Other Seminars

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Mon 1 Feb 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Altering the Vasculature to Promote Tumour Immunity

Prof Awen Gallimore

The journal Science voted “Cancer Immunotherapy” the most important scientific breakthrough in 2013 due in part to the success of adoptive T cell therapy. However, the success of this treatment and others may be limited by the failure of activated lymphocytes to effectively infiltrate tumors.... Read more

The journal Science voted “Cancer Immunotherapy” the most important scientific breakthrough in 2013 due in part to the success of adoptive T cell therapy. However, the success of this treatment and others may be limited by the failure of activated lymphocytes to effectively infiltrate tumors. Using an established mouse model where carcinogen-induced tumours arise in vivo, we have reported that depletion of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), can promote development of specialised blood vessels (high endothelial venules or HEV) in tumours. HEV are normally found only in secondary lymphoid tissue where they facilitate transit of naïve and central memory T cells into the lymph node parenchyma. However, in a recent study HEV have been detected in breast tumours where a significant association between HEV presence and density of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) was observed. Significantly a correlation between the presence of HEV and a favourable prognosis in breast cancer and melanoma patients was reported. In our mouse model of tumorigenesis we also found that the presence of intra-tumoural HEV correlated with a significant increase in the number of TIL and control of tumour growth. Thus, the main objectives of our current work are to determine how HEVs are induced in tumours and the role Tregs play in this process and to test novel immunotherapeutic approaches to drive intra-tumoural HEV neogenesis using established pre-clinical mouse models of cancer. The overall aim is to devise new treatments, combining immunotherapy with regimes designed to alter the tumour vasculature.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 1 Feb 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

WHG Seminars

Old Road Campus Research Building, Seminar Room, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Headington OX3 7DQ

How Big Image Data Can Help the Smallest Patients

Associate Professor Marius Linguraru

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 1 Feb 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

Linking senesence and inflammation: the senesence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP)

Jesus Gil

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Tue 2 Feb 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminars: What information is in 'Big Data' brain imaging

Professor Stephen Smith

Audience: Public

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 2 Feb 2016 from 16:00 to 17:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Dissecting autoimmunity – B and T cell responses in Rheumatoid Arthritis

Vivianne Malstrom, Professor in Rheumatological Immunology

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is a complex and heterogeneous inflammatory disorder, where many patients (but not all) display clear autoimmune features characterized by MHC class II association and autoantibody production. Disease develops gradually during a long time period with different compartments... Read more

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is a complex and heterogeneous inflammatory disorder, where many patients (but not all) display clear autoimmune features characterized by MHC class II association and autoantibody production. Disease develops gradually during a long time period with different compartments being the site of initiation (lung) versus disease precipitation (joints). A functional understanding of this stepwise process is emerging. We study B and T cells and their effector functions in blood, joints and lungs of RA patients. We utilize peptide - HLA-DR-tetramers as well as antigen-tetramers (for specific T and B cell capture respectively). Expression of recombinant IgG (BCR) from RA-derived B cells has e.g. revealed an inflammation-independent, but autoimmune, mechanism for pain and bone erosion, explaining some of the conundrums of early aggressive disease. The possibility to capture antigen-specific lymphocytes is currently applied for immunosurveillance of the autoimmune lymphocyte repertoire in RA patients over time and in response to therapeutic intervention.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Jo Silva

Wed 3 Feb 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, 1st Floor, Room 1, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

Thu 4 Feb 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Respiratory Medicine / Horton Hospital

Dr Neil Stewart, Prof Ian Pavord, Dr May Nyein, Dr Matthew Scarborough, Dr Rahul Shrimanker

Respiratory Medicine: "Severe eosinophilic airways disease", Prof Ian Pavord and Dr Rahul Shrimanker -- Horton Hospital: "...But We Don't Give Antibiotics For Sore Throat...", Dr May Nyein, Dr Neil Stewart and Dr Matthew Scarborough Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS

Respiratory Medicine: "Severe eosinophilic airways disease", Prof Ian Pavord and Dr Rahul Shrimanker -- Horton Hospital: "...But We Don't Give Antibiotics For Sore Throat...", Dr May Nyein, Dr Neil Stewart and Dr Matthew Scarborough Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 4 Feb 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

How a bioinformatics scientist turned entrepreneur

Dr Fiona Nelson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Thu 4 Feb 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

The Regulation of Intestinal Immune Homeostasis in Mice and Men

Dr Arthur Mortha

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Fri 5 Feb 2016 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

The remarkably low affinity of CD4/pMHC II interactions

Davis Group, Mafalda Santos

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 5 Feb 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

Uncovering intratumor heterogeneity with Bayesian nonparametrics

Ke Yuan

Carcinogenesis is an evolutionary process in which advantageous mutations accumulate over time and cells harboring these mutations give rise to new clones. The nature of this progressing disease makes time course analysis very difficult and therefore the composition of these clones is generally... Read more

Carcinogenesis is an evolutionary process in which advantageous mutations accumulate over time and cells harboring these mutations give rise to new clones. The nature of this progressing disease makes time course analysis very difficult and therefore the composition of these clones is generally unknown. We will discuss methods designed to identify intratumoral cancer clones with different sequencing paradigms, namely bulk and single-cell sequencing. A common foundation of the methods is Bayeisan nonparametrics, by which the number of clones can be inferred in a principled framework. Bio: Ke works on statistical methods for quantifying breast cancer mircoenvironment from tumor images. His goal is to build probabilistic decision making machines to predict clinical outcomes (survival, relapse, etc), based on empirical features extracted from both tumor images and the associated molecular profiles (gene expression, copy number, etc).

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 5 Feb 2016 from 13:00 to 13:30

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off Parks/South Parks Road, OX1 3PT T: 01865 272500 - See more at: https://new.talks.ox.ac.uk/talks/id/42affee9-9764-40ef-bb73-f5707a91bff7/#sthash.PvRBVuxF.dpuf, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Dr Joaquim Vieira : Epigenetic mechanisms of epicardial gene reactivation to repair the adult heart

Dr Joaquim Vieira

Epicardium-derived cells (EPDCs) play an essential role during heart development by contributing to the major cardiovascular cell types: smooth muscle cells, interstitial fibroblasts, endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes. Critical to this process is the epicardially-expressed Wilms’ tumour 1... Read more

Epicardium-derived cells (EPDCs) play an essential role during heart development by contributing to the major cardiovascular cell types: smooth muscle cells, interstitial fibroblasts, endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes. Critical to this process is the epicardially-expressed Wilms’ tumour 1 (Wt1) gene. The activity of EPDCs is significantly reduced during the later stages of embryogenesis leading to the characteristic quiescent phenotype of the adult epicardium. This gradual loss of activity can be followed by monitoring the expression of Wt1. Previously, we have shown that stimulation (priming) with the monomeric-actin binding peptide thymosin β4 (Tβ4) is capable of restoring the embryonic potential to the adult epicardium in vivo by, reactivating Wt1 and mobilising EPDCs to promote neovascularisation and de novo cardiomyogenesis following injury. However, the mechanism for Tβ4-mediated reactivation remains elusive. Here, we report findings arising from an in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation screen to map epigenetic changes mediated by SWI/SNF-chromatin remodelling complexes and histone post-translational modifications at the level of Wt1, both in the developing and adult (intact and injured) heart. In addition, we report the in vivo requirement for endogenous versus exogenous Tβ4 (priming) for the epigenetic reprogramming of the adult epicardium. In vitro and in vivo studies are on-going to further dissect out the Tβ4-mediated epigenetic mechanism of Wt1 reactivation. Understanding how to restore embryonic potential to adult EPDCs, following injury, may underpin the development of resident cell-based therapies for heart repair.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Fri 5 Feb 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

How to be open about the use of animals in scientific research

Carmel Turner

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Fri 5 Feb 2016 from 13:30 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off Parks/South Parks Road, OX1 3PT T: 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Dr Jeroen de Baaij : Magnesium Transport in the Kidney and the Brain: CNNM2 as Novel Regulator

Dr Jeroen De Baaij

Patients with hypomagnesaemia (serum Mg2+ < 0.7 mmol/L) suffer from a wide range of symptoms including muscle cramps, cardiac arrhythmias and epilepsy. Hypomagnesaemia has been associated to several neurological diseases. Disturbances in the body Mg2+ homeostasis can often be attributed to a... Read more

Patients with hypomagnesaemia (serum Mg2+ < 0.7 mmol/L) suffer from a wide range of symptoms including muscle cramps, cardiac arrhythmias and epilepsy. Hypomagnesaemia has been associated to several neurological diseases. Disturbances in the body Mg2+ homeostasis can often be attributed to a reduced Mg2+ absorption in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT) segment of the kidney. The DCT determines the urinary Mg2+ excretion, since no reabsorption takes place beyond this segment of the nephron. In this lecture, I aim to show the recent identification of novel genes regulating Mg2+ transport. I’ll report the identification of novel mutations in the DCT-protein CNNM2 in five families suffering from intellectual disability, seizures, and hypomagnesaemia. To elucidate the physiological role of CNNM2, CNNM2 function was studied in in vitro transport assays and the zebrafish knockdown model system. Using stable Mg2+ isotopes, we demonstrated that CNNM2 increases cellular Mg2+ uptake in HEK293 cells. In contrast, cells expressing mutated CNNM2 proteins did not show increased Mg2+ uptake. Knockdown of cnnm2 isoforms in zebrafish resulted in disturbed brain development and reduced body Mg content. These phenotypes were rescued by injection of mammalian wild-type Cnnm2 cRNA, whereas mammalian mutant Cnnm2 cRNA did not improve the zebrafish knockdown phenotypes. Altogether these data show that CNNM2 is fundamental for brain development, neurological functioning and Mg2+ homeostasis.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Fri 5 Feb 2016 from 14:00 to 15:00

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Catering provided so please arrive promptly - First come, first served, Headington OX3 7FZ

Searching for a vaccine for melioidosis, and Update on the Zika virus epidemic

Professor Susanna Dunachie, Professor Peter Horby

Melioidosis is a neglected tropical disease caused by the soil-dwelling bacteria Burkholderia pseudomallei. Patients present with a range of clinical syndromes including pneumonia, sepsis and abscesses, and the in-hospital mortality is 40% in Thailand. Melioidosis is endemic in Southeast Asia and... Read more

Melioidosis is a neglected tropical disease caused by the soil-dwelling bacteria Burkholderia pseudomallei. Patients present with a range of clinical syndromes including pneumonia, sepsis and abscesses, and the in-hospital mortality is 40% in Thailand. Melioidosis is endemic in Southeast Asia and Northern Australia but it is widespread across the tropics and a recent estimate puts the annual global death toll at 89,000 which is higher than Dengue. After this talk, Professor Peter Horby will provide an update on the emerging Zika virus infection.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Francois Van Loggerenberg

Mon 8 Feb 2016 from 10:00 to 11:30

CPM - WTCHG Career Equality Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

WTCHG Post Doc Career Workshop

Dr Ross Chapman, Ellie Tzima, Tzviya Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Dr Zamin Iqbal

The panel, Dr Ross Chapman, Dr Zam Iqbal, Dr Ellie Tzima and Dr Tzviya Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, will each give a short presentation sharing the challenges and rewards they have experienced on the road to setting up their groups. After the presentations, the floor will be opened to a Q & A session, and... Read more

The panel, Dr Ross Chapman, Dr Zam Iqbal, Dr Ellie Tzima and Dr Tzviya Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, will each give a short presentation sharing the challenges and rewards they have experienced on the road to setting up their groups. After the presentations, the floor will be opened to a Q & A session, and followed by coffee, tea and biscuits for informal chat with panellists. Please advise Donna (brcpa@well.ox.ac.uk), if you would like to attend (for catering purposes). Everyone welcome.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Susan Wilson

Please advise Donna (brcpa@well.ox.ac.uk), if you would like to attend (for catering purposes).

Mon 8 Feb 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

Mechanisms of DNA Replication Control from Yeast to Human

Professor Anne Donaldson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eric O'Neill

Mon 8 Feb 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Mechanisms of osteoarthritis progression following non-invasive repetitive murine knee trauma

Dr Blandine Poulet

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 8 Feb 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Harnessing sequencing innovations to identify and implement cancer predisposition genes

Zazneen Rahman

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Mon 8 Feb 2016 from 16:00 to 17:00

Health Economics Seminars

New Richards Building, New Richards Building Teaching Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LG

Beware of Kinked Frontiers: A Systematic Review of the Choice of Comparator Strategies in Cost-Effectiveness Analyses of Human Papillomavirus Testing in Cervical Screening

James O'Mahoney, Post doctoral researcher

This seminar presents the findings of a recently published systematic review that examined the choice of comparator strategies in cost-effectiveness analyses (CEAs) of cervical screening programmes. Although the importance of comparator strategies has been long recognised in CEA, the review shows... Read more

This seminar presents the findings of a recently published systematic review that examined the choice of comparator strategies in cost-effectiveness analyses (CEAs) of cervical screening programmes. Although the importance of comparator strategies has been long recognised in CEA, the review shows that many recently published CEAs of cervical screening have failed to include sufficient comparator strategies. This is likely to result in the underestimation of incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) for certain strategies, which may lead to sub-optimal policy choices. This study employs the idea of the "policy-relevant" portion of the efficient frontier, where the ICERs approach the cost-effectiveness threshold. The analysis demonstrates the importance of correctly estimating ICERs along this portion of the frontier. The findings of this review apply more generally, as similar problems of comparator omission can also be found in the breast and colorectal screening CEA literature.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Laurence Roope, Researcher

Tue 9 Feb 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Tue 9 Feb 2016 from 13:00 to 13:45

WIMM Occasional Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 2

Lineage bias and restriction of haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

Joana de Teixeira Carrelha

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Viva Seminar

Wed 10 Feb 2016 from 09:00 to 16:00

Jenner Seminars

MRC CiC Tropical Infectious Disease Consortium Meeting

Various Speakers

The MRC CiC Tropical Infectious Disease Consortium is holding a one day meeting at the Jenner Institute, University of Oxford with the aim to catalyse future translational projects. Delegates: MRC, MRC CiC awardees, academic and SME/industry investigators wishing to engage in translational... Read more

The MRC CiC Tropical Infectious Disease Consortium is holding a one day meeting at the Jenner Institute, University of Oxford with the aim to catalyse future translational projects. Delegates: MRC, MRC CiC awardees, academic and SME/industry investigators wishing to engage in translational research which has potential impact on health in resource-poor settings. The objectives of the meeting are; To highlight opportunities, facilities and expertise with in the Consortium for collaborative research; To showcase breadth and depth of projects, highlighting those that have already made significant progress; For the MRC to inform awardees and interested parties of pathways to further translational research funding (e.g. DPFS/TSB). Registration: Anyone wishing to register for this event should email Sharon Harrison at jennermeetingenquiries@ndm.ox.ac.uk by close of business on Tuesday 12th January 2015.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Wed 10 Feb 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, E. P. Abraham Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NDPH Seminar: Translating genomics into population-based cancer screening strategies – opportunities and challenges

Nora Pashayan

Personalised or risk-stratified screening offers opportunities to improve the efficiency of cancer screening programmes and reduce their adverse consequences. Polygenic risk score alone or combined with non-genetic risk factors could be used for risk-stratification for risk-tailored screening. ... Read more

Personalised or risk-stratified screening offers opportunities to improve the efficiency of cancer screening programmes and reduce their adverse consequences. Polygenic risk score alone or combined with non-genetic risk factors could be used for risk-stratification for risk-tailored screening. Developing and implementing such risk-stratified programmes would require coordination of multi-disciplinary efforts.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 10 Feb 2016 from 14:30 to 16:30

Medical Sciences Division Events

John Radcliffe Academic, Tingewick Hall, Academic Block, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, OX3 9BQ , Headington OX3 9DU

Theatre of Debate: People are Messy

Various Speakers

FREE performance Arrival 2.00pm for 2.30pm start People are messy is a comedy drama which explores the complexities of patient and public involvement through the eyes of two teenagers with very different ways of confronting a future made uncertain by a serious medical condition. “This... Read more

FREE performance Arrival 2.00pm for 2.30pm start People are messy is a comedy drama which explores the complexities of patient and public involvement through the eyes of two teenagers with very different ways of confronting a future made uncertain by a serious medical condition. “This fabulous, entertaining and moving play goes to the heart of why involving patients and the public is so important to science and to society. It will appeal to audiences of all ages and will bring the issues to a whole new audience nationwide. I am very excited about its potential impact.” Simon Denegri, NIHR National Director for Patients and the Public Entry is FREE. To book a place please use the link below: http://www.eventbrite.com/e/people-are-messy-a-new-play-about-patient-and-public-involvement-in-research-tickets-19548155058

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Thu 11 Feb 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

New Radcliffe House, Room 2, Walton Street OX2 6NW

Does changing the local supply of elective care have any impact on the consumption of emergency care?

Dr Stuart Redding

Booking Recommended

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Thu 11 Feb 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Neurology / Gastroenterology

Dr Mkael Symmonds, Dr Vincent Cheung, Dr Elham Khatamzas, Dr Helen Bungay, Dr Hanif Esmail, Dr Adam Bailey

Neurology: "Double vision and unsteadiness in a 37 year old woman", Dr Mkael Symmonds -- Gastroenterology: "Shifting sediment", Dr Vincent Cheung, Dr Elham Khatamzas, Dr Helen Bungay, Dr Hanif Esmail and Dr Adam Bailey -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Neurology: "Double vision and unsteadiness in a 37 year old woman", Dr Mkael Symmonds -- Gastroenterology: "Shifting sediment", Dr Vincent Cheung, Dr Elham Khatamzas, Dr Helen Bungay, Dr Hanif Esmail and Dr Adam Bailey -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 12 Feb 2016 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Safer Surgical Services and Human Factors: Two steps forwards….

Professor Peter McCulloch, Dr Lauren Morgan, Ms Lorna Flynn

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 12 Feb 2016 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

Dissecting the immune response to a human bacterial pathogen

Cerundolo Group, Giorgio Napolitani

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 12 Feb 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting Rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

"Machinery of drug transport in Escherichia coli and related bacteria"

Prof Ben Luisi

Microorganisms encode several classes of transmembrane molecular pumps that can expel a wide range of chemically distinct toxic substances. These machines contribute to the capacity of the organisms to withstand harsh environments, and they help to confer resistance against clinical... Read more

Microorganisms encode several classes of transmembrane molecular pumps that can expel a wide range of chemically distinct toxic substances. These machines contribute to the capacity of the organisms to withstand harsh environments, and they help to confer resistance against clinical antimicrobial agents. In Gram-negative bacteria, the pumps comprise tripartite assemblies that actively transport drugs and other harmful compounds across the cell envelope. We describe recent structural and functional data that have provided insights into the architecture and transport mechanism of the AcrA-AcrB-TolC pump of Escherichia coli. This multi-drug efflux pump is powered by AcrB, a member of the resistance/nodulation/cell division (RND) family of transporters, which are energised by proton electrochemical gradients. Crystallographic data reveal how a small protein AcrZ is engaged in a concave surface in the transmembrane domain of AcrB, and we discuss how this interaction may affect the efflux activities of AcrB and other RND family members. References [1] Du, D., Wang, Z., James, N.R., Voss, J.E., Klimont, E., Ohene-Agyei, T., Venter, H. Chiu, W. and Luisi, B.F. (2014). Structure of the AcrAB-TolC multidrug efflux pump. Nature. 509, 512-515. Doi:10.1038/nature13205 [2] Du, D., van Veen, H.W., Murakami, S., Pos, K.M. and Luisi, B.F. (2015). Structure, mechanism and cooperation of bacterial multidrug transporters. Current Opin. Struct. Biol . doi: 10.1016/j.sbi.2015.07.015 PMID 26282926.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eleanor Martin

Fri 12 Feb 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Jenner Seminars

Old Road Campus Research Building, Ludwig/Jenner Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7DQ

Epstein-Barr virus vaccines: a fight on two fronts

Dr Graham Taylor

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Fri 12 Feb 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off Parks/South Parks Road, OX1 3PT T: 01865 272500 - See more at: https://new.talks.ox.ac.uk/talks/id/42affee9-9764-40ef-bb73-f5707a91bff7/#sthash.WfxtFowo.dpuf, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Guest Speaker Professor William A Harris FRS, Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge : ‘Of Cell Types and Cell Numbers in the Retina’

Professor William A Harris FRS

The seminar will describe recent experiments that uncover some of the possible principles and biological mechanisms that ensure that neural structures reach their appropriate sizes and cellular compositions in the face of tremendous cell-to-cell variability in progenitor clonal output.

The seminar will describe recent experiments that uncover some of the possible principles and biological mechanisms that ensure that neural structures reach their appropriate sizes and cellular compositions in the face of tremendous cell-to-cell variability in progenitor clonal output.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

GUEST SPEAKER

Fri 12 Feb 2016 from 14:30 to 15:30

Development & Cell Biology Theme Guest Speakers (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

A novel regulator of RNA metabolism and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis”

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Katherine McNeil

Fri 12 Feb 2016 from 14:30 to 15:30

Development & Cell Biology Theme Guest Speakers (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

A novel regulator of RNA metabolism and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Professor Brian Black

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sara Bouskela

Mon 15 Feb 2016 from 14:30 to 15:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Tue 16 Feb 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Tue 16 Feb 2016 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, 2nd floor (note main door closes at 4pm), off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Does alpha-synuclein pathology spread in the brain?

Professor Miquel Vila

Miquel Vila received his M.D. from the University of Barcelona Medical School in 1993. He then moved to the laboratory of Experimental Neurology and Therapeutics (Prof. Yves Agid) at the Salpêtrière Hospital in Paris (France), where he obtained his Master degree and PhD in Neuroscience from the... Read more

Miquel Vila received his M.D. from the University of Barcelona Medical School in 1993. He then moved to the laboratory of Experimental Neurology and Therapeutics (Prof. Yves Agid) at the Salpêtrière Hospital in Paris (France), where he obtained his Master degree and PhD in Neuroscience from the University of Paris VI (Pierre et Marie Curie), under the supervision of Dr Etienne Hirsch. His PhD work was devoted to the study of the functional consequences of dopaminergic neurodegeneration on the functioning of the basal ganglia. From 1998 to 2001, he worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the laboratory of Dr Serge Przedborski at the Department of Neurology, Movement Disorders Division, at Columbia University (New York, USA), focusing on the molecular mechanisms of neuronal death in Parkinson's disease. To continue his work, he obtained in 2001 a position as an Assistant Professor of Neurology at Columbia University. In December 2005, he moved back to Barcelona as an ICREA Research Professor to develop a new research lab on Neurodegeneration at the Vall d’Hebron Research Institute, thanks to the support of the European Commission’s Marie Curie Excellence Grants program. In addition, he holds positions as associate Professor at the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of the Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB) and as Principal Investigator of the Spanish Network of Excellence on Neurodegenerative Diseases (CIBERNED).

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Wed 17 Feb 2016 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

Breaking Bad and Creating Good: Exploiting DNA as an Immune Adjuvant to Treat Cancer and Autoimmune Syndromes

Professor Andrew Mellor

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 18 Feb 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Rheumatology / Geratology

Dr Laura Watts, Prof Paul Wordsworth, Dr Jordan Bowen

Rheumatology: "'Curiosities from the Musculoskeletal Casebook': Lessons from rare bone diseases", Dr Laura Watts on behalf of Prof Paul Wordsworth -- Geratology: "Acute ambulatory care and the Future Hospital", Dr Jordan Bowen -- Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS

Rheumatology: "'Curiosities from the Musculoskeletal Casebook': Lessons from rare bone diseases", Dr Laura Watts on behalf of Prof Paul Wordsworth -- Geratology: "Acute ambulatory care and the Future Hospital", Dr Jordan Bowen -- Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 18 Feb 2016 from 13:15 to 14:15

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

The large scale features of chromatin 3D organisation

Professor Mario Nicodemi

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Fri 19 Feb 2016 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Imaging Prostate Cancer with Amino Acid Positron Emission Tomography

Dr David Schuster

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 19 Feb 2016 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MAITs, Nodes and Chips

Klenerman Group, Chris Wilberg

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 19 Feb 2016 from 11:30 to 12:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Statistical tools based on latent variable models to understand heterogeneity in single-cell gene expression data

Dr. Florian Buettner

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Fri 19 Feb 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

From bench to backside: an editor's story

Dr Yvonne Bordon & Dr Claudio Alves

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Mon 22 Feb 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Oh To Be Seventeen Again: IL-17 signaling in fungal immunity

Dr Sarah Gaffen

My laboratory works on understanding the basis for immunity to infections and autoimmunity. Specifically, we are trying to define mechanisms of signal transduction by cytokines and their receptors. Our main focus is the interleukin-17 superfamily of receptors. Our research is aimed at defining the... Read more

My laboratory works on understanding the basis for immunity to infections and autoimmunity. Specifically, we are trying to define mechanisms of signal transduction by cytokines and their receptors. Our main focus is the interleukin-17 superfamily of receptors. Our research is aimed at defining the molecular and biochemical structure-function relationships in the IL-17R complex, as well as the role of Th17 cells at the oral mucosa.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Tue 23 Feb 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminars: Hazardous drinking: the main cause of Russian health crisis

Professor David Zaridze

Audience: Public

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 24 Feb 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

CPM - WTCHG Career Equality Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

Work-Life Balance Talk - Prof Chris Pugh

Prof Chris Pugh

Seminar enabling speakers from all walks of science to share their experiences of how they have developed their scientific career and balanced this with lifestyle, to inform and inspire others to achieve their full potential in science.

Seminar enabling speakers from all walks of science to share their experiences of how they have developed their scientific career and balanced this with lifestyle, to inform and inspire others to achieve their full potential in science.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Donna Seymour

If you would like to attend, please email, brcpa@well.ox.ac.uk, so that you will be catered for in the buffet sandwich lunch.

Wed 24 Feb 2016 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

The Impact of Immunogenetic Variation on Human Health and Disease

Professor Mary Carrington

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 24 Feb 2016 from 15:00 to 16:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Single-Cell Systems Biology: The Now and The Next

Dave Ruff

A key focus for the Oxford Consortium for Single-Cell Biology is to apply newly developed single-cell techniques to functional genomics. As part of this, the consortium is hosting Dave Ruff to help advance gene editing approaches at the single-cell level. Dave is a thought leader in the development... Read more

A key focus for the Oxford Consortium for Single-Cell Biology is to apply newly developed single-cell techniques to functional genomics. As part of this, the consortium is hosting Dave Ruff to help advance gene editing approaches at the single-cell level. Dave is a thought leader in the development of single-cell methods and will be presenting both the latest technologies and where he thinks the breakthroughs in single-cell systems biology over the next few years will be. Before joining Fluidigm in early 2013, Dave spent 17 years innovating qPCR and next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies at Applied Biosystems/Life Technologies. He has been a lead investigator in the development of qPCR assays and chemistry, multiplex preamplification, protein quantification, NGS library preparation, sample-to-answer workflows, single-cell analysis, and nucleic acid sample-preparation processes. Prior to Applied Biosystems, Dave served as a research scientist at several early-stage biotechnology companies in California, including five years at Amgen. He received his academic instruction in biochemistry and molecular biology at the University of California, Riverside and California Institute of Technology. Dave is currently active in advancing single-cell research topics centered around epigenetics, multimodal quantification and genome editing. He also serves on the editorial board of the Elsevier Journal Biomolecular Detection and Quantification.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Thu 25 Feb 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Target Discovery Institute (Basement Seminar Room), Headington OX3 7FZ

Droplet microfluidics: a tool for massively parallel single-cell analysis, sorting and sequencing

Dr Linas Mazutis

ALL WELCOME Linas Mazutis works on technology development for single cell analysis. His work includes droplet microfludic systems, which they are using for applications including: single-cell transcriptomics, screening of single-cells producing therapeutic antibodies and integrated microfluidic... Read more

ALL WELCOME Linas Mazutis works on technology development for single cell analysis. His work includes droplet microfludic systems, which they are using for applications including: single-cell transcriptomics, screening of single-cells producing therapeutic antibodies and integrated microfluidic platforms for long-term cell cultivation, monitoring and analysis. Droplet microfluidic systems have proven to be valuable tools for single-cell analysis, complex enzymatic assays, disease diagnostics, drug screening or directed evolution experiments. Due to reduced reaction volumes, unique liquid handling capabilities and increased analytical sensitivity microfluidic systems bring a new standard in high-throughput screens.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Thu 25 Feb 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Radiology / GU Medicine

Dr Sam Oduru, Prof Helen McShane, Prof Fergus Gleeson

Radiology: "The Suspected CANcer (SCAN) pathway", Prof Fergus Gleeson -- GU Medicine: "HIV testing: is it on your radar?", Dr Sam Oduru and Prof Helen McShane -- Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS

Radiology: "The Suspected CANcer (SCAN) pathway", Prof Fergus Gleeson -- GU Medicine: "HIV testing: is it on your radar?", Dr Sam Oduru and Prof Helen McShane -- Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 25 Feb 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Ground Floor, Richard Doll Building, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

British doctors: the influence of gender on their aspirations and career trajectories over 40 years.

Professor Michael Goldacre

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 25 Feb 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Thu 25 Feb 2016 from 13:15 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 2

Genetics and pathophysiology of coronal craniosynostosis revealed by Next-Generation DNA sequencing

Vikram Pramod Sharma

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Viva Seminar

Thu 25 Feb 2016 from 14:15 to 16:15

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

New Radcliffe House, Meeting room 2, Walton Street OX2 6NW

Global Health and Non-Communicable Diseases

Prof Andrew Farmer, Prof Carl Heneghan, Dylan Colins, Igho Onakpoya, Merlin Willcox

1415 – 1430 Update on the Global Alliance for Chronic Disease - implementation and capacity building: Prof Andrew Farmer 1430 – 1445 Working with the WHO on the Global Action Plan on NCDs: Prof Carl Heneghan 1445 – 1500 Heartbreak and heart disease: preventing cardiovascular diseases in... Read more

1415 – 1430 Update on the Global Alliance for Chronic Disease - implementation and capacity building: Prof Andrew Farmer 1430 – 1445 Working with the WHO on the Global Action Plan on NCDs: Prof Carl Heneghan 1445 – 1500 Heartbreak and heart disease: preventing cardiovascular diseases in Syrian refugees in Jordan: Dylan Collins 1500 – 1515 Effect of altitude on blood pressure in the Tibetan autonomous region: Igho Onakpoya 1515 – 1530 Pilot clinical study of Moringa oleifera as an oral antidiabetic agent in Mali: Dr Merlin Willcox 1530 – 1615 General discussion: future opportunities

Booking Recommended

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Catia Nicodemo

Fri 26 Feb 2016 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Working with McLaren

Mr Ben Turney

Last year, McLaren Applied Technologies and the University of Oxford announced an exciting new partnership. This presentation outlines the agreed areas of collaboration and the plans for their implementation.

Last year, McLaren Applied Technologies and the University of Oxford announced an exciting new partnership. This presentation outlines the agreed areas of collaboration and the plans for their implementation.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 26 Feb 2016 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

What doesn't kill you makes you stronger - how granulocytic MDSCs impact on T cell memory in severe influenza

Adel Benlarech

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 26 Feb 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off Parks/South Parks Road, OX1 3PT T: 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Guest Speaker - Professor Alison Woollard, Dept of Biochemistry, University of Oxford : How the worm completes its skin, and other stories

Professor Alison Woollard

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

GUEST SPEAKER

Fri 26 Feb 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

The function and execution of RTEL1 activities at vertebrate telomeres

Dr Simon Boulton

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Fri 26 Feb 2016 from 18:00 to 19:15

St Peter's College, Chapel, New Inn Hall Street OX1 2DL

A Scientist in Whitehall: Science meets policy and values

Professor Sir Mark Walport

Sir Mark Walport will be visiting the St Peter's College and addressing the SPC Chapel on 26 February at 6PM. He has been the Government's Chief Scientific Adviser and Head of the Government Office for Science since April 2013. Previously, he was Professor and Head of the Division of Medicine at... Read more

Sir Mark Walport will be visiting the St Peter's College and addressing the SPC Chapel on 26 February at 6PM. He has been the Government's Chief Scientific Adviser and Head of the Government Office for Science since April 2013. Previously, he was Professor and Head of the Division of Medicine at Imperial College London. He was knighted in 2009, and elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 2011.

Booking Required

Audience: Public