Other Seminars

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Mon 2 Oct 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting Rooms 71a,b and c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Mon 2 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Regulation of Inflammation by non-coding RNAs and nucleic acid binding proteins

Professor Kate Fitzgerald

Audience: Public

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Please note this is a Litchfield Lecture

Mon 2 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NDPH Seminar: TWILIGHT and the role of dual anti-platelet therapy

Dr Roxana Mehran

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Mon 2 Oct 2017 from 16:00 to 17:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, The Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

"Identifying the key function of MeCP2 via genetic manipulation in mice"

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 3 Oct 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, BDI LG Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar: Variable Selection and Dimension Reduction methods for Omics Datasets

Matthew Sutton

In recent years, new technologies have allowed researchers to perform multiple assays on the same set of patient samples. Typically these datasets contain observations of: genes (genomics), mRNA (transcriptomics), proteins (proteomics) and metabolites (metabolomics) and collectively are known as... Read more

In recent years, new technologies have allowed researchers to perform multiple assays on the same set of patient samples. Typically these datasets contain observations of: genes (genomics), mRNA (transcriptomics), proteins (proteomics) and metabolites (metabolomics) and collectively are known as ‘Omics’ datasets. In this talk, I will discuss my research developing new methods in Bayesian and frequentist methodology for incorporating variable selection and dimension reduction for high dimensional Omics dataset.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 3 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Understanding regulatory variation in humans through variable chromatin modules

Dr Bart Deplancke

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 4 Oct 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Population Health Seminars

New Richards Building, Seminar Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LG

HERC Seminar: Use of Rapid Reviews in Health Technology Assessment Processes – Effective or Impractical? A Review of the Irish System & Lessons for Others.

Aileen Murphy

Abstract Introduction: As the pace of health technology innovations increases greater pressure is placed on HTA agencies to review and make recommendations promptly. One response to this pressure is the use of Rapid Reviews (RRs). As part of the HTA system RRs can support decision making in an... Read more

Abstract Introduction: As the pace of health technology innovations increases greater pressure is placed on HTA agencies to review and make recommendations promptly. One response to this pressure is the use of Rapid Reviews (RRs). As part of the HTA system RRs can support decision making in an environment with increasing competing demands by synthesising evidence to support informed decisions in a timely manner, without sacrificing scientific rigor. Since 2009 all new drugs in Ireland are first subject to a RR. After which a full HTA may or may not be required. The objective of this study is to examine what factors determine the outcome of a rapid review, i.e. if a full HTA is recommended or not. Methods: Data on drug evaluations from 2009 to 2016 were extracted from the NCPE websites. A logit regression was employed to determine the factors influencing the outcome of the rapid review, i.e. the recommendation for a full HTA. Results: All drugs for which a RR only was required were recommended for reimbursement. Odds of a full HTA being request increase for drugs which were first in class, neoplasms and in musculoskeletal therapeutic areas and those submitted in later years. Conclusions: Since Rapid Review process was introduced there has been a change in the type of drugs for which submissions are being made. While introduced to speed up decision making, they may not be causing delays for which a full HTA is inevitable. Short Bio Dr Aileen Murphy is a lecturer in the Department of Economics, UCC. She completed her PhD on Economic Evaluations at the University of Glasgow and has a MEconSc and BComm from UCC. Her research interests include economic evaluations, Health Technology Assessment, decision analytical modelling and value of information analysis. She has advised the NHS in Scotland (SHTG), NIHR HTA Programme in the UK, Irish Department of Health and European Commission on health economic issues. She lectures on economics, health economics – specifically economic evaluations at undergrad and postgraduate level in UCC – and supervises postgraduate, doctoral and postdoctoral candidates. In addition, Dr Murphy has served as a referee for the National Institute for Health Research Evaluation, NHS, UK as well as several renowned peer reviewed publications (Health Economics, BMC research etc.) and is Editor in Chief at the Northern European Edition of Global and Regional Health Technology Assessment.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 4 Oct 2017 from 13:30 to 15:30

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

CRUK Oxford Centre - Oesophageal Working Group

Dr John Findlay, Mr Stephen Ash, Dr Ling Yang

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sophie Band

Wed 4 Oct 2017 from 16:00 to 17:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, BDI LG Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Discovery, refinement and interpretation of genetic variation underlying human complex traits

Valentina Iotchkova

One of the fundamental challenges in modern human genetics is to convert our continuously improving discovery of disease risk from GWAS studies into an understanding of human biology which is useful for disease management and therapeutic development. Intermediate traits, such as metabolite levels,... Read more

One of the fundamental challenges in modern human genetics is to convert our continuously improving discovery of disease risk from GWAS studies into an understanding of human biology which is useful for disease management and therapeutic development. Intermediate traits, such as metabolite levels, serum protein levels, physiological measurements and other aspects of normal physiology provide a rich phenotype of natural homeostasis. By mapping the genetic components of variation in these phenotypes we can both understand normal human physiology and explore the relationship with disease processes. This in turn provides useful biomarkers and therapeutic endpoints with clear cut causal relationships with diseases process. To show the power of this approach we mapped 20 biomedical traits (lipids, hematological, glycemic, inflamatory, renal) in over 35,000 people from 18 studies including the UK10K cohort, replicated in over 100,000 people from 7 studies using whole genome sequencing data and imputation techniques. This has provided an unprecedented perspective on genetic components of normal variation in human physiology. We reconfirmed many previous associations, discovered 17 novel ones and refined the inter-relationship between traits and loci. Given the sample size and the whole genome sequence framework we were further able to fine map 59 loci to credible sets of under 20 variants (e.g. LIPC locus for association with HDL). Additionally, we developed a robust method, GARFIELD, to associate loci to functional regions of interest (e.g. enhancers, promoters). With its use, we identified traits with ubiquitous enrichment (e.g. Height) and traits with cell-type specific patterns of enrichment (e.g. Crohn’s Disease). Moreover, we show that full blood count GWAS data from the UK Biobank study is enriched in a cell-type specific manner in active enhancers (ChromHMM) from the BLUEPRINT data. The combination of functional enrichments and intermediate traits provide promising hypotheses of biomarkers and target gene identification.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 5 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

REVEAL Study / Neurology

Dr Martin Landray, Dr Louise Bowman, Dr Sarosh Irani

REVEAL Study: Dr Martin Landray and Dr Louise Bowman -- Neurology: "A novel form of antibody-mediated epilepsy", Dr Sarosh Irani -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

REVEAL Study: Dr Martin Landray and Dr Louise Bowman -- Neurology: "A novel form of antibody-mediated epilepsy", Dr Sarosh Irani -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 5 Oct 2017 from 16:30 to 17:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, GPEC Level 3 Seminar Room 2B, Headington OX3 9DU

Vaccination for viral hepatitis - hope or hype?

Prof Ellie Barnes

Audience: Public

Organisers: Prof Holm Uhlig

Fri 6 Oct 2017 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

It’s no longer OK to say I practise differently than everyone else

Professor James Wright

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 6 Oct 2017 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Broadly protective influenza vaccines

Professor Alain Townsend

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 6 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Parkinson’s progress: novel genes, mouse models and synthesis

Professor Matt Farrer

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a multifaceted, age-associated syndrome best known for movement disorder but also affects autonomic, cognitive, psychiatric, sensory and sleep systems. Progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons disrupts cortical and thalamic neurotransmission, and the ability to... Read more

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a multifaceted, age-associated syndrome best known for movement disorder but also affects autonomic, cognitive, psychiatric, sensory and sleep systems. Progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons disrupts cortical and thalamic neurotransmission, and the ability to modulate striatal outputs necessary to initiate and control motor function. Mechanisms of neuroplasticity and compensation in PD brain are poorly understood but evidently mask symptoms until they fail. While mid-brain Lewy body pathology is typically noted at post-mortem, its relationship with respect to clinical symptoms remains enigmatic. Over the past 20 years my group has taken a molecular genetic view to define the etiology of PD. We have used mutant gene dysfunction to recapitulate disease ontology, and have focused on mouse modelling. Notable discoveries include alpha-synuclein (SNCA) dosage is correlated with onset and severity, and that leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) p.G2019S is a major cause of disease, frequent in Berbers. My seminar will present our latest gene discovery, loss of DNAJC12, and data from mouse modelling of vacuolar protein sorting 35 (VPS35) p.D620N. From these observations I suggest mutant-induced dysfunction challenges presynaptic proteostasis, inducing activity-dependent modifications in the synaptic vesicle cycle and dopaminergic neurotransmission. Several genes ‘linked’ to parkinsonism, including SNCA, LRRK2, VPS35DNAJC12, DNAJC13, DNAJC6, DNAJC26, SYNJ1, parkin and PINK1 have a presynaptic role and may be unified by this hypothesis. While the failure of adaptive changes, with age, leads to the selective and progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons, there are now tools to define these molecular pathways and their potential for neuroprotection.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Richard Wade-Martins

Mon 9 Oct 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71a, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

PET for Radiation Treatment Planning and Monitoring

Professor Anca-Ligia Grosu

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eric O'Neill

Mon 9 Oct 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Investigating the mechanisms of regulatory T-cell differentiation in vivo by novel Fluorescent Timer reporters

Dr Masahiro Ono, MD, PhD

Dr Masahiro Ono was originally trained as a dermatologist, and later specialised in molecular and systems immunology. He obtained his PhD in 2006 on autoimmunity and regulatory T cells, and thereafter, worked on the molecular mechanism of the transcription factor Foxp3, revealing the interaction of... Read more

Dr Masahiro Ono was originally trained as a dermatologist, and later specialised in molecular and systems immunology. He obtained his PhD in 2006 on autoimmunity and regulatory T cells, and thereafter, worked on the molecular mechanism of the transcription factor Foxp3, revealing the interaction of Foxp3 and the transcription factor Runx1 and their transcriptional mechanisms. In 2009, he obtained a Human Frontier Science Program Long-Term Fellowship, and joined University College London (UCL). Thus he extended his expertise to genomics and systems analysis, establishing a new multidimensional framework for visualising transcriptomic data and unravelling complex processes in T cell differentiation. In 2012, he was awarded a prestigious Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) David Phillips Fellowship, thereby established his lab in UCL. In 2015, he was appointed to a proleptic Senior Lecturer in the Department of Life Sciences, Imperial. He is conducting multidisciplinary projects on the transcriptional programme of T cell memory and immune regulation.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Irina Udalova

Mon 9 Oct 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Oxford Martin School, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

The Neurobiology of Drosophila Mating Behaviors

Barry Dickson

The behavioral rituals that animals perform as they seek out their mates provide ideal models to study the neural control of complex goal-directed behaviors. They are innate, robust, and sexually dimorphic, reflecting the activation of genetically-determined sexually-dimorphic circuits. I will... Read more

The behavioral rituals that animals perform as they seek out their mates provide ideal models to study the neural control of complex goal-directed behaviors. They are innate, robust, and sexually dimorphic, reflecting the activation of genetically-determined sexually-dimorphic circuits. I will present our current understanding of the neural circuits that control mating in Drosophila, which include sexually-dimorphic components for sensory integration, decision-making, and action selection.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Mon 9 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

How efficient is modern medicine

Professor Peter Rothwell

Audience: Public

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Mon 9 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Main Meeting Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

CPNP Seminar - Scaling up school-based physical activity interventions: Importance of implementation

David Lubens

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Mon 9 Oct 2017 from 14:00 to 15:30

TDI Seminar Series

NDM Building, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Repurposing a drug-target deconvolution technology for enmasse monitoring of protein complex dynamics in intact cells and tissues

Chris Soon Heng TAN, Ph.D.

Chris Tan obtained a Bachelor of Science (Molecular Biology) and a Master of Science (Computer Science) from the National University of Singapore. He pursued his doctoral training in Toronto, Canada with the late Prof. Tony Pawson, Prof. Rune Linding and Prof. Gary Bader, making key contributions... Read more

Chris Tan obtained a Bachelor of Science (Molecular Biology) and a Master of Science (Computer Science) from the National University of Singapore. He pursued his doctoral training in Toronto, Canada with the late Prof. Tony Pawson, Prof. Rune Linding and Prof. Gary Bader, making key contributions to our understanding of the evolution of phospho-tyrosine signaling networks (Science, Science Signaling). He is interested in systems biology approaches to address research questions at the boundary of basic science and translational research. Presently, he focuses on applying proteome-wide MS-based approaches to dissect mechanisms of drug action and chemical toxicity, and to understand the molecular basis of gene addiction and drug resistance

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Andrea Keepence-Keyte

All Welcome

Tue 10 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar: Novel trials of common infection management in primary care

Professor Christopher Butler

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natasha Bowyer

Tue 10 Oct 2017 from 14:00 to 15:00

Development & Cell Biology Theme Guest Speakers (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Hippo signalling in heart development and regeneration

James F. Martin, MD, PhD

Biography: My research is aimed at understanding how Wnt, Bmp, Hippo and other signalling pathways are related to development and tissue regeneration. The ultimate goal of our studies is to obtain an in depth understanding of these pathways in order to develop ways to treat congenital diseases and... Read more

Biography: My research is aimed at understanding how Wnt, Bmp, Hippo and other signalling pathways are related to development and tissue regeneration. The ultimate goal of our studies is to obtain an in depth understanding of these pathways in order to develop ways to treat congenital diseases and regenerate heart muscle and other adult tissues. Toward that end, we have recently discovered that Hippo signalling is a critical repressor of adult heart regeneration.

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 11 Oct 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract infections in primary care: Findings from an updated meta-ethnography

Evdokia Germeni

Updating of quantitative systematic reviews and statistical meta-analyses is now mainstream practice. Several organizations, including the Cochrane Collaboration, recommend updating every two years, while there is also evidence to suggest that a considerable number of clinically relevant reviews... Read more

Updating of quantitative systematic reviews and statistical meta-analyses is now mainstream practice. Several organizations, including the Cochrane Collaboration, recommend updating every two years, while there is also evidence to suggest that a considerable number of clinically relevant reviews may become obsolete within one year of publication or even less. Paradoxically enough, the same does not apply for systematic reviews and syntheses of qualitative evidence, for which to date there has been almost no consideration of whether or how they can be updated. Implicit in this failure could be the assumption that beliefs, needs, and experiences remain unchanged over time or that these are shaped in a vacuum, without any influence from external factors. In this seminar, I will outline the main benefits and challenges of updating a qualitative synthesis, as those emerged from our own endeavour to update a 2011 meta-ethnography of GPs’ experiences of antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs), including their views of interventions aimed at more prudent prescribing. Biography Evi Germeni joined the Health Experiences Research Group (HERG) in November 2016 thanks to an Advanced Postdoc Mobility Fellowship that she won from the Swiss National Science Foundation. She has a background in Health Communication, with considerable focus on qualitative research approaches. She spent the first part of her fellowship at the University of Exeter Medical School, working on issues related to the updating of qualitative syntheses. Before coming to the UK, she worked as Postdoctoral Researcher and Lecturer of Qualitative Research Methods in Health Communication at the University of Lugano, Switzerland.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Susan Kirkpatrick

Wed 11 Oct 2017 from 11:00 to 12:30

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, BDI LG Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox Seminar: Ethics at the Coal-Face: do clinical ethics services do anything useful?

Melanie Jansen

Everyone knows that difficult ethical dilemmas arise in healthcare. Clinical Ethics Services are increasingly a part of the hospital landscape, intended as a mechanism through which to deal with difficult ethical situations. But what do they actually do? And if they are doing something – is it... Read more

Everyone knows that difficult ethical dilemmas arise in healthcare. Clinical Ethics Services are increasingly a part of the hospital landscape, intended as a mechanism through which to deal with difficult ethical situations. But what do they actually do? And if they are doing something – is it helpful? Perhaps the more important question is – what should they be doing? In this presentation, Melanie explores the utility of CES. She will begin by presenting difficult cases, and then work through these using the Clinical Ethics Consultation process at her own hospital as a springboard to present and critique various ways that clinical ethics service provision may be approached. She will discuss the difficulty inherent in evaluating CES and present some interesting empirical and philosophical work in this area. Bio: Dr Melanie Jansen is a medical doctor completing advanced training in General Paediatrics and Paediatric Intensive Care Medicine. She is interested in everything to do with critical care but particularly congenital cardiac disease and trauma management. She is currently involved in research on blood coagulation in trauma. Since medical school, Melanie has had a strong interest in ethics and to pursue this, she completed a Master of Arts in Philosophy during her medical specialist training. Melanie was instrumental in developing the Centre for Children’s Health Ethics and Law (CCHEL) at Children’s Health Queensland, and continues to sit on the steering committee and be a member of the response group for the Clinical Ethics Consultation Service. Melanie has also undertaken training in mediation through the Resolution Institute. She is currently travelling on a Churchill Fellowship to research ways to enrich and inform development of paediatric clinical ethics services. In her ‘spare’ time she tends to multiple cats, a few chickens and her wine cellar, and tries to move as much as possible. She is interested in promoting the arts and creativity in medicine, in building functioning teams in an age of hyper-specialisation, and in bringing more philosophy into the clinical setting.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

If you would like to attend, please email jane.beinart@ethox.ox.ac.uk

Thu 12 Oct 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Genetic and epigenetic control of thymus development and function

Georg Hollander

T cells develop in the thymus where stromal cells provide a unique microenvironment that promotes their development and selection so that naïve T cells exiting to peripheral tissues are purged of reactivity to “Self” specificities but poised to respond to injurious “Non-Self” antigens.... Read more

T cells develop in the thymus where stromal cells provide a unique microenvironment that promotes their development and selection so that naïve T cells exiting to peripheral tissues are purged of reactivity to “Self” specificities but poised to respond to injurious “Non-Self” antigens. Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) constitute an essential component of that environment as they have the unqiue capacity for the promiscuous expression of transcripts that encode proteins which are normally only detected in differentiated organs residing in the periphery (a.k.a. tissue restricted self antigens, TRA). The molecular regulation of TEC development and the cell’s competence for promiscuous gene expression of TRA will be discussed.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 12 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Haematology / Gastroenterology

Dr Simon Leedham, Dr James East, Dr Katalin Balassa

Haematology: 'How to find your perfect match', Dr Katalin Balassa -- Gastroenterology: 'Slaughter’s Field of Screams', Dr Simon Leedham and Dr James East -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Haematology: 'How to find your perfect match', Dr Katalin Balassa -- Gastroenterology: 'Slaughter’s Field of Screams', Dr Simon Leedham and Dr James East -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 13 Oct 2017 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Heavy petting in oesophagogastric cancer

Mr Nick Maynard, Dr John Findlay

On behalf of the Upper GI Surgical Team: ‘Heavy petting in oesophagogastric cancer’ by Dr John Findlay, Upper GI SpR ‘How much should we tell the public about outcomes from oesophagectomy?’ by Mr Nick Maynard, Consultant Upper GI Surgeon

On behalf of the Upper GI Surgical Team: ‘Heavy petting in oesophagogastric cancer’ by Dr John Findlay, Upper GI SpR ‘How much should we tell the public about outcomes from oesophagectomy?’ by Mr Nick Maynard, Consultant Upper GI Surgeon

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 13 Oct 2017 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Exploring peroxisomes - an advanced microscopy study

Dr Silvia Galiani, Dr Katharina Reglinski

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 13 Oct 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, BDI LG Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar: Discovery of rare and common variants associated with blood pressure and hypertension

Joanna M M Howson

High blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature death. Prior to our work around 70 genetic loci were associated with blood pressure or hypertension. However, at that time there was limited knowledge on the specific causal genes and pathways involved. I will talk... Read more

High blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature death. Prior to our work around 70 genetic loci were associated with blood pressure or hypertension. However, at that time there was limited knowledge on the specific causal genes and pathways involved. I will talk through some of the recent advances that have been made in the field of blood pressure genetics over the last twelve months, which have been made possible through large-scale collaborations and UK Biobank.

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 13 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Mon 16 Oct 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Lung immunity and repair: effects of influenza, interferons and pollutants

Dr Andreas Wack

After his PhD on thymocyte development at the MRC National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR) in London, Andreas Wack moved to the research institute of Novartis Vaccines in Siena, Italy, where he worked on the modulation of human T and NK cell function by the hepatitis C virus, human dendritic... Read more

After his PhD on thymocyte development at the MRC National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR) in London, Andreas Wack moved to the research institute of Novartis Vaccines in Siena, Italy, where he worked on the modulation of human T and NK cell function by the hepatitis C virus, human dendritic cell subsets and their crosstalk, the mechanism of action of vaccine adjuvants, and next generation influenza vaccines. Since 2009 he is back at the NIMR, now Francis Crick Institute, where his group studies the responses of airway epithelia and innate immune cells to influenza infection and to influenza-bacterial co-infection. His lab aims to identify determinants of immunopathology and protection and has assessed unique and redundant roles of type I and type III interferons in influenza. A second focus of his group is airway epithelial cell differentiation, a process that has to be efficient and balanced to guarantee timely repair of lung tissue damage during infection.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Irina Udalova

Mon 16 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Laboratory of Angiogenesis and Vascular Metabolism,Vesalius Research Center, Leuven

Professor Peter Carmeliet

Audience: Public

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Mon 16 Oct 2017 from 17:00 to 18:00

Burdon Sanderson Cardiac Science Centre Lecture Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

INTERNATIONAL GUEST SPEAKER - 14TH ANNUAL BURDON SANDERSON CARDIAC SCIENCE LECTURE: Optogenetic, tissue clearing, and viral vector approaches to understand and influence whole-animal physiology and behaviour

Viviana Gradinaru

Our research group at Caltech develops and employs optogenetics, tissue clearing, and viral vectors to gain new insights on circuits underlying locomotion, reward, and sleep. In particular we will discuss how bidirectional manipulation of mesopontine cholinergic cell bodies exerted opposing effects... Read more

Our research group at Caltech develops and employs optogenetics, tissue clearing, and viral vectors to gain new insights on circuits underlying locomotion, reward, and sleep. In particular we will discuss how bidirectional manipulation of mesopontine cholinergic cell bodies exerted opposing effects on locomotor behavior and reinforcement learning and how these effects were separable via limiting photostimulation to PPN cholinergic terminals in the ventral substantia nigra pars compacta or to the ventral tegmental area, respectively (Xiao et al, Neuron, 2016). Genetically encoded tools that can be used to visualize, monitor, and modulate mammalian neurons are revolutionizing neuroscience. However, use of genetic tools in non-transgenic animals is often hindered by the lack of vectors capable of safe, efficient, and specific delivery to the desired cellular targets. To begin to address these challenges, we have developed an in vivo Cre-based selection platform (CREATE) for identifying adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) that more efficiently transduce genetically defined cell populations (Deverman et al, Nature Biotechnology, 2016). As a first test of the CREATE platform, we selected for viruses that transduced the brain after intravascular delivery and found a novel vector, AAV-PHP.B, that transduces most neuronal types and glia across the brain. We also demonstrate how whole-body tissue clearing can facilitate transduction maps of systemically delivered genes (Yang et al, Cell, 2014; Treweek et al, Nature Protocols, 2016) and how non-invasive delivery vectors can be used to achieve dense to sparse labeling to enable morphology tracing (unpublished). Since CNS disorders are notoriously challenging due to the restrictive nature of the blood brain barrier, the recombinant vectors engineered to overcome this barrier can enable potential future use of exciting advances in gene editing via the CRISPR-Cas, RNA interference and gene replacement strategies to restore diseased CNS circuits. In addition to control of neuronal activity we need feedback on how exactly the tissue is responding to modulation. We have worked on two related topics: optical voltage sensors and imaging of single molecule RNA in cleared tissue. We used directed evolution of opsins to make them better at reporting action potentials (Flytzanis et al, Nature Communications, 2014). Changes in RNA transcripts can also report on activity history of brain circuits. Preserving spatial relationships while accessing the transcriptome of selected cells is a crucial feature for advancing many biological areas, from developmental biology to neuroscience. Collaborators and us recently reported on methods for multi-color, multi-RNA, imaging in deep tissues. By using single-molecule hybridization chain reaction (smHCR), PACT tissue hydrogel embedding and clearing and light-sheet microscopy we detected single-molecule mRNAs in ~mm-thick brain tissue samples (Shah et al, Development, 2016) and by rRNA labeling we mapped the identity and growth rate of pathogens in clinical samples (DePas et al, mBio, 2016). Together these technologies can enable high content anatomical and functional mapping to define changes that affect cell function and health body-wide.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Tue 17 Oct 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NPEU Seminar - Perinatal mental health: finding the right balance

Fiona Alderdice

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 17 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Floor meeting - 2 groups will give an update on the research work in their laboratory

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 17 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

HPV and Human Cancer: A prevention success and a therapeutic opportunity

Peter Howley

Despite the extraordinary effectiveness of the current HPV VLP based vaccines in prevention they have no therapeutic value. Individuals already infected by a cancer associated HPV type are still at risk fro developing cancer. Dr Howley's lab has been studying the pathway by which HPV targets p53 proteolysis with the goal of uncovering a therapeutic strategy.

Despite the extraordinary effectiveness of the current HPV VLP based vaccines in prevention they have no therapeutic value. Individuals already infected by a cancer associated HPV type are still at risk fro developing cancer. Dr Howley's lab has been studying the pathway by which HPV targets p53 proteolysis with the goal of uncovering a therapeutic strategy.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Tue 17 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar: Suicide, psychosis and the case for public mental health

Professor Peter Jones

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natasha Bowyer

Wed 18 Oct 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Tinsley Building, Centre for Neural Circuits and Behaviour, Tinsley Building, Mansfield Road, Oxford, Mansfield Road OX1 3TA

Learning and Memory in Drosophila: Linking Behavior, Neuronal Circuits and Synaptic Plasticity

André Fiala

Deciphering how neuronal brain circuits control behaviour represents a key task in modern neuroscience. A fundamental problem is to understand how brains integrate present sensory stimuli, past experience, and behavioural options. We aim at understanding how adaptive behaviour is organized through... Read more

Deciphering how neuronal brain circuits control behaviour represents a key task in modern neuroscience. A fundamental problem is to understand how brains integrate present sensory stimuli, past experience, and behavioural options. We aim at understanding how adaptive behaviour is organized through the properties of single neurons, their synapses, and the circuits the neurons are part of. A combination of genetic tools employing cell-specific transgene expression, e.g., opto- and thermogenetics, splitGFP reconstitution across cells, or functional optical imaging, advances the analysis of brains as integrated systems for the control of behaviour. For such an endeavour, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is particularly suitable. It combines brain simplicity, behavioural richness, and experimental accessibility. We use associative olfactory conditioning paradigms to analyze how odour information is represented in the brain and how odour representations are associated with behavioural relevance through learning. As a model system of how a central brain structure brings about such adaptive behaviour, our research focuses on the mushroom body of the Drosophila central brain. The mushroom body of Drosophila is an evolutionary ancient third-order brain structure, comprising but ~2200 intrinsic neurons. It integrates input from multiple sensory modalities with experience-dependent modulation through multiple biogenic amines and neuropeptides. Its output then is integrated with innate behavioural tendencies to bring about adaptive behaviour. The mushroom body features structural, functional, or cellular similarity with several distinct mammalian brain structures. Our recent research on the function of the mushroom body will be summarized and discussed as a paradigmatic case of how a brain operates.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Wed 18 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:30

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, TBC, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox Seminar: A middle way on NITP? Choosing testing virtuously

Tom Shakespeare

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Thu 19 Oct 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Thu 19 Oct 2017 from 12:30 to 13:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

IGF2BP1 promotes the immune escape in advanced stage ovarian cancer

Dr Nadine Bley

The mRNA binding protein IGF2BP1 (IGF2 mRNA binding protein) is an oncofetal protein de novo synthesized in various aggressive solid cancers. In the cytoplasm, the protein controls the localization, translation and/or turnover of target mRNAs and thereby modulates cell proliferation, migration and... Read more

The mRNA binding protein IGF2BP1 (IGF2 mRNA binding protein) is an oncofetal protein de novo synthesized in various aggressive solid cancers. In the cytoplasm, the protein controls the localization, translation and/or turnover of target mRNAs and thereby modulates cell proliferation, migration and invasion during development and cancer. In epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) high levels of IGF2BP1 expression are significantly correlated with poorer prognosis and associated with the mesenchymal subtype of EOC, characterized by a reduced immune signature. Aiming to characterize the role of IGF2BP1 in EOC we used a combination of deep sequencing and quantitative proteomics. As expected we identified the protein as an essential regulator of cell migration and invasion. More strikingly, an IGF2BP1-dependent modulation of components of the MHC class I antigen processing and presentation machinery (APM) was found in EOC-derived cells, which is in line with the frequent deficiencies in these molecules in EOC lesions. IGF2BP1 repressed the expression of genes essential for MHC class I antigen processing machinery leading to an impaired MHC class I surface antigen expression. Additionally, IGF2BP1 promoted CD274/PD-L1 expression which itself represses the proliferation of activated T-cells. In summary, our data suggest that IGF2BP1 promotes the immune escape of invasive cancer cells in advanced stage ovarian cancer.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Penny Berry

Thu 19 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Respiratory / Acute General Medicine Firm C

Dr Ku Shah, Dr William Flight

Respiratory: "A tale of two trajectories", Dr William Flight -- Acute General Medicine Firm C: "Does the exact diagnosis matter?", Dr Ku Shah -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Respiratory: "A tale of two trajectories", Dr William Flight -- Acute General Medicine Firm C: "Does the exact diagnosis matter?", Dr Ku Shah -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 20 Oct 2017 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Massive haemoptysis and emergency control

Dr Ifor Capel

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 20 Oct 2017 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

How to PERK up your iNKT cells: A novel mechanism of iNKT cell activation via ER-stressed APCs

Melissa Bedard (Cerundolo Group)

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 20 Oct 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Oxford Martin School, Lecture Theatre, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Neural circuits underlying the whole-body coordination of behaviour in Platynereis larvae

Dr Gaspar Jekely

Our goal is to understand how neuronal circuits coordinate behaviours extending to whole organ systems or to the entire body. Achieving this at cellular resolution in an entire nervous system is possible by studying small animals amenable to genetic and other manipulations. We are actively... Read more

Our goal is to understand how neuronal circuits coordinate behaviours extending to whole organ systems or to the entire body. Achieving this at cellular resolution in an entire nervous system is possible by studying small animals amenable to genetic and other manipulations. We are actively developing the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii as a new system for circuit neuroscience. We use whole-body connectomics, neuronal activity imaging, and behavioural analysis to understand the circuit bases of behaviour in fully mapped, stereotypical circuits. Genome editing and transgenic access to single neurons allow us to link molecular function to network activity and behaviour. I will present recent results on the integration of phototactic and UV-avoidance responses and on a hydrodynamic startle behaviour.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Fri 20 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

INT'L GUEST SPEAKER - Dr Claudia Lodovichi, Neuroscience Institute CNR and Venetian Institute of Molecular Medicine (VIMM) – Padua : Circuit formation and function in the olfactory system

Dr Claudia Lodovichi

The specificity of connections in the nervous system is essential to translate electrical activity into meaningful neuronal codes. We are interested in understanding how an ensemble of neurons wire together to form specific circuits and how these circuits process information. We address these... Read more

The specificity of connections in the nervous system is essential to translate electrical activity into meaningful neuronal codes. We are interested in understanding how an ensemble of neurons wire together to form specific circuits and how these circuits process information. We address these questions in the olfactory system. Combining real-time imaging, quantitative anatomy, behaviour and electrophysiology we seek to understand the mechanism underlying the topographic organization of the olfactory bulb, in particular the role of the odorant receptor and spontaneous activity. We are also studying adult neurogenesis in the olfactory system, an extreme form of neuronal network plasticity. I will summarize results we recently obtained on these topics.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Fri 20 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

“CRISPR-Cas Gene Editing: Defining Genome-wide Activity for Therapeutics”

Shengdar Tsai

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Mon 23 Oct 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting rooms 71a, b and c, Headington OX3 7DQ

CHD6 is a novel oxidative DNA damage response factor

Dr Aaron Goodarzi

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 23 Oct 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI Basement seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

A mass spectrometric view on epigenetic and phosphorylation based signalling systems

Dr Matthias Gstaiger

In this talk Dr Gstaiger will highlight his recent efforts towards a systematic analysis of protein complexes underlying epigenetic regulation as well as kinase mediated signalling using quantitative mass spectrometry. Short Bio: Matthias Gstaiger is heading a research team interested in the... Read more

In this talk Dr Gstaiger will highlight his recent efforts towards a systematic analysis of protein complexes underlying epigenetic regulation as well as kinase mediated signalling using quantitative mass spectrometry. Short Bio: Matthias Gstaiger is heading a research team interested in the analysis of interaction proteomes associated with cell signalling. His interest into protein interactions dates back to his PhD studies at University of Zürich (1992-1996) when he discovered a mechanism for tissue specific transcription via the interaction of transcription factors and tissue specific coactivators. During his postdoctoral studies at the FMI in Basel (1996-2003) he combined functional genomics with mass spectrometry to uncover novel biochemical routes for cell growth control and nutrient signalling. Since 2004 he has his own group at the IMSB at ETH Zurich, which develops and applies quantitative mass spectrometry techniques to systematically study the modular and dynamic nature of cellular signalling systems in health and disease.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Mon 23 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Does evasion of innate sensing explain pandemic potential of primate lentiviruses in humans

Professor Greg Towers

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Tue 24 Oct 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Transcriptional profiling of macrophages in rheumatic disease for precision medicine based therapies

Dr Harris Perlman

The Perlman Lab centers on rheumatic disease, particularly the impact that macrophages play in pathogenesis of rheumatic disease. Macrophages have emerged as key players in the development of inflammation and fibrosis in central target organs including the synovium, kidney and lung during the... Read more

The Perlman Lab centers on rheumatic disease, particularly the impact that macrophages play in pathogenesis of rheumatic disease. Macrophages have emerged as key players in the development of inflammation and fibrosis in central target organs including the synovium, kidney and lung during the pathogenesis and remission of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and systemic sclerosis (SSc), respectively. Macrophages also contribute to the co-morbidities associated with these diseases including atherosclerosis and obesity. We observed marked heterogeneity in the macrophage population within diseased tissues that is dependent on their origin (embryonic vs. bone marrow derived), target organ and microenvironment. Moreover, these macrophages are extremely plastic and can alter their phenotype throughout the course of disease. Based on our data we developed a central hypothesis that during the initiation and early progression phase of disease tissue resident macrophages that normally function to maintain tolerance to local antigens, are overwhelmed by recruited pro-inflammatory or pro-fibrotic monocyte derived macrophages or pro-inflammatory dendritic cells depending on the target organ and environmental milieu. As the disease progresses to the chronic phase, however, the recruited macrophages acquire characteristics reminiscent of tissue resident macrophages while retaining a pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic phenotype, resulting in failed resolution of inflammation and progressive tissue destruction and fibrosis. The data anticipated from our projects would be the first to demonstrate a direct linkage of macrophage ontogeny and activation to disease activity and tissue damage. In addition, our studies allow us to explore commonalities in macrophage function between diseases that could lead to broad therapeutic interventions. In our state-of-the-art murine models we use cutting-edge technologies that we developed including micro-MRI, CT and SPECT to evaluate joint inflammation, bone destruction and lung fibrosis, Luminex-based gene arrays and multiparameter flow cytometry/sorting, whole population RNA seq and single cell RNA Seq and Chip-seq. We will cross-reference these data with those we will obtain through the AMP programs, which examine macrophage heterogeneity in the synovium and kidney from patients with rheumatic disease. This will allow us to rapidly move to functional analyses of relevant pathways and testing of new therapeutic strategies in the mouse models. I believe that our data has the potential to be paradigm shifting and transformative for the field of rheumatic disease.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Hume

Tue 24 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

The emergence of erythropoiesis from the early haematopoietic hierarchy: a single cell-RNA-seq approach

Assoc Prof Merav Socolovsky

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 24 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar: The REVEAL trial – asking a good question, getting a reliable answer.

Associate Professor Louise Bowman

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natasha Bowyer

Tue 24 Oct 2017 from 14:00 to 15:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

Big Data Institute, Basement seminar room, BDI, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Improving Openness and Reproducibility of Scientific Research

Dr Timothy Errington

Scientific communication can be improved to increase efficiency in the accumulation of knowledge. This requires at least two changes to the present culture. One change is conceptual – embracing that progress is made more rapidly by identifying error in current theories than by finding support for... Read more

Scientific communication can be improved to increase efficiency in the accumulation of knowledge. This requires at least two changes to the present culture. One change is conceptual – embracing that progress is made more rapidly by identifying error in current theories than by finding support for current theories. Such a shift could reduce bias in design, analysis, and reporting decisions that elicit positive results and ignore negative results. The other change is practical – science will benefit by taking advantage of current technologies and a shift in incentives to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of research. This includes management of ones research and collaborations, connecting to tools (such as repositories), and discovering others research. This presentation will focus on mechanisms to improve openness, integrity, and reproducibility in research. I will discuss this in the context of the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology (https://osf.io/e81xl/wiki/home/), a project to assess reproducibility rates, predictors of reproducibility, and common obstacles to conducting replications in preclinical cancer biology. We have published some of the first replications from this project, which illustrates some of the challenges and opportunities in how biomedical research is conducted and communicated.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Tue 24 Oct 2017 from 14:00 to 15:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 1, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI / Ludwig Institute Seminar: Improving Openness and Reproducibility of Scientific Research

Tim Errington

Scientific communication can be improved to increase efficiency in the accumulation of knowledge. This requires at least two changes to the present culture. One change is conceptual – embracing that progress is made more rapidly by identifying error in current theories than by finding support for... Read more

Scientific communication can be improved to increase efficiency in the accumulation of knowledge. This requires at least two changes to the present culture. One change is conceptual – embracing that progress is made more rapidly by identifying error in current theories than by finding support for current theories. Such a shift could reduce bias in design, analysis, and reporting decisions that elicit positive results and ignore negative results. The other change is practical – science will benefit by taking advantage of current technologies and a shift in incentives to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of research. This includes management of ones research and collaborations, connecting to tools (such as repositories), and discovering others research. This presentation will focus on mechanisms to improve openness, integrity, and reproducibility in research. I will discuss this in the context of the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology (https://osf.io/e81xl/wiki/home/), a project to assess reproducibility rates, predictors of reproducibility, and common obstacles to conducting replications in preclinical cancer biology. We have published some of the first replications from this project, which illustrates some of the challenges and opportunities in how biomedical research is conducted and communicated.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Wed 25 Oct 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Building personalised risk maps to improve health outcomes

Darren Wright

Abstract The role of preventative services in improving health outcomes has long been recognised. However, outcomes have frequently proven difficult to measure, particularly in relation to socioeconomic factors. At the same time, there is lack of investment in areas such as housing support and... Read more

Abstract The role of preventative services in improving health outcomes has long been recognised. However, outcomes have frequently proven difficult to measure, particularly in relation to socioeconomic factors. At the same time, there is lack of investment in areas such as housing support and access to employment, which can potentially have a positive impact on health outcomes. This talk will discuss the outcomes measurement system, developed by Inside Outcomes which builds personalised risk maps for individuals. The risk map system is based on a methodology that identifies the full range of risks and protective factors that patients present with to health and wellbeing services. Examples of risks to individual health and wellbeing can range from being the victim of domestic abuse, to smoking, through to unmanaged blood pressure. The removal of these risks will generally lead to an improved health outcome. The flexibility of the system allows it to be equally applicable in primary care, public health commissioned preventative services or more indirect health providers such as housing associations. Equally, as the system is applied in the same manner across very different service types it allows the outcomes from those services to be compared. The seminar will trace the development of using risk maps with individuals, providing examples of their use, and how software has been developed to manage this process. The talk will also highlight the challenges of using such an approach with individuals, the different professional attitudes and the impact their use has had on people who commission services. The talk will also look at how the risks identified in individuals can be linked to the range of National Outcome Frameworks such as the NHS Outcome Framework, Adult Social Care Framework and Public Health Outcome Framework. As these frameworks set the basis for priorities in commissioning services, relating day to day activity to them provides a credible evidence base for why services should continue. By taking a holistic approach to managing the range of risks that people present to services we increase the chances of positive outcomes. The simultaneous management of social and clinical factors present an opportunity to support people to make sustainable changes in their lives. For example, a GP trying to support someone to manage stress and anxiety will get little traction unless other risks around substance misuse and homelessness are simultaneously managed. Through mapping all the issues a patient presents with we can provide a plan for how services can integrate around an individual. For more information see: http://www.insideoutcomes.co.uk/welcome-to-inside-outcomes-limited/risk-maps/ Bio Darren Wright is a director of Inside Outcomes. Inside Outcomes is focussed on supporting organisations that work with individuals, in health and wellbeing, to demonstrate the impact they have. This covers a diverse range of agencies from small voluntary sector agencies to primary care. Previously Darren has worked across the NHS and local authorities designing and commissioning preventative services. He commissioned the Birmingham Life Expectancy Programme from 2008 to 2013 where he identified a need for better outcome measurement. He has also played a leading role, nationally in the develop of Health Overview and Scrutiny functions and the development of Health and Wellbeing Boards.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Chrysanthi Papoutsi

Wed 25 Oct 2017 from 11:00 to 12:30

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, BDI LG Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox Seminar: The Ethics of AMR Carriership

Morten Byskov

Many countries have specific AMR prevention guidelines, such as zero-tolerance policies, in order to prevent further introduction and spread of AMR. These guidelines may in many ways affect the lives and well-being of carriers of antimicrobial resistant pathogens, resulting in complex ethical... Read more

Many countries have specific AMR prevention guidelines, such as zero-tolerance policies, in order to prevent further introduction and spread of AMR. These guidelines may in many ways affect the lives and well-being of carriers of antimicrobial resistant pathogens, resulting in complex ethical dilemmas that often remain largely implicit in practice. In this presentation I present and discuss three ethical issues that arise from AMR carriership in the face of such prevention guidelines: First, how should the impact of AMR control measures, such as isolation and mandatory eradication treatments, on the well-being of individual carriers be conceptualized? Second, if AMR control measures should adhere to the principle of the least restrictive means, how should this principle be interpreted? And, thirdly, if AMR control measures should be relaxed because of their adverse impact on the well-being of individual carriers, how can a particular level of acceptable risk for the further spread of AMR be identified and ethically justified?

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

If you would like to attend, please email jane.beinart@ethox.ox.ac.uk

Wed 25 Oct 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, First Floor Meeting Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

HERC Seminar: Are Public Hospitals Overcrowded? Evidence from Trauma and Orthopaedics in England

Thomas Hoe

Abstract: Hospitals face a trade-off between how many non-emergency patients they admit each period ('crowding') and how long these patients must wait for an appointment ('waiting'). This paper evaluates whether there is too much crowding at public hospitals in England. I first exploit... Read more

Abstract: Hospitals face a trade-off between how many non-emergency patients they admit each period ('crowding') and how long these patients must wait for an appointment ('waiting'). This paper evaluates whether there is too much crowding at public hospitals in England. I first exploit pseudo-random variation in emergency admissions to estimate the short-run effect of admissions on quality of care. I find that crowding has large adverse effects on patients, causing the rate of unplanned readmission to vary by up to 20%. The most plausible mechanism behind this effect is that physicians discharge patients early due to binding bed constraints. I then conduct a marginal welfare analysis that compares the impact of non-emergency admissions on quality of care (a crowding effect) with the impact on access to care (a waiting effect). This shows that policies which reduce non-emergency admissions, thereby decreasing crowding but increasing waiting times, may lead to substantial net welfare gains. Biography: Thomas Hoe is a PhD Candidate in Economics at University College London and a Visiting Scholar at the Institute for Fiscal Studies. His research focuses on healthcare and public economics, and makes use of large administrative datasets. In recent work he has studied crowding in public hospitals, how emergency departments respond to pressures to reduce waiting times, and how hospitals may reduce emergency readmissions. Thomas’ past experience includes working as an economist in the public and private sector on policy issues in antitrust, healthcare, and financial services.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 25 Oct 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

New genetic and physiological systems to discover mechanisms involved in diabetes pathogenesis

Professor Seung K. Kim

Systems to identify the cell type-specific and molecular functions regulated by genes linked to type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk could transform our understanding of the genetic basis of this disease. However, in vivo systems for efficiently investigating and discovering T2D risk gene functions relevant... Read more

Systems to identify the cell type-specific and molecular functions regulated by genes linked to type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk could transform our understanding of the genetic basis of this disease. However, in vivo systems for efficiently investigating and discovering T2D risk gene functions relevant to human cells are needed. We will describe the merging of fruit fly genetics and physiology with human islet biology to address this fundamental gap in diabetes research. Based on our ability to measure insulin production and secretion in Drosophila, we identified fly orthologs of T2D risk genes that are regulators of insulin output. With human islets, we performed loss- and gain-of-function studies using lenti-viral gene delivery systems and identified cognate human T2D risk genes that regulate human beta cell function, including BCL11A, SIX3 and PRC1. High-throughput genetic and physiological systems described today could be useful for identifying cell-specific T2D risk gene functions, including unsuspected regulators of human beta cell function like BCL11A and PRC1, and should improve genome-scale investigations of genetic mechanisms underlying T2D risk.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Wed 25 Oct 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 conference room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

T cell communication goes viral-a role for extracellular vesicles in T cell help

Professor Mike Dustin

We recently discovered that T cells generate extracellular vesicles within the immunological synapse that are highly enriched in T cell antigen receptors. Recently, we developed new methods to document what other proteins are present and how they are localised within the extracellular vesicles,... Read more

We recently discovered that T cells generate extracellular vesicles within the immunological synapse that are highly enriched in T cell antigen receptors. Recently, we developed new methods to document what other proteins are present and how they are localised within the extracellular vesicles, which we refer to as synaptic ectosomes. The newly identified proteins include the retroviral restriction factor tetherin (CD317) and the ligand for CD40 (CD154). I will present a new model for how these “virus” like particles help spread information in lymphoid tissues.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Chris Willberg

please arrive 5 minutes early for entry

Thu 26 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:30

BDI seminars

The Inaugural Meeting of the Big Data Ethics Forum

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 26 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Acute General Medicine Firm B / Renal

Dr Ben Storey, Dr Jeffrey Aronson

Acute General Medicine Firm B: "Fatal drug toxicity and genetic polymorphisms", Dr Jeffrey Aronson -- Renal: "Mortality Trends of ESRD patients from Oxfordshire and all-England, 1967-2017" marking the Golden Anniversary of the Oxford Kidney Unit (1967-2017), Dr Ben Storey -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Acute General Medicine Firm B: "Fatal drug toxicity and genetic polymorphisms", Dr Jeffrey Aronson -- Renal: "Mortality Trends of ESRD patients from Oxfordshire and all-England, 1967-2017" marking the Golden Anniversary of the Oxford Kidney Unit (1967-2017), Dr Ben Storey -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 26 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

As a mouse in a maze: Finding a group leader position

Dr Alfredo Castello Palomares

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Alice Mayer

Fri 27 Oct 2017 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Side-effects to some, therapies to others: autonomic neuromodulation

Professor Alex Green

The talk is about the autonomic side-effects of neuromodulation including Deep Brain Stimulation and Dorsal Root Ganglion stimulation for pain. It may be possible to harness such effects for new therapies.

The talk is about the autonomic side-effects of neuromodulation including Deep Brain Stimulation and Dorsal Root Ganglion stimulation for pain. It may be possible to harness such effects for new therapies.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 27 Oct 2017 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Activation of human innate-like T cells by adenovirus vectors

Dr Nicholas Provine

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 27 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

INT'L GUEST SPEAKER Professor Viacheslav Nikolaev, Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE) Institute of Experimental Cardiovascular Research: ‘Shining light on local cAMP signalling in cardiac disease’

Professor Viacheslav Nikolaev

Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) regulates numerous physiological functions by acting in subcellular microdomains. Cardiac actions of cAMP include but are not limited to the modulation of contractility, pathological growth and remodelling. This is achieved at least in part, by local pools of... Read more

Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) regulates numerous physiological functions by acting in subcellular microdomains. Cardiac actions of cAMP include but are not limited to the modulation of contractility, pathological growth and remodelling. This is achieved at least in part, by local pools of cAMP formed around calcium handling proteins such as L-type calcium channels located in T-tubules or caveolin-rich membrane structures as well as calcium release and reuptake units found in sarcoplasmatic reticulum. Recently, we developed several differentially localised versions of a highly sensitive cytosolic cAMP Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensor Epac1-camps and expressed them in transgenic mice to study the regulation of local cAMP dynamics and their alterations in cardiac disease. Using these new tools and live cell imaging, we could uncover that cardiac hypertrophy and early heart failure are associated with relocation of the cGMP-regulated phosphodiesterases (PDEs) 2 and 3 between beta-adrenoceptor associated submembrane microdomains and between plasma membrane and sarcoplasmic reticulum. In addition, some cAMP-specific PDE4 isoforms were found to relocate between calcium release channels and the cytosol. This newly identified molecular mechanism may allow some functional compensation such as augmentation of catecholamine-stimulated cardiac contractility in early disease or even lead to arrhythmias originating from high cAMP levels at certain subcellular locations. These alterations of microdomain-associated signalling mechanisms might serve as a targets for more specific cardiovascular therapeutics.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Fri 27 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

How LAB282 accelerates Oxford drug discovery

Thomas Hank

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Butler

Fri 27 Oct 2017 from 16:30 to 17:30

AfOx insaka - a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research

Blavatnik School of Government, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter OX2 6GG

AfOx insaka - a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research

Prof Kelly Chibale, Prof Sandra Fredman

The AfOx insaka is a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research with speakers from diverse and varied academic disciplines. This first insaka will feature Prof Kelly Chibale - who will speak about Pioneering and Seeding a pharmaceutical R&D Industry in Africa, and Prof Sandra Fredman - who will speak about Human Rights Law in Africa.

The AfOx insaka is a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research with speakers from diverse and varied academic disciplines. This first insaka will feature Prof Kelly Chibale - who will speak about Pioneering and Seeding a pharmaceutical R&D Industry in Africa, and Prof Sandra Fredman - who will speak about Human Rights Law in Africa.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Africa Oxford Initiative

Mon 30 Oct 2017 from 11:30 to 12:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, St Luke's Chapel, ROQ, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Improving research impact via a cross-sectoral email list for knowledge translation

David Evans, Professor Trish Greenhalgh

Abstract: It is well established that early and ongoing linkage between researchers and end-users of research (clinicians, managers, policymakers, publishers/media, service users, industry) is key to achieving research impact. Early dialogue on what the problems are, prioritisation of research... Read more

Abstract: It is well established that early and ongoing linkage between researchers and end-users of research (clinicians, managers, policymakers, publishers/media, service users, industry) is key to achieving research impact. Early dialogue on what the problems are, prioritisation of research topics and engagement with the research process all help to set the scene for uptake of research findings once a study is complete. David Evans has a background in health policy and implementation; for 15 years he has run the C.H.A.I.N. (contact – help – advice – information – networking) email list which is free to join and which links academics with practitioners and policymakers in their chosen field. In this seminar he will introduce CHAIN, explain how you can join it and what you can expect to get out of it, and present examples of CHAIN’s successes in supporting research impact.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof. Trish Greenhalgh

Mon 30 Oct 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Deconstructing and reconstructing a metastatic tumour microenvironment

Dr Oliver Pearce

I originally trained as an organic chemist with Prof Ben Davis and Prof Len Seymour at Oxford University. My PhD thesis was on the development of chemically glycosylated viral vectors for cancer gene therapy. For my post-doctoral studies I moved to Prof. Ajit Varki’s lab at the University of... Read more

I originally trained as an organic chemist with Prof Ben Davis and Prof Len Seymour at Oxford University. My PhD thesis was on the development of chemically glycosylated viral vectors for cancer gene therapy. For my post-doctoral studies I moved to Prof. Ajit Varki’s lab at the University of California, San Diego. Here I investigated how glycans are involved in cancer immunity. After five years in California I returned to the UK for a second post-doc with Prof. Fran Balkwill at Barts Cancer Institute to further train in cancer biology. In September 2017 I started my own research program with funding from UCB Pharma and Against Breast Cancer. The focus of my research is the tumour microenvironment, in particular the composition of the tumour extracellular matrix and its role in immunosuppression.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Irina Udalova

Mon 30 Oct 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Oxford Martin School, Lecture Theatre, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Neural Codes for the Sense of Taste

Dr Mark Stopfer

Four of the five major sensory systems (vision, olfaction, somatosensation, and audition) are thought to use different but partially overlapping sets of neurons to form unique representations of vast numbers of stimuli. Gustation is considered an exception, by representing only small numbers of... Read more

Four of the five major sensory systems (vision, olfaction, somatosensation, and audition) are thought to use different but partially overlapping sets of neurons to form unique representations of vast numbers of stimuli. Gustation is considered an exception, by representing only small numbers of basic taste categories. Using new methods for delivering tastant chemicals and making electrophysiological recordings from the gustatory system of the moth Manduca sexta, we found that chemical-specific information is initially encoded in the population of gustatory receptor neurons as broadly distributed spatiotemporal patterns of activity, dramatically integrated and temporally transformed as it propagates to monosynaptically connected second-order neurons, and observed in tastant-specific behavior. Our results suggest that the gustatory system, rather than constructing basic taste categories, uses a spatiotemporal population code to generate unique neural representations of individual tastant chemicals.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Mon 30 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

The first ten hours in the life of the frog

Sir Jim Smith

Audience: Public

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Tue 31 Oct 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Metabolomics enhances precision medicine and interpretation of gene mutation

Dr Lining Guo, Dr Lucy Davison, Professor John Todd

Dr. Lining Guo is a Vice President in Metabolon (Durham, North Carolina), responsible for overseeing Metabolon’s scientific collaboration and contract research with over 900 academic and industry partners worldwide. Prior to Metabolon, Lining was Director of Biochemistry in Paradigm Genetics, a... Read more

Dr. Lining Guo is a Vice President in Metabolon (Durham, North Carolina), responsible for overseeing Metabolon’s scientific collaboration and contract research with over 900 academic and industry partners worldwide. Prior to Metabolon, Lining was Director of Biochemistry in Paradigm Genetics, a system biology company, and a technical leader of biochemistry in Dow AgroSciences (a Dow Chemical Company). Lining received his Ph.D. from The Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Lucy Davison works as a Senior Postdoctoral Fellow at the Royal Veterinary College in London and the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics in Oxford. She is a veterinary surgeon with a special interest in the genetics and immunology of diabetes mellitus. After a PhD at the University of London, Lucy completed her Clinical Specialist training in canine and feline medicine. She was then awarded a Wellcome Trust Intermediate Clinical Fellowship at Cambridge Institute for Medical Research with Prof. John Todd. This was followed by a Wellcome Trust Veterinary Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics in Oxford with Prof. Chris O’Callaghan. Lucy’s research aims to understand the relationship between genotype and diabetes risk in humans and other species. This presentation will focus on the 16p13.13 region in humans, which affects risk of many autoimmune conditions including type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis and primary biliary sclerosis. John Todd FRS, FMedSci, FRCP Hons, PhD is Professor of Precision Medicine at the University of Oxford (until recently Professor of Medical Genetics at the University of Cambridge), Director of the JDRF/Wellcome Trust Diabetes and Inflammation Laboratory (DIL) in the University’s Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics, and a Senior Investigator of the National Institute for Health Research. His PhD was in Biochemistry at the University of Cambridge. Todd researches type 1 diabetes (T1D) genetics and disease mechanisms with an aim of clinical intervention. Previously, Todd was Professor of Human Genetics and a Wellcome Trust Principal Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. Todd helped pioneer genome-wide genetic studies, first in mice and then in humans. He then went on to study the associations between mapped genomic disease-associated regions and phenotypes by founding and deploying the Cambridge BioResource. His research in genetics and diabetes has received several awards and prizes. In the latest phase of his research, to translate basic genetic and immunological knowledge to treatment and prevention, the DIL has now completed its first two mechanistic, statistically adaptive, drug dose-finding studies in T1D patients. This design and analyses have revealed several previously unknown effects of interleukin-2 (IL-2) on the human immune system, providing key information on the future possibility of using subcutaneous administration of ultra-low doses of IL-2 to preserve pancreatic islet beta-cell function to treat and prevent T1D. In Oxford the DIL is launching a programme to investigate which T1D risk regions affect beta-cell function and fragility. We are applying the latest single-cell, mass spectrometry methods, bioinformatics and statistical methods. Todd has supervised 31 PhD students with three in progress. h-index 94, total citations over 38,000.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Irina Udalova

Tue 31 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Exploring the mechanisms of haematopoietic lineage progression at the single-cell level

Professor Ana Cvejic

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 31 Oct 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF