Other Seminars

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Mon 3 Jul 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Visualising Pattern Recognition Receptor Signalling

Prof Clare Bryant

Clare Bryant is Professor of Innate Immunity at the Department of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Cambridge. Her research focusses on using multidisciplinary approaches to determine the molecular mechanisms by which Pattern Recognition Receptors (PRRs) signal. She used super resolution... Read more

Clare Bryant is Professor of Innate Immunity at the Department of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Cambridge. Her research focusses on using multidisciplinary approaches to determine the molecular mechanisms by which Pattern Recognition Receptors (PRRs) signal. She used super resolution microscopy to visualise formation of the inflammasome and the spatial orientation of its endogenous constituents. She is using single molecular florescent techniques to determine how Toll-like receptors signal in response to bacterial and endogenous ligands. She also uses more conventional experimental approaches to determine how PRRs influence the host immune response to Salmonella infection in vitro and in vivo.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Tue 4 Jul 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Personalising treatment of inflammatory autoimmune arthritis: immune regulation and the microbiome

Professor Ranjeny Thomas

Professor Thomas is a graduate of the University of Western Australia. She received her MBBS in 1984, and then trained in Perth as a rheumatologist. She commenced a research fellowship with Peter Lipsky at Southwestern Medical Center, University of Texas in 1990, where she first identified and... Read more

Professor Thomas is a graduate of the University of Western Australia. She received her MBBS in 1984, and then trained in Perth as a rheumatologist. She commenced a research fellowship with Peter Lipsky at Southwestern Medical Center, University of Texas in 1990, where she first identified and characterised human circulating dendritic cell precursors. She is now Professor of Rheumatology at University of Queensland, Translational Research Institute, consultant rheumatologist at Princess Alexandra Hospital and fellow of the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences. Her research is focussed on the study of autoimmune disease and restoration of tolerance. Through this work, she developed and tested the first rheumatoid arthritis vaccine. She has also contributed major insights into the pathogenesis of spondyloarthropathy and autoimmune diabetes, leading to the development of disease biomarkers and therapeutic strategies. Ranjeny is founder and a director of the spin-off company, Dendright, which is developing vaccines to suppress autoimmune diseases.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Tue 4 Jul 2017 from 14:30 to 15:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Radcliffe Primary Care, Room 2, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Evaluation of Closing the Gap the major initiative to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health

Professor Margaret Kelaher

In 2008, there was a formal apology to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of Australia for the suffering caused by dispossession and forced removal of children. This was followed by the announcement of the “Closing the Gap” program which included a commitment to closing the life... Read more

In 2008, there was a formal apology to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of Australia for the suffering caused by dispossession and forced removal of children. This was followed by the announcement of the “Closing the Gap” program which included a commitment to closing the life expectancy gap between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and other Australians within a generation and halving the mortality gap for children under five within a decade. These initiatives collectively represented over $2 billion dollar (AUD) investment. Nearly 10 years, on while significant progress has been made the program is not on target to achieve mortality reductions. In this presentation Margaret Kelaher will discuss the evaluation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people's engagement in the governance and design of the program as well as the achievements of "Closing the Gap" itself . The presentation will highlight the strengths and weaknesses of different evaluative approaches in understanding the program. It will highlight ways in which the "Closing the Gap" could be strengthened to achieve greater health equity.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Trish Greenhalgh

Thu 6 Jul 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

NON-KINASE TARGETS OF PROTEIN KINASE INHIBITORS

Associate Professor Lenka Munoz

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eric O'Neill

Thu 6 Jul 2017 from 16:30 to 17:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, GPEC Level 3 Seminar Room 2B, Headington OX3 9DU

Innate activation of gut-homing T cells

Tianqi Leng

Audience: Public

Organisers: Dr Holm Uhlig

Fri 7 Jul 2017 from 15:00 to 16:00

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Using NKT Cell Antigens as Vaccine Adjuvants

Professor Ian Hermans

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Mon 10 Jul 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI Basement seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Towards a Comprehensive Structural Understanding of BCR-ABL Tyrosine Kinase Complexes

Prof Oliver Hantschel

Short bio: Oliver Hantschel studied biochemistry at the University of Regensburg and at Rockefeller University in New York City. He received his PhD in 2004 from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg and did postdoctoral work with Giulio Superti-Furga at the Research Center for... Read more

Short bio: Oliver Hantschel studied biochemistry at the University of Regensburg and at Rockefeller University in New York City. He received his PhD in 2004 from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg and did postdoctoral work with Giulio Superti-Furga at the Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna. Since 2011, he is a Tenure-track Assistant Professor at the EPFL School of Life Sciences and was awarded the first 'ISREC Foundation Chair in Translational Oncology'.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Mon 10 Jul 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Building tools and a common infrastructure for endotype discovery and response stratification in Immune-Inflammatory diseases

Michael R Barnes, PhD

The immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMID) are a range of disorders that generally develop in genetically susceptible individuals, with an autoimmune pathogenic mechanism. The term IMID encompasses a range of ostensibly unrelated conditions, with a collective population incidence of 5-7%,... Read more

The immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMID) are a range of disorders that generally develop in genetically susceptible individuals, with an autoimmune pathogenic mechanism. The term IMID encompasses a range of ostensibly unrelated conditions, with a collective population incidence of 5-7%, that share overlapping inflammatory mechanisms, the commonest of which include rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), psoriasis, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Since the early 1990s, the development of immunomodulatory humanized antibodies, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) inhibitors have revolutionized the treatment of IMIDs. The therapeutic aim in IMID treatment is to gain rapid control of inflammation, prevent tissue damage, improve quality of life and, if possible, achieve long-term disease remission. When successful targeted biologic therapy has been revolutionary in achieving these aims, but biologics are currently prescribed stochastically, through trial and error with low or absent response rates seen in 10-40% of patients depending on the disease and drug used. The heterogeneity of response observed with biologics suggests the existence of differing molecular etiology, so-called “disease endotypes”, phenotypically presenting as the same disease, but betraying differing underlying mechanism with differential drug response. Multi-Omic analysis, including RNA sequencing holds considerable promise for mechanistic insight into the personalisation of therapies for IMIDS, such as Psoriasis and Rheumatoid Arthritis. Tools and a TranSMART data warehouse framework are described, enabling multi-omic analysis in longitudinal transcriptome samples collected from Psoriasis and RA patients undergoing biologic treatment. Exploratory analysis of RNA-seq data identifies many differentially expressed genes which collectively highlight biological pathways or “endotypes” which offer potential new insights into the stratification of biologic therapies in IMIDs. We show evidence that the concept of both disease endotype and drug endotype can be used to predict therapeutic response and inform patient stratification.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 10 Jul 2017 from 15:00 to 16:00

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

DEEP LEARNING: OPPORTUNITIES, CHALLENGES, AND APPLICATIONS IN LIFE SCIENCES

Dr Ulrich Bodenhofer

Deep Learning is a collective term comprising applications of artificial neural networks (ANNs) with many layers to complex tasks by learning from data. The current surge of interest in Deep Learning has only become possible by the availability of (1) new techniques for training multi-layered ANNs,... Read more

Deep Learning is a collective term comprising applications of artificial neural networks (ANNs) with many layers to complex tasks by learning from data. The current surge of interest in Deep Learning has only become possible by the availability of (1) new techniques for training multi-layered ANNs, (2) large corpora of training data, and (3) relatively cheap high-performance computing (graphical processing units; GPUs). After a short introduction to the necessary machine learning basics, this seminar talk gives an overview of deep learning. We will highlight current successes in a variety of application fields, open issues, and potential future directions. Special emphasis will be given to recent applications in the life science domain.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Gerton Lunter

Tue 11 Jul 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

MHU Student Presentations

Christopher Booth; Alba Rodriguez Meira, Caroline Harrold

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 12 Jul 2017 from 10:30 to 11:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

A new approach for single cell whole genome amplification

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Butler

Thu 13 Jul 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Addressing the needs of family carers at the end of life: the New Zealand experience

Professor Merryn Gott

This presentation will describe a research programme exploring the experiences and support needs of families and whānau who provide care for people with a life limiting illness (whānau is a Māori term for extended family). Preliminary findings will be presented from a study investigating the end... Read more

This presentation will describe a research programme exploring the experiences and support needs of families and whānau who provide care for people with a life limiting illness (whānau is a Māori term for extended family). Preliminary findings will be presented from a study investigating the end of life circumstances of Māori and non-Māori dying in advanced age, which was undertaken within a public health framework and with a particular focus on the work undertaken by family and whānau carers. Resources developed in collaboration with carers in related research will also be presented, including a music video made with Pacific Island family caregivers; digital stories made by Māori whānau caregivers; and a practical guide to caring written by an 'ex-palliative home carer'. Transferable lessons for working with other communities of carers will also be considered. The talk will be of interest to all those working or researching palliative and end of life care, as well as those who are interested in using digital media in their research and involving patients (PPI) in research projects. Professor Merryn Gott, The University of Auckland Merryn Gott has been conducting research with older people for over 20 years and has a particular interest in developing models of palliative and end of life care to meet the needs of ageing populations. Her research programme has been supported by substantial grants from the HRC, UK Department of Health, Research Councils and Health Charities. She has published over 180 papers in peer reviewed journals, as well as a number of books, including International Perspectives on Palliative and End of Life Care for Older People, published by Oxford University Press. http://goo.gl/REg0P4. She is a Visiting Professor at the School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Sheffield and sit on the Health Research Council, Public Health Assessing Committee. She has recently completed a five year term as Associate Editor, BMJ Supportive and Palliative Care and is an Editorial Board member for Progress in Palliative Care.

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 13 Jul 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement meeting room, NDM Research Building, Headington OX3 7FZ

Biology of dendritic cells and Macrophages: From development to functions

Florent Ginhoux

Dendritic cells (DCs), monocytes and macrophages play crucial and distinct roles in tissue homeostasis and immunity, but also contribute to a broad spectrum of pathologies and are thus attractive therapeutic targets. Potential intervention strategies aiming at manipulation of these cells will... Read more

Dendritic cells (DCs), monocytes and macrophages play crucial and distinct roles in tissue homeostasis and immunity, but also contribute to a broad spectrum of pathologies and are thus attractive therapeutic targets. Potential intervention strategies aiming at manipulation of these cells will require in-depth insights of their origins and the mechanisms that govern their homeostasis. The focus of Florent Ginhoux's laboratory is to understand the ontogeny of DCs, monocytes and macrophages, their differentiation pathways and how their unique ontogeny dictates their immune functions. Their approach encompasses the integration of high dimensional platforms such as RNAseq, single cell transcriptome analysis using microfluidic RNA sequencing and deep immunophenotypic assessment using state of the art 18 parameters flow cytometry or Cytometry by Time-Of-Flight mass spectrometry (CyTOF). Such high density molecular profiling at the single level and at unprecedented dimensionality and complexity will provide new insights in the biology of DC, monocyte and macrophage cell populations.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Fri 14 Jul 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Characterizing the molecular identity of dormant hematopoietic stem cells

Dr Florian Buettner

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Butler

Fri 14 Jul 2017 from 16:00 to 17:00

Development & Cell Biology Theme Guest Speakers (DPAG)

Le Gros Clark Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off South Parks Road OX1 3QX

One rule to fold them all: The developmental implications of a simple universal model for cortical morphology

Professor Bruno Coelho Cesar Mota

The mammalian cerebral cortex is probably the most complex structure ever studied by science. At first glance, any attempt to model it from first principles, would seem doomed to failure. Morphologically, there seems to be a clear distinction between folded, or gyrified, cortices, on one hand, and... Read more

The mammalian cerebral cortex is probably the most complex structure ever studied by science. At first glance, any attempt to model it from first principles, would seem doomed to failure. Morphologically, there seems to be a clear distinction between folded, or gyrified, cortices, on one hand, and smooth, or lissencephalic, ones on the other. And yet, the fundamental building blocks for the nervous system and its developmental neuro-proliferative program are largely conserved. Furthermore, comparative neuroanatomical studies strongly suggest the existence of a universal scale-invariant mechanism for the folding of the cortex as a whole. In search for such mechanism, we have recently shown that cortical folding in mammals follows a single power-law relation between three morphological variables. This relation in turn is derived from a simple physical model, based on known mechanisms of axonal elongation and the self-avoiding nature of the cortical surface. The model is in excellent agreement with data obtained from the cortices of dozens of diverse mammalian species. All this regularity implies that, in spite of all the apparent morphological and functional diversity, evolution has in fact only a few degrees of freedom with which to shape a cortex in response to the various constraints and adaptive pressures. In fact, a simple model can be shown to predict all major coarse-grained morphological features of the cerebral cortex from variations in only three developmental parameters: the number of symmetric and asymmetric divisions of progenitor cells in early development, and the average volumetric density of neurons. It is thus possible that much of the diversity in cortical morphology occurs simply through a small number of adjustments in the various rates that characterize neuro-proliferation in mammals.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Zoltan Molnar

Mon 17 Jul 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

The Nucleolar Response to Chromosome Breaks

Manuel Stucki PhD, Dept. of Gynecology

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eric O'Neill

Mon 17 Jul 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Anti-TNF Therapy: How Did We Get There and Where To Next?

Professor Sir Ravinder Maini FRS FMedSci

Ravinder Maini, combined laboratory-based immunological translational research with clinical practice in rheumatology throughout his career. He was Director/Head of The Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, at Imperial College, London, from 1990-2002, and since retirement, is Emeritus Professor at... Read more

Ravinder Maini, combined laboratory-based immunological translational research with clinical practice in rheumatology throughout his career. He was Director/Head of The Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, at Imperial College, London, from 1990-2002, and since retirement, is Emeritus Professor at Imperial College, London and a Visiting Professor at Oxford. Maini’s research contributions in the field of rheumatic diseases have focussed on immunological mechanisms of autoimmunity, cytokines and immunotherapy of rheumatoid arthritis. For his research contributions, he has been elected a Fellow of Royal Society, London; Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences; and Foreign Associate Member of the USA Academy of Sciences. He has been awarded honorary Doctorates of the Universities of Glasgow and University Rene Descartes, Paris; Distinguished Investigator Award by the American College of Rheumatology; and Honorary Fellowships of Scientific Societies in the United Kingdom, Europe and Australia. He was honoured by a Knighthood for his contributions to Rheumatology in 2002. His ‘bench to bedside’ research, in collaboration with Marc Feldmann, which commenced in 1985, resulted in the identification of TNF as a therapeutic target, and development of anti-TNF therapy in the late 1990s. Maini and Feldmann have been jointly awarded international prizes including the Crafoord Prize by The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, The Lasker prize for Clinical Research, and The Canada Gairdner International Award.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Wed 19 Jul 2017 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, please note doors are locked at 4pm, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Targeting mitochondrial biogenesis and function in Parkinson’s disease

Michela Deleidi

Dr. Deleidi group’s research aims to identify key molecular pathways in the pathogenesis of sporadic and familial Parkinson's using human neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Michela Deleidi is studying human ageing processes and age-related neurological disorders with a... Read more

Dr. Deleidi group’s research aims to identify key molecular pathways in the pathogenesis of sporadic and familial Parkinson's using human neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Michela Deleidi is studying human ageing processes and age-related neurological disorders with a particular focus on Parkinson's. She wants to employ stem cells from people affected by the condition and investigate how the immune system and mitochondria, the powerhouses of our cells, interact with each other. This should give more information about how inflammation in Parkinson's plays a role in the development of the condition. https://www.dzne.de/standorte/tuebingen/forschergruppen/deleidi.html

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Please note now WEDNESDAY July 19th

Wed 19 Jul 2017 from 16:00 to 17:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Syndecan proteoglycans: gatekeepers of the cell adhesion phenotype

Professor John Couchman

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Thu 20 Jul 2017 from 14:30 to 15:30

Kennedy Institute Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Wimm seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

BRC G-Mi Monthly Seminar

Speakers: Katja Simon 'Autophagy providing free fatty acids for neutrophil differentiation' Julie Schulthess 'Controlling the function of macrophages through bacteria-derived metabolites'

Speakers: Katja Simon 'Autophagy providing free fatty acids for neutrophil differentiation' Julie Schulthess 'Controlling the function of macrophages through bacteria-derived metabolites'

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 21 Jul 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar: Transcriptome Deconvolution of Heterogeneous Tumor Samples with Immune Infiltration

Wenyi Wang

We develop a novel method DeMixT for the gene expression deconvolution of three compartments in cancer patient samples: tumor, immune and surrounding stromal cells. In validation studies using mixed cell line and laser-capture microdissection data, DeMixT yielded accurate estimates for both cell... Read more

We develop a novel method DeMixT for the gene expression deconvolution of three compartments in cancer patient samples: tumor, immune and surrounding stromal cells. In validation studies using mixed cell line and laser-capture microdissection data, DeMixT yielded accurate estimates for both cell proportions and compartment-specific expression profiles. Application to the head and neck cancer data shows DeMixT-based deconvolution provides an important step to link tumor transcriptome data with clinical outcomes.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Fri 21 Jul 2017 from 13:30 to 14:30

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI Basement seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

* CANCELLED * Molecular mechanisms of DNA replication revealed by structural studies

Prof Luca Pellegrini

Short bio info: 1992-1996 PhD at ETH Zurich, with Prof. Tim Richmond The rest is all at the Department of Biochemistry, in Cambridge: 1996-2003 Postdoc with Prof. Tom Blundell 2003-2008 Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow 2008-2014 Senior Lecturer and Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow 2014-2107 Reader in Structural Biology 2017- Professor of Structural Biology

Short bio info: 1992-1996 PhD at ETH Zurich, with Prof. Tim Richmond The rest is all at the Department of Biochemistry, in Cambridge: 1996-2003 Postdoc with Prof. Tom Blundell 2003-2008 Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow 2008-2014 Senior Lecturer and Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow 2014-2107 Reader in Structural Biology 2017- Professor of Structural Biology

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

*This talk has been cancelled - will be rescheduled for after summer*

Wed 26 Jul 2017 from 15:00 to 16:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

Old Road Campus Research Building, Ludwig Seminar Room, Basement ORCRB, Headington OX3 7DQ

On the role of the microbiota as a key modulator of the tumor microenvironment

Dr Romina Goldszmid

Cancer has historically been viewed as a disease determined by genetic and environmental factors, however, it is now clear that inflammation affects all stages of the disease: initiation, progression and metastasis formation. The inflamed tumor microenvironment is in part sustained by infiltrating... Read more

Cancer has historically been viewed as a disease determined by genetic and environmental factors, however, it is now clear that inflammation affects all stages of the disease: initiation, progression and metastasis formation. The inflamed tumor microenvironment is in part sustained by infiltrating mononuclear phagocytes (MPs) [e.g. dendritic cells, monocytes, macrophages] and neutrophils. In cancer, as in infection, MPs can induce adaptive immune responses, but in cancer they mainly promote the tumor’s immune evasion, progression, and metastasis. We, and others, have recently uncovered a role for commensal microbes in controlling the response of subcutaneous tumors to cancer immuno- and chemotherapy. In this presentation, we will discuss the role of the microbiota in regulating the composition and function of the myeloid cell compartment in the tumor microenvironment and the role of these cells in the response to cancer chemotherapy. Targeting MPs represents a powerful approach to manipulate the outcome of immune responses; therefore, a clear understanding of their regulation and functional organization may lead to rational novel cancer immunotherapeutic approaches.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Wed 26 Jul 2017 from 15:30 to 16:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

A loop of cancer-stroma-cancer interaction promotes peritoneal metastasis of ovarian cancer via TNFα-TGFα-EGFR

Dr Joseph Kwong

Peritoneum is the most common site for ovarian cancer metastasis. Here we investigate how cancer epigenetics regulates reciprocal tumour-stromal interactions in peritoneal metastasis of ovarian cancer. Firstly, we find that omental stromal fibroblasts enhance colony formation of metastatic ovarian... Read more

Peritoneum is the most common site for ovarian cancer metastasis. Here we investigate how cancer epigenetics regulates reciprocal tumour-stromal interactions in peritoneal metastasis of ovarian cancer. Firstly, we find that omental stromal fibroblasts enhance colony formation of metastatic ovarian cancer cells, and de novo expression of transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-α) is induced in stromal fibroblasts co-cultured with ovarian cancer cells. We also observed an over-expression of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in ovarian cancer cells, which is regulated by promoter DNA hypomethylation as well as chromatin remodelling. Interestingly, this ovarian cancer-derived TNF-α induces TGF-α transcription in stromal fibroblasts through nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB). We further show that TGF-α secreted by stromal fibroblasts in turn promotes peritoneal metastasis of ovarian cancer through epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling. Finally, we identify a TNFα-TGFα-EGFR interacting loop between tumour and stromal compartments of human omental metastases. Our results therefore demonstrate cancer epigenetics induces a loop of cancer-stroma-cancer interaction in omental microenvironment that promotes peritoneal metastasis of ovarian cancer cells via TNFα-TGFα-EGFR.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Penny Berry

Wed 26 Jul 2017 from 16:00 to 17:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Swine influenza; a potpourri of pork and pathogen

Dr Richard Webby

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Thu 27 Jul 2017 from 10:00 to 11:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Room 1, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

Use and costs of primary care services in relation to body mass index in middle-aged and older women in England: a prospective cohort study

Dr Seamus Kent

Excess weight is associated with several chronic conditions and increased total healthcare costs. However, little is understood about the impact of excess weight on the use and costs of primary healthcare services in the United Kingdom. Using individual participant data from a large cohort of women... Read more

Excess weight is associated with several chronic conditions and increased total healthcare costs. However, little is understood about the impact of excess weight on the use and costs of primary healthcare services in the United Kingdom. Using individual participant data from a large cohort of women aged above 50 years in England (the Million Women Study), linked to routinely collected primary care data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, we describe and quantify the relationships between BMI and the number and costs of primary care consultations, tests, and prescriptions issued. 69,440 women who provided information on height and weight, had a BMI of ≥18.5kg/m2, and had no previous cancer at recruitment, were followed for an average of 6.0 years from April 2006 (recruitment 1996 to 2001). Annual rates and costs of consultations (7.0 items, 99% CI 6.8-7.1; £288, 280-295) and prescription items issued (27.0 items, 26.0-27.9; £227, 216 to 237) were lowest for women with a BMI of 20-22.5kg/m2. Every 2 kg/m2 increase in BMI beyond 20 kg/m2 was associated with 5.2% (4.8-5.6) and 9.9% (9.2-10.6) increase in annual consultation and prescription costs, respectively. Annual rates and costs of tests were similar for women at different BMIs. Among all women aged 55-79 years in England, 11% (£229million/£2.2billion) and 20% (£384million / £1.9billion) of all consultation and prescription costs, respectively, were attributable to overweight and obesity. 27% of the annual prescription costs attributable to overweight and obesity were for diabetes medications, 19% for cardiovascular medications, and 13% for analgesics. These results provide reliable estimates of the primary care costs of excess weight and emphasise the need for investment to reduce the prevalence of obesity and the burden on primary care.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Morrish

Thu 27 Jul 2017 from 14:00 to 17:00

The Hill Expert-in-Residence Programme 2017

Big Data Institute, Old Road Campus, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

The Hill Experts in Residence Digital Health Event

The Hill Expert-in-Residence Programme 2017 Digital health experts will be in Oxford on Thursday 27 July and you have the final opportunity to get world-leading expertise and advice about digital health ideas you may have, or digital health projects you’re currently working on. In order to... Read more

The Hill Expert-in-Residence Programme 2017 Digital health experts will be in Oxford on Thursday 27 July and you have the final opportunity to get world-leading expertise and advice about digital health ideas you may have, or digital health projects you’re currently working on. In order to make the most of what is a limited amount of time during the one-on-one sessions, it’s important to be as clear as possible with your idea and vision. One great way of doing this is to use the Business Model Canvas, which is a free tool to help you visualise and clarify all the main components of a start-up. The University of Oxford’s Entrepreneurship Centre have a short blog post on this topic which includes a link to download a copy of the canvas and we recommend you read it for a short introduction – http://www.eship.ox.ac.uk/business-model-canvas-explained. The following experts will be within 5 minute walk of the John Radcliffe Hospital or one-to-one sessions from 14:00 to 17:00: Stefania Marcoli leads teams in healthcare projects at the world famous frog Design in Milan, Italy. Stefania was involved in designing early Apple products. Dr Neil Bacon is a former nephrologist with a clinical and academic career spanning 18 years. In 1998 he founded the multi-award winning Doctors.net.uk and has also launched iWantGreatCare.org. Dr Alex Pasteur is a partner in F-Prime Capital, a global venture capital firm investing in healthcare and technology, with over $2 trillion in assets under management. David Cole has worked at IBM for over 18 years and now works within IBM’s artificial intelligence arm, Watson. Outside of IBM, David runs Thinking of Oscar, a charity which supports children and their families whilst in hospital care by funding projects and innovation beyond what is supplied by the NHS. Joel Haspel is a Director at GE Healthcare Finnamore, with particular expertise in working within the NHS system, health informatics, management consultancy and whole system change. As part of the University of Oxford Experts in Residence programme run by the Medical Sciences Division, TheHill, Oxford's healthcare ideas and innovation lab situated at the heart of Oxford’s medical, academic, digital and entrepreneurial communities, catalysing a generation of globally impactful healthcare innovation will be running the penultimate Digital Health Experts in Residence It is open to patients, carers, nurses, doctors, healthcare professionals, designers, developers, researchers, business leaders and investors. The final Expert-in-Residence event will be taking place on Thursday 24th August and will be a Pitch Event with the Digital Health Experts as well as local Digital Health key opinion leaders to attend enable people to come forward to pitch their ideas, with a chance to gain feedback, support & mentoring and even financial support towards ideas agreed by the panel. Keep the date in your diary!! There are a limited number of slots, so please register to avoid disappointment. Please register to book a slot with an Expert using this Eventbrite page and email geraldine.murphy@oxfordahsn.org More information on our Experts-in-Residence can be found on The Hill website - http://www.thehill.co/experts-in-residence/ WHEN - Thursday, 27th July 2017 from 14:00 to 17:00 WHERE – Seminar Rooms, The Big Data Institute, University of Oxford, Li Ka Shing Centre for Health Information and Discovery, Old Road Campus, Oxford, OX3 7LF

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: The Hill

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-hill-experts-in-residence-27th-july-2017-tickets-35909623651?aff=es2

Mon 31 Jul 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI Basement seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

NGL – a molecular graphics library for the web

Dr Alex Rose

Interactive visualization and annotation of large macromolecular complexes on the web is becoming a challenging problem as experimental techniques advance at an unprecedented rate. Integrative/Hybrid approaches are increasing being used to determine 3D structures of biological macromolecules by... Read more

Interactive visualization and annotation of large macromolecular complexes on the web is becoming a challenging problem as experimental techniques advance at an unprecedented rate. Integrative/Hybrid approaches are increasing being used to determine 3D structures of biological macromolecules by combining information from X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and cryo-electron microscopy with data from diverse complementary experimental and computational methods. The wealth, size and complexity of available and future structures make scalable visualization and annotation solutions more important than ever. The web can provide easy access to the resulting visualizations for all interested parties, including colleagues, collaborators, reviewers and educators. Herein, we utilize the web-based NGL library to provide 3D visualization of experimental and computational data integrated with general molecular graphics. The NGL library has a versatile API to control every aspect from data loading, processing, rendering and user-interaction. A distinguishing feature of NGL is its scalability to system with a million atoms and more. Further, the library supports many file formats for small molecules, macromolecular structures, molecular dynamics trajectories, maps for crystallographic, microscopy and general purpose volumetric data. Annotations can be loaded from text, json, msgpack or xml files. A wide array of customizable representations is available. Molecular data can be displayed as balls, sticks, cartoons, surfaces and labels or with specialized representations such as hyperballs and ropes. Volumetric data can be rendered as isosurfaces, point clouds or volume slices. Additional file parsers and data representations can be added through a plugin system. The NGL library allows developers to create custom visualization solutions for specialized or novel 3D data derived from bioinformatics calculations and biophysical/biochemical experiments. The resulting interactive visualizations enable spatial understanding and exploratory analyses. Furthermore, these web-based tools simplify data exchange and foster collaborative analysis.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley