Other Seminars

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Wed 1 Mar 2017 from 15:30 to 16:30

DPAG Guest Speakers

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library (2nd Floor), off Parks Road OX1 3PT

A 3D atlas and database of human development.

Prof. Antoon FM Moorman

Antoon Moorman (1947) did his university studies in biology and chemistry. Subsequent to his PhD, he continued his career in the Department of Anatomy & Embryology, where he became professor of Embryology and head of the Department. His research interest became focused on the development of the... Read more

Antoon Moorman (1947) did his university studies in biology and chemistry. Subsequent to his PhD, he continued his career in the Department of Anatomy & Embryology, where he became professor of Embryology and head of the Department. His research interest became focused on the development of the heart. His lab has become authoritative in producing computer-based 3D-gene expression reconstructions to clarify the intricate three-dimensional development of the cardiac chambers and the conduction system. He published more than 400 articles and was knighted in the Order of the Dutch Lion in 2012. (For an interview see: (Ozkan J, 2012) Pioneer who gave shape to Cardiac Morphology: Antoon FM Moorman, PhD, FESC. Circulation 126 (8), F43-F48)

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Thu 2 Mar 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

*CANCELLED* Gendering skin: exploring the gendered dimensions of a qualitative study on four dermatological conditions

Abigail McNiven

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Susan Kirkpatrick

CANCELLED

Thu 2 Mar 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

How the MyD88 signaling network is regulated to prevent autoimmunity and lymphoma

Professor Sir Philip Cohen

The major goal of Philip Cohen’s research is to understand how the signal transduction networks that regulate the innate immune system are activated during infection by bacteria and viruses, and to discover how they trigger the production of inflammatory mediators to combat these pathogens.... Read more

The major goal of Philip Cohen’s research is to understand how the signal transduction networks that regulate the innate immune system are activated during infection by bacteria and viruses, and to discover how they trigger the production of inflammatory mediators to combat these pathogens. Understanding these signalling networks is important, not just because it may lead to the development of improved drugs to fight infection, but also because failure to control the production of inflammatory mediators causes major global diseases, such as arthritis, asthma, colitis, fibrosis, lupus, psoriasis and sepsis. A further aim of his research is therefore to identify which components of these signalling networks are attractive drug targets for the treatment of these diseases. Another focus is to understand the interplay between protein phosphorylation and protein ubiquitylation in regulating the innate immune system, which we tackle by using a range of state-of-the-art techniques that include molecular, cellular and chemical biology, protein chemistry, mass spectrometry, CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing technology and mouse genetics.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 2 Mar 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

On the Impact of Genetic Variation on Molecular and Organismal (Immunological) Phenotypes

Bart Deplancke

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Thu 2 Mar 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1

WIMM / WIMM

Professor David Beeson, Dr Lynn Quek

WIMM: "First-in-class, oral mutant IDH2 inhibitor reverses differentiation block in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia and produces clinically meaningful responses", Dr Lynn Quek -- WIMM: "Genetic disorders at the neuromuscular synapse. Can we treat them?", Prof David Beeson -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

WIMM: "First-in-class, oral mutant IDH2 inhibitor reverses differentiation block in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia and produces clinically meaningful responses", Dr Lynn Quek -- WIMM: "Genetic disorders at the neuromuscular synapse. Can we treat them?", Prof David Beeson -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 2 Mar 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Proteomic modeling of erythropoiesis

Dr Marjorie Brand

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Thu 2 Mar 2017 from 14:00 to 15:00

WTCHG Spotlight Series

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Spotlight on Autoimmune Diabetes

Ricardo Ferreria, Dr Tony Cutler, Dr Jamie Inshaw, Dan Rainbow

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Catherine Green

Thu 2 Mar 2017 from 16:30 to 18:00

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, Level 3 GPEC Seminar Room 2B, Headington OX3 9DU

Title TBC

Dr Tom Chapman

Audience: Public

Organisers: Dr Holm Uhlig

Fri 3 Mar 2017 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

The 100,000 Genomes Project

Jennifer Whitfield

Jennifer Whitfield is the training and education lead for the Oxford NHS Genomic Medicine Centre, where they are currently recruiting for the 100,000 Genomes Project. The 100,000 Genomes Project was launched in 2012 by David Cameron as part of the Olympic legacy, and aims to establish a new... Read more

Jennifer Whitfield is the training and education lead for the Oxford NHS Genomic Medicine Centre, where they are currently recruiting for the 100,000 Genomes Project. The 100,000 Genomes Project was launched in 2012 by David Cameron as part of the Olympic legacy, and aims to establish a new genomic medicine service through the NHS by sequencing the entire genomes of around 70,000 people with rare inherited diseases or cancer. This is an NHS transformational programme, working with hospital Trusts through each of 13 Genomic Medicine Centres around the country (of which Oxford is one) to deliver the project at a local level. This includes developing pathways for identifying and recruiting patients, engaging and training clinical staff and setting up the necessary infrastructure, processes and systems, both clinical and diagnostic, to be able to continue the service once the project is over. Further information about the project at national level can be found here: http://www.genomicsengland.co.uk/

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 3 Mar 2017 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Control of meningitis: induction of functional antibody against Neisseria meningitidis

Dr Christine Rollier

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 3 Mar 2017 from 10:30 to 12:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Primary Care for the Developing World

Dr Merlin Wilcox, Prof Andrew Farmer, Dr Jenny Hirst, Shameq Sayeed

Coordination: Shameq Sayeed, Academic Clinical Fellow in General Practice Chair: Jennifer Hirst, NIHR Doctoral Research Fellow We would like to invite you to a series of short presentations on diverse aspects of global primary care from colleagues within the University and beyond. In addition to... Read more

Coordination: Shameq Sayeed, Academic Clinical Fellow in General Practice Chair: Jennifer Hirst, NIHR Doctoral Research Fellow We would like to invite you to a series of short presentations on diverse aspects of global primary care from colleagues within the University and beyond. In addition to considering particular research methodologies in these settings, we hope this will also create opportunities for future collaborations. Each presentation will be 12-15 minutes in length with 5 minutes for discussion. Dr Jessica Price DPhil Student, Department of Primary Health Care Sciences, University of Oxford Social Autopsies: illuminating avoidable factors and barriers to care in child deaths in rural South Africa Dr Merlin Wilcox Academic Clinical Lecturer, Dept of Primary Care and Population Sciences, University of Southampton Honorary clinical Researcher, Department of Primary Health Care Sciences, University of Oxford Inadequate quality of primary care is a key avoidable factor in child deaths in Africa Dr Jennifer Hirst NIHR Doctoral Research Fellow, Department of Primary Health Care Sciences, University of Oxford Point-of-care HbA1c testing in primary care in South Africa Dr Ibrahim Bello Head of Family Medicine, Obefemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals’ Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria Knowledge, attitude and utilization of ICT and E-health among Health workers in OAUTHC, Ile-ife Dr Chris Paton Group Head, Global Health Informatics, Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford LIFE: Life-saving Instruction for Emergencies – a mobile and VR training platform for low-income countries. www.oxlifeproject.org Dr Shameq Sayeed Academic Clinical Fellow, Department of Primary Health Care Sciences, University of Oxford Enhancing primary care in Palestine: blended learning in a transitional training programme

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Fri 3 Mar 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting Rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

Protein structure determination to atomic accuracy from cryoEM density using Rosetta

Prof Frank Dimaio

Recent advances in technology have made determination of cryoEM single particle reconstructions at 3-5Å resolution routine, even for relatively small protein complexes with low symmetry. While this "near-atomic resolution" data provides key structural information, determination of an atomic model... Read more

Recent advances in technology have made determination of cryoEM single particle reconstructions at 3-5Å resolution routine, even for relatively small protein complexes with low symmetry. While this "near-atomic resolution" data provides key structural information, determination of an atomic model from such maps is difficult and error prone. I will describe the developments my lab has made in advancing the Rosetta protein structure prediction methodology to bridge this "resolution gap," allowing accurate determination of atomic details from such sources of data. I will describe the tools our lab has developed for automated de novo model building, model completion, and all atom refinement, as well as ongoing efforts at extending our approach to even lower resolution sources of data.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Luigi De Colibus

Fri 3 Mar 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

NOBEL PRIZE WINNER Professor Erwin Neher, Georg August Universität Göttingen : TBA

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

NOBEL PRIZE WINNER - http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/1991/

Mon 6 Mar 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Kennedy Institute Seminars

NDM Building, NDM lecture theatre, Headington OX3 7FZ

T-B Crosstalk on the Germinal Centre Road to Memory

Prof Hai Qi

Dr. Hai Qi received a Bachelor of Medicine from the Beijing Medical University in 1996 and a Ph.D. in Pathology from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston in 2003. After postdoctoral training at NIH with Dr. Ronald Germain, in 2009 he joined the faculty of Tsinghua University, where... Read more

Dr. Hai Qi received a Bachelor of Medicine from the Beijing Medical University in 1996 and a Ph.D. in Pathology from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston in 2003. After postdoctoral training at NIH with Dr. Ronald Germain, in 2009 he joined the faculty of Tsinghua University, where he is currently a Professor in Immunology. His group studies follicular helper T (Tfh) cells and germinal center biology with a particular emphasis on cell-cell interactions, cell migration, and functional specialization. In this talk, Dr. Qi will present new findings on how territoriality and function of follicular helper T cells are regulated in the germinal center niche and how T cells impinge on the development of memory B cells.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 6 Mar 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

A DaNGeRous talk about dendritic cells

Dr Caetano Reis e Sousa

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Tue 7 Mar 2017 from 09:00 to 17:30

Centre for Personalised Medicine Seminars

St Anne's College, Tsuzuki lecture theatre, Woodstock Road OX2 6HS

Personalised Medicine in Practice: Advances in Reproductive Science   

Prof Thierry Voet, Prof Cecilia Lindgren, Dr. John Perry, prof. Joris Vermeesch, Prof. Melinda Mills, Prof. Michael Parker, Dr. Patricia Diaz-Gimeno, Dr. Reedik Magi, Prof. Stephen Franks

Two days of national and international speakers focussing on methodology development and discoveries in the field of reproductive science Topics to cover: - preimplantation genetic screening - biomarkers in reproductive health: extra-cellular vesicles - integrated genomics in reproductive traits - model systems in reproductive health ethics

Two days of national and international speakers focussing on methodology development and discoveries in the field of reproductive science Topics to cover: - preimplantation genetic screening - biomarkers in reproductive health: extra-cellular vesicles - integrated genomics in reproductive traits - model systems in reproductive health ethics

Booking Required

Audience: Staff and students of the University and also people in the field.

Organisers: Catherine Lidbetter

Tue 7 Mar 2017 from 13:30 to 14:30

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Congenital dyserythropoietic anaemias: from clilnical manifestations to molecular pathogenesis

Achille Iolascon

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Thu 9 Mar 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room (please note, not ORCRB), Headington OX3 7FZ

Cell-free DNA as a Liquid Biopsy for Precision Cancer Medicine

Professor Nitzan Rosenfeld

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 9 Mar 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1

Emergency Medicine / Clinical Biochemistry

Dr Moya Dawson, Dr Chris Bird, Dr Nishan Guha

Emergency Medicine: "PEM – the catchers in the rye", Dr Moya Dawson and Dr Chris Bird -- Clinical Biochemistry: "Metabolic Emergencies", Dr Nishan Guha -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Emergency Medicine: "PEM – the catchers in the rye", Dr Moya Dawson and Dr Chris Bird -- Clinical Biochemistry: "Metabolic Emergencies", Dr Nishan Guha -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 9 Mar 2017 from 15:30 to 17:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Room 3, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

Market structure, patient choice and hospital quality for elective patients

Giuseppe Moscelli

We examine the change in the effect of market structure on hospital quality for elective procedures (hip and knee replacements, and coronary artery bypass grafts) following the 2006 loosening of restrictions on patient choice of hospital in England. We allow for time-varying endogeneity due to the... Read more

We examine the change in the effect of market structure on hospital quality for elective procedures (hip and knee replacements, and coronary artery bypass grafts) following the 2006 loosening of restrictions on patient choice of hospital in England. We allow for time-varying endogeneity due to the effect of unobserved patient characteristics on patient choice of hospital using Two Stage Residual Inclusion. We find that the change in the effect of market structure due to the 2006 choice reforms was to reduce quality by increasing the probability of a post-operative emergency readmission for hip and knee replacement patients. There was no effect of the choice reform on hospital quality for coronary bypass patients. We find no evidence of self-selection of patients into hospitals, suggesting that a rich set of patient-level covariates controls for differences in casemix.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Catia Nicodemo

Fri 10 Mar 2017 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

A journey in surgical advanced therapeutic medicinal products: tissue engineered airway trials

Professor Martin Birchall

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 10 Mar 2017 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Analysis of arginine metabolism in AML blasts and T lymphocytes provides insights into tumour immune escape strategies

Andreas Hadjinicolaou

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 10 Mar 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

NDM Seminar Series

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Translating Parkinson's for target discovery: From patient cohorts to genetic models / Understanding endometriosis: genomics meets phenomics

Professor Richard Wade-Martins, Professor Krina Zondervan

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kathryn Smith

Fri 10 Mar 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

* CANCELLED * Guest Speaker - Professor Mark Kearny, Leeds Institute of Cardiovascular & Metabolic Medicine

Professor Mark Kearny

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Mon 13 Mar 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BCG induced trained immunity through epigenetic and metabolic reprogramming

Prof Reinout van Crevel

The Bacille Calmette–Guerin (BCG), the only vaccine against tuberculosis, remains the most commonly used vaccine worldwide. In addition to its effects on mycobacterial diseases, BCG also exerts beneficial non-specific effects ranging from protection against non-mycobacterial diseases, decreased... Read more

The Bacille Calmette–Guerin (BCG), the only vaccine against tuberculosis, remains the most commonly used vaccine worldwide. In addition to its effects on mycobacterial diseases, BCG also exerts beneficial non-specific effects ranging from protection against non-mycobacterial diseases, decreased incidence of allergic diseases, and treatment of certain malignancies. This is thought to be caused by potentiation of innate immune responses through epigenetic mechanisms, a process termed ‘trained immunity’. The process of trained immunity may also account for BCG-associated resistance to infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis tuberculosis (also termed ‘early clearance’), and this could have important consequences for our quest for improving tuberculosis vaccination strategies. BCG-induced trained immunity results in an increased in-vitro responsiveness of monocytes and macrophages, with effector functions such as cytokine production and reactive oxygen species release being increased upon secondary stimulation with non-related pathogens. The change in inflammatory profile and the underlying epigenetic changes are dependent on changes in cellular metabolism, and these metabolic changes are also epigenetically mediated, hence showing a complex interaction between immunometabolic pathways and epigenetic modifications in trained immunity.

Audience: Public

Please contact lisbeth.soederberg@ndm.ox.ac.uk to set up a meeting with the speaker.

Mon 13 Mar 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

STAT Transcription Factors in the Pathogenesis and Treatment of Cancer

David A. Frank, MD, PhD

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eric O'Neill

Mon 13 Mar 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Making Muscle Mighty

Prof Mark Lewis

“Mark is a molecular cell biologist and his research interests are in the basic sciences of musculoskeletal regeneration and repair. Skeletal muscle (SkM) represents the major focus of activities although the group also works with the tissues that SkM interfaces with - that is bone, tendon,... Read more

“Mark is a molecular cell biologist and his research interests are in the basic sciences of musculoskeletal regeneration and repair. Skeletal muscle (SkM) represents the major focus of activities although the group also works with the tissues that SkM interfaces with - that is bone, tendon, neural systems. The research takes a primarily in vitro approach to this and has, over the years, moved from conventional 2D (cells grown on planar plastic) culture to 3D cultures. In order to develop these bioengineered systems, the research has been heavily involved in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine since its beginnings in the early 2000s (the majority of the work is in the MSK area with some interests in other systems). 3D skeletal muscle constructs provide a test bed for physiological and pathophysiological experimentation in a controlled environment whilst better recapitulating native skeletal muscle architecture than conventional in vitro culture techniques; the constructs can be mechanically and electrically stimulated as well as co-cultured with various “interface cells”. I shall discuss the background to this work and how it is being used in a variety of contexts including to study pathogenic mechanisms and potential treatments for muscle atrophy associated with osteoarthritis.”

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 13 Mar 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Identification of a novel DNA replication protein mutated in microcephalic primordial dwarfism

Professor Grant Steward

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Mon 13 Mar 2017 from 14:00 to 15:30

NDM Research Building Seminars

NDM Building, Seminar Room, NDM Research Building, Old Road Campus, Headington OX3 7FZ

Harnessing NK-cell functions for treatments against viruses and cancer

Dr. Amir Horowitz

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Karen Poxon

Dr. Amir Horowitz is based at the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center, The Rockefeller University

Mon 13 Mar 2017 from 14:00 to 15:00

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, WTCHG Rooms A/B, Headington OX3 7BN

Next generation association studies for complex traits: Progress in understanding the genomic landscape of osteoarthritis

Professor Ele Zeggini

Osteoarthritis is a common complex disease with a substantial public health burden. The genetic causes and molecular pathways underpinning disease development remain largely unidentified. In this talk I will highlight recent successes in understanding the aetiopathogenesis of osteoarthritis through... Read more

Osteoarthritis is a common complex disease with a substantial public health burden. The genetic causes and molecular pathways underpinning disease development remain largely unidentified. In this talk I will highlight recent successes in understanding the aetiopathogenesis of osteoarthritis through large scale studies linking electronic health records to genetics research, and promising functional genomics approaches for deciphering the processes that lead to disease development and progression.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Gil McVean

Mon 13 Mar 2017 from 16:30 to 17:30

Dopamine Club

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Dopamine neurons: morphology, connections, functional properties and susceptibility in Parkinson's disease

Professor Paul Bolam

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Katie Jennings

Tue 14 Mar 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

TBA

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Penny Berry

Tue 14 Mar 2017 from 14:00 to 15:00

WTCHG Spotlight Series

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Spotlight on INSTRUCT Structural Biology Hub

TBC

TBC

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Catherine Green

Wed 15 Mar 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, Post Grad Centre Level 3, Headington OX3 9DU

Human Focus Group: Barnes Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Carolina Arancibia

Wed 15 Mar 2017 from 12:00 to 14:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Room 1, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

Impact case-study workshop

Professor Trish Greenhalgh

With a focus on primary care, this workshop will prepare you on how to prepare a case-study for the next REF. Bring ideas for something to work up during the workshop (this has to be based on work done in primary care at Oxford). A working lunch will be provided - booking essential (please provide... Read more

With a focus on primary care, this workshop will prepare you on how to prepare a case-study for the next REF. Bring ideas for something to work up during the workshop (this has to be based on work done in primary care at Oxford). A working lunch will be provided - booking essential (please provide any dietary requirements). This workshop is aimed at researchers in the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 16 Mar 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Introducing Whole Genome Sequencing into Routine Healthcare: The 100,000 Genomes Project and Beyond

Dr Clare Turnbull

Dr Clare Turnbull is the Clinical Lead for Cancer Genomics for the Genomics England 100,000 Genomes Project. She will speak about this world-leading NHS transformation project through which whole genome sequencing is being introduced into clinical care across the UK for cancer and rare disease. ... Read more

Dr Clare Turnbull is the Clinical Lead for Cancer Genomics for the Genomics England 100,000 Genomes Project. She will speak about this world-leading NHS transformation project through which whole genome sequencing is being introduced into clinical care across the UK for cancer and rare disease. She will focus on some of the challenging aspects of delivering the programme, such as (i) optimising pathology pipelines through routine healthcare for cancer sample collection and preparation (ii) interpretation of germline and tumour genomic data for clinical reporting and (iii) engagement of the UK clinical academic community into the program to optimise patient recruitment and research outputs Clare also leads a research team at Institute of Cancer Research/Queen Mary University of London, undertaking translational studies in cancer genomics and genetic predisposition, with particular focus on the genetic basis of testicular cancer. Having trained as a Clinical Geneticist, her clinical work at Guys Hospital NHS Trust focuses on managing patients and families with genetic susceptibility to cancer.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Thu 16 Mar 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1

Combined Medical-Surgical Grand Round

Professor David Cranston, Professor Constantin Coussios, Professor Gail ter Haar

"Focused ultrasound for non-invasive surgery and drug delivery", Professor Gail ter Haar, Professor David Cranston and Professor Constantin Coussios. Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

"Focused ultrasound for non-invasive surgery and drug delivery", Professor Gail ter Haar, Professor David Cranston and Professor Constantin Coussios. Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Thu 16 Mar 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI Basement seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Protein Folding Machines- Molecular Machines for Complex Problems

Kelly Knee

Bio: Kelly Knee received her BA in molecular biology and materials science from Alfred University in New York State, where she studied the properties of bioactive glasses on bone growth. She received her PhD in molecular biophysics from Wesleyan University in Connecticut. Her thesis work with... Read more

Bio: Kelly Knee received her BA in molecular biology and materials science from Alfred University in New York State, where she studied the properties of bioactive glasses on bone growth. She received her PhD in molecular biophysics from Wesleyan University in Connecticut. Her thesis work with Professor Ishita Mukerji used UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy to understand the molecular assembly of sickle cell hemoglobin polymers, as well as the DNA A to B transition. From Wesleyan she joined the lab of Jonathan King at MIT as a postdoctoral fellow. Her work in the King lab centered around understanding the structure and function of the protein folding machine TRiC/CCT and it’s homologs. That work was conducted as part of the Center for Protein Folding Machinery, an NIH funded center for translational medicine, which brought together a number of basic and translational scientists in order to better understand the role of protein chaperones in human diseases, including cataracts, Alzheimer’s disease, and Huntington’s disease. Kelly is currently a principal scientist in the Pfizer Rare Disease Research Unit in Cambridge MA. Her work in the RDRU is focused mainly on Sickle Cell Disease, hematological disorders, and aggregation diseases.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Fri 17 Mar 2017 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Innate activation of gut-homing T cells

Tianqi Leng

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Mon 20 Mar 2017 from 09:15 to 17:15

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Medical Sciences Teaching Centre, off South Parks Road OX1 3PL

OPDC Research Day

Prof. Dr. Birgit Liss, Professor Masud Husain, Professor Richard Wade-Martins, Dr Thomas Barber, Siddharth Arora, Johannes Klein, Dr George Tofaris, Dr Laura Parkkinen, Dr Jimena Monzon Sandoval, Dr Dayne Beccano-Kelly, Dr Brent Ryan, Dr Natalie Connor-Robson, Dr Paul Dodson, Dr Sarah Threlfell

The OPDC Research Day is a one-day event with research talks from world leading Parkinson’s researchers on topics including clinical studies, imaging, genetics, proteomics, neuronal cells and animal models. The 2017 OPDC Research Day will be held in the Medical Sciences Teaching Centre, Oxford.... Read more

The OPDC Research Day is a one-day event with research talks from world leading Parkinson’s researchers on topics including clinical studies, imaging, genetics, proteomics, neuronal cells and animal models. The 2017 OPDC Research Day will be held in the Medical Sciences Teaching Centre, Oxford. The day will start at 9am with a programme of talks and poster sessions on Parkinson's research. This will be followed by a drinks reception from 5-7pm. Registration is free. This one-day event will include research talks by national and international keynote speakers and Oxford researchers on a range of Parkinson’s work including clinical studies, imaging, genetics, proteomics, neuronal cell culture and animal models. Abstract Submission closes Friday February 17th 2017

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Abstract Submission closes Friday February 17th 2017

Mon 20 Mar 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

Bouncers of the chromatin: Ubiquitin and SUMO tell when it is time to leave

Professor Nico Dantuma

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eric O'Neill

Mon 20 Mar 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Molecular mechanisms of the TGFß signalling pathway in human stem cell fate choice, tissue formation and disease

Dr Siim Pauklin

My work as a postdoctoral research associate includes both scientific research as well as mentoring and teaching. My scientific studies focus on transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms that govern cell fate choice of human pluripotent stem cells and tissue formation via the TGFß/Nodal-Smad2/3... Read more

My work as a postdoctoral research associate includes both scientific research as well as mentoring and teaching. My scientific studies focus on transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms that govern cell fate choice of human pluripotent stem cells and tissue formation via the TGFß/Nodal-Smad2/3 signalling pathway. I provide research supervision to my younger colleagues and I am on the Editorial board of an international journal for stem cell research. My teaching responsibilities include presenting university lectures to PhD students on stem cells, tumorigenesis and cancer stem cells.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Tue 21 Mar 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Health Economics Seminars

Title TBC

Dr Shona Fielding

Audience: Public

Organisers: HERC

Tue 21 Mar 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Dissecting the Circuits and Algorithms That Process Visual Motion

Thomas R. Clandinin

Peripheral visual circuits perform paradigmatic computations such as motion processing. However, our understanding of the necessary and sufficient roles of individual cell types, their interactions, and the molecules that underpin their specific activity patterns remains limited. Our work combines... Read more

Peripheral visual circuits perform paradigmatic computations such as motion processing. However, our understanding of the necessary and sufficient roles of individual cell types, their interactions, and the molecules that underpin their specific activity patterns remains limited. Our work combines genetic manipulations of both neural activity and molecular function with in vivo imaging of calcium and voltage signals to unravel circuit mechanisms using the Drosophila visual system as a model. Our results reveal that the algorithms used to detect visual motion in flies and humans are fundamentally similar.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Wed 22 Mar 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Conference Room, Headington OX3 9DS

LMO2 protein complexes driving haematopoietic cell fate and leukaemogenesis

Dr Trang Hoang

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 22 Mar 2017 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

Osler House, Wing Tat Lee Seminar room, Osler Road OX3 9BL

Goldilocks & 3 Tales of the Immune System

Professor Sophie Hambleton

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 23 Mar 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Thu 23 Mar 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room (please note, not ORCRB), Headington OX3 7FZ

Adipocytes in the melanoma microenvironment – insights from zebrafish models of cancer

Professor Richard White

Zebrafish models of cancer have emerged as powerful tools to image cancer progression and metastasis. When coupled with the robust genetic tools available in the model, it is an ideal system to dissect the in vivo interactions between tumor cells and their surrounding microenvironment. In a screen... Read more

Zebrafish models of cancer have emerged as powerful tools to image cancer progression and metastasis. When coupled with the robust genetic tools available in the model, it is an ideal system to dissect the in vivo interactions between tumor cells and their surrounding microenvironment. In a screen for stromal factors supporting melanoma outgrowth, we have identified signals from the surrounding adipocytes as being major drivers of melanoma progression. The seminar will discuss the nature of the melanoma-adipocyte interactions including novel ways of interrupting this cross-talk.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Thu 23 Mar 2017 from 11:15 to 12:15

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Conference Room, Headington OX3 9DS

"A common functional role of SCL and LYL1 in red cell and platelet production”

Prof David Curtis

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Thu 23 Mar 2017 from 13:30 to 14:30

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Understanding the myeloma microenvironment

Irene M. Ghobrial, MD

Dr. Ghobrial received her MD in 1995 from Cairo University School of Medicine, Egypt. She completed her Internal Medicine training at Wayne State University, Mich., and her Hematology/Oncology subspecialty training at Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Minn. She joined Dana-Farber in the field of... Read more

Dr. Ghobrial received her MD in 1995 from Cairo University School of Medicine, Egypt. She completed her Internal Medicine training at Wayne State University, Mich., and her Hematology/Oncology subspecialty training at Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Minn. She joined Dana-Farber in the field of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia and multiple myeloma in 2005. She is conducting research in the area of homing and migration of B cells and novel therapeutic agents in Waldenstrom's macroglbulinemia and multiple myeloma.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Fri 24 Mar 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement meeting room, NDM Research Building, Headington OX3 7FZ

How Autophagy Defends the Cytosol Against Bacterial Invasion

Professor Felix Randow

Intracellular pathogens inhabit specific cellular niches determined by the degree of compartment-specific immune surveillance and the pathogen's need for host cell activities and nutrients. Most intracellular bacteria dwell in vacuoles while only few have conquered the cytosol, a perhaps... Read more

Intracellular pathogens inhabit specific cellular niches determined by the degree of compartment-specific immune surveillance and the pathogen's need for host cell activities and nutrients. Most intracellular bacteria dwell in vacuoles while only few have conquered the cytosol, a perhaps counterintuitive situation considering the abundant energy sources available in the cytosol for bacterial growth. Potent cytosolic defense mechanisms must therefore exist. I will discuss the role of cell-autonomous immunity in defending the cytosol from bacterial invasion, in particular how 'eat-me' signals including galectins and ubiquitin become associated with cytosol-invading bacteria, how cells transform the bacterial surface into an anti-bacterial and pro-inflammatory signaling platform, and how cargo-selecting autophagy receptors target cytosolic bacteria for destruction by autophagy.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Mon 27 Mar 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

The p53 family in cancer biology

Professor Gerry Melino

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eric O'Neill

Mon 27 Mar 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Long-range training of mononuclear phagocytes following infection and injury

Dr. John R. Grainger

Dr. Grainger undertook his MRes and PhD at the University of Edinburgh on the Wellcome Trust funded Molecular Basis of Disease programme. The focus of his PhD work was exploring mechanisms used by gastrointestinal worms to modulate the host's adaptive immune system in order to improve their own... Read more

Dr. Grainger undertook his MRes and PhD at the University of Edinburgh on the Wellcome Trust funded Molecular Basis of Disease programme. The focus of his PhD work was exploring mechanisms used by gastrointestinal worms to modulate the host's adaptive immune system in order to improve their own survival. As part of these studies he identified a novel mechanism by which helminths secrete TGF-β homologues to suppress the inflammatory response. After his PhD John moved in 2009 as a visiting research fellow to the Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), USA, where he developed an interest in novel functions of innate immune cells during mucosal infection. In 2014 he returned to the UK to the Manchester Collaborative Centre for Inflammation Research (MCCIR) and was awarded a Wellcome Trust and Royal Society funded Sir Henry Dale fellowship to establish his own group. His group’s recent studies have predominantly focused on understanding the mechanisms responsible for training monocytes and macrophages in response to gastrointestinal parasite challenge; with the ultimate goal of identifying novel pathways that can be manipulated to improve patient outcomes in inflammatory diseases, such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD).

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 27 Mar 2017 from 14:00 to 15:00

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, WTCHG Seminar Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

Julia for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology

Dr Ben Ward

The 2 language problem describes a situation in which a software developer may prototype or write software in one of the many high­level programming languages (Python, R, Perl, Ruby, Matlab), but must re­write parts of the program in a lower level language (e.g. C) to achieve performance. Such... Read more

The 2 language problem describes a situation in which a software developer may prototype or write software in one of the many high­level programming languages (Python, R, Perl, Ruby, Matlab), but must re­write parts of the program in a lower level language (e.g. C) to achieve performance. Such lower level languages are considered more difficult, and more time consuming to develop with. The two language problem hinders science and scientists in several ways including longer development and testing times for biologists and this creates resistance to developing and maintaining high­quality professional software. The modern julia language for technical computing can solve this problem for scientists as it is a dynamic and high level language with the ease of use of Python, but the performance of C. Critically, a scientist needs to only write in the one language to create a piece of software that is performant yet easier to create, understand, and modify. This is possible due to the combination of its features and design: by combining a type system, type inference, multiple dispatch of methods, and a JIT compiler, the generation of compiled, highly­typed and specialized code, can be achieved whilst programming in a high level and dynamic style. BioJulia was set up to create a community for life scientists wanting to use the language for Biological work. The package Bio.jl provides core bioinformatics infrastructure with data types and methods essential for the majority of typical bioinformatic tasks (including sequence manipulation and alignment, phylogenetics, and protein structure manipulation). The community is committed to providing a friendly environment for biologists getting to grips with coding and development, and is committed to good and open software carpentry practices.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Gil McVean

Mon 27 Mar 2017 from 18:00 to 20:00

Centre for Personalised Medicine Seminars

St Anne's College, Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, Woodstock Road OX2 6HS

Talks from Professor Taka-Aki Sato & Professor Yasuhiro Yasutomi

Professor Taka-Aki Sato, Professor Yasuhiro Yasutomi

Leading-Edge Applications of Mass Spectrometry in Drug Discovery and Diagnosis Professor Taka-Aki Sato, Director of the R&D Center for Precision Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Japan Driven by the development of high-end mass spectrometers, proteome & metabolome analysis are currently expanding... Read more

Leading-Edge Applications of Mass Spectrometry in Drug Discovery and Diagnosis Professor Taka-Aki Sato, Director of the R&D Center for Precision Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Japan Driven by the development of high-end mass spectrometers, proteome & metabolome analysis are currently expanding to single-cell imaging and characterization of heterogeneity in post-translational modification. The main topics of this seminar include: (1) visualization of molecular abundance in biological specimens by mass spectrometry imaging (MSI); (2) high-sensitivity detection of diagnostic markers by Immuno-Beads MS technology; and (3) a brief introduction to the development of next-generation mass spectrometry system for contribution in drug discovery and diagnosis field. Nonhuman Primates Resource for Medical Science in Tsukuba Primate Research Center, Japan Professor Yasuhiro Yasutomi, Director of Tsukuba Primate Research Center (TPRC), National Institutes of Biomedical Innovation, Health and Nutrition (NIBIOHN) and Department of Immunoregulation, Graduate School of Medicine, Mie University, Japan Nonhuman primates (NHP) are critical resources for biomedical research. Cynomolgus monkeys are one of the key nonhuman primate models that share nearly all characteristics with humans.  Tsukuba Primate Research Center (TPRC) in National Institutes of Biomedical innovation, Health and Nutrition (NIBIOHN) Japan has a large-scale breeding colony of experimental monkeys (approximately 1,6000 monkeys), which play a significant role in the development of pharmaceutical products and medical technologies. The center is the forefront facility in Japan that both supplies laboratory-bred monkeys, mainly cynomolgus monkeys, and performs medical research. Cynomolgus monkeys have been maintained in indoor facilities as closed colony monkeys in TPRC since 1978. In addition to quality control, supply, research resource development, and basic technology development involving the experimental monkeys, evaluation of state-of-the-art medical technology, evaluation of the efficacy of new drugs and safety assessments are also performed using the monkeys. TPRC proactively to develop model animals for these diseases by artificial manipulation such as infectious disease. Moreover, some spontaneous diseases have been found during such health examinations, and the familial progress of diseases such as macular degeneration, dilated cardiomyopathy, endometriosis, senile plaque formation, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes has been confirmed. Since cynomolgus monkeys have a long life span and can be used for longevity studies such as those focused on Alzheimer disease using aged animals that are more than 20 years old, which correspond to ≥60 years of age in humans. I will introduce TPRC for new proposal of NHP study in medical science field.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Catherine Lidbetter

Special Lectures to students / CPM members and the general biomedical community in Oxford by high-profile visitors from Japan Monday 27 March 18:00 – 20:00, Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, St Anne’s College, Oxford. Refreshments will be served after the lectures. This event is free and no sign-up is needed. http://www.well.ox.ac.uk/cpm/talks-from-professor-taka-aki-sato-and-professor-yasuhiro-yasutomi

Tue 28 Mar 2017 from 10:00 to 11:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Propensity score: help or hype?

Professor Tobias Kurth

Propensity scoring provides a useful way to analyze observational study data and are a necessary component of an epidemiologist’s methodological toolbox. This presentation will discuss how the propensity score can be derived and review their many applications, such as matching, adjustment, and... Read more

Propensity scoring provides a useful way to analyze observational study data and are a necessary component of an epidemiologist’s methodological toolbox. This presentation will discuss how the propensity score can be derived and review their many applications, such as matching, adjustment, and weighting. A clinical example will be used to discuss how propensity score analyses compare to other methods to control for confounding and scenarios in which propensity scores are particularly suitable (and others in which they are not). Tobias Kurth is a professor of public health and epidemiology and the director of the Institute of Public Health at the Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany. He is also the co-director of the Centre Virchow-Villermé for Public Health Paris - Berlin. He received his MD degree at the University of Tübingen, Germany, training in neurology at the University Hospital of Essen, Germany, and a doctorate in epidemiology from the Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health. He previously worked as a research director of the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Inserm) in Paris and Bordeaux. His areas of research interests and expertise are in neuroepidemiology, cardiovascular epidemiology, pharmacoepidemiology, and research methodology. He joined The BMJ in 2009 as editorial adviser and has served as consulting clinical epidemiology editor since 2010

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Catia Nicodemo

Tue 28 Mar 2017 from 11:00 to 12:30

New Richards Building, Teaching Room, New Richards Building, Old Road Campus , Old Road Campus OX3 7LG

Relational Autonomy and the Promotion of Decisional Capacity in Individuals with Impairments

Dr Camilla Kong

With recent legal developments in England and Wales and human rights conventions, there has been increased debate about concept of mental capacity to determine whether individuals with impairments can make decisions about their care and treatment. My book defends a concept of mental capacity, but... Read more

With recent legal developments in England and Wales and human rights conventions, there has been increased debate about concept of mental capacity to determine whether individuals with impairments can make decisions about their care and treatment. My book defends a concept of mental capacity, but challenges the individualistic focus it currently has in medico-juridical practice and theoretical literature. The book defends a relational concept of mental capacity and suggests that assessments of capacity must consider how relationships can enable or disable the decision-making abilities of individuals with impairments. By exploring key concepts, such as rights, autonomy, and rationality, which underlie mental capacity, the book suggests that there needs to be an ethical reorientation of mental capacity, towards the examination of the how primary relationships as well as capacity assessments themselves must display key competencies in order to ensure that autonomy skills are promoted and encouraged, as well as to better situate, interpret, and understand the choices and actions of individuals with impairments. My presentation will present the argument in one of the chapters, where I reconceive the account of autonomy that is operationalised within the concept of mental capacity. Legal appeals to autonomy in mental capacity law are characterised by imprecision, where the experiences of individuals with impairments are neglected. The argument pushes against the philosophical tendency to treat individuals with impairments as ‘contrast’ cases, as well as challenges the strong individualism within contemporary accounts of autonomy. Instead, the chapter seeks to establish a ‘shared’ conception of autonomy and proposes a relational account that revolves around two conditions: perceptual and autonomy competencies. The phenomenology of absorbed coping draws attention to how impairment can affect one’s perceptual engagement with the world, whilst a relational account of autonomy competencies take into consideration the socially-acquired nature of one’s self-understanding and self-reflection. This chapter further provides interpersonal and intrapersonal indicators of autonomy-enabling relationships.

Audience: Members of the University only

Please note: If you are not a member of the Ethox Team and are planning on coming, please can you email me to let me know.

Tue 28 Mar 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Computational approaches to gene expression and regulation in blood cells and cancer

Professor David Westhead

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 29 Mar 2017 from 10:30 to 12:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Room 1, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

Seminar and mini practical on health apps: a proposed comprehensive framework to guide clinical risk assessment and promote safer use

Michelle Van Velthoven

This will be a seminar and mini practical. In the seminar, I’ll introduce our work on a proposed framework to guide clinical risk assessment of health apps (see abstract below).This will be followed by a mini practical in which you will get the opportunity to test the framework on a health app of... Read more

This will be a seminar and mini practical. In the seminar, I’ll introduce our work on a proposed framework to guide clinical risk assessment of health apps (see abstract below).This will be followed by a mini practical in which you will get the opportunity to test the framework on a health app of your choice and provide feedback. You are welcome to work together with others. It would be helpful if you could identify and/or download a health app onto your smartphone or tablet before the mini practical. Abstract Aim: Globally, health systems are struggling with reliably appraising the safety and efficacy of rapidly changing digital health interventions whilst allowing useful innovations to be rapidly adopted. Assessment and regulation of the large number of health apps should be proportional to their clinical risk, but there is large uncertainty about suitable criteria to assess risk. We aimed to identify criteria for assessing clinical risks associated with different types of health apps. Methods: Our work builds on previous studies that identified some of the risks that health apps can pose and contextual factors that can mediate these risks. This work is grounded in a review of existing literature; consultation with stakeholders; and participation in multiagency policy discussion. We combined different risk domains for apps (technical safety, usability, intervention quality, and engagement) with their functions (learning, behaviour and cognition change, communication, record keeping, and clinical decision support). Results: We developed a comprehensive generic risk framework that app users, developers, commissioners, regulators and other stakeholders worldwide can use to guide assessment of the likely risks posed by a specified health app in a specific context. We also propose questions that should help determine whether these risks have been addressed. Conclusions: Apps are very promising in healthcare but are very numerous, complex, rapidly evolving and with overlapping functions. A rigorous risk framework should help stakeholders to deal with the large quantity of health apps, classify and manage clinical risks, and improve patient safety by applying generic risk assessment criteria. Further work is needed to test and develop the criteria we propose, especially as apps that integrate different functions are emerging, which will make risk assessment more complex.  Bio Michelle van Velthoven • Postdoctoral researcher in digital health, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford • Associate editor, DIGITAL HEALTH (SAGE journal) • Honorary research fellow, Global eHealth Unit, Imperial College London I am a health services researcher in the digital health group and work with Professor John Powell. My research interests are mobile health, Health Technology Assessment (HTA), primary care, and global health. Currently, I am researching whether and how health apps can be assessed and appraised. Also, I am working on projects that explore online patient ratings and experiences to improve health services and an online intervention to reduce anxiety. My background is an undergraduate degree in Biomedical Sciences and MSc in HTA and International Health, both from Radboud University Nijmegen in the Netherlands. I received my PhD from Imperial College London in 2014, which explored mHealth-based collection of information relevant to childhood diarrhoea and pneumonia in rural China.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Chrysanthi Papoutsi

Thu 30 Mar 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement meeting room, NDM Building (please note: not ORCRB), Headington OX3 7FZ

Thu 30 Mar 2017 from 14:00 to 15:00

WTCHG Spotlight Series

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Spotlight on Endometriosis

TBC

TBC

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Catherine Green

Fri 31 Mar 2017 from 14:15 to 15:15

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

"INSIGHTS INTO LIGAND RECOGNITION AND DESENSITIZATION FROM THE X-RAY STRUCTURE OF A NICOTINIC RECEPTOR"

Asst. Prof Ryan Hibbs

Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are ligand gated ion channels that mediate fast chemical neurotransmission at the neuromuscular junction and play diverse signaling roles in the central nervous system. The vast majority of these and other pentameric receptors in the superfamily assemble as... Read more

Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are ligand gated ion channels that mediate fast chemical neurotransmission at the neuromuscular junction and play diverse signaling roles in the central nervous system. The vast majority of these and other pentameric receptors in the superfamily assemble as obligate heteromers. Here I will present methods we developed for expression and biochemical characterization of heteromeric ion channels and present the first X-ray crystal structure of a nicotinic receptor. The alpha4beta2 nicotinic receptor that we characterized structurally is the most abundant receptor subtype in the brain, is the principal target in nicotine addiction and its dysfunction is associated with familial epilepsy. The structure of the receptor in complex with the agonist nicotine reveals principles of ligand selectivity among different classes of subunit interfaces in the heteropentameric assembly. The receptor is stabilized by nicotine in what we suggest is a non-conducting, desensitized conformation. The constriction point in the permeation pathway is formed at the selectivity filter, located at the cytosolic end of the pore. The desensitized state of this channel provides a distinct structural reference point in the allosteric gating cycle of the larger Cys-loop receptor superfamily.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa