Other Seminars

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Thu 1 Dec 2016 from 10:30 to 12:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

How do People with Dementia and Their Carers Make Assistive Technology Work for Them: Innovation, personalisation and bricolage

Dr Grant Gibson

Biography A Social Gerontologist by background, Dr Grant Gibson is a Lecturer in Dementia Studies within the Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Stirling. Grant lectures on the Dementia Studies MSc at the University of Stirling; one of the world’s first and leading Dementia Studies... Read more

Biography A Social Gerontologist by background, Dr Grant Gibson is a Lecturer in Dementia Studies within the Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Stirling. Grant lectures on the Dementia Studies MSc at the University of Stirling; one of the world’s first and leading Dementia Studies postgraduate programmes, and teaches on modules including Dementia and the Environment and Research and Evaluation in Dementia Care. Grant has been a researcher in the fields of dementia care for over 12 years. Within dementia care, Grant’s interests lay in the design and implementation of assistive technologies for people with dementia within routine care, user perspectives in relation to technology in dementia care, and mainstreaming of non-pharmacological interventions (including technology) within dementia care. Grant wider interests include embodiment, masculinity and the subjective experience of chronic illness in older age. Grant’s PhD used embodied perspectives to explore men’s experiences of living with Parkinson’s Disease, and the intersection of age and gender relations in this experience. Funded by the Life Changes Trust, Grant is currently co-investigator on a project called ‘A Good Life in Later Years’, which is using co-production to explore what makes up the essence of a ‘good life’ for older people in Scotland. Abstract In the United Kingdom Assistive technologies (AT) are being ‘mainstreamed’ within dementia care services. However little is known about how people with dementia use either these technologies, or the services that provide them in practice. Reporting the results of part of an NIHR study exploring provision of services to people with dementia in primary care, in this seminar Grant Gibson explores issues around the use of assistive technologies within dementia care. In the bulk of the seminar Grant reports on a project examining the everyday use of AT among people with dementia and their carers. Qualitative, in-depth semi-structured interviews with 29 people with dementia and carers explored their experiences of using AT within their everyday lives and facilitators and barriers to their use. From using sticky notes as signs or re-purposing of everyday or even novelty devices, to networking smartphones and tablets within bespoke telecare systems, AT were used in combination with everyday devices to provide care in often individual, personalised and novel ways. In practice this use can be characterised by ‘bricolage’; the non-conventional combination of devices in diverse ways often differing from their original design. Factors influencing the bricolage based use of technology in dementia care included the ability and willingness of informal carers to act as bricoleurs, a lack of awareness of AT products or how to access AT through formal services among people with dementia, carers and GP’s and a lack of flexibility in AT systems. While everyday use of AT among people with dementia can be characterised by bricolage, current design and delivery of products, alongside the organisation of technology services for dementia limits the use of AT in person centred ways. How people with dementia and carers engage in bricolage when using AT, and how services can mobilise these experiences in order to provide truly person centred technology enabled care services in dementia therefore requires greater attention.

Booking Recommended

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Joseph Wherton

Thu 1 Dec 2016 from 11:00 to 11:45

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

New approaches to the investigation of the interactions between enhancers and promoters during haemopoiesis

Dr James Davies

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

VIVA SEMINAR

Thu 1 Dec 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1

Medical Director's Office / Silver Star

Dr Lucy Mant, Dr Charlotte Frise, Dr Lucy Mackillop, Dr Tony Berendt, Dr Mary Miller, Dr Aoife Lowney

Medical Director's Office: “Delivering Compassionate Excellence at the End of Life: Challenges and Progress”, Dr Tony Berendt, Dr Mary Miller and Dr Aoife Lowney -- Silver Star: "Vitamins and pregnancy: why bother?", Dr Lucy Mant, Dr Charlotte Frise and Dr Lucy Mackillop -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Medical Director's Office: “Delivering Compassionate Excellence at the End of Life: Challenges and Progress”, Dr Tony Berendt, Dr Mary Miller and Dr Aoife Lowney -- Silver Star: "Vitamins and pregnancy: why bother?", Dr Lucy Mant, Dr Charlotte Frise and Dr Lucy Mackillop -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 1 Dec 2016 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Targeting leukemia by lipid specific T cells

Dr Giulia Casorati

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 1 Dec 2016 from 14:00 to 15:00

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Connecting genetic risk to disease endpoints through the human blood plasma proteome

Prof. Dr. Karsten Suhre

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) with intermediate phenotypes, like changes in metabolite and protein levels, provide functional evidence for mapping disease associations and translating them into clinical applications. However, although hundreds of genetic risk variants have been associated... Read more

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) with intermediate phenotypes, like changes in metabolite and protein levels, provide functional evidence for mapping disease associations and translating them into clinical applications. However, although hundreds of genetic risk variants have been associated with complex disorders, the underlying molecular pathways often remain elusive. Associations with intermediate traits across multiple chromosome locations are key in establishing functional links between GWAS-identified risk-variants and disease endpoints. Here, we describe a GWAS performed with a highly multiplexed aptamer-based affinity proteomics platform. We quantified associations between protein level changes and gene variants in a German cohort and replicated this GWAS in an Arab/Asian cohort. We identified many independent, SNP-protein associations, which represent novel, inter-chromosomal links, related to autoimmune disorders, Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and many other disease endpoints. We integrated this information into a genome-proteome network, and created an interactive web-tool for interrogations. Our results provide a basis for new approaches to pharmaceutical and diagnostic applications.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christine Webb

Fri 2 Dec 2016 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

What is the impact of adverse events on surgeons?

Mr Kevin Turner, Catherine Johnson

All surgical procedures carry the potential for adverse events. Dealing with the sequelae of the complications and errors that arise in the course of normal practice is therefore part and parcel of a surgeon’s working life. The challenges and stresses that this creates are now well recognised,... Read more

All surgical procedures carry the potential for adverse events. Dealing with the sequelae of the complications and errors that arise in the course of normal practice is therefore part and parcel of a surgeon’s working life. The challenges and stresses that this creates are now well recognised, although surgical training has, until recently, done little to help surgeons prepare for such events, and on-going professional and personal support is limited. Although it is crucial to focus on the needs of patients and their families when errors occur, it is also important to recognise that surgeons may be the ‘second victims’ in such circumstances. This is not least because they must respond to the challenge of providing effective patient care and may also need to deal with the reactions of the patient’s family, with the judgements of colleagues and, in some cases, with disciplinary or legal proceedings. Until now it has been unclear how, and to what extent, surgeons need support. We have recently launched a national research study to explore these issues. Our research aims to examine the nature of the impact that adverse events have on the professional and personal lives of surgeons, whether there may be differences in that impact for complications versus errors and the nature of the support that surgeons might require as a result. For further information see www.surgeonwellbeing.co.uk or follow us on Twitter @Surgeons_UK.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 2 Dec 2016 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Plasma membrane lipids: a passive or active environment?

Prof Christian Eggeling

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 2 Dec 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Vaccine Biomanufacturing

Dr Tarit Mukhopadhyay

Audience: Members of the University only

Please email lisbeth.soederberg@ndm.ox.ac.uk to set up a meeting with the speaker.

Fri 2 Dec 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Guest Spkr Professor Frances Platt, Professor of Biochemistry and Pharmacology, Dept. of Pharmacology : ‘Lysosomal dysfunction in rare and common diseases’

Professor Frances Platt, Professor of Biochemistry and Pharmacology

The lysosome has emerged over the past decade as a key-signalling hub within the cell, in addition to its better-known role in macromolecule catabolism and recycling. Lysosomal dysfunction leads to devastating human diseases, the best characterised of which are the rare monogenic diseases, the... Read more

The lysosome has emerged over the past decade as a key-signalling hub within the cell, in addition to its better-known role in macromolecule catabolism and recycling. Lysosomal dysfunction leads to devastating human diseases, the best characterised of which are the rare monogenic diseases, the lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs). However, we have recently begun to appreciate that lysosomal dysfunction occurs in a much broader range of rare and common human diseases and may represent a novel therapeutic target.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Fri 2 Dec 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Long-distance interactions in gene expression control: function and regulation by the 3D genome's architecture

Dr Francois Spitz

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Mon 5 Dec 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

The radiobology of proton beam therapy: Associateds with DNA damage complexity and ubiquitin-dependent responses

Dr J L Parsons

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eric O'Neill

Mon 5 Dec 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Synchrony in Drosophila melanogaster: From Peripheral Cells to Group Dynamics

Professor Joel Levine

The fly has been classified as a solitary creature with a limited repertoire of social behaviors that include reproductive interactions such as courtship and mating as well as fighting. Recent studies from our lab and others have shown that social context modulates individual behavior and that... Read more

The fly has been classified as a solitary creature with a limited repertoire of social behaviors that include reproductive interactions such as courtship and mating as well as fighting. Recent studies from our lab and others have shown that social context modulates individual behavior and that group level behaviors become evident when patterns of interaction are viewed as networks. I will discuss studies from our lab that define a neuropeptidergic pathway which controls pheromone expression and mediates social modulation of mating frequency. I will also provide an update on our ongoing analysis of social networks in Drosophila.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Mon 5 Dec 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

New mechanisms of auto inflammatory disease

Dr Seth Masters

Mutations in innate immune genes can cause inherited inflammatory diseases (autoinflammatory diseases), which are the focus for the Masters laboratory. This work involves identifying and validating the functional significance of novel genetic variants, and the pathways in which they fall. One... Read more

Mutations in innate immune genes can cause inherited inflammatory diseases (autoinflammatory diseases), which are the focus for the Masters laboratory. This work involves identifying and validating the functional significance of novel genetic variants, and the pathways in which they fall. One particular pathway of interest is the inflammasome, with recent findings showing how mutations in the Pyrin inflammasome cause Pyrin Associated Autoinflammation with Neutrophilic Dermatosis (PAAND). Related work studied mutations in the NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasomes, and observations from these rare diseases was extended to the analysis of common diseases such as obesity/type 2 diabetes and inflammatory bowel disease. This work provides therapeutic outcomes for patients with severe autoinflammatory disease, and shows how innate immune pathways influence common inflammatory diseases.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 5 Dec 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

3D Chromatin Folding Determines Pathogenicity of Structural Variations

Stefan Mundlos

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Tue 6 Dec 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Exploring the role of SCF at the onset of haematopoiesis

Emanuele Azzoni

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

POSTPONED TO THE NEW YEAR

Tue 6 Dec 2016 from 15:00 to 16:00

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

PD-1 cancer immunotherapy

Professor Gordon Freeman

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 7 Dec 2016 from 10:00 to 11:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Some Malaria vaccine strategies

Prof Robert Sauerwein

Audience: Members of the University only

Please email lisbeth.soederberg@ndm.ox.ac.uk to set up a meeting with the speaker.

Wed 7 Dec 2016 from 10:00 to 11:30

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room (please note, not ORCRB), Headington OX3 7FZ

From in silico to the clinic: methods to study proteasome catalysed peptide splicing - AND - Proteasome-Catalyzed peptide splicing and its immunological relevance

Juliane Liepe, Michele Mishto

Proteasome-Catalyzed peptide splicing and its biological implications - Michele Mishto, PhD Proteasome generates the epitopes presented on MHC class I molecules that elicit the CD8+ T cell response. Such a response could be used as sword to cut the head of tumours by immunotherapies or to develop... Read more

Proteasome-Catalyzed peptide splicing and its biological implications - Michele Mishto, PhD Proteasome generates the epitopes presented on MHC class I molecules that elicit the CD8+ T cell response. Such a response could be used as sword to cut the head of tumours by immunotherapies or to develop vaccines against specific pathogens. In addition to canonical epitopes there have also been a few reported instances of proteasome-generated spliced epitopes. Despite their efficacy in attacking cancer in patients and animal models, these spliced epitopes have been regarded as rare events and substantially neglected. Are we neglecting a relevant portion of the MHC-I immunopeptidome and thus limiting the efficacy of immunotherapies against tumour? To answer to this question we have performed in silico, in vitro and in vivo experiments aimed to identify and characterize MHC-I-presented spliced epitopes and how they are produced. The outcome is astonishing. We have found that, indeed, one third of the MHC-I immunopeptidome variety are proteasome-generated spliced peptides and only through these peptides one third of the antigens detected at the cell surface can be represented. The amount of the spliced peptides at the cell surface is comparable to the canonical non- spliced peptides and could trigger similar CD8+ T cell response. Furthermore, during Listeria monocytogenes infection the production of spliced epitopes by proteasome addresses the CD8+ T cell response toward antigens that would be otherwise neglected by the immune system. Because of these promising results we can argue that by studying the proteasome-catalysed peptide splicing, its mechanisms and dynamics we could improve the efficacy of anti-cancer immunotherapies such as DNA vaccination and adoptive T cell therapy as well as the development of vaccines against pathogens. However, we will also need to understand how proteasome-catalysed peptide splicing is impacting the central and peripheral tolerance processes, whether it plays a pivotal role in autoimmunity, and whether its role is limited to the antigen presentation or it goes beyond that. From in silico to the clinic: methods to study proteasome-catalysed peptide splicing. Juliane Liepe Abstract The proteasome is a multicomplex enzyme that catalyses protein degradation. It is furthermore regulating the immune response through antigen presentation, where the proteasome produces most of the epitopes presented in the MHC-class I pathway. These epitopes can be generated by simple cut, or cut-and-paste events. Latter so-called proteasome-generated spliced peptides represent more than one third of all peptides bound to MHC-class I molecules. The role of these spliced peptides during an immune response and their potential to represent novel targets for immunotherapy against cancer and viral infection still needs to be explored. In order to explore this and the complexity of the involved processes an advanced systems biology pipeline is necessary. We here develop and exploit a set of in silico tools to study the details of proteasome-catalysed peptide splicing and its importance in the MHC-class I pathway. This includes algorithms to identify spliced peptides from ex cellulo mass spectrometry data and methods to classify and characterise spliced peptides. Furthermore, we present in silico tools to facilitate a systematic approach to discover novel spliced peptide targets for immunotherapy either against cancer or through vaccine against pathogens. The proteasome already is a target for therapeutic trails against autoimmune disorders, cancer and infectious diseases, but its full potential still needs to be explored. This research and the in silico tools developed here will aid such translational aspects and advance the ongoing research in systems immunology.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Wed 7 Dec 2016 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Antibody Responses in Dengue and Zika Infection

Prof Gavin Screaton

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 8 Dec 2016 from 10:00 to 11:00

Medical Sciences Division Events

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Kennedy Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

EU Funding in Horizon 2020 - Brexit and Beyond

Gill Wells

This talk will outline the implications of the vote to leave the EU on participation in existing EC-funded research awards and future EC funding opportunities as well as give details of what the University of Oxford is doing to ensure the best possible outcomes for research and education in the... Read more

This talk will outline the implications of the vote to leave the EU on participation in existing EC-funded research awards and future EC funding opportunities as well as give details of what the University of Oxford is doing to ensure the best possible outcomes for research and education in the negotiation of the UK’s new relationship with the EU. The presentation will last approximately 30 minutes followed by 15 minutes for questions

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alison Brindle

Thu 8 Dec 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, NDM Building (please note: not ORCRB), Headington OX3 7FZ

The control of replication fork repair and human disease

Dr Peter McHugh

Our cellular DNA is constantly being assaulted by reactive metabolites and their by-products. Many of the resulting DNA lesions can be repaired throughout the cell cycle. However certain forms of damage such as DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) and DNA protein crosslinks (DPCs) are selectively... Read more

Our cellular DNA is constantly being assaulted by reactive metabolites and their by-products. Many of the resulting DNA lesions can be repaired throughout the cell cycle. However certain forms of damage such as DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) and DNA protein crosslinks (DPCs) are selectively recognised and repaired during DNA replication. ICLs and DPCs block DNA replication and if unrepaired, or misrepaired, produce devastating health conditions. This is exemplified by the inherited syndrome Fanconi anaemia, where patients suffer from bone marrow failure, developmental defects and ultimately a massively increased risk of leukaemia and solid tumours, often in childhood. A key effector of the Fanconi anaemia DNA repair pathway is XPF/FANCQ protein. XPF is the active subunit of a dimeric endonuclease (XPF-ERCC1), capable of processing damaged replication fork structures. Despite the clear link between XPF, replication-coupled DNA repair and human disease, very little is known about the mechanism of the recruitment of XPF to damage-arrested forks, and how XPF interacts with and processes these forks. Here, I will present our recent advances that include a biochemical reconstitution of replication fork repair, and new information on the network or proteins that ensure efficient fork repair.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Thu 8 Dec 2016 from 14:00 to 15:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Phosphorylated CtIP functions as a co-factor of the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 endonuclease in DNA end resection

Professor Petr Cejka

To repair a DNA double-strand break (DSB) by homologous recombination (HR), the 5'-terminated strand of the DSB must be resected. The human MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) and CtIP proteins were implicated in the initiation of DNA end resection, but the underlying mechanism remained undefined. Here we show... Read more

To repair a DNA double-strand break (DSB) by homologous recombination (HR), the 5'-terminated strand of the DSB must be resected. The human MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) and CtIP proteins were implicated in the initiation of DNA end resection, but the underlying mechanism remained undefined. Here we show that CtIP is a co-factor of the MRE11 endonuclease activity within the MRN complex. This function is absolutely dependent on CtIP phosphorylation that includes the key cyclin-dependent kinase target motif at Thr-847. Unlike in yeast where the Xrs2/NBS1 subunit is dispensable in vitro, NBS1 is absolutely required in the human system. The MRE11 endonuclease in conjunction with RAD50, NBS1 and phosphorylated CtIP preferentially cleaves 5'-terminated DNA strands near DSBs. Our results define the initial step of HR that is particularly relevant for the processing of DSBs bearing protein blocks or secondary DNA structures.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Penny Berry

Thu 8 Dec 2016 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, please note doors are locked at 4pm, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Huntington’s Disease In A Dish: Current progress and future perspectives

Professor Nick Allen

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Thu 8 Dec 2016 from 16:30 to 18:00

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

TrueColours UC – the expected and unexpected! and Molecular redefinition of human intestinal stromal cells using single cell RNAseq

Dr Alissa Walsh, Dr James Kinchen

This week we welcome Dr Alissa Walsh who will be talking about TrueColours UC and Dr James Kinchen who will be discussing molecular phenotypes of intestinal stromal cells.

This week we welcome Dr Alissa Walsh who will be talking about TrueColours UC and Dr James Kinchen who will be discussing molecular phenotypes of intestinal stromal cells.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Carolina Arancibia

Fri 9 Dec 2016 from 08:00 to 09:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1

Combined Medical-Surgical Grand Round

Dr Sue Pavord

Haematology: "Go Bloodless", Dr Sue Pavord and the Blood Transfusion Team. Chair: Prof Chris O'Callaghan

Haematology: "Go Bloodless", Dr Sue Pavord and the Blood Transfusion Team. Chair: Prof Chris O'Callaghan

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 9 Dec 2016 from 15:00 to 16:00

Medical Sciences Division Events

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

EU Funding in Horizon 2020 - Brexit and Beyond

Gill Wells

This talk will outline the implications of the vote to leave the EU on participation in existing EC-funded research awards and future EC funding opportunities as well as give details of what the University of Oxford is doing to ensure the best possible outcomes for research and education in the... Read more

This talk will outline the implications of the vote to leave the EU on participation in existing EC-funded research awards and future EC funding opportunities as well as give details of what the University of Oxford is doing to ensure the best possible outcomes for research and education in the negotiation of the UK’s new relationship with the EU. The presentation will last approximately 30 minutes followed by 15 minutes for questions.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alison Brindle

Fri 9 Dec 2016 from 16:00 to 17:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Beyond inflammation: MMP-9 in neuro-psychiatric disorders’

Professor Leszek Kaczmarek

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 12 Dec 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Characterisation of novel cellular pathways restricting virus replication in mammalian and plant cells: exploitation for vaccine design

Prof Peter Simmonds

Audience: Members of the University only

Please email lisbeth.soederberg@ndm.ox.ac.uk to set up a meeting with the speaker.

Mon 12 Dec 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

A novel mechanism for controlling the bioavailability and activation of latent TGFb

Tonia Vincent

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eric O'Neill

Wed 14 Dec 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Medical Sciences Division Events

Tinbergen Building, Lecture Theatre A, Experimental Psychology, South Parks Road , South Parks Road OX1 3PS

EU Funding in Horizon 2020 - Brexit and Beyond

Gill Wells

This talk will outline the implications of the vote to leave the EU on participation in existing EC-funded research awards and future EC funding opportunities as well as give details of what the University of Oxford is doing to ensure the best possible outcomes for research and education in the... Read more

This talk will outline the implications of the vote to leave the EU on participation in existing EC-funded research awards and future EC funding opportunities as well as give details of what the University of Oxford is doing to ensure the best possible outcomes for research and education in the negotiation of the UK’s new relationship with the EU. The presentation will last approximately 30 minutes followed by 15 minutes for questions

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alison Brindle

Wed 14 Dec 2016 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

IFITM3 Regulation of Viral Pathogenesis

Prof Ian Humphreys

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 14 Dec 2016 from 14:00 to 15:00

SGC Seminars

Old Road Campus, WTCHG, Seminar room A

Identification of novel functional sites in protein domains from the analysis of human variation

Prof Geoff Barton

In this talk I will present for the first time a new analysis that compares the growing publically available variation data for human with variation seen across all available protein sequences regardless of species. The analysis confirms expected patterns of variation in human are consistent with... Read more

In this talk I will present for the first time a new analysis that compares the growing publically available variation data for human with variation seen across all available protein sequences regardless of species. The analysis confirms expected patterns of variation in human are consistent with protein structural features, but also highlights structurally and functionally important sites in around 15,000 human protein domains that are not found by conventional sequence analysis methods and would be hard to identify even by inspection of the protein three-dimensional structure. Some of the identified sites are well characterised and known to interact with ligands. The importance of other identified sites has previously been unrecognised, but our analysis suggests they are likely to have key roles in binding or domain stability. In the talk I will explain the method and illustrate the new analysis with a number of examples including the Nuclear Receptor Ligand Binding Domains and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) which are important therapeutic targets. The new method shows promise in helping to guide the interpretation of nsSNPs in context with disease studies as well as contributing to the deeper understanding of protein function and specificity.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Wed 14 Dec 2016 from 15:00 to 16:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Small Lecture Theatre (2nd floor), off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Making the most of your microscopy images with CellProfiler and CellProfiler Analyst

Dr Beth Cimini

Beth Cimini is a postdoctoral fellow and assay developer in Dr. Anne Carpenter's lab at the Broad Institute. Beth graduated magna cum laude with BA from Boston University, where she studyied cholinergic stimulation of nitric oxide production in the salamander retina. She went on to do her PhD at... Read more

Beth Cimini is a postdoctoral fellow and assay developer in Dr. Anne Carpenter's lab at the Broad Institute. Beth graduated magna cum laude with BA from Boston University, where she studyied cholinergic stimulation of nitric oxide production in the salamander retina. She went on to do her PhD at University of California-San Francisco under Dr. Elizabeth Blackburn, where she focused on the physiological roles of different isoforms of the TIN2 telomere master regulator. The Carpenter lab is the home of CellProfiler and CellProfiler Analyst, two open-source software packages designed to help biologists analyze and explore microscopy data. CellProfiler is launched 125,000+ times per year by users around the world and has been cited in more than 3,500 papers from 1,000 distinct laboratories.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Thu 15 Dec 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

'Lipid galaxy – Engaging invariant Natural Killer T cells in immunoprotection

Henk Schipper, MD PhD

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Tue 20 Dec 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Lineage commitment and chromatin dynamics

Professor Frank Grosveld

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 20 Dec 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Immune checkpoints in atherosclerosis

Prof Esther Lutgens

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Tue 20 Dec 2016 from 13:00 to 13:45

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

The role of elements binding CTCF and Cohesin in directing tissue-specific enhancer activity

Lars Hanssen

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

VIVA SEMINAR

Wed 21 Dec 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, Level 5 Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DU

Human Focus Group: Simmons Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Carolina Arancibia