Other Seminars

seminar-banner

Mon 3 Dec 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar: Processing single cell RNA-Seq datasets with kallisto and BUStools

Páll Melsted,

Single cell RNA-Sequencing (scRNA-Seq) provides a unique look into the function of tissue at the individual cell level. In this talk will show recent developments in kallisto for processing scRNA-Seq datasets and the newly developed BUS file format. The BUS format is intended as a... Read more

Single cell RNA-Sequencing (scRNA-Seq) provides a unique look into the function of tissue at the individual cell level. In this talk will show recent developments in kallisto for processing scRNA-Seq datasets and the newly developed BUS file format. The BUS format is intended as a technology-agnostic file format for intermediate results in scRNA-Seq, separating the problem of read processing and downstream analysis. BUS output can be generated efficiently using kallisto, and the results can be processed with BUSTools and technology specific notebooks written in high level languages. This talk will cover the motivation, design, and generation of BUS format using kallisto as well as demonstrating the simplicity and speed of the downstream processing using Jupyter notebooks.

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 3 Dec 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Temporally regulated amino acid uptake through SLC7A5 is required for CD4+ effector T cell differentiation

Dr Linda Sinclair

T follicular helper cells (TFH) are critical cells for germinal center (GC) formation and for the production of high affinity, isotype-switched antibody responses. Using a novel single cell assay for System L amino acid transport, we show that the in vivo differentiation of TFH is accompanied by... Read more

T follicular helper cells (TFH) are critical cells for germinal center (GC) formation and for the production of high affinity, isotype-switched antibody responses. Using a novel single cell assay for System L amino acid transport, we show that the in vivo differentiation of TFH is accompanied by sustained regulation of System L amino acid transport capacity. The System L transporter, SLC7A5, has a key role in activated T cells to transport the essential amino acid methionine. Methionine is required for de novo protein synthesis and is also the biosynthetic precursor for S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), the main methyl donor used in the DNA, RNA and histone modifications that regulate cellular transcriptional programs. In particular, regulated methionine delivery to the cell interior is rate limiting for RNA methylation and for coordinating epigenetic histone modifications in immune activated T cells. SLC7A5 expression is thus a critical metabolic checkpoint linking nutrient supply to key processes required for effector T cell differentiation. ---- Linda was born in Lund, Sweden and had a varied international primary and secondary schooling, finally coming to rest in Scotland; she received her undergraduate degree in Immunology from Edinburgh, followed by her PhD from Dundee. Since then she has continued working with Doreen Cantrell to advance understanding on how nutrient availability impacts upon the immune system, specifically on the activation, differentiation and function of T lymphocytes. – demonstrating a novel role for the metabolic sensor mTOR in regulating lymphocyte homing (Nat Imm 2008) – demonstrating that regulated expression of SLC7A5 (an amino acid transporter) is required to co-ordinate the metabolic reprogramming of cytotoxic T cells upon antigen stimulation, both to sustain mTOR signalling and c-MYC expression (Nat Imm 2013, EMBO 2015)

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 3 Dec 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Detoxifying and improving doxorubicin for different and better anti-cancer treatment

Prof Jacques Neefjes

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Mon 3 Dec 2018 from 14:30 to 15:30

Development & Cell Biology Theme Guest Speakers (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Molecular basis of organelle tethering during adipocyte differentiation

Dr Robin Klemm

Contact sites between organelles are vital to the function of eukaryotic cells. Lipid droplets are dynamic organelles specialized in lipid storage, and interact physically with mitochondria in several cell types. The mechanisms generating this contact site are, however, poorly understood. Here, we... Read more

Contact sites between organelles are vital to the function of eukaryotic cells. Lipid droplets are dynamic organelles specialized in lipid storage, and interact physically with mitochondria in several cell types. The mechanisms generating this contact site are, however, poorly understood. Here, we discover in adipocytes, professional fat storing cells, that the mitochondrial outer-membrane protein MIGA2 tethers mitochondria to lipid droplets. We identify a lipid droplet targeting motif, and reveal that MIGA2 additionally interacts with the endoplasmic reticulum by binding to the membrane-proteins VAP-A/B. Depleting MIGA2 by CRISPR-Cas9 causes severe perturbation of triacylglycerol production during adipocyte differentiation. Specifically, our data indicate that MIGA2 is required for the de novo synthesis of lipids from non-lipid precursors. Based on its nearly ubiquitous expression pattern, we anticipate that MIGA2 is critical for lipid and energy homeostasis in a wide spectrum of cell-types.

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 4 Dec 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Salmonella species as initiators of gallbladder and colon carcinoma

Professor Sjaak Neefjes

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Tue 4 Dec 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NPEU Seminar: TBC

Dr Lisa Hinton

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 4 Dec 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Understanding early mouse and human development

Dr Magdalana Zernicka-Goetz

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 5 Dec 2018 from 12:30 to 13:30

WHG Lunchtime Lab Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Leedham and Myers Lunchtime Lab Talks

Daniel Wells, Martijn Koppens

Leedham Group Speaker: Martijn Koppens Title: ‘Regulation of the BMP antagonist GREM1 in bowel inflammation’ Myers Group Speaker: Daniel Wells Title: ‘Single cell RNAseq of the testis: transcriptional programmes, DNA binding motifs, and imputation’

Leedham Group Speaker: Martijn Koppens Title: ‘Regulation of the BMP antagonist GREM1 in bowel inflammation’ Myers Group Speaker: Daniel Wells Title: ‘Single cell RNAseq of the testis: transcriptional programmes, DNA binding motifs, and imputation’

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Wed 5 Dec 2018 from 14:30 to 16:30

Ethox Centre and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 1, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox and WEH Seminar: Avoiding ethics dumping in global research - Looking for equitable partnerships

Speakers: Prof. Doris Schroeder, Director Centre for Professional Ethics, UCLan, Lead Author of GCC Joyce Adhiambo Odhiambo, Health Activist, former sex worker Leana Snyders, Director South African San Council Dr Joshua Kimani, Clinical Research Director, Nairobi Background: Ethics dumping is the... Read more

Speakers: Prof. Doris Schroeder, Director Centre for Professional Ethics, UCLan, Lead Author of GCC Joyce Adhiambo Odhiambo, Health Activist, former sex worker Leana Snyders, Director South African San Council Dr Joshua Kimani, Clinical Research Director, Nairobi Background: Ethics dumping is the practice of exporting unethical research to settings with less stringent regulations or compliance mechanisms. Ethics dumping includes, amongst others: • trying to obtain retrospective ethics approval, • ignoring or side-stepping local approval systems, • failing to compensate for harm incurred during a study, • undertaking high-risk research in settings, which may not benefit from the results, • commercializing samples without benefit sharing, • avoiding high animal welfare standards, • misinterpreting existing standards of care. New developments: To achieve fair partnerships in research is the aim of the Global Code of Conduct for Research in Resource- Poor Settings (GCC). The GCC provides guidance to researchers of all disciplines and focuses especially on research in resource poor-settings. The GCC has bite through its adoption by both the European Commission and the European & Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP). Those in receipt of research funds have to demonstrate that they abide by the GCC, see recent NATURE article. What is widely regarded as a major achievement of the GCC is that vulnerable research populations in low and middle income countries (LMICs), in particular indigenous peoples from the Kalahari and sex workers from Nairobi, were represented throughout the drafting process.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Wed 5 Dec 2018 from 16:00 to 17:00

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

Pol epsilon – structure, function and cancer

Professor Erik Johansson

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 6 Dec 2018 from 09:00 to 10:00

St Antony's College, Nissan Lecture Theatre, 62 Woodstock Road OX2 6JF

Crossing Boundaries 2018 - A Conference on Global Health Systems Research

Crossing Boundaries showcases the breadth and forms of multidisciplinary research employed to strengthen health systems in low- and middle-income countries. Keynote speakers will introduce participants to a range of key methodologies and issues from across the spectrum of health systems research.... Read more

Crossing Boundaries showcases the breadth and forms of multidisciplinary research employed to strengthen health systems in low- and middle-income countries. Keynote speakers will introduce participants to a range of key methodologies and issues from across the spectrum of health systems research. The event is an ideal opportunity to learn about health systems research, network, find collaboration opportunities, and showcase your work by submitting an abstract. Abstract submissions for rapid oral/poster presentations are invited from early career researchers and DPhil students. Those with accepted abstracts will present two slides to the plenary audience and present their poster at a special poster session. Submissions must include your name, department/school/group, telephone number, and a 250 word structured abstract, including background, methods, results, and conclusion. To submit, email abstracts to: crossingboundaries@ndm.ox.ac.uk (subject heading 'Crossing Boundaries 2018 - Abstract). Submissions must be received by 30 October 2018. Registration is open to general conference delegates. Registration will close at 12pm on 30 November. Early registration is advised; first come, first served.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Professor Mike English

Thu 6 Dec 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Meeting Room 3, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

US-PEx - Making better use of patient experience data for health service improvement

Dr Catherine Montgomery, Dr Alison Chisholm

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Thu 6 Dec 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Thu 6 Dec 2018 from 14:00 to 15:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Radcliffe Humanities, 3rd Floor Seminar Room, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Q&A with Dr Lin Lee, Chief Editor, BMC Medicine

D Lin Lee

Department members are all invited to come along to a short talk/Q&A session on Thursday 6 December at 2pm by Dr Lin Lee, Chief Editor for BMC Medicine. Lin will talk about the general scope and threshold of BMC Medicine, Trish and Chrysanthi’s collection, and perhaps future collections the... Read more

Department members are all invited to come along to a short talk/Q&A session on Thursday 6 December at 2pm by Dr Lin Lee, Chief Editor for BMC Medicine. Lin will talk about the general scope and threshold of BMC Medicine, Trish and Chrysanthi’s collection, and perhaps future collections the journal has planned that are relevant (there is one planned about Big Data). The talk will last around 20 minutes, with time for questions/discussion afterwards.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Charlotte Thompson-Grant

Thu 6 Dec 2018 from 16:30 to 18:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, George Pickering Education Centre Level 3 Academic Centre, Room 2B, Headington OX3 9DU

What is CVID? The many requirements for immunoglobulin production in humans

Professor Bodo Grimbacher

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Holm Uhlig

Fri 7 Dec 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Combined Medical-Surgical Grand Round

Prof Chris Pugh

Renal: "OUCAGS and clinical academic training in the UK", Prof Chris Pugh -- Chair: Prof Freddie Hamdy

Renal: "OUCAGS and clinical academic training in the UK", Prof Chris Pugh -- Chair: Prof Freddie Hamdy

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 7 Dec 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

DeCRYPTing epithelial barrier breakdown in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

David Fawkner-Corbett

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 7 Dec 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

A detergent free solution to the age old problem of membrane protein extraction

Professor Tim Dafforn

Biography: I began my science career studying protein engineering under Professor J. John Holbrook at the Bristol University. During these studies I developed 2 approaches to enzyme engineering based on forced evolution and rational design. I moved to a PDRA position in the laboratory of Professor... Read more

Biography: I began my science career studying protein engineering under Professor J. John Holbrook at the Bristol University. During these studies I developed 2 approaches to enzyme engineering based on forced evolution and rational design. I moved to a PDRA position in the laboratory of Professor Robin Carrell FRS in the Cambridge Institute of Medical Research. Working with Dr Arthur Lesk I studied the mechanism of action of a class of serine proteinase inhibitors (SERPINS) involved in innate immunity and blood clotting. During this time I defined a mechanistic and structural explanation which underlies a group of diseases known as serpinopathies. In 2003 I was awarded a prestigious MRC Career development fellowship to continue my work on the SERPINS, as part of this I worked with Professor Alison Rodger (Warwick) to establish Linear Dichroism as an important technique for the study of membrane proteins and protein fibres. More recently I have developed three research strands all enabled by linear dichroism. Firstly I have produced insights into the assemblies that underlie bacterial cell division. Secondly I have developed a novel method that trivializes the production of membrane proteins enabling advances in bioprocessing. Finally I have developed a platform bioassay that represents one of the first commercial applications of synthetic biology.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Mon 10 Dec 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting rooms 71a,b,c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Epigenome maintenance in response to DNA damage

Sophie Polo, PhD

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 10 Dec 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 1, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Confidence Bands in Functional data - The Bootstrap or Gaussian Kinematic formula?

In this talk we study simultaneous confidence bands (SCBs) for functional parameters. We introduce a new Multiplier Bootstrap and a "parametric approach" using the Gaussian Kinematic Formula (GKF) for construction of SCBs. The GKF as introduced by Jonathan Taylor can be use to approximate the... Read more

In this talk we study simultaneous confidence bands (SCBs) for functional parameters. We introduce a new Multiplier Bootstrap and a "parametric approach" using the Gaussian Kinematic Formula (GKF) for construction of SCBs. The GKF as introduced by Jonathan Taylor can be use to approximate the distribution of the maximum of Gaussian related processes for large thresholds. One of the main results of this talk will be an error bound on the asymptotical coverage rate of SCBs constructed using the GKF, which basically requires only a functional CLT for the estimator of the functional parameter and some regularity assumptions on the limiting process. We also shortly discuss a strategy how these ideas can be extended to discretely observed functional processes contaminated by observation noise, where we build on Scale Spaces introduced by Chaudhuri and Marron in the early 2000’s. The theoretical discussion will be accompanied by simulation studies for the population mean in signal plus noise models and an application of a two sample situation in DTI fibers. In the end we will give a short outlook on different settings our method can also be applied to, e.g. Signal-to-Noise ratios (Cohen's d) or General linear Models, which are of interest in statistical analysis of fMRI data.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Mon 10 Dec 2018 from 11:30 to 12:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Mon 10 Dec 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Immunomodulation via the cardiac lymphatic system to improve heart repair

Professor Paul Riley

The lymphatic vasculature is a blind-ended network covering most tissues and organs of the body and is essential for vertebrate development and homeostasis. During pathological conditions lymphatic vessels expand via lymphangiogenesis to aid the clearance of interstitial fluid and reduce... Read more

The lymphatic vasculature is a blind-ended network covering most tissues and organs of the body and is essential for vertebrate development and homeostasis. During pathological conditions lymphatic vessels expand via lymphangiogenesis to aid the clearance of interstitial fluid and reduce inflammation. Whilst the response of the lymphatics to injury and inflammation has been well documented at peripheral sites, there is minimal insight into their role(s) during pathophysiology of organ systems such as the heart. We investigated the response of the cardiac lymphatic vessels to myocardial infarction (MI) and observed a significant lymphangiogenic response, underpinned by reactivation of the developmental lymphatic programme. VEGF-C treatment significantly augmented lymphangiogenesis post-MI resulting in improved cardiac function. To determine whether this effect might be mediated by immunomodulation, we flow-sorted immune cells from VEGF-C treated hearts and observed increased clearance of macrophages to mediastinal lymph nodes by day 7 post-MI. The molecular phenotype of cleared versus retained macrophages was equivalent, suggesting that a reduction in macrophage load in the heart alone was sufficient to correlate with improved outcome. Finally, we examined macrophage trafficking in Lyve-1 knock-out mice, which have impaired immune cell uptake, and observed significantly reduced macrophage clearance, which correlated with reduced cardiac output, elevated fibrosis and increased pathological remodelling. These data suggest that invoking developmental lymphangiogenesis to modulate the innate immune response may represent a therapeutic target to promote optimal cardiac repair following injury. ---- Paul Riley is a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences (elected 2014) and is the British Heart Foundation (BHF) Professor of Regenerative Medicine. He currently occupies the Chair of Development and Cell Biology in the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics at the University of Oxford. He is Director of the BHF Oxbridge Centre for Regenerative Medicine (from 2013; https://www.cardioscience.ox.ac.uk/bhf-centre-of-regenerative-medicine); co-founder of the Oxford spin-out OxStem Cardio (from 2016; https://www.oxstem.com/product-pipeline/cardio) and co-academic lead on the Oxford Medical Sciences Division’s Institute of Developmental and Regenerative Medicine (project completion 2021; https://www.bhf.org.uk/research-projects/funding-towards-a-new-oxford-institute-of-developmental-and-regenerative-medicine-idrm). He was formerly Professor of Molecular Cardiology at the UCL-Institute of Child Health, London, where he was a principal investigator within the Molecular Medicine Unit at UCL-ICH (1999-2011). Prior to this, he obtained his PhD at UCL (1992-1995) and completed post-doctoral fellowships at the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Toronto, Canada and the Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Oxford (1996-1999). In 2008, Professor Riley was awarded the Outstanding Achievement Award of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Basic Sciences. Currently Professor Riley’s team is focusing on exploiting the full potential of activated resident epicardium-derived cells and coronary lymphatic endothelium towards regenerating the adult heart and understanding the mechanisms of activation of these distinct lineages to extrapolate to human patients suffering from cardiovascular disease. For further information please visit: http://www.dpag.ox.ac.uk/research/riley-group-1

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 10 Dec 2018 from 14:00 to 16:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Radcliffe Humanities, Seminar Room, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Workshop on public co-applicants

Doreen Tembo, Martin Lodemore

This is for anyone who is considering having or being a public co-applicant in a funding application for health research. There will be talks, followed by discussions based on the draft NIHR Guidance on public co-applicants and our questions will be used to further develop that document.

This is for anyone who is considering having or being a public co-applicant in a funding application for health research. There will be talks, followed by discussions based on the draft NIHR Guidance on public co-applicants and our questions will be used to further develop that document.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Bernard Gudgin

Mon 10 Dec 2018 from 14:30 to 15:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

VIVA - “Cancer cell killing using engineered antibody fragments”

Jennifer Chambers

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 10 Dec 2018 from 15:00 to 16:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Phenome@BDI Seminar

Dr. Antoniya Georgieva, Dr Bartek Papiez

Re-using routinely collected maternity data for the development of a new diagnostic tool during childbirth Dr Antoniya Georgieva, Oxford Centre for Fetal Monitoring Technologies, Big Data Institute Monitoring continuously the fetal heart rate during childbirth is the gold standard to assess... Read more

Re-using routinely collected maternity data for the development of a new diagnostic tool during childbirth Dr Antoniya Georgieva, Oxford Centre for Fetal Monitoring Technologies, Big Data Institute Monitoring continuously the fetal heart rate during childbirth is the gold standard to assess whether a baby is at risk of oxygen starvation. This is achieved with a cardiotocogram, CTG, showing continuously the fetal heart rate and contraction signals (Figure 1). This is to identify babies that could benefit from an emergency operative delivery (e.g. Caesarean section), in order to prevent death or permanent brain injury of the baby. The long, dynamic and complex heart rate patterns are poorly understood and known to have high false positive and false negative rates. Visual interpretation by clinicians in real-time is challenging and fetal monitoring in labour remains an enormous unmet medical need. Complex motion modelling for medical imaging applications Dr Bartek Papiez, Rutherford Fund Fellow at Health Data Research UK, Big Data Institute During this talk, I will present an overview of my work on the development of accurate, thus complex and realistic but still computationally efficient models of organ motion. The presented framework has established a solid foundation both to remove unwanted motion and motion-related imaging artefacts to perform image analysis, and to construct atlases (or shape models) from imaging. The previous application of this framework supported various cancer imaging modalities primarily providing reliable quantitative image analysis of lung and liver tumour. In this talk, I will also present our initial results on constructing a 3D atlas from ultrasound (US) volumes. Our method simultaneously aligns a set of images from population to a reference space thereby representing the population average. The resulting atlas shows high structural(anatomical) overlap, and correspondence between the US-based and an age-matched fetal MRI-based atlas is also observed.​

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Tue 11 Dec 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Oxford Martin School, Oxford Martin School, 34 Broad Street, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Sleep: A Window on Consciousness

Prof Giulio Tononi

How does consciousness come about, and how can the brain create a world even when it is disconnected from the environment? Consciousness never fades when we are awake. However, when awakened from sleep, we sometimes recall dreams and sometimes recall no experiences. Traditionally, dreaming has been... Read more

How does consciousness come about, and how can the brain create a world even when it is disconnected from the environment? Consciousness never fades when we are awake. However, when awakened from sleep, we sometimes recall dreams and sometimes recall no experiences. Traditionally, dreaming has been identified with rapid eye-movement (REM) sleep, characterized by wake-like, globally ‘activated’, high-frequency EEG activity. However, dreaming also occurs in non-REM (NREM) sleep, characterized by prominent low-frequency activity. Recent work using no-task, within-state paradigms has identified a ‘posterior hot zone’ where the EEG must be activated for subjects to experience dreams. Localized, content-specific activations occur depending on whether one dreams of faces, places, movement, and speech. These findings highlight the likely neural substrate of our own experiences and suggest some of the necessary and sufficient conditions for consciousness.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Tue 11 Dec 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Wed 12 Dec 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

Ethox Centre and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox and WEH Seminar - On balancing security and privacy

Dr Carissa Veliz

When duties arising from two different rights are incompatible with one another, the rights in question can be said to be in conflict. Public discourse is flooded with claims about the incompatibility between the right to privacy and the right to security. According to popular belief, the more... Read more

When duties arising from two different rights are incompatible with one another, the rights in question can be said to be in conflict. Public discourse is flooded with claims about the incompatibility between the right to privacy and the right to security. According to popular belief, the more privacy individuals enjoy, the less the state is able to provide security, and vice versa. According to former NSA security consultant Ed Giorgio, ‘[p]rivacy and security are a zero-sum game’ (cited by Wright 2008)—meaning that for every increase in one, there is a decrease in the other. In other words, the state seems to have incompatible duties: on the one hand, to respect its citizens’ right to privacy by refraining from spying on them, and on the other hand, to guarantee its citizens’ right to security, which, so the argument goes, cannot be done without spying on the general population. In this presentation I focus on the supposed trade-off between privacy and security and argue that, more often than not, a decrease in privacy entails a decrease in security. In the context of terrorist threats and mass surveillance, I argue that the latter may be as risky for the security of citizens as the former.

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 12 Dec 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 1, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Big Data Ethics Forum: HIV phylogenetic research and public health - challenges and opportunities

Professor Christophe Fraser

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Wed 12 Dec 2018 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, Sherrington Library, 2nd floor Sherrington Building, DPAG, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Challenges and Opportunities of Translational Neurogenomics

Dr Sonja Scholz

Dr. Scholz is a Neurologist and Neurogeneticist specialized in movement disorders. She received her medical degree from the Medical University Innsbruck, Austria. Following graduation, she was a post-doctoral fellow at the Laboratory of Neurogenetics (NIA) under the supervision of Drs. Andrew... Read more

Dr. Scholz is a Neurologist and Neurogeneticist specialized in movement disorders. She received her medical degree from the Medical University Innsbruck, Austria. Following graduation, she was a post-doctoral fellow at the Laboratory of Neurogenetics (NIA) under the supervision of Drs. Andrew Singleton and John Hardy. She obtained a Ph.D. in Neurogenomics from the University College London, UK in 2010. She then moved to Baltimore to complete her neurology residency training at Johns Hopkins. In 2015, Dr. Scholz received the McFarland Transition to Independence Award for Neurologist-Scientists. She is an Assistant Clinical Investigator within the Neurogenetics Branch (NINDS). Her laboratory focuses on identifying genetic causes of neurodegenerative diseases, such as dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy, and frontotemporal dementia.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Thu 13 Dec 2018 from 09:30 to 10:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Thu 13 Dec 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

Ethox Centre and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Big Data Institute, L1 Meeting Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox and WEH Seminar: Deploying Epigenetics to Identify Genetically Influenced Social Inequalities

Dr Benjamin Gregg

The epigenome is the set of potentially heritable changes in gene expressions that occur in the absence of changes to the DNA sequence itself. The transfer from parent to offspring may be accompanied by some of the negative consequences of a particular environment (of the mother, of both parents,... Read more

The epigenome is the set of potentially heritable changes in gene expressions that occur in the absence of changes to the DNA sequence itself. The transfer from parent to offspring may be accompanied by some of the negative consequences of a particular environment (of the mother, of both parents, even of grandparents) for the fetus and postnatal life. I advance four arguments: (1) Epigenetics can be politically salient with respect to identifying negative determinants of human health with epigenetic sources. Such salience remains hypothetical today given the absence of clear, causal evidence of a well-understood epigenetic mechanism. (2) The epigenetic porosity between environment and body raises political issues where toxic environments are human constructions, such as those characterized for example by poverty, malnutrition, pollution, or inadequate health care. Further, If scientists cannot establish some kind of “natural” epigenetic normality that holds for all humans, then are epigenetic variants natural phenomena that can be evaluated in any objective sense? (3) Moral responsibility for health-endangering environments (in utero or in early life) does not follow simply from determining the causal connection between epigenetic mechanism and environmental exposure. For example, the lifestyles and health habits of vulnerable individuals may reflect a range of unhealthy behaviors. While this observation raises questions about a lack of personal responsibility, it might also be invoked to reject the remediation of toxic environments. (4) Still, epigenetic research may offer political promise if it can ever expose some “natural” inequalities as, in fact, epigenetically influenced.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 13 Dec 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

VIVA - "Acquired Alpha Thalassaemia in Myelodysplastic Syndrome"

Pak Leng Cheong

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Thu 13 Dec 2018 from 13:30 to 14:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

VIVA - ‘The molecular and cellular basis for oncogene collaboration in acute myeloid leukaemia’

Cristina Di Genua

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Butler

Thu 13 Dec 2018 from 14:30 to 15:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Main Meeting Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

HERC Seminar: Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis for Comparative Value Assessment throughout the Drug Lifecycle

Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) has been proposed as appropriate methodology for supporting many key decisions in the drug lifecycle, including regulatory authorization, health technology assessment (HTA) and prescription. The relevant decision criteria are different in these three... Read more

Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) has been proposed as appropriate methodology for supporting many key decisions in the drug lifecycle, including regulatory authorization, health technology assessment (HTA) and prescription. The relevant decision criteria are different in these three settings: regulatory MCDAs are mostly concerned with assessing treatment benefit-risk profiles, prescription ones additionally consider convenience and patient satisfaction, and HTAs value cost and equity aspects. This presentation will question whether any single methodology can support decisions as diverse as these, but it will also argue for the value of MCDA as a general framework for structuring comparative treatment assessments. I will demonstrate the use of MCDA in benefit-risk assessment, discuss flaws present in most applications of MCDA in HTA, and argue against application of MCDA in prescription setting.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 13 Dec 2018 from 16:00 to 18:00

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, George Pickering Education centre, Level 3 Academic centre, Room 2B, Headington OX3 9DU

Standards of gastritis assessment – implications for clinical practice and research

Dr Jan Bornschein

While most research on inflammatory conditions in the UK focuses on the intestine, the stomach has been somewhat neglected. Although advanced endoscopic techniques often make biopsies unnecessary, structured and standardised tissue sampling is still required to investigate certain clinical conditions and to allow building up an adequate biobank repository.

While most research on inflammatory conditions in the UK focuses on the intestine, the stomach has been somewhat neglected. Although advanced endoscopic techniques often make biopsies unnecessary, structured and standardised tissue sampling is still required to investigate certain clinical conditions and to allow building up an adequate biobank repository.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jan Borschein

Fri 14 Dec 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

CAREER SEMINAR “A story of development and differentiation – from red blood cells to career moves”

Dr Maria Suciu

As a scientist at Genomics plc, I split my time between working on our collaboration with Vertex and leading the integration of functional genomics data with GWAS data. The focus of my research training has been on long-range gene regulation by non-coding elements and the impact of variants on... Read more

As a scientist at Genomics plc, I split my time between working on our collaboration with Vertex and leading the integration of functional genomics data with GWAS data. The focus of my research training has been on long-range gene regulation by non-coding elements and the impact of variants on these elements, with an emphasis on open chromatin data in red blood cells. I undertook my doctoral studies in the laboratories of Jim Hughes and Doug Higgs at the Weatherall Institute for Molecular Medicine supported by the Wellcome Trust, followed by a brief postdoctoral role with the WIGWAM Consortium. Before joining Genomics plc, I worked for SevenBridges, a biomedical data analysis startup, as an Algorithmics R&D Scientist.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Natalia Sampaio

Mon 17 Dec 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Can we end epidemics? - NOW STARTING 9.15AM

Dr Richard Hatchett, CEO

Audience: Public

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

The seminar will be followed by coffee & pastries in the Doll Building Atrium.

Mon 17 Dec 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Can we cure rheumatoid arthritis?

Prof John Isaacs

The past 20 years have seen a revolution in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) management, due to earlier and more intensive treatment, and targeted therapies. However, less than 50% of patients achieve disease remission, and most will relapse if therapy is stopped. In this seminar I will discuss our... Read more

The past 20 years have seen a revolution in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) management, due to earlier and more intensive treatment, and targeted therapies. However, less than 50% of patients achieve disease remission, and most will relapse if therapy is stopped. In this seminar I will discuss our current experimental medicine studies which focus on improving RA outcomes. These include therapeutic tolerance induction, targeting of the RA synovial fibroblast, and developing a better understanding of remission and relapse biology in the context of RA. ---- John Isaacs is Professor of Clinical Rheumatology at Newcastle University. His work focusses on the potential of novel immunotherapies to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ranging from target identification to early- and late-stage clinical trials. He has performed several pioneering experimental medicine studies in patients with inflammatory disease, challenging existing dogma and informing the design of subsequent generations of therapeutic agents. He was the first to demonstrate immunogenicity of a humanised therapeutic antibody, CAMPATH-1H (Lancet). Professor Isaacs runs a research group focussed on therapeutic tolerance induction. Recently his team developed, and completed a phase 1 study of, tolerogenic dendritic cell therapy in inflammatory arthritis patients. In 1999, Professor Isaacs received the British Society for Rheumatology Michael Mason Medal and, in 2010, he presented the Heberden Round to the Society. From 2007 to 2017 Professor Isaacs chaired ARUK’s Clinical Study Group for Adult Inflammatory Arthritis, developing a competitive research agenda for the UK. He also led the MRC/ABPI RA-MAP consortium, seeking prognostic and therapeutic biomarkers for RA. He is a PI of the NIHR Translational Research Collaboration for inflammatory disease, and a member of the MRC’s Translational Research Group. He has published over 200 peer-reviewed manuscripts. Current grant funding as principal applicant, £7.1m; total current grant funding £43.8m.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Tue 18 Dec 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS