Other Seminars

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Mon 2 Jul 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Genome Editing of Stem Cells: Moving Towards the Clinic

Dr. Matthew Porteus

Genome editing provides a mechanism to precisely change the DNA sequence of cells with single nucleotide precision. We have developed a highly efficient platform to modify multiple types of human stem cells, including hematopoietic stem cells and pluripotent stem cells, with high efficiency using a... Read more

Genome editing provides a mechanism to precisely change the DNA sequence of cells with single nucleotide precision. We have developed a highly efficient platform to modify multiple types of human stem cells, including hematopoietic stem cells and pluripotent stem cells, with high efficiency using a combination of CRISPR/Cas9 and AAV6. I will discuss our progress in applying this platform to several different genetic diseases of the blood and immune system including sickle cell disease and severe combined immunodeficiency. In addition, I will discuss our optimized protocols to generate precisely modified human pluritpotent stem cells.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sabrina Harris

Mon 2 Jul 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

New immune cell biology revealed by super-resolution microscopy

Prof Daniel Davis

I will present high- and super-resolution microscopy data which reveal novel insights into molecular recognition by human Natural Killer (NK) cells and macrophages. I will discuss how genetic diversity in NK cell inhibitory receptors impacts the nanoscale organisation of the protein at cell... Read more

I will present high- and super-resolution microscopy data which reveal novel insights into molecular recognition by human Natural Killer (NK) cells and macrophages. I will discuss how genetic diversity in NK cell inhibitory receptors impacts the nanoscale organisation of the protein at cell surfaces, both of which effect receptor signalling. I will also show that receptor shedding promotes the detachment of immune cells from target cells to aid serial engagement of multiple target cells. In this way, counter-intuitively, shedding of activating receptors on immune cells can positively impact immune responses. ---- Daniel M Davis began studying the immune system at Harvard University with Jack Strominger, after obtaining a PhD in Physics in Glasgow, UK. Currently, he is a Professor of Immunology at Manchester University and Director of Research in the Manchester Collaborative Centre for Inflammation Research. Prior to this, he was the Head of the Immunology Section at Imperial College London in South Kensington. He has published well over 120 academic papers, cited over 10,000 times, including articles in Nature, Science and Scientific American. His work has helped establish new concepts in how immune cells communicate with each other and how they detect signs of disease in other cells. He became a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences in 2011 and currently chairs their selection panel for immunology candidates. He is also the author of a popular-level book THE COMPATIBILITY GENE, described by Bill Bryson in the Guardian’s Books of the Year as ‘elegantly written and unexpectedly gripping’. His second book, THE BEAUTIFUL CURE, has been described by Stephen Fry as 'One of those books that makes you look at everything human in a new, challenging and thrilling way'.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 2 Jul 2018 from 12:30 to 13:30

WHG Lunchtime Lab Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Hill and Bhattacharya Lunchtime Lab Talks

Dr Alexander Mentzer, Yara Alenazi, James Eaton

Hill Group: Speaker: Dr Alexander Mentzer Title: Using genetic associations with antibody responses in humans to understand susceptibility to infection Bhattacharya Group: Speaker: Yara Alenazi Title: 2-warheads, a method for precision targeting of chemokine expression patterns in... Read more

Hill Group: Speaker: Dr Alexander Mentzer Title: Using genetic associations with antibody responses in humans to understand susceptibility to infection Bhattacharya Group: Speaker: Yara Alenazi Title: 2-warheads, a method for precision targeting of chemokine expression patterns in disease Speaker: James Eaton Title: Lessons from nature: Engineering of multiple chemokine binding proteins and peptides

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Mon 2 Jul 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Interpreting the CpG island signal

Prof Rob Klose

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Mon 2 Jul 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - Some large simple randomized trials in life threatening bleeding

Professor Ian Roberts

Ian Roberts is Professor of Epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and co-director of LSHTM’s Clinical Trials Unit. He first trained as a paediatrician and then in epidemiology at the University of Auckland, New Zealand and at McGill University, Canada. He established... Read more

Ian Roberts is Professor of Epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and co-director of LSHTM’s Clinical Trials Unit. He first trained as a paediatrician and then in epidemiology at the University of Auckland, New Zealand and at McGill University, Canada. He established and is co-ordinating editor of the Cochrane Injuries Group, an international network of individuals that prepares and maintains systematic reviews of the effectiveness of interventions in the prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of injury. He is principal investigator of the CRASH trials, large international randomised controlled trials that seek better ways to treat seriously injured trauma patients. His current focus is the conduct of large scale trials of tranexamic acid in the management of acute severe bleeding. This includes the international WOMAN trial which tested the administration of tranexamic acid to women with post-partem haemorrhage.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Mon 2 Jul 2018 from 15:00 to 16:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Migraine – a real headache for science patients and society

Dr. Danny Bar Zohar

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Lars Fugger

Wed 4 Jul 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Health Economics Seminars

Richard Doll Building, First Floor Main Meeting Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Discrete Choice Experiments to Inform Programming and C-E Modelling of HIV Prevention

Dr Fern Terris-Prestholt

Discrete choice experiments (DCEs) are a survey based method for quantitatively estimating user preferences for products and/or services characteristics and are increasingly being applied in health preference research. This presentation will provide an overview of two innovative applications of... Read more

Discrete choice experiments (DCEs) are a survey based method for quantitatively estimating user preferences for products and/or services characteristics and are increasingly being applied in health preference research. This presentation will provide an overview of two innovative applications of DCEs to inform HIV prevention policy. The first will focus on how DCE are more recently being used to inform the design of complex public health interventions and trials, where effectiveness is highly dependent on user uptake and adherence. The second application shows how DCEs can be used to inform cost-effectiveness modelling of new technologies, where there is little data on uptake, or how the package of service in which the new technology is delivered, or indeed its own efficacy, will likely affect uptake. While examples are taken from African settings, the methodological lessons are relevant to the introduction of new prevention technologies across settings. Biography: Fern Terris-Prestholt is an Associate Professor in the Department of Global Health and Development at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. She has worked on the economics of HIV prevention since 2000. She has a particular interest in incorporating consumer demand into conventionally supply-side interventions. Her projects span economic evaluations and preference studies of new prevention technologies, including rapid diagnostics for syphilis, HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for and HIV self-testing. She is co-Lead of the Centre for Health Economics in London (CHiL) theme on the Economics of Preferences and Behaviour (tinyurl.com/LSHTM-CHiL ) and co-Convenor of IHEA’s Special Interest Group on Health Preference Research (tinyurl.com/IHEA-Sig-HPR).

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: HERC

Thu 5 Jul 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Targeting the microenvironment in B cell malignancies

John Gribben

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 5 Jul 2018 from 16:00 to 17:00

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, Headington OX3 9DU

Gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies

Claire Booth

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Holm Uhlig

Fri 6 Jul 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Colon and rectal surgery

Dr Heather Yeo

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 6 Jul 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Statins – the good and the bad: What microscopy tells us

Dr Dilip Shrestha

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Mon 9 Jul 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

Regulation of endothelial cell junctions

Prof Dietmar Vestweber

Molecular mechanisms that control the formation and integrity of endothelial junctions are important for the development of blood vessels and for the stability and regulation of the vasculature during inflammatory processes. We have recently shown that the endothelial specific receptor type... Read more

Molecular mechanisms that control the formation and integrity of endothelial junctions are important for the development of blood vessels and for the stability and regulation of the vasculature during inflammatory processes. We have recently shown that the endothelial specific receptor type tyrosine phosphatase VE-PTP is an important regulator of endothelial junctions and of blood vessel development. We found that the adhesion molecule VE-cadherin as well as the tyrosine kinase receptor Tie-2 represents important substrates of VE-PTP. The seminar will discuss how the interplay of these membrane proteins influences the integrity of blood vessels and thereby leukocyte extravasation and vascular permeability. ---- Dietmar Vestweber studied biochemistry at the Universities of Tuebingen and Munich, and received his diploma in 1982. He received his PhD in 1985 at the Max Planck Institute in Tuebingen for studies on the role of E-cadherin in epithelial junction formation. From 1987 - 1989 he was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Basel (Switzerland) working on the mechanisms of protein transport into mitochondria. In 1990 he started an independent research group at the Max Planck Institute for Immunobiology in Freiburg, where he turned to study leukocyte trafficking. In 1994 Vestweber became full professor for Cell Biology at the University of Muenster. In 1999 he became director of the department of Vascular Cell Biology of the Max Planck Institute in Bad Nauheim. Since 2001 he is the founding director of the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Biomedicine in Muenster. He is interested in leukocyte trafficking and vascular integrity.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Tue 10 Jul 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

In vivo imaging of adaptive immune responses to pathogens and tumors

Dr Matteo Iannacone

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Tue 10 Jul 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - Malaria elimination in the Greater Mekong Subregion

Dr Tom Peto

Tom is a postdoctoral researcher in clinical trials and epidemiology working for the University of Oxford and based at the Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit. Since 2012 he has been in Southeast Asia working on malaria epidemiology, treatment, and elimination. His main areas of... Read more

Tom is a postdoctoral researcher in clinical trials and epidemiology working for the University of Oxford and based at the Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit. Since 2012 he has been in Southeast Asia working on malaria epidemiology, treatment, and elimination. His main areas of research are: - New artemisinin combination therapies for malaria - Mass drug administration for malaria - Malaria diagnostics Previously he spent 5 years in Tanzania on a clinical trial of severe malaria treatment. He studied at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine for a Master’s degree in Public Health, and then received a Doctorate on the effectiveness of infant hepatitis B vaccination in The Gambia. In this seminar, Tom will discuss the challenges of malaria in South East Asia.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 11 Jul 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

Ethox Centre and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethical Issues for Verbal Autopsy in the Context of Health and Demographic Surveillance Systems

Alex Hinga

The objective of my study is to identify ethical issues in Health and Demographic Surveillance Systems (HDSS) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and to make recommendations on how these ethical issues should be responded to. A HDSS longitudinally monitor births, deaths and migrations in a geographically... Read more

The objective of my study is to identify ethical issues in Health and Demographic Surveillance Systems (HDSS) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and to make recommendations on how these ethical issues should be responded to. A HDSS longitudinally monitor births, deaths and migrations in a geographically defined population. There are 53 HDSS sites located in low and middle income countries across Africa, Asia and Oceania. The majority of these HDSS sites are in sub-Saharan Africa. The Verbal Autopsy, which involves conducting interviews with the bereaved to find out the probable cause of death, is a key component of a HDSS. HDSS sites are seen as interim measures for providing population-level data in countries without well-functioning civil registration and vital statistics systems. Methodologically, HDSS are indistinctly positioned between research, health care and public health practice. Secondly, they involve long-term follow up of entire populations in settings of multidimensional poverty. In addition, HDSS have received little attention in the ethics literature and guidelines. Therefore, there is a lack of clarity on what the ethical issues in HDSS are and how they should be responded to. My study will contribute to filling this gap. I am using a case study research design. Participants include HDSS research and community stakeholders. Data collection methods include individual in-depth interviews, observation, focus group discussions and document review.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Christa Henrichs

Thu 12 Jul 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

133p53 isoforms cause inflammation and cancer: a novel mechanism for wild type p53 to promote cancer development

Professor Antony Braithwaite

We developed a transgenic mouse model of human 133p53 isoform 1, which showed that the isoform can function as an oncogene, but also promotes inflammation by activation of the prototypical NFkB pathway 2,3. These observations led us to explore a role for the 133p53 isoform in cancers and... Read more

We developed a transgenic mouse model of human 133p53 isoform 1, which showed that the isoform can function as an oncogene, but also promotes inflammation by activation of the prototypical NFkB pathway 2,3. These observations led us to explore a role for the 133p53 isoform in cancers and autoimmune conditions. We show that prostate cancers with substantially elevated levels of 133TP53 mRNA are more aggressive and have a high immune cell content. We find a similar pattern in a subset of glioblastomas 4. Of interest, we also find elevated levels 133p53 by IHC in hyperproliferative synovium from Rheumatoid Arthritis patients. These data provide strong evidence that a key role of the 133p53 isoform is in immune signalling which, if left unchecked, can promote malignancy. References: 1. Slatter, T.J., Hung, N.A., Campbell, H.C., et al. (2011). Hyperproliferation, cancer, and inflammation in mice expressing a Δ133p53-like isoform. Blood 117, 5166-5177 2. Campbell, H.G., Slatter, T.L., Jeffs, et al. (2012). Does the Δ133p53 isoform trigger inflammation and autoimmunity? Cell Cycle 11, 446-450 3. Campbell, H.G., Fleming, N., Roth, I. et. al. (2018). 133p53 isoform promotes tumour invasion and metastasis via interleukin-6 activation of JAK-STAT and RhoA-ROCK signalling Nature Comm. DOI: 10.1038/s41467-017-02408-0 | 4. Kazantseva, M., Eiholzer, R., Mehta, S. et al (2018). Elevation of the TP53 isoform D133TP53b in glioblastomas: an alternative to mutant p53 in promting tumour development. J Pathol. 2018 Jun 10. doi: 10.1002/path.5111.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 12 Jul 2018 from 11:30 to 12:30

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Immune responses to the RTS,S malaria vaccine in African children

Prof Carlota Dobano

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Mon 16 Jul 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

Nucleic Acid Sensing by Innate Immune Receptors

Prof Jan Rehwinkel

The innate immune response is critical for successful host defence against virus infection. Cell-intrinsic mechanisms detect virus presence and restrict virus replication. Nucleic acids are often a molecular signature of virus infection and are recognised by innate receptors including toll-like... Read more

The innate immune response is critical for successful host defence against virus infection. Cell-intrinsic mechanisms detect virus presence and restrict virus replication. Nucleic acids are often a molecular signature of virus infection and are recognised by innate receptors including toll-like receptors, RIG-I-like receptors and cytosolic DNA sensors. These receptors signal for the induction of innate response genes such as those encoding type I interferons. These in turn induce the expression of restriction factors, host proteins that limit virus replication. Our work focuses on cytosolic nucleic acid sensors, in particular RIG-I, MDA5 and cGAS. We are also studying the restriction factor SAMHD1. We are using in vitro and in vivo models of virus infection (including influenza A virus, retroviruses and varicella-zoster virus) and are interested in Aicardi-Goutières syndrome, a rare genetic disease linked to chronic anti-viral innate immune responses. In this presentation, I will discuss our recent work on cGAS and other nucleic acid sensors.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Tue 17 Jul 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Richard Doll Lecture Theatre , Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Tue 17 Jul 2018 from 12:30 to 13:30

Tropical Medicine Seminars

NDM Building, Tropical Medicine Meeting Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Ethical issues for Verbal Autopsy in Health and Demographic Surveillance Systems in Africa

Alex Hinga

Alex Hinga is a PhD student at the KEMRI Wellcome Trust Research Programme in Kilifi, Kenya (2016-2019). He holds an MSc in Public Health (2014) from University of the West of England (UWE Bristol) and a BSc in Medical Laboratory Science (2010) from Kenyatta University, Kenya.

Alex Hinga is a PhD student at the KEMRI Wellcome Trust Research Programme in Kilifi, Kenya (2016-2019). He holds an MSc in Public Health (2014) from University of the West of England (UWE Bristol) and a BSc in Medical Laboratory Science (2010) from Kenyatta University, Kenya.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Georgina Humphreys

Lunch provided, all welcome

Wed 18 Jul 2018 from 12:30 to 13:30

WHG Lunchtime Lab Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Grimes and Knight Lunchtime Lab Talks

Dr Hai Fang, Dr Katie Burnham, Loic Carrique, Jeremy Keown

Grimes Group: Speaker: Loic Carrique Title: Investigating the transcriptional activity of influenza virus polymerase Speaker: Jeremy Keown Title: Structural studies of the Influenza Polymerase Knight Group: Speaker: Dr Katie Burnham Title: Exploring variation in the sepsis response through a... Read more

Grimes Group: Speaker: Loic Carrique Title: Investigating the transcriptional activity of influenza virus polymerase Speaker: Jeremy Keown Title: Structural studies of the Influenza Polymerase Knight Group: Speaker: Dr Katie Burnham Title: Exploring variation in the sepsis response through a combined -omics approach Speaker: Dr Hai Fang Title: Building infrastructures for genetics-led drug target discovery

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Thu 19 Jul 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Microfluidics with fluid walls; a simple technology for everyone in cell and molecular biology

Professor Peter Cook

Workflows in cell and molecular biology often use microliter volumes and containers with solid walls (e.g., microcentrifuge tubes, microplates). An accessible technology that provides an easy entrée into the use of nanoliter volumes will be described. In this case, liquids are confined by fluid... Read more

Workflows in cell and molecular biology often use microliter volumes and containers with solid walls (e.g., microcentrifuge tubes, microplates). An accessible technology that provides an easy entrée into the use of nanoliter volumes will be described. In this case, liquids are confined by fluid (not solid) walls. Aqueous circuits with any 2D shape, or grids containing thousands of identical chambers, are made in seconds using standard cell-growth media on polystyrene Petri dishes; then, interfacial forces pin liquids to substrates, and an immiscible overlay prevents evaporation. The confining fluid walls are pliant, resilient, and optically transparent; they self-heal when liquids are pipetted through them, and they can even drive flows through circuits without the need for external pumps. The technology will be illustrated using some common cell-based workflows (e.g., cell feeding, replating, cloning, cryopreservation, lysis plus RT-PCR, transfection plus genome-editing, fixation plus immuno-labeling, and the response of human cells to cytokines and drugs, worms to osmotic stress, and bacterial biofilms to chemotactic gradients).

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Mon 23 Jul 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

WHG High Profile Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

B cells biology in sepsis

Dr Manu Shankar-Hari

Sepsis is defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection. Sepsis is common, with an extrapolated critical care treated incidence of 103 per 100,000 population in 2014 in England. As critical care incidence represents a small proportion of sepsis... Read more

Sepsis is defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection. Sepsis is common, with an extrapolated critical care treated incidence of 103 per 100,000 population in 2014 in England. As critical care incidence represents a small proportion of sepsis cases treated within a health care system, making it more common than some cancers, with an estimated global case load of 16 million cases per year. The improving in hospital mortality generates more sepsis survivors, with longer-term sequelae such as increased health care use and greater risk of death compared to general population. Immunologically, the transition from infection to sepsis represents an inflection point in the race between the human immune system devised to detect danger signals and overwhelm pathogens, ideally without causing a non-homeostatic systemic activation of immune cells. The consequence of such non-homeostatic immune system activation, characterised using whole blood leukocyte transcriptome, highlight changes in major canonical signalling pathways of cellular function, metabolism, in both innate and adaptive immune systems. Either a consequence or primary manifestation of this allostatic overload is accelerated lymphocyte apoptosis, contributing to lymphopenia seen in sepsis patients. In contrast to T cell biology in sepsis, B cell biology is poorly characterised, despite the likely inevitability of B cell changes when there are T cell changes such as loss of helper T cells and impaired ability of T cells to respond to new antigen challenge. We measured key aspects of B cell biology in community acquired sepsis, in adults without any documented immune co-morbidity, prior to critical care admission. In this cohort, B cells are lower than normal at critical care admission, despite normal levels of B cell survival factors (BAFF and APRIL). As a proportion of total B cells, the transitional and naïve B cell subsets were similar, whilst plasmablasts and memory B cells were significantly lower, compared to age-matched health controls. The greater loss of memory loss was secondary to higher apoptosis and the apoptotic cells had greater phosphosrylated-erk mean fluorescent intensity (MFI). In addition, there was reciprocal lower MFI for CD22 without concomitant higher MFI for Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) and spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK). Using micro-array on negatively selected CD19 positive B cells, the apoptosis networks highlighted by the Ingenuity pathways analysis involved intrinsic pathway with higher expression of CASP2, CASP6, pro-apoptotic BCL2 proteins (APAF1, HTRA2, HIP1 and BOK) and death Receptor pathway with higher expression of plasma membrane death receptor (DR) genes (FAS, TNFRSF25, TNFRSF10B, TNFRSF10A, DR4, DR5 and Trail-R), DR adaptor proteins (CRADD, PIDD1 and FADD), CFLAR, CASP8 and CASP10. Thus, in sepsis, there are major alternations in B cell biology. These findings highlight potential interventions for improving both acute and for longer-term sequalae to sepsis such re-infections related to immunosuppression.

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 23 Jul 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

Happy and healthy blood vessels: Keep ‘em quiescent

Prof Hellmut Augustin

Vascular dysfunction is the primary cause of human mortality. The molecular analysis of endothelial activation mechanisms has therefore been focus of intense research during the last three decades. Conversely, vascular quiescence is not just the absence of activation programs. Instead, it is only... Read more

Vascular dysfunction is the primary cause of human mortality. The molecular analysis of endothelial activation mechanisms has therefore been focus of intense research during the last three decades. Conversely, vascular quiescence is not just the absence of activation programs. Instead, it is only recognized in recent years that vascular quiescence is an active process that needs to be actively maintained in order to avoid vascular dysfunction. The presentation will discuss the state-of-the-art of vascular quiescence research and focus on recent systems biology approaches to study the transcriptomic program and epigenetic regulation of vascular quiescence. ---- Trained as veterinary surgeon (DVM, Hannover, Germany) and as experimental pathologist (PhD, Cornell University, USA), Hellmut Augustin worked previously as Assistant Professor at the University of Göttingen, Germany (1993-2000) and as Departmant Head at the Tumor Biology Center in Freiburg, Germany (2001-2006). Since 2006, he is Professor of Vascular and Tumor Biology at Heidelberg University and Division Head at the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg. His laboratory (www.augustinlab.de) studies 1.) the molecular mechanisms of physiological blood vessel formation, assembly, and maturation focusing on angiogenesis regulating receptor tyrosine kinases, most notably on the Angiopoietin-Tie ligand-receptor system as well as on other selected novel candidate molecules, 2.) the mechanisms of organotypic vascular differentiation and angiocrine signaling studying the lung and liver vasculature as prototypic vascular beds, 3.) the molecular mechanisms of tumor progression focusing on tumor-vessel interactions during metastasis, and 4.) translational tumor microenvironment experiments aimed at defining the therapeutic window of stromal targeted therapies.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Wed 25 Jul 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

* CANCELLED * CANCELLED - Using the UK Biobank cohort study for biomedical research

Dr Carmen Piernas

The UK Biobank study has recruited 500,000 volunteers from all around the UK aged 40-69 at enrolment. This age group is being studied because it involves people at risk over the next few decades of developing a wide range of important diseases (including cancer, heart disease, stroke, diabetes,... Read more

The UK Biobank study has recruited 500,000 volunteers from all around the UK aged 40-69 at enrolment. This age group is being studied because it involves people at risk over the next few decades of developing a wide range of important diseases (including cancer, heart disease, stroke, diabetes, dementia). The purpose of this talk is to provide an introduction to this resource for health research and guidance on how to access and handle this data.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

CANCELLED

Wed 25 Jul 2018 from 14:00 to 15:00

Ethox Centre and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 1, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

An ethical analysis of screening for perinatal mental health in the UK

Roshni Janarthanan

tbc

tbc

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christa Henrichs

Wed 25 Jul 2018 from 14:00 to 15:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 1, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox Seminar - An ethical analysis of screening for perinatal mental health in the UK

Roshni Janarthanan

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley