Other Seminars

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Tue 5 Apr 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Population Health Seminars

New Richards Building, Teaching Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LG

BHF CPNP Seminar: Current WHO population based programmes to promote diet and physical activity

Dr Temo Waqanivalu

Dr Temo Waqanivalu is currently the Program Officer, Surveillance and Population Based Prevention (SPP) Unit in the Prevention of NCD Department (PND) in WHO HQ, Geneva. The focus of the work is on providing technical guidance and support to member states on population based prevention in the... Read more

Dr Temo Waqanivalu is currently the Program Officer, Surveillance and Population Based Prevention (SPP) Unit in the Prevention of NCD Department (PND) in WHO HQ, Geneva. The focus of the work is on providing technical guidance and support to member states on population based prevention in the areas of diet (salt reduction, obesity prevention, marketing of foods and non-alcoholic beverages to children) and physical activity. Prior to joining WHO HQ he was Coordinator of Non-Communicable Disease (NCD) and Health Promotion of the WHO Division of Pacific Technical Support (DPS) of the Western Pacific region located in Suva, Fiji. From 1994 after graduation from Fiji School of Medicine, he worked in the Ministry of Health of the Fiji Islands and progressed through the ranks of Public Health and last held the post of National Advisor NCD before moving to WHO in December 2005 as the Technical Officer Nutrition and Physical Activity. He progressed through work in WHO to the position of Coordinator NCD and Health Promotion, the position he last held, overseeing and coordinating WHO support and providing direct technical advice in areas of NCD (including mental health) and Health Promotion and general public health to the 22 Pacific Island Countries and areas. He has also held part-time lecturer positions at the Fiji School of Medicine.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 5 Apr 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

DNA repair, NAD+ and mitophagy in neurodegeneration and ageing

Dr Evandro Fang

Ageing is emerging as a universal problem bringing formidable socioeconomic challenges. Studies on the mechanisms of ageing will facilitate our understanding of the process and will generate potential preventive strategies. Since no single ageing theory can satisfactorily explain all aspects of the... Read more

Ageing is emerging as a universal problem bringing formidable socioeconomic challenges. Studies on the mechanisms of ageing will facilitate our understanding of the process and will generate potential preventive strategies. Since no single ageing theory can satisfactorily explain all aspects of the ageing process, an integration of multiple theories on ageing is favored. The speaker will describe his latest studies on how two classical ageing hypotheses, persistent DNA damage and mitochondrial dysfunction, converge to explain premature ageing symptoms and contribute to neurological phenotypes in a series of ageing laboratory models. Emerging evidence suggests a critical role for DNA damage signalling from the nucleus to mitochondria (NM signalling) in regulating mitochondrial function and ageing. The interconnected roles of DNA damage, NAD+, and mitophagy will be explored in relation to ageing and neurodegenerative diseases, especially Alzheimer’s disease.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Penny Berry

Wed 6 Apr 2016 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, 2nd floor (note main door closes at 4pm), off Parks Road OX1 3PT

The Function of alpha-Synuclein

Professor Robert Edwards

Professor Robert Edwards received his BA from Yale College and his MD from Johns Hopkins. He trained in clinical neurology at UCSF, and as a postdoctoral fellow in molecular biology with William Rutter, also at UCSF. Professor Edwards established his own laboratory first at UCLA in 1990 when he... Read more

Professor Robert Edwards received his BA from Yale College and his MD from Johns Hopkins. He trained in clinical neurology at UCSF, and as a postdoctoral fellow in molecular biology with William Rutter, also at UCSF. Professor Edwards established his own laboratory first at UCLA in 1990 when he began to work on neurotransmitter transporters and Parkinson’s disease. In addition, the Edwards lab has contributed to molecular cloning of the first opioid receptor, as well as the synaptic vesicle protein SV2. He moved back to UCSF in 1995 and has continued to make fundamental contributions to our understanding of both neurotransmitter release and neurodegenerative disease. His group has identified three distinct families of proteins that transport classical transmitters into synaptic vesicles, and explored their role in synaptic transmission using a combination of biochemistry, biophysical methods, optical imaging and genetic manipulation in mice. The group is also exploring both physiological and pathological roles of the Parkinson's disease-associated protein alpha-synuclein. Professor Edwards is a member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation and has won a number of awards, including two Distinguished Investigator Awards from NARSAD. He has served on numerous editorial boards and review committees, including the Scientific Advisory Board of the National Parkinson Foundation. Current research interests include Parkinson’s disease and neurotransmitter release.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Serena Cerritelli

Thu 7 Apr 2016 from 10:30 to 11:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Fragmented narratives of young people living with skin conditions

Abigail McNiven

Booking Recommended

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Thu 7 Apr 2016 from 11:00 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Negotiating normalcy: enacting healthy bodies in HIV narratives

Thuy Phan

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Fri 8 Apr 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting Room A/B, Headington OX3 7BN

Membrane pore-forming proteins in the arms race between host and pathogen

Helen Saibil

The talk will cover electron microscopy studies on pore forming proteins of the MACPF/CDC superfamily which includes the key immune mediators perforin and complement C9, as well as the bacterial cholesterol dependent cytolysins.

The talk will cover electron microscopy studies on pore forming proteins of the MACPF/CDC superfamily which includes the key immune mediators perforin and complement C9, as well as the bacterial cholesterol dependent cytolysins.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof David Stuart

Fri 8 Apr 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Department of Oncology

Radiological Protection - a case of the Emperor's New Clothes

Prof Wade Allison

Wade Allison examines the science, motives and consequences of today's radiation safety regulations. He outlines how the principles of the current safety culture might be changed and the benefits of doing so, not only for Medicine but also for the global environment.

Wade Allison examines the science, motives and consequences of today's radiation safety regulations. He outlines how the principles of the current safety culture might be changed and the benefits of doing so, not only for Medicine but also for the global environment.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Daniel McGowan

Mon 11 Apr 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Structural proteomics: development of an integrated pipeline from genes to crystals

Prof Raymond Owens

My background is in molecular biology/biotechnology and its application to complex multi-disciplinary projects both in industry and academia. I currently lead the Oxford Protein Production Facility-UK), an initiative of the University of Oxford, funded by the MRC and BBSRC at the Research Complex... Read more

My background is in molecular biology/biotechnology and its application to complex multi-disciplinary projects both in industry and academia. I currently lead the Oxford Protein Production Facility-UK), an initiative of the University of Oxford, funded by the MRC and BBSRC at the Research Complex at Harwell. We work in partnership with academic groups across the UK on the production and crystallization of a wide variety of recombinant proteins of biomedical importance. Our research activity is focused on the expression and characterisation of protein: protein, and protein: ligand complexes. In particular, we have been investigating the interaction between β-lactam antibiotics (penicillins and cephalosporins) and their therapeutic target in gram negative bacteria (Sainsbury et al. 2011, van Berkel et al. 2013). Recent results point to the possibility of using structural information in the design of new inhibitors for the treatment of infections by antibiotic resistant bacteria (Ren et al 2016).

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Tue 12 Apr 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Haematopoietic flow, cell competition and T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

Professor Hans-Reimer Rodewald

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 13 Apr 2016 from 15:00 to 16:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Transcriptional control of adaptive immunity by BACH2 - lessons from patients

Dr Ben Afzali

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Wed 13 Apr 2016 from 16:00 to 16:45

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Evolutionary tradeoffs and the geometry of gene expression space

Professor Uri Alon

Uri Alon is a Systems Biologists at the Weizmann Institute of Science. He was trained as a physicist, but got hooked by the challenge of understanding the design principles of cells. His lab studies “biological networks and circuits, and more recently, also principles of human interactions, using... Read more

Uri Alon is a Systems Biologists at the Weizmann Institute of Science. He was trained as a physicist, but got hooked by the challenge of understanding the design principles of cells. His lab studies “biological networks and circuits, and more recently, also principles of human interactions, using a combined experimental and theoretical approach, aiming to uncover general underlying principles that govern their functioning and evolution” https://www.weizmann.ac.il/mcb/UriAlon/homepage. He did pioneering work in discovering network motifs, and was awarded, among others, the Overton Prize by the International Society for Computation Biology (2004) and the HFSP Nakasone Award (2014). He is a member of EMBO. Apart from his scientific credentials, Uri Alon is well known for his songs, TED talk and publications on the culture of science. Taking a leaf out of the book of improvisation theatre, he has been an inspiration to many on nurturing and supporting the next generation of scientists.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Wed 13 Apr 2016 from 17:15 to 18:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

Love and fear in the lab - a guitar talk on the importance of emotions in science

Professor Uri Alon

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Thu 14 Apr 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Policing secretion: protein quality control and traffic COPs

Dr Liz Miller

Research in the Miller lab is broadly aimed at understanding basic mechanisms of secretory protein biogenesis, focusing on protein quality control within the endoplasmic reticulum. They use the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as a model system, which affords facile biochemical, genetic,... Read more

Research in the Miller lab is broadly aimed at understanding basic mechanisms of secretory protein biogenesis, focusing on protein quality control within the endoplasmic reticulum. They use the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as a model system, which affords facile biochemical, genetic, genomic and proteomic tools. By using such a tractable model system, they can rapidly discover new pathways and dissect mechanisms that may be directly relevant to a number of human diseases, most notably cystic fibrosis and similar diseases of protein misfolding. Vesicle formation from the ER is relatively well understood and relies on cytoplasmic coat proteins known as the COPII coat. Yet, despite a relatively deep understanding of the mechanisms that drive COPII vesicle formation and cargo capture, we know very little about how this process is regulated to prevent improper traffic of misfolded proteins. One long-term goal is to understand how vesicle abundance and architecture can adapt to changing physiological needs with respect to cargo load.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Thu 14 Apr 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Jenner Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

Identifying malaria antigens associated with protection

Prof Laurent Rénia

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Thu 14 Apr 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

RAPIDE Platform for Ebola treatment studies

Professor Peter Horby

The RAPIDE platform was a unique & novel platform for assessing potential treatments for Ebola virus disease. The trial design was pragmatic and aimed to achieve answers quickly and appropriately within the context of an unprecedented infectious disease. The Wellcome Trust were able to rapidly fund... Read more

The RAPIDE platform was a unique & novel platform for assessing potential treatments for Ebola virus disease. The trial design was pragmatic and aimed to achieve answers quickly and appropriately within the context of an unprecedented infectious disease. The Wellcome Trust were able to rapidly fund the study. There was a remarkable collaborative effort between the affected countries, humanitarian organisations, governments, public health agencies and National Health Staff. The study examined two potential treatments using a phase II trial: Brincidofovir was tested in Liberia and TKM-130803 was tested in Sierra Leone. Professor Horby will discuss the difficulties with running clinical trials under such challenging conditions.   More about the speaker: Peter is a clinical academic who trained in adult medicine, infectious diseases and public health in the UK and Australia. He is Director of the Epidemic Diseases Research Group at Oxford (ERGO) where he is involved in conducting clinical and epidemiological research on epidemic and emerging infections. He has previously held positions with the UK Health Protection Agency, WHO, and was the founding Director of the Oxford University Clinical Research Unit at the National Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Hanoi, Vietnam. He has worked extensively in resource constrained settings and has led research on a range of emerging and epidemic infections, including variant CJD, SARS, H5N1, H7N9, dengue, cholera, measles, Streptococcus suis, and Hand Foot and Mouth Disease. He is the Principal Investigator of the Wellcome Trust funded platform for evaluating experimental therapeutics for Ebola – Rapid Assessment of Potential Interventions and Drugs for Ebola (RAPIDE). His team have been evaluating an intravenous anti-Ebola preparation (TKM-Ebola) in Sierra Leone and Peter supporting the evaluation of convalescent plasma in Sierra Leone and Guinea.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Francois Van Loggerenberg

Refreshments are provided, please arrive in good time.

Fri 15 Apr 2016 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Autophagy defects in monogenic forms of Crohn's Disease

Sumeet Pandey

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 15 Apr 2016 from 13:15 to 14:15

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Rewards and challenges in career as a core facility manager

Stephen Taylor, Christoffer Lagerholm

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Fri 15 Apr 2016 from 14:00 to 15:00

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Ebola: Response, sequencing, vaccines and survivors

Professor Miles W Carrol

The European Mobile Laboratory (EMLab) was the first EBOV diagnostics unit deployed to the outbreak epicentre by WHO in March 2014. This enabled access to many thousands of EBOV positive samples which were transported back to Europe and analysed by deep sequencing platforms to reveal the virus... Read more

The European Mobile Laboratory (EMLab) was the first EBOV diagnostics unit deployed to the outbreak epicentre by WHO in March 2014. This enabled access to many thousands of EBOV positive samples which were transported back to Europe and analysed by deep sequencing platforms to reveal the virus mutation rate and gain in site into pathogen transmission (Carroll et al Nature 2015). Using the MinION, miniature sequencing device, the EMLab subsequently performed NGS on positive samples within Guinea in as little as 24 hours from receipt of positive samples. This enabled the provision of real time molecular epidemiology that helped guide the frontline activities of contact tracing to help halt the transmission chains (Quick et al Nature 2016). The research arm of the EMLab, EVIDENT, also established a study to dissect the immune response of EBOV disease survivors and make comparisons with that induced by vaccination. Additional studies on direct contacts of people infected with EBOV, indicates that many of them have immunity to the virus suggesting the official number of those infected during the outbreak is a significant underestimate. EVIDENT also supported the phase III ring vaccine trial and the favipiravir JIKI therapeutic trial. Miles Carroll joined Public Health England as Deputy Director, Head of Research at Porton Down in September 2008. In his current role he is responsible for > 250 scientists and support services personnel. He also has strategic and operational control to ensure that the Department is at the forefront of translational research in the areas of emerging diseases, diagnostics and decontamination, host pathogen interactions, infectious disease vaccines and therapeutics. Miles gained his PhD from the Medical Faculty at the University of Manchester which enabled him to obtain an International Fogarty Fellowship and continue his studies on recombinant poxviruses at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, USA. On his return to the UK, Miles Joined Oxford Biomedica as Vice President of Immunotherapy. At OBM Miles invented the cancer vaccine, TroVax and led the pre-clinical and Phase II development programme. Miles has authored >60 publications primarily in the field of recombinant vaccines and emerging diseases, and has >10 granted patents. He has acted as an advisor to several biotech companies, appeared as an expert witness in both European and US patent cases. He also serves on the Scientific Review Boards of both Animal and Plant Health Institute (Weybridge) and Defence Science and Technology Laboratories. Miles is honorary Professor of Vaccinology at the Medical Faculty of the University of Southampton.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Francois Van Loggerenberg

Please note new time. Refreshments provided - please arrive early

Mon 18 Apr 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Jenner Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

Recombinant MVA based vaccines for the Global Control of African Horse Sickness

Dr Javier Castillo-Olivares

The presentation will cover the main features of the disease, the rational for conducting our research and the work we have been carrying out using MVA based vaccines to prevent AHS. We are working on other aspects of the disease but will not have time to talk much about other subjects. These include pathogenesis, epitope mapping and immuno-therapy.

The presentation will cover the main features of the disease, the rational for conducting our research and the work we have been carrying out using MVA based vaccines to prevent AHS. We are working on other aspects of the disease but will not have time to talk much about other subjects. These include pathogenesis, epitope mapping and immuno-therapy.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Tue 19 Apr 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Catering provided so please arrive promptly - First come, first served, Headington OX3 7FZ

Putting Programmers into Programs: modelling and capacity building in malaria control programs

Prof Lisa White

There is no “one size fits all” intervention for malaria elimination due to the spectrum of available sub-optimal interventions acting at different stages of the parasite life-cycle and the heterogeneous transmission landscape. Every district of every country has its own unique challenges,... Read more

There is no “one size fits all” intervention for malaria elimination due to the spectrum of available sub-optimal interventions acting at different stages of the parasite life-cycle and the heterogeneous transmission landscape. Every district of every country has its own unique challenges, conditions and solutions. Mathematical modelling is the best available approach for combining the many interacting factors that must be considered. This approach would increase the cost-effectiveness of a national elimination strategy if it were integrated into the national malaria control program. However, mathematical modelling is a relatively new discipline and has yet to reach many of the countries where malaria elimination is being implemented. A project is underway to simultaneously develop bespoke mathematical models for the Asian setting and train a new group of mathematical modelers embedded within their national malaria control programs. These modelers have formed a network where expertise and model programs are shared freely within the group. Through their national modelers, national control programs are able to access the full suite of models developed by the project staff and modify them to answer nationally relevant questions. More about the speaker: Lisa White is currently the head of an Oxford University mathematical and economic modelling (MAEMOD) group based in Thailand at the Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit whose research focus is on tropical infections and primarily malaria. MAEMOD coordinates an international network of infectious disease modellers and modelling research beneficiaries working in the Tropics (TDModNet). Her work on malaria combines within and between host infection models with multi-strain/species modelling to consider the characterisation, emergence and spread of antimalarial drug resistance and its containment. She has strong collaborative links with the National Center of Malaria Control (CNM) in Cambodia and members of the WHO concerned with the containment of artemisinin resistance in its focus in Western Cambodia. She is also an active member of Malaria Eradication Research Agenda (malERA) an international consultative initiative aimed at identifying current knowledge gaps and new tools needed for malaria eradication. She is now developing mathematical models to be used as tools for national and international malaria elimination strategy design in the Asia-Pacific region. A large part of this approach will be to build capacity in the region for performing mathematical modelling research and for policymakers to access these new human resources effectively.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Francois Van Loggerenberg

Refreshments provided - please arrive early

Tue 19 Apr 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

MHU Student Presentations

Julia Truch; Martin Larke; Eleni Louka

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 20 Apr 2016 from 14:00 to 15:00

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

Imaging genomics of functional brain networks

Dr Jonas Richiardi

During rest, brain activity is intrinsically synchronized between different brain regions, forming networks of coherent activity. These 'resting-state' functional networks (FNs), consisting of multiple regions widely distributed across lobes and hemispheres, appear to be a fundamental theme of... Read more

During rest, brain activity is intrinsically synchronized between different brain regions, forming networks of coherent activity. These 'resting-state' functional networks (FNs), consisting of multiple regions widely distributed across lobes and hemispheres, appear to be a fundamental theme of neural organization in mammalian brains. Previous work has mostly focused on polymorphisms in candidate genes, or used a twin study approach to demonstrate heritability of aspects of resting-state connectivity. The recent availability of high spatial resolution post-mortem brain gene expression datasets, together with several large-scale imaging genetics datasets, which contain joint in-vivo functional brain imaging data and genotype data for several hundred subjects, opens intriguing data analysis avenues. Using novel cross-modal graph-based statistics, we show that functional brain networks defined with resting-state fMRI can be recapitulated using measures of correlated gene expression, and that the relationship is not driven by gross tissue types. The set of genes we identify is significantly enriched for certain types of ion channels and synapse-related genes. We validate results by showing that polymorphisms in this set significantly correlate with alterations of in-vivo resting-state functional connectivity in a group of 259 adolescents. We further validate results on another species by showing that our list of genes is significantly associated with neuronal connectivity in the mouse brain. These results provide convergent, multimodal evidence that resting-state functional networks emerge from the orchestrated activity of dozens of genes linked to ion channel activity and synaptic function.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Rosie Butler

Wed 20 Apr 2016 from 14:00 to 15:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Specificity, cross-talk and adaptation in Type I Interferon signaling

Professor Anton Zilman

Innate immune system is the first line of defense of higher organisms against pathogens. It coordinates the behavior of millions of cells of multiple types, achieved through numerous signaling molecules. This talk focuses on the signaling specificity of a major class of signaling molecules - Type I... Read more

Innate immune system is the first line of defense of higher organisms against pathogens. It coordinates the behavior of millions of cells of multiple types, achieved through numerous signaling molecules. This talk focuses on the signaling specificity of a major class of signaling molecules - Type I Interferons - which are also used therapeutically in the treatment of a number of diseases, such as Hepatitis C, multiple sclerosis and some cancers. Puzzlingly, different Interferons act through the same cell surface receptor but have different effects on the target cells. They also exhibit a strange pattern of temporal cross-talk resulting in a serious clinical problem - loss of response to Interferon therapy. We combined mathematical modeling with quantitative experiments to develop a quantitative model of specificity and adaptation in the Interferon signaling pathway. The model resolves several experimental puzzles and directly affects the clinical use of Type I Interferons in treatment of viral hepatitis and other diseases.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Thu 21 Apr 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Thu 21 Apr 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Understanding regulatory circuitry through large-scale genetic perturbation analyses

Prof Frank Holstege

The long-term goal of the Frank Holstege's group is to develop wiring-diagram models that describe how regulatory circuitry works at the molecular level across entire genomes. Their initial focus is on transcription regulation and their analyses require quantitative measurements of transcription... Read more

The long-term goal of the Frank Holstege's group is to develop wiring-diagram models that describe how regulatory circuitry works at the molecular level across entire genomes. Their initial focus is on transcription regulation and their analyses require quantitative measurements of transcription rates for all genes, determination of transcription factor occupancy across the genome, mechanistical insight into signal transduction induced protein-modifications and their consequences for transcription, analysis of chromatin structure and modifications, the activity of co-regulatory protein complexes, etc. They have put together a powerful tool-box for genome-wide analyses that includes DNA microarray expression-profiling, genome-wide localisation analysis by ChIP on chip and various bioinformatics tools.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Thu 21 Apr 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Oncology / Radiology

Dr Victoria Woodcock, Prof Sarah Blagden, Dr Ambika Talwar

Oncology: "Trials and Protides: Chemotherapy for the 21st Century?", Dr Victoria Woodcock and Prof Sarah Blagden -- Radiology: "The pulmonary nodule, friend or foe?", Dr Ambika Talwar -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Oncology: "Trials and Protides: Chemotherapy for the 21st Century?", Dr Victoria Woodcock and Prof Sarah Blagden -- Radiology: "The pulmonary nodule, friend or foe?", Dr Ambika Talwar -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 22 Apr 2016 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

'Rare events - unavoidable challenges and lessons to be learned'

Mr Radu Mihai

Treating rare diseases raise the challenge of minimal previous exposure to similar operations. Defining a learning curve is therefore controversial as many such 'events' seem to occur in clusters. Similarly, rare complications might occur in 'clusters' hence the response to rare/never events should be interpreted with caution.

Treating rare diseases raise the challenge of minimal previous exposure to similar operations. Defining a learning curve is therefore controversial as many such 'events' seem to occur in clusters. Similarly, rare complications might occur in 'clusters' hence the response to rare/never events should be interpreted with caution.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 22 Apr 2016 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

A role for LYVE-1 in the lymphatic dissemination of hyaluronan encapsulated Group A Streptococci

Prof David Jackson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 22 Apr 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

CANCELLED: Self-Tuning Neurons and Firing Rate Homeostasis

Gina Turrigiano

Homeostatic mechanisms stabilize neural circuit function by keeping firing rates (FRs) within a set-point range, but whether individual neocortical neurons regulate firing cell-autonomously, and whether this process is restricted to certain behavioral states such as sleep or wake, is unknown. We... Read more

Homeostatic mechanisms stabilize neural circuit function by keeping firing rates (FRs) within a set-point range, but whether individual neocortical neurons regulate firing cell-autonomously, and whether this process is restricted to certain behavioral states such as sleep or wake, is unknown. We have followed the process of FR homeostasis in individual visual cortical neurons in freely behaving rodents as they cycled between sleep and wake states. When FRs are perturbed by visual deprivation, over time they return precisely to a cell-autonomous set-point, and this restoration of firing occurs selectively during periods of active waking and is suppressed by sleep. Longer natural waking periods result in more FR homeostasis, as does artificially extending the length of waking. This exclusion of FR homeostasis from sleep raises the possibility that memory consolidation or some other sleep-dependent process is vulnerable to interference from homeostatic plasticity mechanisms.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

CANCELLED

Mon 25 Apr 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Relating Circuit Dynamics to Computation: Robustness and Dimension-specific Computation in Cortical Dynamics

Shaul Druckmann

Neural dynamics represent the hard-to-interpret substrate of circuit computations. However, not all changes in population activity may have equal meaning, i.e., a small change in the evolution of activity along a particular dimension may have a bigger effect on a given computation than a large... Read more

Neural dynamics represent the hard-to-interpret substrate of circuit computations. However, not all changes in population activity may have equal meaning, i.e., a small change in the evolution of activity along a particular dimension may have a bigger effect on a given computation than a large change in another. We term such conditions dimension-specific computation. If the brain operates under such conditions, our chances to learn what computations a circuit is performing from observing its activity will be greatly improved. We used neural recordings and simultaneous optogenetic perturbations to probe cortical dynamics during motor preparatory activity. We found remarkably robust dynamics along certain dimensions of the population activity, which can be shown to carry nearly all of the decodable behavioral information. The circuit thus appears set up to make informative dimensions stiff, i.e., resistive to perturbations, while leaving uninformative dimensions sloppy, i.e., sensitive to perturbations. This robustness can be achieved by a modular circuit organization, whereby modules with normally independent dynamics correct each other, a common feature in robust systems engineering.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Mon 25 Apr 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Targeting aberrant transcriptional and epigenetic networks for AML treatment

Professor Eric So

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Mon 25 Apr 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Targeting aberrant transcriptional and epigenetic networks for AML treatment

Professor Eric So

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Mon 25 Apr 2016 from 14:30 to 15:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Restriction of HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection in myeloid and lymphoid cells

Lise Chauveau

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Mon 25 Apr 2016 from 17:00 to 18:30

Building capacity on disability in low- and middle-income countries

Kellogg College, Mawby Room (disabled access), 62 Banbury Road OX2 6PN

Identification, diagnosis and management of neurodisabilities in LMICs

Prof Charles Newton, Dr Melissa Gladstone

The second session in this on-going seminar series on Building capacity on disability in low- and middle-income countries will be given my Prof. Charles Newton and Dr. Melissa Gladstone. The theme of this session is the Identification, diagnosis and management of neurodisabilities in LMICs. ... Read more

The second session in this on-going seminar series on Building capacity on disability in low- and middle-income countries will be given my Prof. Charles Newton and Dr. Melissa Gladstone. The theme of this session is the Identification, diagnosis and management of neurodisabilities in LMICs. Details of the two talks are provided below: 'Neurodisability in Resource Poor Countries' Prof. Charles Newton Bio: Professor Charles Newton is the Cheryl & Reece Scott Professor of Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and St John's College, University of Oxford, and the Scientific Director of the Muhimbili-Wellcome Programme, Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania as well as the Head of Neurosciences, KEMRI-Wellcome Collaborative Programme, Kilifi Kenya. Professor Newton conducts research on the epidemiology and behavioural consequences of children experiencing a range of adversities in the low-income countries of insults, in particular the association of autism and developmental disorders with infections of the central nervous system (particularly malaria, HIV and bacterial meningitis). 'Early childhood screening and surveillance for developmental disorders in low income settings' Dr. Melissa Gladstone, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool Abstract Developmental delay is common in low income settings. More than 200 million children have developmental delay. Structured programmes in high income settings recommend surveillance programmes with the use of developmental tools to assess children to support health workers to make decisions about when children might be likely to need support. Evidence as to the efficacy of these programmes in terms of their specificity and sensitivity is very limited. The most efficacious programmes at present are those for hearing screening and blood spot screening for certain neonatal disorders which cause developmental delay. Furthermore, programmes supporting parents most at risk are most efficacious. In low income settings, the tools to assess children are not well validated, often not simple to use and are in no way universal. Furthermore, the structures for these programmes are not in place and there are limited services for rehabilitation. Without these structures, children may be identified but no support provided. This may be distressing for families and cause them to spend resources that they do not have hunting for services which do not exist. Integrated programmes to support developmental stimulation, early communication and nutrition have been shown to be effective in improving short term developmental and long term psychosocial and cognitive outcomes in later life although for these to be effective they will also require infrastructure, funding and clear supervisory structures. Children with disabilities could be incorporated into these programmes and can benefit from these programmes. These do not rely on the developmental age of the child but purely look at provision of support to families. This is likely to be more effective. A shift from surveillance and screening to provision of integrated support programmes from infancy for children at risk is likely to make the biggest inroads to reducing developmental delay and for supporting parents of children with disabilities. These require good training, supportive supervision and effective integration into systems of care which have adequate resources to enable this. Bio: Dr Melissa Gladstone is a Senior Lecturer in Paediatric Neurodisability at the Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool. Her focus is in improving low cost interventions and outcomes for children with neurodevelopmental disorders in low income settings. Together with her team she has developed the Malawi Developmental Assessment Tool (MDAT), a tool to assess child development in rural African settings that has been applied widely in Africa. For more info, please see: http://www.mchw.org/?p=883

Audience: Public

Organisers: Dr Anne Geniets

Tue 26 Apr 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Tue 26 Apr 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Single cell gene expression dynamics

Professor Jonathan Chubb

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 26 Apr 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Tue 26 Apr 2016 from 14:30 to 15:30

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Utilizing natural variations and systems biology to study the human immune system

Dr John Tsang

Dr. Tsang is a Principal Investigator at the intramural research program of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, where he leads a laboratory investigating systems immunology. He is also the founding director of computational systems biology at the Trans-NIH Center for Human... Read more

Dr. Tsang is a Principal Investigator at the intramural research program of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, where he leads a laboratory investigating systems immunology. He is also the founding director of computational systems biology at the Trans-NIH Center for Human Immunology (CHI), where he leads efforts to integrate and analyze of large-scale data sets to dissect the human immune system in health and disease. His lab develops and applies systems biology approaches – combining computation, modeling and experiments - to study the immune system at both the organismal and cellular levels. At the organismal level and working together with colleagues at the CHI, his lab has been utilizing systems biology and large-scale data-driven approaches to study the human immune system using multiplexed technologies in human cohorts. The resulting multi-modal data sets are analyzed and modeled in an integrative manner to 1) uncover biomarkers of immune responsiveness and health, 2) infer connectivities among components of the immune system, and ultimately, 3) understand how immune responses are orchestrated across scales – from molecules to cells to cell-to-cell interactions in space and time. At the cellular level, his lab has been using macrophages as a model to study immune cell adaptations to the environment at both the cell-population and single-cell levels, particularly in assessing and modeling cell-to-cell heterogeneity in transcriptional responses and studying the functional consequences of cell-to-cell variations at both the network and cellular levels. Dr. Tsang received his PhD in biophysics from Harvard University/Massachusetts Institute of Technology, M.Math and B.A.Sc in computer science and computer engineering from the University of Waterloo in Canada. Prior to joining the NIH, Dr. Tsang was a research scientist at Merck Research Laboratories’ Rosetta Inpharmatics Division, where he was integrating large-scale genetic and gene expression data to infer and assess gene networks associated with human diseases.

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 27 Apr 2016 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

A role for toll-like receptors in the regulation of cellular senescence

Dr Juan Carlos Acosta

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 28 Apr 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI (Basement seminar room) (Note: not the ORCRB), Headington OX3 7FZ

Supercharging cell division: how protein phosphatases define the temporal order of mitosis & cytokinesis

Professor Francis Barr

Francis Barr's group is interested in how the polarization & division of human cells is regulated. Their work addresses a number of major questions about the processes needed for cell growth and division, and the consequences of dysregulation of these pathways in human cancers and other diseases.... Read more

Francis Barr's group is interested in how the polarization & division of human cells is regulated. Their work addresses a number of major questions about the processes needed for cell growth and division, and the consequences of dysregulation of these pathways in human cancers and other diseases. For example, one aim is to describe the molecular mechanisms human cells use to regulate cell division and coordinate the processes of chromosome segregation and cytokinesis, with particular focus paid to the role of protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. In this area they have ongoing projects examining the regulation of protein phosphatases in dividing cells, and how PP1 and PP2A phosphatases contribute important timing properties to the metaphase to anaphase transition. A major focus is on the mitotic kinase Aurora A & its control by protein phosphatase 6 (PP6).

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Thu 28 Apr 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Clinical Immunology / Respiratory Medicine

Prof Cal Maclennan, Dr Annabel Nickol

Clinical Immunology: "Pathogen evolution in the immunocompromised host: from primary immunodeficiency to global health", Prof Cal Maclennan. -- Respiratory Medicine: "Irn-Bru – good for your breathing?", Dr Annabel Nickol and Dr Maxine Hardinge. -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Clinical Immunology: "Pathogen evolution in the immunocompromised host: from primary immunodeficiency to global health", Prof Cal Maclennan. -- Respiratory Medicine: "Irn-Bru – good for your breathing?", Dr Annabel Nickol and Dr Maxine Hardinge. -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 29 Apr 2016 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Surgical Grand Round

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 29 Apr 2016 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Exploring mechanisms of NOD2 function in innate immunity

Daniele Corridoni

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 29 Apr 2016 from 11:30 to 12:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

DNA interstrand cross-link and mismatch repair

Dr Jean Gautier

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Penny Berry

Fri 29 Apr 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off Parks/South Parks Road, OX1 3PT T: 01865 272500 , off Parks Road OX1 3PT

GUEST: Prof Fiona Watts FRS FMedSci, Director, Centre for Stem Cells & Regenerative Medicine. Guy's Hospital King's College London :- ‘Signals that control exit from the stem cell compartment in human epidermis’

Professor Fiona Watt FRS

Stem cell behaviour is controlled by intrinsic mechanisms and by external signals from the local microenvironment or niche. Using cultures of human epidermal stem cells, my lab is investigating the interplay between specific intrinsic and extrinsic signals in regulating stem cell fate. We have been... Read more

Stem cell behaviour is controlled by intrinsic mechanisms and by external signals from the local microenvironment or niche. Using cultures of human epidermal stem cells, my lab is investigating the interplay between specific intrinsic and extrinsic signals in regulating stem cell fate. We have been able to define soluble factors, cell surface ligands and extracellular matrix components that control exit from the stem cell compartment.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

GUEST SPEAKER

Fri 29 Apr 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Noncoding RNA regulation of myeloid transcription factors, DNA methylation and leukaemia

Daniel G Tenen

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose