Other Seminars

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Mon 1 Jun 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre (ring CTSU bell to enter building), Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Poxvirus Immune evasion proteins and interference with intrinsic innate immune responses

Prof Joanna Shisler

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Mon 1 Jun 2015 from 14:00 to 15:00

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar rooms A/B, Headington OX3 7BN

HIV viral genomics: virulence, pathogenesis and public health

Christophe Fraser

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 2 Jun 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Diet and type 2 diabetes - where are we now?

Dr Nita Forouhi

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 3 Jun 2015 from 10:00 to 18:00

Oxford Genomic Centre Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Main Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Lifting the Lid on Epigenetics

OXFORD GENOMICS CENTRE SUMMER FORUM 2015 Lifting the lid on Epigenetics Wednesday, 3rd June 2015 Lecture Theatre, Richard Doll Building, Old Road Campus A series of presentations and discussions hosted by the Oxford Genomics Centre 10:00-10:30 Registration and coffee 10:30-10:35 ... Read more

OXFORD GENOMICS CENTRE SUMMER FORUM 2015 Lifting the lid on Epigenetics Wednesday, 3rd June 2015 Lecture Theatre, Richard Doll Building, Old Road Campus A series of presentations and discussions hosted by the Oxford Genomics Centre 10:00-10:30 Registration and coffee 10:30-10:35 Welcome and opening remarks from Dr David Buck Session 1: Common Diseases and Epigenetics (chair: Prof Mark McCarthy) 10:35-11:00 Prof Mark McCarthy (WTCHG) "Life beyond DNA in the research for the molecular basis of type 2 diabetes" 11:00-11:25 Prof Julian Knight (WTCHG) "Genetic modulation of an MHC master regulator: insights into the utility of eQTL mapping" 11:25-11:50 Dr Jordana Bell (King’s College) "TBC" 12:00-13:00 Lunch Session 2: Cancer and Epigenetics (chair: Prof Ian Tomlinson) 13:00-13:25 Dr Andrew Feber (UCL) "TBC" 13:25-13:50 Dr Ben Fairfax (WTCHG) "Exploring the genetics of context specific DNA-methylation in primary monocytes" 13:50-14:15 Dr Andrew Beggs (University of Birmingham) "Epigenetics for biomarker development and scientific translation" 14:15-14:45 Coffee break Session 3: The Emerging Technologies (chair: Dr Tudor Fulga) 14:45-15:10 Dr Gavin Kelsey (Babraham Institute) "Profiling DNA methylation genome-wide in single cells" 15:10-15:35 Dr Timo Wagner (Agena) "Methylation Analysis with MassARRAY – Established and Novel Approaches" 15:35-16:00 Dr Alex Shalek (MIT School of Science) "Enabling 'bottom-up' biology through single cell genomics" 16:00-16:30 Q&A panel with all speakers 16:30:-18:30 Drinks reception with sponsors poster session

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Wed 3 Jun 2015 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Iron, malaria and the gut microbiome

Prof. Michael Zimmermann

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 3 Jun 2015 from 14:30 to 16:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

New Radcliffe House, Room 2, Walton Street OX2 6NW

The Impact of Improved Hospital Survival on Subsequent Emergency Admissions

Dr Mauro Laudicella

Dr Mauro Laudicella is a Senior Lecturer in Health Economics in the HSR and Management division of the School of Health Sciences and an Honorary Research Fellow in the Imperial College Business School and Centre for Health Policy. If anyone would like to meet a speaker please contact Catia Nicodemo: catia.nicodemo@economics.ox.ac.uk

Dr Mauro Laudicella is a Senior Lecturer in Health Economics in the HSR and Management division of the School of Health Sciences and an Honorary Research Fellow in the Imperial College Business School and Centre for Health Policy. If anyone would like to meet a speaker please contact Catia Nicodemo: catia.nicodemo@economics.ox.ac.uk

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Catia Nicodemo

Thu 4 Jun 2015 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

New Radcliffe House, Room 2, Walton Street OX2 6NW

CANCELLED: NIHR CLAHRC Oxford - An overview.

Alex Gardiner

This seminar has now been CANCELLED.

This seminar has now been CANCELLED.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Thu 4 Jun 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Small Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building , off Parks Road OX1 3PT

RESOLFT Super Resolution Microscopy: Application for Life Science

Dr Ilaria Testa

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Thu 4 Jun 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

WTCHG / Cardiology

Dr Vanessa Ferreira, Prof Hugh Watkins, Dr Jenny Taylor, Prof Julian Knight

WTCHG: "Genome Sequencing comes to the Clinic" Cardiology: "New tools for differentiating hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from its mimics" Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS

WTCHG: "Genome Sequencing comes to the Clinic" Cardiology: "New tools for differentiating hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from its mimics" Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 4 Jun 2015 from 16:00 to 17:30

Cortex Club

Sherrington Building, Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Connectomics: The dense reconstruction of neuronal circuits

Dr Moritz Helmstaedter

The mapping of neuronal connectivity is one of the main challenges in neuroscience. Only with the knowledge of wiring diagrams is it possible to understand the computational capacities of neuronal networks, both in the sensory periphery, and especially in the mammalian cerebral cortex. Our methods... Read more

The mapping of neuronal connectivity is one of the main challenges in neuroscience. Only with the knowledge of wiring diagrams is it possible to understand the computational capacities of neuronal networks, both in the sensory periphery, and especially in the mammalian cerebral cortex. Our methods for dense circuit mapping are based on 3-dimensional electron microscopy (EM) imaging of brain tissue, which allows imaging at nanometer-scale resolution across substantial volumes (typically hundreds of micrometers per spatial dimension) using Serial Block-Face Scanning Electron Microscopy (SBEM). The most time-consuming aspect of circuit mapping, however, is image analysis; analysis time far exceeds the time needed to acquire the data. Therefore, we developed methods to make circuit reconstruction feasible by increasing analysis speed and accuracy, using a combination of crowd sourcing and machine learning. We have applied these methods to circuits in the mouse retina, mapping the complete connectivity graph between almost a thousand neurons, and we are currently improving these methods for the application to much larger neuronal circuits in the cerebral cortex. Using these methods, we want to measure the similarity between neuronal networks in the cortex of different individuals and different species in search for the algorithms of sensory perception, search for engrams of sensory experience in the cerebral cortex, and ultimately understand the alterations in neuronal network structure in psychiatric disease.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Alexandru Calin

Fri 5 Jun 2015 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

GM-CSF/ Eosinophil Axis in IL-23-Driven Chronic Intestinal Inflammation

Dr Isabelle Arnold

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 5 Jun 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, ground floor, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Professor Herman Steller : “Regulation of Proteasome Activity in Development, Aging and Disease”

Professor Herman Steller

The long-term health of cells critically relies on selective protein degradation since damaged or aggregated proteins cause proteotoxic stress that can impair cell function and cause cell death. Many neuro-degenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s Disease, ALS... Read more

The long-term health of cells critically relies on selective protein degradation since damaged or aggregated proteins cause proteotoxic stress that can impair cell function and cause cell death. Many neuro-degenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s Disease, ALS and retinitis pigmentosa, are caused by the accumulation of protein aggregates. We recently discovered a novel mechanism that enables cells to avoid proteotoxic stress by stimulating the assembly of proteasomes, the multi-protein protease complex responsible for the regulated proteolysis of intracellular proteins. Significantly, this pathway is sensitive to diet, mitochondrial function, and oxidative stress. Furthermore, the activity of this pathway declines with age. Finally, polymorphisms in the central factor in this pathway, PI31, are associated factor with Alzheimer’s Disease. Our findings suggest that insufficient availability of proteasomes contributes to the aging process and chronic neuro-degenerative diseases. Background reading: Bader, M. Benjamin, S. Wapinski O., Smith, DM., Goldberg, AL., and Steller, H. (2011). A conserved F-box-regulatory complex controls proteasome activity in Drosophila. Cell. 145, 371-82. Cho-Park, P., and Steller, H. (2013). Proteasome regulation by ADP-ribosylation. Cell, 153, 614–627.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

GUEST SPEAKER

Mon 8 Jun 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

The DNA Damage Response

Dr Kyle Miller

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Nemerofksy-Birks

Mon 8 Jun 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre (ring CTSU bell to access building), Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Innate immune responses in bovine tuberculosis

Dr Jayne Hope

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

For any enquiries regarding the seminar or to meet with the speaker, please email lisbeth.soederberg@ndm.ox.ac.uk

Mon 8 Jun 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Peripheral and Central Mechanisms of OA Pain

Professor Victoria Chapman

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Irina Udalova

Mon 8 Jun 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Oxford Genomic Centre Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room A and B, Headington OX3 7BN

Biomarker Development for Immuno-Oncology and Cancer immunotherapy: Simultaneous Digital Counting of Nucleic-Acids and Proteins at 800-Plex

Dr Joseph Beechem

Both the ENCODE and TCGA projects highlighted the value of quantifying multiple biomarker classes (DNA, RNA, and protein) from cancer tumor samples. In the case of cancer immunotherapy, the importance of measuring non-DNA markers (e.g., mRNA and proteins) becomes crucial since cell signaling, tumor... Read more

Both the ENCODE and TCGA projects highlighted the value of quantifying multiple biomarker classes (DNA, RNA, and protein) from cancer tumor samples. In the case of cancer immunotherapy, the importance of measuring non-DNA markers (e.g., mRNA and proteins) becomes crucial since cell signaling, tumor microenvironment, and protein-protein interactions dominate over pure SNP-based (DNA) driver mutations in determining therapeutic response. Combining multiple data types together into a single correlated analysis, however, is adversely effected by the drastically different methodologies utilized for measurement. For example, the fluorescence signal intensity obtained from a camera imaging a protein array (e.g., RPPA) is very difficult to correlate directly with an RNA sequencing count of a clonally amplified, cDNA-converted, mRNA molecule. New developments in multiple biomarker-class optical barcode counting significantly reduce this problem. Recent developments using NanoString Technology has shown how optical barcode technology can be utilized for multiplexed digital counting of proteins and be combined with simultaneous digital counting of nucleic acids on a single platform.

Booking Recommended

Audience: Public

Organisers: Marta Guderska

Mon 8 Jun 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Making Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Backwards and Sideways

Derrick Rossi

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Tue 9 Jun 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Floor meeting - 2 groups will give an update on the research work in their laboratory

Dr Petter Woll, Dr Kerol Bartolovic

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 9 Jun 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Challenges in nutritional epidemiology and selected results from Adventist Health Study-2

Professor Gary Fraser

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 10 Jun 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Interaction profiling through proteomic peptide phage display

Dr Ylva Ivarsson

Ylva Ivarsson’s main research interest is in the molecular interactions that underlie cellular signal transduction. In particular, her group focuses on mapping interactions between modular domains and motifs found in the intrinsically disordered regions of the human proteome. A considerable part... Read more

Ylva Ivarsson’s main research interest is in the molecular interactions that underlie cellular signal transduction. In particular, her group focuses on mapping interactions between modular domains and motifs found in the intrinsically disordered regions of the human proteome. A considerable part of the human proteome is intrinsically disordered and the disordered regions are enriched in short motifs serving as docking sites for peptide binding domains. Domain-motif interactions are crucial for the wiring of signaling pathways but hese interactions are typically transient and difficult to capture through most conventional high-throughput methods. Therefore, her group has developed a novel approach for large-scale profiling of domain-motifs interactions, called Proteomic Peptide Phage Display (ProP-PD). This approach combines bioinformatics, oligonucleotide arrays, peptide phage display and next-generation sequencing. It allows the interrogation of domain-motif interactions on a proteome-wide scale and facilitates de novo motif discovery.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Wed 10 Jun 2015 from 12:30 to 13:30

Oxford Genomic Centre Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room B, Headington OX3 7BN

Routine molecular subgrouping of medulloblastoma: Bridging the divide between research and the clinic using low-cost DNA methylomics

Dr Ed Schwalbe

Background: DNA-methylation patterns allow the subclassification of medulloblastoma, the most common childhood malignant brain tumour, into four molecular subgroups (WNT, SHH, MBGrp3 and MBGrp4). These subgroups have distinct molecular and clinico-pathological features, and their distinction is... Read more

Background: DNA-methylation patterns allow the subclassification of medulloblastoma, the most common childhood malignant brain tumour, into four molecular subgroups (WNT, SHH, MBGrp3 and MBGrp4). These subgroups have distinct molecular and clinico-pathological features, and their distinction is now informing future treatments and risk-stratification. Whilst microarrays to assign subgroup are suitable for research purposes, they are limited by expense, platform-specificity, sample quality requirements and practicality. Here, we aimed to develop a low-cost, array-independent, robust subgrouping assay suitable for routine quality-controlled subclassification, including scant and poor-quality samples. Methods: A minimal, multiply-redundant, 17-locus methylation signature was derived to assign subgroup, using Illumina 450k DNA-methylation array data and subgroup calls from 253 medulloblastomas. A cross-validated machine-learning classifier was developed to assign subgroup using these loci. We next investigated whether bisulfite treatment of DNA could induce methylation-dependent SNPs suitable for multiplexed interrogation of methylation status, using an adaptation of Sequenom's iPlex assay. Multiplexed primer-mixes were designed and quantitation validated using molar-ratios of bisulfite-treated methylated:unmethylated DNA. Subsequently, the assay was run on 101 DNA extracts from fresh-frozen, FFPE and cytospin (<30,000 nuclei) tumour material, representing all subgroups. Subgroup assignments by Sequenom assay were compared to gold standard 450k array calls. Results: Validation using molar-ratios of methylated:unmethylated DNA demonstrated close concordance between methylation-ratios and Sequenom methylation estimates at all loci. Subsequently, 95/103 (92%) medulloblastomas tested were assigned with high confidence to the same subgroup by both Sequenom and 450k assays. Conclusions: Medulloblastomas can be routinely subgrouped using minimal DNA-methylation signatures. The assay is suitable for reliable, robust subgroup assignation from poor-quality, degraded samples using 100ng of DNA. The assay's low-cost, rapidity (3 days from extraction to result) and application to single samples demonstrate its potential for routine use. This first demonstration of multiplexed, methylation-based Sequenom subtyping holds rich promise for future molecular subclassification and prognostication across diverse tumour types. Schwalbe, E.C.1, Hicks, D. 1 , Rafiee, G. 1,Gohlke, H. 2, Enshaei, A. 1, Potluri, S. 1, Matthiesen, J. 1, Mather, M. 1, Chaston, R.3, Crosier, S. 1, Smith, A.J. 1, Williamson, D. 1, Bailey, S. 1, Clifford, S.C. 1 1Northern Institute for Cancer Research, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, U.K. 2Agena BioSciences, Hamburg, Germany 3NewGene, Newcastle upon Tyne, U.K.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Marta Guderska

Thu 11 Jun 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Pandemics: Can we learn the lessons of history?

Professor Michael Baker

Human history has been shaped, and continues to be shaped, by infectious diseases and pandemics. This presentation will draw on research about factors that affected pandemic influenza mortality in the New Zealand armed forces and in isolated Pacific Islands. It will then review lessons from several... Read more

Human history has been shaped, and continues to be shaped, by infectious diseases and pandemics. This presentation will draw on research about factors that affected pandemic influenza mortality in the New Zealand armed forces and in isolated Pacific Islands. It will then review lessons from several modern pandemics, notably smallpox, HIV/AIDS, SARS, and Ebola. The 1918 influenza pandemic killed more people than the entire First World War. How will we commemorate this anniversary in three years’ time? This lecture will make a plea for us to build on these lessons of history so we are better prepared for the inevitable epidemics and pandemics of the future. Bio: Michael Baker is a public health physician and Professor of Public Health at the University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand. He has a strong interest in infectious disease surveillance, prevention and control. His research on infectious diseases won the New Zealand Health Research Council’s Liley Medal in 2013 and his Housing and Health Research Group received the Prime Minister’s Science prize in 2014. Professor Baker has worked internationally with the World Health Organisation and his research is part- funded by the US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention. He is the recipient of the NZ-UK Link Foundation 2015 Visiting Professorship at the University of London’s School of Advanced Study (SAS).

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Francois Van Loggerenberg

Refreshments will be provided - Please arrive promptly.

Thu 11 Jun 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Stroke Medicine / Radiology

Prof Fergus Gleeson, Prof Gary Ford

Stroke Medicine: "When thrombolysis fails" Radiology: "CT: Please Sir, may I have some more" Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Stroke Medicine: "When thrombolysis fails" Radiology: "CT: Please Sir, may I have some more" Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 12 Jun 2015 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

BRCA1 in Innate Immunity

Daniel Gaughan (Simmons Group)

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 12 Jun 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting Rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

Cryomicroscopy of cellular and viral architecture

Prof Peter Rosenthal

I will describe research in two areas of interest to my laboratoy: (1) electron cryotomography and three-dimensional reconstruction of the thin edge of frozen-hydrated cells to understand cytoskeletal architecture and to understanding the packaging of von Willebrand factor (VWF) in rod-shape... Read more

I will describe research in two areas of interest to my laboratoy: (1) electron cryotomography and three-dimensional reconstruction of the thin edge of frozen-hydrated cells to understand cytoskeletal architecture and to understanding the packaging of von Willebrand factor (VWF) in rod-shape granules in endothelial cells called Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs). (2) three-dimensional reconstruction of lipid-enveloped influenza viruses to understand virus assembly and entry into cells during infection. Lastly, I will discuss methods for improving cryomicroscopy images from the molecular to the cellular scale.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eleanor Martin

Fri 12 Jun 2015 from 11:15 to 12:15

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Fri 12 Jun 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, ground floor, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Professor Oscar Marin, KCL : 'Molecular regulation of cortical interneuron diversity and plasticity'

Professor Oscar Marin

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

GUEST SPEAKER

Mon 15 Jun 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Consulting research stakeholders in Kilifi on fair practice in research data sharing: Findings and policy implications

Dr Vicki Marsh

Vicki Marsh is a Senior Researcher in Social Science and Public Health at the KEMRI Wellcome Trust Research Programme in Kenya, Associate Professor at the Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health in NDM and Research Associate at the Ethox Centre in NDPH at Oxford. Originally trained in... Read more

Vicki Marsh is a Senior Researcher in Social Science and Public Health at the KEMRI Wellcome Trust Research Programme in Kenya, Associate Professor at the Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health in NDM and Research Associate at the Ethox Centre in NDPH at Oxford. Originally trained in medicine in the UK, she has worked in Kenya for the past 25 years. Her current main research interests are in health research ethics, with a focus on strengthening research policy.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Francois van Loggerenberg

Refreshments will be provided - Please arrive promptly.

Mon 15 Jun 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre , Headington OX3 7LF

The Use of Biologic Therapies to Induce New Populations of Treg in Autoimmunity

Dr Clare Notley

Limiting the severity of inflammation and its eventual resolution are critical pathways which are vital to minimizing damage to host tissues. We study the ability of the biologics otelixizumab (anti-CD3) and adalimumab (anti-TNF) to induce a potent CD8+FOXP3+ regulatory T cell (Treg) population in... Read more

Limiting the severity of inflammation and its eventual resolution are critical pathways which are vital to minimizing damage to host tissues. We study the ability of the biologics otelixizumab (anti-CD3) and adalimumab (anti-TNF) to induce a potent CD8+FOXP3+ regulatory T cell (Treg) population in rheumatoid arthritis patients. These Treg can suppress CD4+ T cell proliferation and IL-17 and IFN-γ production; however their mechanism of action is unknown. We have been studying how monocytes are crucial for the induction of FOXP3 expression in CD8+ T cells and how CD8+ T cells can control their ability to become a Treg via p38 phosphorylation. Our studies aim to 1) identify novel therapeutic targets that may mimic Treg function or 2) enhance the efficacy of biologic drugs used in the clinic to treat RA and type 1 diabetes by the use of combination therapy.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Irina Udalova

Mon 15 Jun 2015 from 13:30 to 14:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NPEU Seminar - Risks and benefits of psychotropic medication in pregnancy

Dr Irene Peterson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Mon 15 Jun 2015 from 16:00 to 18:00

Dopamine Club

Sherrington Building, Sherrington library, doors to the Sherrington building close at 4:30, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Technical overview and discussion of single unit DA cell recordings in awake animals

Dr Paul Dodson, Anna Kaufmann

This term's meeting will see Paul Dodson and Anna Kaufmann from the MRC Anatomical Neuropharmacology unit discussing their area of expertise of in vivo recordings of single DA cell activity in awake animals. They will be covering technical considerations when embarking on and conducting these... Read more

This term's meeting will see Paul Dodson and Anna Kaufmann from the MRC Anatomical Neuropharmacology unit discussing their area of expertise of in vivo recordings of single DA cell activity in awake animals. They will be covering technical considerations when embarking on and conducting these experiments, what such recordings are telling us about tonic and burst firing modes in DA neurons, as well as presenting exciting new data from their own experiments. Please come along and support the meeting and its lively discussions. DA Club is an informal, lab-meeting style forum promoting interaction between researchers interested in dopamine. Meetings are open to anyone within the University. Doors will be open from 4:00 for drinks, nibbles and a chance to catch up with potential and current collaborators with talks and discussion between 4:30-5:30. Please get in touch with katie.jennings@dpag.ox.ac.uk if you have any questions or wish to be added to the mailing list. You can also visit www.dpag.ox.ac.ukdopamine-club for more details.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Stephanie Cragg

Tue 16 Jun 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Big Data and connected challenges in health: examples in cardiovascular disease

Professor Harry Hemingway

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 17 Jun 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Control of lysosomal integrity and autophagy by sphingolipids - possibilities for therapeutic intervention

Prof. Marja Jaattela

All Welcome to attend.

All Welcome to attend.

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 17 Jun 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

DPAG Guest Speakers

Sherrington Building, Small Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Pulse trains to percepts: The challenge of creating a perceptually intelligible world with sight recovery technologies

Professor Geoff Boynton

Retinal diseases affect more than 20 million individuals worldwide. An extraordinary variety of sight recovery therapies are either about to begin clinical trials, have begun clinical trials, or are currently being implanted in patients. However, as yet we have little insight into the perceptual... Read more

Retinal diseases affect more than 20 million individuals worldwide. An extraordinary variety of sight recovery therapies are either about to begin clinical trials, have begun clinical trials, or are currently being implanted in patients. However, as yet we have little insight into the perceptual experience likely to be produced by these implants – what will the world look like to patients? I will discuss the interplay between the various kinds of sight recovery procedures and the underlying biology of the retina and cortex, and create neuro-perceptual models to create movies simulating what people with ‘restored vision’ are likely to ‘see’.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sara Bouskela

Wed 17 Jun 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

NDM Seminar Series

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Structural Biology/Respiratory Medicine

Assoc. Professor Robert Gilbert, Dr Najib Rahman

Strubi: Hitting a moving target: using structural biology to understand determinants of cell fate relevant to cancer and neurodevelopmental disorders. Respiratory: Malignant pleural effusion: therapeutic approaches and novel treatments

Strubi: Hitting a moving target: using structural biology to understand determinants of cell fate relevant to cancer and neurodevelopmental disorders. Respiratory: Malignant pleural effusion: therapeutic approaches and novel treatments

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof Julian Knight

Thu 18 Jun 2015 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Room 1, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

Thu 18 Jun 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Geratology / Palliative Care

Dr Laura Brown, Dr Anna Sutherland, Dr Sarah Hanrott, Dr Tim Harrison

Geratology: "High Court or Modus Vivendi?" Palliative Care: "Steroids and seizures: Palliative management of brain tumours" Chair: Prof Chris O'Callaghan

Geratology: "High Court or Modus Vivendi?" Palliative Care: "Steroids and seizures: Palliative management of brain tumours" Chair: Prof Chris O'Callaghan

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 18 Jun 2015 from 15:00 to 16:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Magnesium cation signaling in the healthy and diseased immune system

Dr Michael Lenardo

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Fri 19 Jun 2015 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

"Evidence of T Cell Driven Selection Pressure in the HIV-1 UTR"

Katja Pfafferot (McMichael Group)

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 19 Jun 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

DPAG Guest Speakers

Sherrington Building, In the Small Lecture Theatre, 2nd floor, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Building a Nanoscale Bushy Cell Connectome: Wiring Diagrams, Big Data Challenges and Hearing In Silico

Dr George Spirou

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Zoltan Molnar

GUEST SPEAKER

Fri 19 Jun 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, ground floor, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Professor Anna Gloyn : 'Unravelling causal mechanisms for diabetes pathogenesis’

Professor Anna Gloyn

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Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

GUEST SPEAKER

Fri 19 Jun 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

From plasmid to patent attorney

Robert Stephen

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Mon 22 Jun 2015 from 10:00 to 11:00

TDI Seminar Series

NDM Building, Seminar Roon, Headington OX3 7FZ

Dissecting cancer by epigenomics and single-cell sequencing

Professor Christoph Bock

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Verity Pavitt

All welcome

Mon 22 Jun 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting Rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

The signaling mechanism of a 'double-edged receptor, DCC'

Dr Jia-Huai Wang

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eleanor Martin

Mon 22 Jun 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

The Cartilage Circadian Clock in Health and Disease

Dr Qing-Jun Meng

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Irina Udalova

Mon 22 Jun 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Centrosomes in asymmetric stem cell divisions

Jordan Raff

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Hosted by Tudar Fulga

Mon 22 Jun 2015 from 14:00 to 15:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting Rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

Synthetic Virology: A renaissance for structure-function studies

Benhur Lee

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eleanor Martin

Tue 23 Jun 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

How to build the largest functional domain in the human nucleus

Professor Brian McStay

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 23 Jun 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

Oxidation of nucleic acids and control mechanism of spontaneous mutagenesis and tumorigenesis in mammals

Professor Yusaku Nakebeppu

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Nemerofksy-Birks

Wed 24 Jun 2015 from 09:00 to 16:20

SGC Seminars

Saïd Business School, Park End Street OX1 1HP

4th Oxford Symposium - Epigenetic Mechanisms in Health and Disease New Frontiers in Epigenetics

Udo Oppermann, Susanne Muller-Knapp, Jorn Walter

Chromatin biology and epigenetics is a fast growing field at the frontier of modern biology, with considerable impact on understanding of fundamental mechanisms in human health and disease. The symposium ‘Epigenetic Mechanisms in Health and Disease’ aims to bring together clinical and... Read more

Chromatin biology and epigenetics is a fast growing field at the frontier of modern biology, with considerable impact on understanding of fundamental mechanisms in human health and disease. The symposium ‘Epigenetic Mechanisms in Health and Disease’ aims to bring together clinical and non-clinical scientists at the forefront of epigenetics and chromatin biology and inflammation to discuss the latest advances in the field. We aim to explore future trends in epigenetics and related fields of gene regulation, development, molecular recognition and signalling, with an emphasis on prospects of translation into clinical applications. On the first day the focus will be on the latest advances in inflammation followed by epigenetics highlights on the second day. The symposium is followed by a medicinal chemistry workshop centered on epigenetic target classes on the third day.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Alison Carter

Wed 24 Jun 2015 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Environmental influences on inflammatory immune responses

Prof. Brigitta Stockinger

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 25 Jun 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Population Health Seminars

New Richards Building, Teaching Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LG

HERC Seminar: Modelling the cost of cancer: a system of equations approach to understanding inter-relationships

Rachel Knott

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Fri 26 Jun 2015 from 08:00 to 09:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Combined Medical-Surgical Grand Round

Ms Kim Gorrisen, Mr Ian Lindsey, Dr Satish Keshav, Mr Bobby Bloemendaal, Mr Bruce George, Dr Alex Kent

Gastroenterology: "Stimulation, not stoma: SNS?" Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS.

Gastroenterology: "Stimulation, not stoma: SNS?" Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS.

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 26 Jun 2015 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

A lymphatic route for macrophage clearance

Shaumick Bhattacharjee (Jackson Group)

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Mon 29 Jun 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

The global picture of malaria: optimism or caution?

Professor Kevin Marsh

Malaria remains major global health threat. At the end of the last century it was described as a public health disaster. In the last fifteen years there has been remarkable progress in reducing cases and deaths due to malaria. This has led to a welcome new optimism and a shift towards the idea... Read more

Malaria remains major global health threat. At the end of the last century it was described as a public health disaster. In the last fifteen years there has been remarkable progress in reducing cases and deaths due to malaria. This has led to a welcome new optimism and a shift towards the idea of global elimination culminating in eradication. However the threats of underfinancing as well as emerging drug and insecticide resistance mean that many challenges remain to be overcome.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Francois Van Loggerenberg

Refreshments will be provided - Please arrive promptly.

Mon 29 Jun 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Immune sensing of vitamin B metabolites

Jamie Rossjohn

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Mon 29 Jun 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

ESC seminars

Nikolaus Maniadakis, Aldo Pietro Maggioni

The talk includes: - The ESC Observational program in Cardiology - The ESC OECD project on health systems and HF adherence - The ESC Atlas of cardiology project

The talk includes: - The ESC Observational program in Cardiology - The ESC OECD project on health systems and HF adherence - The ESC Atlas of cardiology project

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Mon 29 Jun 2015 from 16:00 to 17:00

Population Health Seminars

New Richards Building, Teaching Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LG

HERC Seminar - Impact of performance-based financing in a low resource setting: a decade of experience in Cambodia

Dr Ellen Van de Poel

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 30 Jun 2015 from 14:00 to 15:00

TDI Seminar Series

NDM Building, Seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Detection of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in cell-free plasma DNA

Dr Chunxiao Song

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Verity Pavitt

All welcome