new payment models in the United States and cost-constraints in the NHS, eligibility criteria are... Read more

Total joint replacement is a surgical procedure with profound impact on patients’ activity and quality of life, and this surgical procedure is highly utilized on both sides of the Atlantic. Due to new payment models in the United States and cost-constraints in the NHS, eligibility criteria are now being used by physicians to determine who may receive total joint replacement. I will explore the ethics of patient selection to improve outcomes; specifically, screening patients by body mass index to determine eligibility for total joint replacement. I argue that this type of screening is not ethically defensible, and that the creation of eligibility cutoffs is likely to lead to unfair restrictions on who receives total joint replacements.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Christa Henrichs

Tue 26 Jun 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Controlling mouse HSC function and myelopoiesis in vivo

Claudia Waskow

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 27 Jun 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Room 3, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

Under pressure - do patients really want the responsibility of managing their own BP?

Dr Claire Schwartz

A quantitative and qualitative exploration of how patients really feel about monitoring their own blood pressure and managing their medications and discussion about whether they would be prepared to make this part of their lifestyle in the long-term.

A quantitative and qualitative exploration of how patients really feel about monitoring their own blood pressure and managing their medications and discussion about whether they would be prepared to make this part of their lifestyle in the long-term.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Wed 27 Jun 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox Seminar: Justice and vulnerability in big data

Angela Ballantyne

Data is powerful because it is used to tell stories – stories about people and the lives they lead. Data carries an appealing veneer of objectivity. But telling stories is never ethically neutral. Narratives always have embedded cultural values and ethical assumptions. Data analytics and... Read more

Data is powerful because it is used to tell stories – stories about people and the lives they lead. Data carries an appealing veneer of objectivity. But telling stories is never ethically neutral. Narratives always have embedded cultural values and ethical assumptions. Data analytics and artificial intelligence are increasingly used to influence decisions about service delivery and access (in both the public and private sectors). In this talk I argue that the most vulnerable and marginalized citizens often rely on multiple government services, experience the greatest surveillance of their activities, and therefore have the most data produced about them. But conversely, they often have the least capacity to influence the narratives that are drawn with this data and the resulting policies. To date, there has been significant discussion of data benefit sharing (ensuring the advantages/profits derived from the use of data are shared justly with the data providers and data subjects). I will discuss recent attempts, particularly in relation to indigenous data, to the move the debate from ‘benefit sharing’ towards ‘power sharing’. Power sharing requires a co-governance model where data subjects and communities have decision making capacity in relation to data governance and use.[1] I will describe recent initiatives in New Zealand, and argue in favour of transparency, accountability and co-governance models for public sector data. If you would like to attend, please e-mail Jane Beinart at jane.beinart@ethox.ox.ac.uk.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Wed 27 Jun 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - Post-Truth Medicine: Death and Disability by Disinformation

Sir Rory Collins

Rory Collins studied Medicine at St Thomas’s Hospital Medical School, London, and Statistics at George Washington University and Oxford University. He came to Oxford in 1981 to run the ISIS “mega-trials” which showed that emergency treatment of heart attacks with streptokinase and aspirin... Read more

Rory Collins studied Medicine at St Thomas’s Hospital Medical School, London, and Statistics at George Washington University and Oxford University. He came to Oxford in 1981 to run the ISIS “mega-trials” which showed that emergency treatment of heart attacks with streptokinase and aspirin halves mortality. Subsequently, his focus has involved showing that lowering LDL-cholesterol safely reduces the risk of having heart attacks and strokes. In 1985, he became co-director (with Richard Peto) of the University of Oxford's Clinical Trial Service Unit & Epidemiological Studies Unit (CTSU). He was appointed BHF Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology in 1996, and Head of the Nuffield Department of Population Health in 2013. Rory became Principal Investigator of the UK Biobank prospective study of 500,000 people in 2005. He was elected to the Fellowship of the UK Academy of Medical Science in 2004 and the Royal Society in 2015, and knighted by the Queen for services to Science in 2011.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 28 Jun 2018 from 14:00 to 15:00

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Characterising the Role of the Novel C-type lectin Receptor CD302 in Dendritic Cell Migration

Dr Pablo Silveira

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 28 Jun 2018 from 14:00 to 15:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting room A , Headington OX3 7BN

"Structural insights into Potato Virus Y - a bad guy and a good guy"

Assist. Prof Marjetka Podobnik

Potato virus Y (PVY) is the type member of the genus Potyvirus, which includes some of the most destructive plant viruses. PVY has been placed on a Top 5 list of scientifically and economically important plant viruses, affecting potato, tomato, tobacco, pepper as well as ornamentals and weeds. PVY... Read more

Potato virus Y (PVY) is the type member of the genus Potyvirus, which includes some of the most destructive plant viruses. PVY has been placed on a Top 5 list of scientifically and economically important plant viruses, affecting potato, tomato, tobacco, pepper as well as ornamentals and weeds. PVY virions are assembled of a positive sense single stranded RNA, enveloped with approximately 2000 copies of a coat protein (CP) to form flexuous filaments 740 nm in length and 12 nm in diameter. Expression of recombinant CP in bacteria results in formation of self-assembled flexuous filaments called virus like particles (VLPs), which are devoid of viral RNA and thus non-infectious. In my talk I will show our recent results on near-atomic cryo-EM structures of both, PVY virions (‘bad guys’) and VLPs (‘good guys’), revealing unique structural features of PVY and significant differences between the two types of filaments. Furthermore, I will also discuss the potential of VLPs for use in (bio)technology.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Fri 29 Jun 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Genomic approaches to understanding the dysregulated host response in sepsis

Prof Julian Knight

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 29 Jun 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Rational Design of Artificial Genetic Switches

Professor Hiroshi Sugiyama

To produce a genetic switch that turns on specific gene expression, we developed a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor conjugated to pyrrole–imidazole polyamide (PIP) that has remarkable properties such as sequence-specific DNA binding, effects on cell permeability, and nuclear localization. We... Read more

To produce a genetic switch that turns on specific gene expression, we developed a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor conjugated to pyrrole–imidazole polyamide (PIP) that has remarkable properties such as sequence-specific DNA binding, effects on cell permeability, and nuclear localization. We constructed a library of 32 types of PIP conjugates that bind to different base sequences and has evaluated gene expression using DNA microarray technology in mice and human cells. We demonstrated that upregulation of gene expression in different transcriptional networks is based on sequence specificity.1 To develop a genetic switch that turns off specific gene expression, we synthesized a functional PIP with a DNA alkylating agent. Our research group found that the functional polyamide targets the mutant (GTT) sequence of Kras codon 12, which is found in colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer where it effectively suppresses Kras expression.2 We confirmed the compound’s effectiveness in experiments using human colorectal cancer cells and tumor-bearing mice. We have also developed functional polyamides that inhibit the binding of RUNX family genes, which are among the key transcription factors responsible for tumor growth and are drug candidates for the treatment of leukemia, lung cancer, and stomach cancer.3 Therefore, strategies to expand our tunable PIPs could create an epoch-making approach to modulate the desired gene expressions. Recently, we installed cooperative binding host-guest unit to PIP and demonstrated potent cooperative inhibitory effects on gene expression under physiological conditions by disrupting transcription factors- DNA binding.4 In this talk recent progress of regulation of the gene expression using designed PIPs will be discussed.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Fri 29 Jun 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

NDM Seminar Series

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar Rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

SAMHD1 at the crossroads of nucleotide metabolism and cell death / High-Throughput Production of Human Proteins for Structural and Functional Analyses.

Prof Jan Rehwinkel, Dr Nicola Burgess Brown

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kathryn Smith