Other Seminars

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Wed 6 Jan 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

New Radcliffe House, Room 2, Walton Street OX2 6NW

Narrative research into sexual abuse in the medical profession

Dr Louise Stone

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Wed 6 Jan 2016 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

A Window into Virus-Host Interactions: The Dividend of Phenotypic Screens

Professor Ray Chung

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 8 Jan 2016 from 14:00 to 15:00

Jenner Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar Rooms A/B, Headington OX3 7BN

Systems based approaches to vaccine development

Prof Bali Puledran

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Mon 11 Jan 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

Ubiqutin-dependent responses to DNA damage

Professor Niels Mailand

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eric O'Neill

Mon 11 Jan 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Microbiota-host interaction from the immune system point of view

Prof Maria Rescigno

Maria Rescigno graduated in Biology in 1990 at the University of Milan. From 1991 to 1994 she worked at the University of Cambridge, UK, in the Department of Biochemistry, as a visiting scholar. From 1995 to 1999, she worked at the National Research Council of Milan where she received her PhD in... Read more

Maria Rescigno graduated in Biology in 1990 at the University of Milan. From 1991 to 1994 she worked at the University of Cambridge, UK, in the Department of Biochemistry, as a visiting scholar. From 1995 to 1999, she worked at the National Research Council of Milan where she received her PhD in Pharmacology and toxicology in 1999. From 1999 to 2001 she worked at the University of Milano-Bicocca where she specialized in Applied Biotechnology. Since 2001 she is the director of the Dendritic cell biology and immunotherapy Unit at the Department of Experimental Oncology at the European Institute of oncology. She was the first to show that dendritic cells in the gut actively participate to bacterial uptake. Her major field of interest is the development of new immunotherapy strategies to fight cancer. She authored more than 120 publications in high impact journals including Nature Immunol, Immunity, J. Exp. Med., Science. She was nominated EMBO young investigator in 2007. Since 2008 she is visiting professor at the University of Oslo. In 2011 Maria Rescigno won the Avon prize as ‘Woman symbol of the city of Milan’ and was elected EMBO member. From 2014 she is Associate Professor at the University of Milan.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Tue 12 Jan 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Mechanisms of tumor evasion from NK cell surveillance and potential clinical applications

Michele Ardolino

Natural Killer (NK) cells are a subset of innate lymphocytes that play a major role in the immune response against tumors. During my post-doctoral training, I discovered two mechanisms employed by tumor cells to evade NK cell-mediated immune surveillance. Initially, we found that NK cells... Read more

Natural Killer (NK) cells are a subset of innate lymphocytes that play a major role in the immune response against tumors. During my post-doctoral training, I discovered two mechanisms employed by tumor cells to evade NK cell-mediated immune surveillance. Initially, we found that NK cells infiltrating tumors with low expression of MHC class I molecules became functionally anergic. NK cell anergy was associated with impaired signaling downstream of activating receptors and was reverted by treatment with pro-inflammatory cytokines. Notably, in tumors with anergic NK cells, cytokine treatment had an impressive therapeutic effect resulting in increased mouse survival (Ardolino et al., JCI, 2014). In a second study, we discovered that NK cells in several mouse tumor models expressed the checkpoint inhibitory receptor PD-1. PD-1 inhibited the NK cell response to tumor cells expressing the PD-1 ligand PD-L1. Importantly, mice treated with a PD-1 blocking antibody responded dramatically to the treatment, with the response completely depending on the NK cells (Ardolino et al., manuscript in preparation). As PD-1 is a major target of cancer immunotherapy, this discovery is of the outmost importance and provides new insight on the successful outcome of checkpoint blockade. During the seminar, I will present key data concerning these two studies. In addition, I will briefly overview my plan as an independent investigator, presenting some preliminary data supporting the proposal.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Jo Silva

Wed 13 Jan 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Primary Care, Meeting Room 1, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

‘Illustrating the Person-Based Approach to developing e-health interventions’

Prof Lucy Yardley

Over the past decade, digital media have become an increasingly widely used mode of delivery for health interventions, and this trend is likely to continue. Digital interventions are attractive to providers because of their potential for wide reach at low cost per person, and are valued by users... Read more

Over the past decade, digital media have become an increasingly widely used mode of delivery for health interventions, and this trend is likely to continue. Digital interventions are attractive to providers because of their potential for wide reach at low cost per person, and are valued by users as they can provide convenient, private, instant access to automated, expert and peer support. However, the promise of digital interventions has not yet been realised; often effect sizes are small and the market has already become saturated with untested and unhelpful apps and websites. This talk illustrates how the ‘person-based approach’ to intervention development (which is applicable to digital and non-digital interventions) can produce accessible, engaging and effective health interventions. After describing the approach and explaining how it can be integrated with existing theory- and evidence-based approaches to intervention development, examples of how it has been employed to develop effective interventions will be presented. The development of the POWeR intervention for weight management in primary care and public health will be presented in detail. Brief illustrations will also be provided of the value of the person-based approach in the development of the GRACE/INTRO intervention to change GP antibiotic prescribing behaviour, the Balance Retraining intervention to help primary care patients self-manage dizziness and the PRIMIT intervention to reduce infection transmission through improved hand hygiene.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Morrish

Wed 13 Jan 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Wed 13 Jan 2016 from 14:00 to 15:00

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

Using High Throughput Sequencing To Study Tumour Clonal Populations

Andy Roth

Cancer is an evolutionary process. Mutations in the genomes of cancer cells generate diversity and differential fitness among cells. One implication of this is that most tumours consist of multiple clonal sub-populations of cells. High throughput sequencing (HTS) has emerged as a powerful tool to... Read more

Cancer is an evolutionary process. Mutations in the genomes of cancer cells generate diversity and differential fitness among cells. One implication of this is that most tumours consist of multiple clonal sub-populations of cells. High throughput sequencing (HTS) has emerged as a powerful tool to study cancer genomes. I will present three methods which leverage data from different HTS assays to provide complementary information about the clonal population structure of a tumour. First, I will present a phylogenetic method which uses bulk whole genome sequencing (WGS) data from multiple samples to infer the genotypes of the dominant clones in each sample. Our approach accounts for stochastic under-sampling due to the relatively low coverage (30x-50x) of WGS and allows for point mutation loss due to coincident copy number change. Second, I will discuss the PyClone model which uses targeted deep sequencing data to allows us to infer what proportion of cells in a sample harbour a mutation and which mutations originate at the same point in the evolutionary history of tumour. Third, I will present the single cell genotyper (SCG) model which can be used to analyse targeted single cell sequencing data of known point mutations. The model accounts for several sources of noise, including allele drop-out, and infers both the clonal genotype of the cells and the proportion of each clone in multiple samples. I will finish with some recent results from a study tracking the migration of clones in the peritoneal cavity of high grade serous ovarian cancer patients. We use the three aforementioned methods to determine if the pattern of spread in a patient is indicative of mono-clonal or poly-clonal spread. Keywords: cancer, genomics, Bayesian statistics, high grade serous ovarian cancer, phylogenetics, single cell sequencing, high throughput sequencing.

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 14 Jan 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

High-throughput Approaches in Cancer Cell Models to Enable Precision Cancer Medicine

Dr Matthew Garnett

ALL WELCOME Mathew J. Garnett, PhD leads the Translational Cancer Genomics laboratory and Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer Project at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Cambridge UK. He aims to understand how genetic changes contribute to cancer and to identify molecular biomarkers that... Read more

ALL WELCOME Mathew J. Garnett, PhD leads the Translational Cancer Genomics laboratory and Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer Project at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Cambridge UK. He aims to understand how genetic changes contribute to cancer and to identify molecular biomarkers that will improve the development of new cancer therapies using high-throughput chemical and genetic screens in cancer cell lines and organoids. Mathew is also a member of the scientific leadership team for the Centre for Therapeutic Target Validation (CTTV) which aims to use genome scale experiments and analysis to evaluate new therapeutic targets. After obtaining a BSc in Biochemistry (Hons.) at the University of British Columbia, Canada, Mathew completed his PhD with Prof. Richard Marais at the Institute of Cancer Research (London, UK) on the characterisation of BRAF as a cancer gene. In 2005 Mathew moved to the laboratory of Prof. Ashok Venkitaraman (Cambridge, UK) for his post-doctoral research, where he discovered a new regulator of cell division. Mathew joined the Sanger Institute in 2009.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Thu 14 Jan 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Cardiology / Infection-Microbiology

Dr Alex Pitcher, Professor Susanna Dunachie

Cardiology: "Genetic aortic diseases: too much information?", Dr Alex Pitcher Infection-Microbiology: "What are you?", Dr Susanna Dunachie Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Cardiology: "Genetic aortic diseases: too much information?", Dr Alex Pitcher Infection-Microbiology: "What are you?", Dr Susanna Dunachie Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 14 Jan 2016 from 15:00 to 16:00

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

Fri 15 Jan 2016 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

'Vascular Trials, Big Data, Stroke and Dementia' and 'Community Leg Ulcer Clinics and Telemedicine'

Professor Alison Halliday, Professor Linda Hands

'Vascular Trials, Big Data, Stroke and Dementia' by Professor Alison Halliday (Professor of Vascular Surgery at the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences whose main interest is in Carotid Surgery and Stroke Prevention) and 'Community Leg Ulcer Clinics and Telemedicine' by Professor Linda Hands... Read more

'Vascular Trials, Big Data, Stroke and Dementia' by Professor Alison Halliday (Professor of Vascular Surgery at the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences whose main interest is in Carotid Surgery and Stroke Prevention) and 'Community Leg Ulcer Clinics and Telemedicine' by Professor Linda Hands (Associate Professor of Surgery at the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences and Director of the Oxford Telemedicine Institute. All members of the University and NHS clinical staff are welcome.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 15 Jan 2016 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Advanced Microscopy Studies of HIV-1 Dynamic Structure and Virus-Cell Interactions

Jakub Chojnacki, Eggeling Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 15 Jan 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

WHG High Profile Seminars

Genes, Cells, and Schizophrenia

Professor Steven McCarroll

Genes, cells, and schizophrenia To understand the biological and genetic basis of common, complex disease, two challenges today are (i) to identify the functional alleles and biological mechanisms underlying genetic associations with disease risk; and (ii) to understand how these genes and alleles... Read more

Genes, cells, and schizophrenia To understand the biological and genetic basis of common, complex disease, two challenges today are (i) to identify the functional alleles and biological mechanisms underlying genetic associations with disease risk; and (ii) to understand how these genes and alleles affect the biology of specific cell populations in complex tissues. Our lab’s work focuses on these challenges. I will talk on Friday about two such projects in our work to understand the biological basis of neuropsychiatric disorders. The strongest genetic influence on schizophrenia at a population level involves the disorder’s association with common SNPs in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus on chromosome 6. Though the MHC association is the earliest and strongest genetic signal in schizophrenia, it has been seen as presenting an intractable fine-mapping problem because the complex association signal does not track with patterns of linkage disequilibrium around any known variants. I will describe our work to understand this genetic signal and the functional alleles underlying it. The work has led us to surprising insights about both genetic architecture and a neuro-immune mechanism in schizophrenia. Ultimately we must understand this and other genetic effects in terms of how genome variation shapes the biology of specific cell populations within complex tissues. A challenge in studying the brain and other complex tissues is that they contain tens to hundreds of cell types and cell states, each of which utilizes the genome in distinct ways. I will describe our lab’s work to develop Drop-seq, a new technology for simultaneously analyzing genome-wide gene expression in tens of thousands of individual cells. I will discuss ways that we are applying Drop-seq to better understand how diverse cell populations utilize their genomes and are affected by genetic variation.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Rosie Butler

Fri 15 Jan 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, Seminar Room (Basement), Headington OX3 7FZ

Voltage-gated calcium channels and their roles in disease

Annette Dolphin

I will discuss the many functions of the voltage-gated calcium channel family, the role of their auxiliary subunits, what is known about their structures, their roles in disease and as drug targets. Bio Annette Dolphin received her BA in Natural Sciences (Biochemistry, Class I) from the... Read more

I will discuss the many functions of the voltage-gated calcium channel family, the role of their auxiliary subunits, what is known about their structures, their roles in disease and as drug targets. Bio Annette Dolphin received her BA in Natural Sciences (Biochemistry, Class I) from the University of Oxford and her PhD from University of London, Institute of Psychiatry. She then held postdoctoral fellowships at the College de France in Paris, and at Yale University, before returning to UK to the National Institute for Medical Research, London; followed by a lecturer position in the Pharmacology Department of St. George’s Hospital Medical School, London University. She was appointed Chair of the Department of Pharmacology at Royal Free Hospital School of Medicine, London University in 1990, and moved to University College London in 1997. She is Professor of Pharmacology in the Department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology at UCL. She was elected to the Academy of Medical Sciences in 1999, and the Royal Society in 2015. She is currently a Wellcome Trust Senior Investigator

Audience: Public

Organisers: Stefania Bocchi

Mon 18 Jan 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

New Radcliffe House, Room 2, Walton Street OX2 6NW

Post-marketing withdrawal of anti-obesity medications: an analysis of trends

Igho Onakpoya

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Mon 18 Jan 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Functional plasticity of CD4+ T cells is driven by an asymmetric inheritance of mitochondria

Prof Stephen Cobbold

Steve Cobbold is Professor of Cellular Immunology at the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford, where he continues to investigate how monoclonal antibodies can be used to therapeutically manipulate the immune system. He studied Biochemistry in Oxford, followed by a Ph.D. in... Read more

Steve Cobbold is Professor of Cellular Immunology at the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford, where he continues to investigate how monoclonal antibodies can be used to therapeutically manipulate the immune system. He studied Biochemistry in Oxford, followed by a Ph.D. in Cambridge, which led to the first demonstrations of tolerance induction to proteins and then organ grafts using CD4 monoclonal antibodies in adult rodents. As part of the Waldmann group, he was also actively involved in the development of CAMPATH monoclonal antibodies, which are now used for the treatment of certain leukemias and for multiple sclerosis. He also developed statistical methods for the analysis of antibody clusters as used in the 3rd Human CD Antigen Workshop (1987) and in 1993 he organized the first Canine Leukocyte Antigen Workshop (CLAW). He was a scientific co-founder of TolerRx Inc., and together with Geoff Hale and Peppy Rebello, he co-founded BioAnaLab Ltd., a company that performs contract research and diagnostic testing for the biopharmaceutical industry, which was successfully sold to Merck/Millipore in 2009. He has published more than 250 articles and patents on the therapeutic applications of monoclonal antibodies and the mechanisms of transplantation tolerance. He recently suffered end stage renal failure and received a reciprocal paired donation kidney transplant with CAMPATH induction – perhaps the ultimate in clinical translation of his work?

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Jo Silva

Mon 18 Jan 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Health Economics Seminars

Richard Doll Building, RDB Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Mon 18 Jan 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Clinical application of gene therapy in Hematology, where do we stand

Prof Mariana Cavazzana

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Mon 18 Jan 2016 from 17:00 to 18:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NDPH Inaugural Lectures: Hearts, Minds and Lives

Professor Sarah Parish

Audience: Public

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 19 Jan 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Mechanisms and function of parental specific heterochromatin in mouse early embryos

Prof Dr Antoine Peters

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 19 Jan 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Interferons: Tug of war between host and pathogen

Charlotte Odendall

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Jo Silva

Tue 19 Jan 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminars: Fat fit and Slim ill: new insights into body fat

Professor Jimmy Bell

Audience: Public

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 19 Jan 2016 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, 2nd floor (note main door closes at 4pm), off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Elucidation of a set of validated physiological substrates for the Parkinson’s LRRK2 kinase

Prof. Dario Alessi

Dario Alessi was born in France, attended high school in Brussels and obtained a BSc in Biochemistry from the University of Birmingham, UK in 1988. He received a Ph.D. in 1991 for work on the synthesis and use of spin-labelled ATP analogues to study muscle contraction under the joint supervision of... Read more

Dario Alessi was born in France, attended high school in Brussels and obtained a BSc in Biochemistry from the University of Birmingham, UK in 1988. He received a Ph.D. in 1991 for work on the synthesis and use of spin-labelled ATP analogues to study muscle contraction under the joint supervision of Ian Trayer (University of Birmingham) and David Trentham FRS (National Institute of Medical Research, Mill Hill, London). He then carried out postdoctoral research with Sir Philip Cohen FRS in the MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit at Dundee from 1991 to 1997, where he became fascinated by protein kinases and how they control almost all aspects of cell biology. In 1998 Dario became a Programme Leader in the MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit, and assumed the Directorship of the Unit in April 2012. A key focus of his current research is to understand the regulation and physiological roles of poorly understood protein kinases and components of the ubiquitylation system that implicated in human disease. Dario is very keen to exploit findings emerging from his studies to develop novel treatments for disease. In March 2013 Dario’s lab have published over 210 peer-reviewed research papers/reviews that have accumulated more than 33000 citations. Dario’s Alessi’s h-index is 86 (i.e. 86 papers cited >86 times, with 80 papers cited over 100 times). In March 2010 Dario Alessi was ranked as 16th most cited biochemist worldwide.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Wed 20 Jan 2016 from 12:30 to 13:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Identification of critical effectors of C/EBPalpha mutant AML - Novel molecular insights and targeting strategies

Dr. Florian Grebien

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 20 Jan 2016 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

The Role of TL1A/DR3 in Intestinal Inflammation

Dr Fabio Cominelli

Biography Fabio Cominelli, MD, PhD, is Professor of Medicine and Pathology, Chief of the Division of Gastroenterology and Liver Disease, and Director of the Digestive Health Research Institute at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) and University Hospitals of Cleveland. He is also the... Read more

Biography Fabio Cominelli, MD, PhD, is Professor of Medicine and Pathology, Chief of the Division of Gastroenterology and Liver Disease, and Director of the Digestive Health Research Institute at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) and University Hospitals of Cleveland. He is also the inaugural awardee of the Hermann Menges Jr Chair in Internal Medicine and Associate Dean for Program Development. Dr. Cominelli is the Principal Investigator (PI) and Director of a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Program Project Grant, studying the role of innate immunity in experimental Crohn’s disease, and two R01 grants focused on the role of cytokines and commensal flora in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation. He is also the PI of a T32 Training grant in Digestive Disease Sciences at CWRU, as well as the PI and Director of the Cleveland NIH Digestive Diseases Research Core Center. His research interest in the area of experimental inflammatory bowel disease and intestinal cytokines dates back 28 years to his fellowship in Gastroenterology research under Dr. Robert Zipser at Harbor UCLA Medical Center. These two general areas of research have remained the focus of his investigation ever since. In recognition of his research accomplishments, Dr. Cominelli was the recipient of the 2002 Outstanding Investigator Award from the American Federation for Medical Research for his studies establishing that targeted neutralization of a specific cytokine was effective for the treatment of experimental IBD. Dr. Cominelli has over 25 years of experience and continuous NIH funding in cytokine biology and many seminal discoveries in this field of investigation. His group was the first to report that specific blockade of a single pro-inflammatory cytokine, i.e. interleukin-1 (IL-1), was effective in reducing disease severity in an animal model of experimentally-induced colitis and that an imbalance between intestinal pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines represents a pathogenic mechanism of auto-inflammatory diseases, including IBD. This concept has now gained considerable attention through reports of severe inflammatory disease in infants with homozygous germ-line mutations in the IL-1 gene family. These and other studies have formed the foundation for clinical trials using anti-cytokine therapy (e.g. anti-TNFα therapy) as well as administration of anti-inflammatory cytokines, (e.g. IL-1 receptor antagonist) in patients with auto-inflammatory diseases. Dr. Cominelli has published more than 150 articles and has extensive experience as a journal reviewer. He has been an Associate Editor and an Editorial Board Member for several Journals including the Journal of Immunology, Gastroenterology, Digestive and Liver Disease, The American Journal of Physiology and others. He is currently an Academic Editor for PLoS One and Associate Editor for Translational Research. Dr. Cominelli has been also an outstanding mentor and has trained more than 120 individuals many of them being independent investigators or academic leaders in Gastroenterology. Dr. Cominelli is also a highly respected clinician with strong expertise in clinical program development for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with digestive diseases. He has been named “American Top Doctor” in Gastroenterology by Castle Connonly Medical Ltd (2001-2016), “Best Doctor” in Gastroenterology, by the Cleveland Magazine (2009-2016), “Best Doctor in Gastroenterology (top 1%)”, by US News & World Report (2012-2016) and “Super Doctor in Gastroenterology” by Key Professional Media (2012-2016).

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 20 Jan 2016 from 13:45 to 14:45

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, Seminar Room (Basement), Headington OX3 7FZ

New insights into LRRK2 and SGK3 signalling pathway and relevance to Parkinson’s disease and cancer

Dario Alessi

Dario Alessi received a Ph.D. in 1991 then carried out postdoctoral research with Sir Philip Cohen FRS in the MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit at Dundee from 1991 to 1997, where he became fascinated by protein kinases and how they control almost all aspects of cell biology. In 1998 Dario became a... Read more

Dario Alessi received a Ph.D. in 1991 then carried out postdoctoral research with Sir Philip Cohen FRS in the MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit at Dundee from 1991 to 1997, where he became fascinated by protein kinases and how they control almost all aspects of cell biology. In 1998 Dario became a Programme Leader in the MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit, and assumed the Directorship of the Unit in April 2012. A key focus of his current research is to understand the regulation and physiological roles of poorly understood protein kinases and components of the ubiquitylation system that are implicated in human disease. Dario is very keen to exploit findings emerging from his studies to develop novel treatments for disease. In March 2010 Dario Alessi was ranked as 16th most cited biochemist worldwide and by March 2013 Dario’s lab published over 210 peer-reviewed research papers/reviews that have accumulated more than 33000 citations.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Alex Bullock

Thu 21 Jan 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Cis-regulation dynamics and chromatin architecture during development and evolution

Dr Jose Luis Gomez Skarmeta

ALL WELCOME The Gomez-Skarmeta group combines epigenomics, chromosome capture assays, transgenic enhancer experiments and mutagenic studies to determine how cis-regulatory elements and chromatin structure contribute to development and evolution, and how alteration in this non-coding part of the... Read more

ALL WELCOME The Gomez-Skarmeta group combines epigenomics, chromosome capture assays, transgenic enhancer experiments and mutagenic studies to determine how cis-regulatory elements and chromatin structure contribute to development and evolution, and how alteration in this non-coding part of the genome affects human health. For example, by genome-wide interrogation of histone marks associated with enhancers and promoters in zebrafish, they determined, for the first time in a vertebrate embryo, the dynamics of enhancer activity during early embryogenesis. In addition, they are applying 4C-Seq to systematically determine the gene regulatory landscapes of key developmental genes in embryos of different species. Projects in the lab also investigate the role of mutations in cis-regulatory elements in human disease.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Thu 21 Jan 2016 from 11:30 to 12:15

WIMM Occasional Seminars

Unraveling the molecular and cellular mechanisms of fetal B cell lymphopoiesis to help understand childhood leukaemia

Joanna Green

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Viva Seminar

Thu 21 Jan 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Novel anti-chemokine peptides from ticks

Prof Shoumo Bhattacharya

Chemokines function to recruit inflammatory cells and are well-validated therapeutic targets in atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and atopic dermatitis. The 46 chemokines and 20 receptors form a complex and robust network, driven by the binding of individual... Read more

Chemokines function to recruit inflammatory cells and are well-validated therapeutic targets in atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and atopic dermatitis. The 46 chemokines and 20 receptors form a complex and robust network, driven by the binding of individual chemokines to several receptors and individual receptors to several chemokines, and by the expression of multiple chemokine receptors on individual inflammatory cell types. Network robustness likely underlies the failure of anti-chemokine pharmacological approaches that target individual network nodes. Ticks have evolved small salivary peptides (evasins) that suppress chemokine-driven inflammation by binding and neutralizing multiple chemokines simultaneously. Three evasins have been cloned, and have been shown to suppress inflammation in several pre-clinical models including atherosclerosis, heart, pancreas, joints, and lungs. Our working model is that the evolutionarily honed ability to target many chemokines simultaneously is the basis for evasin efficacy in inflammation, and is an important biological property not possessed by alternative anti-chemokine technology. Using a novel yeast display technology, we have cloned and expressed 30 novel evasins from diverse tick species, and our on-going work shows that they bind and neutralise chemokine function. We hypothesise that these novel evasins possess distinct chemokine neutralising activities that could be used to combinatorially target chemokines in immuno-inflammatory diseases.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Thu 21 Jan 2016 from 12:30 to 13:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Protein ADP-ribosylation in regulation of genome stability

Dr Ivan Ahel

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Penny Berry

Thu 21 Jan 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Acute General Medicine Firm A / Renal Unit

Dr Champika Gamakaranage, Dr Rustam Rea, Dr Brian Shine, Dr Parminder Judge

Acute General Medicine Firm A: "A novel cure for back pain", Dr Champika Gamakaranage and Dr Rustam Rea Renal Unit: "Longterm lithium – renal and endocrine consequences", Dr Brian Shine and Dr Parminder Judge Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS

Acute General Medicine Firm A: "A novel cure for back pain", Dr Champika Gamakaranage and Dr Rustam Rea Renal Unit: "Longterm lithium – renal and endocrine consequences", Dr Brian Shine and Dr Parminder Judge Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 21 Jan 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

TDI Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Identification of Critical Effectors of C/EBPalpha mutant AML - Novel Molecular Insights and Targeting Strategies

Dr. Florian Grebien

Florian Grebien did his PhD jointly supervised by Ernst Müllner of the Medical University Vienna and Hartmut Beug of the Research Institute for Molecular Pathology (IMP) in Vienna. For his post-doctoral research he joined the team of Giulio Superti-Furga at the Research Center for Molecular... Read more

Florian Grebien did his PhD jointly supervised by Ernst Müllner of the Medical University Vienna and Hartmut Beug of the Research Institute for Molecular Pathology (IMP) in Vienna. For his post-doctoral research he joined the team of Giulio Superti-Furga at the Research Center for Molecular Medicine (CeMM), Vienna. Since 2014 he leads an independent research team at the LBI-CR. The laboratory of Florian Grebien aims to contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of leukemia development through the development and use of novel tools for functional evaluation of oncogenic aberrations. Focus of his research is acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a cancer of white blood cells, characterized by the rapid growth of abnormal myeloid cells that accumulate in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells. Florian Grebien has more than 20 PubMed based publications with an overall impact factor exceeding 220 and an h-index of 15. Since June 2015 Dr. Grebien's research is funded by the starting grant "ONCOMECHAML" from the European Research Council (ERC).

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Andrea Keepence-Keyte

Thu 21 Jan 2016 from 15:00 to 16:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome in HIV: from bedside to bench

Irini Sereti

My group studies IRIS, an aberrant inflammatory response upon initiation of antiretroviral therapy in severely immunosuppressed patients with HIV,both in clinic and lab, trying to identify ways to effectively prevent it and treat it.

My group studies IRIS, an aberrant inflammatory response upon initiation of antiretroviral therapy in severely immunosuppressed patients with HIV,both in clinic and lab, trying to identify ways to effectively prevent it and treat it.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Fri 22 Jan 2016 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

“VATS thymectomy for myasthenia gravis: the Oxford experience”

Mr Dionisios Stavroulias

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 22 Jan 2016 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

Regulatory T Cells in Skin Inflammation

Powrie Group, Krista Adelmann

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 22 Jan 2016 from 10:15 to 11:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

Unravelling haematopoietic stem cell dysfunction in isolated Del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes

Laura Stenson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Viva Seminar

Fri 22 Jan 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Oxford Genomic Centre Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room B, Headington OX3 7BN

Running and Reading in Real Time - Looking at Squiggles on the Oxford Nanopore MinION

The utility of the Oxford nanopore MinION sequencer is becoming clear. However, to fully exploit its potential requires a shift in thought in both experimental design and analysis. The conventional model of sequence, map and analysis leading to final result has been replaced by instant access to... Read more

The utility of the Oxford nanopore MinION sequencer is becoming clear. However, to fully exploit its potential requires a shift in thought in both experimental design and analysis. The conventional model of sequence, map and analysis leading to final result has been replaced by instant access to sequence data before the completion of a sequencing run. In the extreme case of the ONT MinION it is possible to analyse squiggle data before a read has even completed. We have developed a platform of tools, minoTour, to analyse MinION data in real time and extend it to exploit both ‘Run Until’ and, in future, ‘Read Until’. Run until allows the sequencer to switch off after achieving a specific goal, such as depth of coverage. Read until allows individual reads to be rejected from the pore and free that pore to sequence an alternative preferred read. We have developed method for run and read until in a number of different scenarios including selective small genome sequencing on barcode normalization. Limitations and challenges to implementing read until will be discussed along with the challenge of Fast Mode whereby speed of processing will be of vital importance. Finally we demonstrate how methodologies for analysing squiggles may help to reduce the reliance on base calling in the field.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Marta Guderska

Fri 22 Jan 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off Parks/South Parks Road, OX1 3PT T: 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Guest Speaker - Professor Matthew Freeman : The cell biology of intercellular signalling

Professor Matthew Freeman

Geneticists and biochemists both tend to represent signalling pathways as diagrams where abstract arrows connect molecular components. Yet signalling doesn’t occur in abstract space but within and between cells, so the cell biology of they systems needs to be considered. Our work on the interface... Read more

Geneticists and biochemists both tend to represent signalling pathways as diagrams where abstract arrows connect molecular components. Yet signalling doesn’t occur in abstract space but within and between cells, so the cell biology of they systems needs to be considered. Our work on the interface of signalling and cell biology started with Drosophila genetics but is increasingly focused on the cell biology of proteins of the rhomboid-like superfamily. We are currently particularly studying the control of inflammatory and growth factor signalling in mammals.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Guest Speaker

Mon 25 Jan 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Chemokines and miRNAs in atherosclerosis

Dr Christian Weber

Coronary artery disease arising from atherosclerosis is a leading cause of death and morbidity worldwide. The underlying pathogenesis involves an imbalanced lipid metabolism and a maladaptive immune response entailing a chronic inflammation of the arterial wall. The disturbed equilibrium of lipid... Read more

Coronary artery disease arising from atherosclerosis is a leading cause of death and morbidity worldwide. The underlying pathogenesis involves an imbalanced lipid metabolism and a maladaptive immune response entailing a chronic inflammation of the arterial wall. The disturbed equilibrium of lipid accumulation, immune responses and their clearance is shaped by leukocyte trafficking and homeostasis governed by chemokines and their receptors. New pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways linking lipid and inflammation biology have been discovered, and genetic profiling studies have unveiled variations involved in human atherosclerosis. The growing understanding of the inflammatory processes and mediators has uncovered an intriguing diversity of targetable mechanisms that can be exploited to complement lipid-lowering therapies. In their role as small chemotactic cytokines, chemokines are crucial mediators and regulators of leukocyte trafficking during immune surveillance and inflammation. Their involvement in the development and progression of inflammatory diseases has been subject of intense investigation. Concordantly, the chemokine system of ligands and receptors has been explored in search for therapeutic targets to prevent or treat atherosclerosis. Targeting the chemokine system e.g. by disrupting functional heteromer formation or modulating the microRNA-mediated regulation of chemokine expression, offers various entry points for a causative treatment of this widespread and chronic illness. MicroRNAs (miRs) have emerged as key regulators of gene expression typically by repressing the target mRNA, which determines cell fate and function under homeostatic and disease conditions. In particular, the effects of miR-126 and miR-155 in atherosclerosis and chemokine biology will be discussed. Although the approach of directly targeting chemokine receptors has encountered some setbacks, several innovative compounds are currently in an advanced stage of development. Herein, the current standing of this dynamic field is highlighted and the potential advantages and drawbacks of particular strategies are discussed.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 25 Jan 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NDPH seminar: Towards more reliable Mendelian randomization investigations

Dr Stephen Burgess

Audience: Public

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Mon 25 Jan 2016 from 17:00 to 19:00

Newton Abraham Lectures

University Museum of Natural History, Parks Road OX1 3PW

Variation across the human genome: a tricky balancing act in human health and disease

Mary Carrington

Newton Abraham Lecture, followed by drinks and canapés in the main court

Newton Abraham Lecture, followed by drinks and canapés in the main court

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Karen Poxon

Please book a free ticket for this event

Tue 26 Jan 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Development & Cell Biology Theme Guest Speakers (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Small Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Skeletal muscle stem cells in the embryo and adult"

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Katherine McNeil

Tue 26 Jan 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Development & Cell Biology Theme Guest Speakers (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Small Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Skeletal muscle stem cells in the embryo and adult

Professor Margaret Buckingham

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sara Bouskela

Tue 26 Jan 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Tue 26 Jan 2016 from 14:00 to 15:00

Department of Oncology

Metabolic Imaging using Hyperpolarised 13C Compounds in MRI

Dr Rolf Schulte

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Brian Burns

Wed 27 Jan 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Room 1, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

Infants health outcomes: Trends and inequality in the last ten years in England

Dr Elisabetta De Cao

This seminar has been rescheduled from its original date of 14 January.

This seminar has been rescheduled from its original date of 14 January.

Booking Recommended

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Catia Nicodemo

Thu 28 Jan 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

New Radcliffe House, Room 2, Walton Street OX2 6NW

Thu 28 Jan 2016 from 13:30 to 14:15

WIMM Occasional Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, Room 4A, George Pickering Education Centre, Headington OX3 9DU

Genome-wide analyses reveal new insights into MLL fusion protein recruitment mechanisms

Jon Kerry

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Viva Seminar

Fri 29 Jan 2016 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

'Deep Brain Stimulation of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex: Targeting Akhos, not Lupe (but may lead to Anis)'

Professor Tipu Aziz, Dr Binith Cheeran

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 29 Jan 2016 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

Lipid-specific T cells, filaggrin and atopic dermatitis

Ogg Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 29 Jan 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

WHG High Profile Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

Evolution's Rapid Rewiring of Mammalian Genome Regulation

Professor Paul Flicek

Mammals are characterised by a wide range of morphological diversity arising from a largely consistent set of genes. A significant fraction of these differences are assumed to derive from differences in transcriptional regulation. We have created maps of transcription factor binding, chromatin... Read more

Mammals are characterised by a wide range of morphological diversity arising from a largely consistent set of genes. A significant fraction of these differences are assumed to derive from differences in transcriptional regulation. We have created maps of transcription factor binding, chromatin organising proteins and active enhancers and promoters across a large number of mammalian species in an attempt to understand these changes at a molecular level. These data provide insight into the evolutionary origin and persistence of regulatory sequences as well as characterise the vast majority of regulatory regions that are not shared in the common ancestor of all mammals. By investing both major mammalian orders and closely related rodent species, we can understand the greater context for the first steps of evolutionary change between species. We have also estimated the contribution of individual transcription factor binding events to tissue-specific regulation and determined the mode of inheritance for these binding sites.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Rosie Butler

Fri 29 Jan 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off Parks/South Parks Road, OX1 3PT T: 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Guest Speaker - Dr Lyndsay Murray, Centre for Integrative Physiology, University of Edinburgh : Motor Unit Pathology in Mouse Models of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

Dr Lyndsay Murray

Spinal Muscular Atrophy is a devastating motor neuron disease affecting primarily children. SMA is caused by mutations and deletion in the SMN1 gene, leading to low SMN levels in affected in individuals. Despite a clear involvement of other tissue types, motor neurons appear to be the most... Read more

Spinal Muscular Atrophy is a devastating motor neuron disease affecting primarily children. SMA is caused by mutations and deletion in the SMN1 gene, leading to low SMN levels in affected in individuals. Despite a clear involvement of other tissue types, motor neurons appear to be the most vulnerable cell type to reduced SMN levels. Indeed the predominant symptom in this disease is progressive paralysis, due to denervation of skeletal muscle and loss of motor neurons. Over the past few years, we have been focused on using mouse models of SMA to investigate the cellular consequences of reduced Smn levels on the motor unit. It is now well established a loss of neuromuscular junctions is an early and significant event in SMA. We have also shown that this loss of neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) appears to be coupled to a reduction in their anatomical plasticity and capacity to remodel, and this reduction in plasticity appears associated with an increase in their vulnerability. Furthermore, the loss of neuromuscular junctions appears to vary between different muscles. In both mouse models and patients with SMA, there appear to be extreme weakness in some muscles groups, while other remain relatively unaffected. We believe that understanding the differences between these differentially vulnerable motor units will give insight into the reasons why motor neurons are selectively vulnerable in SMA, and help us develop therapeutic strategies for how to protect them.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

GUEST SPEAKER

Fri 29 Jan 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Epigenetic dysfunction and its targeting in haematological malignancies

Dr Brian Huntly

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose