Other Seminars

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Tue 1 Dec 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

China Kadoorie Biobank: from population health to drug development

Professor Zhengming Chen

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 1 Dec 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Floor meeting - 2 groups will give an update on the research work in their laboratory

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 2 Dec 2015 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Room 1, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

Thu 3 Dec 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A and B, Headington OX3 7BN

Moving towards a transcription factor-centric view of "epigenetics"

Professor John Greally

The epigenome is now widely studied in order to gain insights into normal cellular events and to understand how dysregulatory processes are involved in disease phenotypes. As data emerge from these studies, the question is now arising whether the epigenetic regulators being studied are capable of... Read more

The epigenome is now widely studied in order to gain insights into normal cellular events and to understand how dysregulatory processes are involved in disease phenotypes. As data emerge from these studies, the question is now arising whether the epigenetic regulators being studied are capable of autonomous decisions or whether they instead in part or mostly reflect the activities of transcription factors. A re-interpretation of epigenomic data with a transcription factor-centric perspective suggests that our insights into cellular processes reflected by the epigenome are enhanced by this alternative model. We can also use the transcription factor viewpoint to re-interpret the original idea of an "epigenetic landscape" to create a neo-Waddingtonian model of cellular events causing human disease risk. These new ways of thinking about epigenetic regulation should be valuable in guiding the study and interpretation of the epigenome in human disease.

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 3 Dec 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Medical Director's Office / Silver Star

Dr Jennifer Hogan, Dr Lucy Mackillop, Dr Tony Berendt

Medical Director's Office: "Never Say Never (Again)", Dr Tony Berendt Silver Star: "Acute Liver Failure in Pregnancy", Dr Jennifer Hogan and Dr Lucy Mackillop Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS

Medical Director's Office: "Never Say Never (Again)", Dr Tony Berendt Silver Star: "Acute Liver Failure in Pregnancy", Dr Jennifer Hogan and Dr Lucy Mackillop Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 4 Dec 2015 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

'Landscaping the future of coronary artery by-pass graft surgery'

Mr George Krasopoulos

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 4 Dec 2015 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Insights into Immune Responses to Typhoid Using the Ultimate Animal Model

Pollard Group, Dr Christoph Blohmke, Dr Jennifer Hill

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 4 Dec 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Building (DPAG Large Lecture Theatre, Ground Floor, OX1 3PT), off Parks Road OX1 3PT., off Parks Road OX1 3PT

INT'L GUEST SPEAKER: Professor Robert Gillies, Moffit Cancer Centre, University of South Florida, Tampa USA : ‘Causes and Consequences of The Hostile Microenvironment of Tumors’

Professor Robert Gillies

Cancers progress through a series of events that can be characterized as “somatic evolution.” A central premise of Darwinian evolutionary theory is that the environment imparts pressure to select for species that aremost fit within that particularmicroenvironmental context. Furthermore, the... Read more

Cancers progress through a series of events that can be characterized as “somatic evolution.” A central premise of Darwinian evolutionary theory is that the environment imparts pressure to select for species that aremost fit within that particularmicroenvironmental context. Furthermore, the rate of evolution is proportional to both (1) the strength of the environmental selection and (2) the phenotypic variance of the selected population. It is notable that, during the progression of cancers from carcinogenesis to local invasion to metastasis, the selective landscape continuously changes, and throughout this process, there is increased selection for cells that have alteredmetabolic phenotypes: implying that these phenotypes impart a selective advantage during the process of environmental selection. One of the most prevalent selected phenotypes is that of aerobic glycolysis, that is, the continued fermentation of glucose even in the presence of adequate oxygen. The mechanisms of this so-called “Warburg effect” have been well studied, and there are multiple models to explain how this occurs at the molecular level. Herein, we propose that unifying insights can be gained by evaluating the environmental context within which this phenotype arises. In other words, we focus not on the “how” but the “why” do cancer cells exhibit high aerobic glycolysis. This is best approached by examining the sequelae of aerobic glycolysis that may impart a selective advantage. Many of these have been considered, including generation of anabolic substrates, response rates of glycolysis vis-à-vis respiration, and generation of antioxidants. Afurther sequeala considered here is that aerobic glycolysis results in a high rate of lactic acid production; resulting in acidification of the extracellular space. Indeed, it has been shown that a low extracellular pH promotes local invasion, promotes metastasis, and inhibits antitumor immunity. In naturally occurring cancers, lowextracellular pH is a strong negative prognostic indicator of metastasisfree survival. Furthermore, it has been shown that inhibition of extracellular acidosis can inhibitmetastasis and promote antitumor immunity. Hence, we propose that excess acid production confers a selective advantage for cells during the somatic evolution of cancers.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

INT'L GUEST SPEAKER

Fri 4 Dec 2015 from 14:30 to 15:30

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Catering provided so please arrive promptly - First come, first served, Headington OX3 7FZ

Moving the Centre of Gravity of Research in Africa

Professor Kevin Marsh

Africa has 15% of the worlds population and 25% of its health problems but less than 1% of its researchers. This represents a major challenge in a world where science technology and innovation are widely seen as being key drivers of development. However there are signs of change, with most... Read more

Africa has 15% of the worlds population and 25% of its health problems but less than 1% of its researchers. This represents a major challenge in a world where science technology and innovation are widely seen as being key drivers of development. However there are signs of change, with most African countries having strong economic growth, key heath indicators improving and a renewed commitment to science as a central pillar of the continents future. I will provide an overview of the landscape of science, particularly health research, in Africa and discuss recent key changes in the approach to building scientific capacity.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Francois Van Loggerenberg

Spaces are limited

Mon 7 Dec 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

The ins and outs of centrosome amplification-mediated invasion

Dr Susana Godinho

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eric O'Neill

Mon 7 Dec 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

THIS TALK AS BEEN CANCELLED AND WILL BE RESCHEDULED

Michele DeLuca

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Tue 8 Dec 2015 from 08:30 to 18:00

Tropical Medicine Seminars

Saïd Business School, Park End Street OX1 1HP

Crossing Boundaries 2 – Health Research Relevant to LMIC Across Oxford’s Disciplines and Divisions

This Conference aims to showcase the diversity and quality of Health Research being undertaken in or relevant to improving health in Low and Middle Income Countries’ that is linked to Oxford; to illustrate the range of disciplines engaged in supporting the development of LMIC health systems and... Read more

This Conference aims to showcase the diversity and quality of Health Research being undertaken in or relevant to improving health in Low and Middle Income Countries’ that is linked to Oxford; to illustrate the range of disciplines engaged in supporting the development of LMIC health systems and to promote multi- disciplinary collaborations; to showcase Oxford’s DPhil Research in Global Health. Sessions will be delivered by experts from: The Nuffield Department of Medicine; The Department of Education; The Institute of Biomedical Engineering; The Department of Primary Health Care; The Ethox Centre; The Department of Clinical Healthcare Brookes University; The Department of Social Policy and Intervention. Current or recently graduated DPhil students are encouraged to submit abstracts for combined rapid oral & poster presentation with a special session devoted to this during the meeting. Prizes wlll be awarded for the best student presentation & project.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 8 Dec 2015 from 11:00 to 11:45

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

The identification and characterisastion of disease genes in craniosynostosis

Aimee Fenwick

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Viva Seminar

Wed 9 Dec 2015 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

New Radcliffe House, Room 2, Walton Street OX2 6NW

CPR and defibrillation training

Dr Susannah Fleming

You may be aware that both New Radcliffe House and the Gibson building have defibrillators available for use in the event of a cardiac arrest. Susannah is a qualified trainer with St John Ambulance, who will cover how to use these devices, as well as how to perform CPR. There will be an... Read more

You may be aware that both New Radcliffe House and the Gibson building have defibrillators available for use in the event of a cardiac arrest. Susannah is a qualified trainer with St John Ambulance, who will cover how to use these devices, as well as how to perform CPR. There will be an opportunity to practice the skills in a supportive environment. Clinicians are welcome to attend, but unfortunately we can't provide certificates for use in your portfolio. Those not from the department of Primary Care Health Sciences wishing to attend must contact the speaker beforehand.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Wed 9 Dec 2015 from 10:30 to 11:15

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

Zooming in on cellular and molecular structures with correlative light and electron microscopy

Prof Bram Koster

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof David Stuart

Wed 9 Dec 2015 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Cell entry and innate immune recognition of enveloped RNA viruses

Professor Yorgo Modis

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 10 Dec 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Combined Medical-Surgical Grand Round

Professor David Cranston, Dr Eric Sidebottom

"Penicillin and the Legacy of Norman Heatley", Professor David Cranston and Dr Eric Sidebottom Chair: Prof Peter McCulloch

"Penicillin and the Legacy of Norman Heatley", Professor David Cranston and Dr Eric Sidebottom Chair: Prof Peter McCulloch

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Mon 14 Dec 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Gaucher disease (with a skeletal perspective)

Prof Timothy Cox

Gaucher disease is a rare inborn lysosomal disorder affecting the metabolism of sphingolipids; it has been the focus of intense – and productive - therapeutic research. With the introduction of macrophage-targeted enzyme therapy much has been learnt about this highly diverse disorder, which... Read more

Gaucher disease is a rare inborn lysosomal disorder affecting the metabolism of sphingolipids; it has been the focus of intense – and productive - therapeutic research. With the introduction of macrophage-targeted enzyme therapy much has been learnt about this highly diverse disorder, which occurs all over the world. Type 1 Gaucher disease, which occurs in 90-95% of recorded cases, is widely regarded as Gaucher disease with no neurological features -although this restriction does not apply for newly recognized late Parkinsonian complications. Hitherto the most familiar presentation is related to disease principally in the macrophage system: there is hepatosplenomegaly, accompanied by growth retardation, hypersplenism and marrow failure with cytopenias. Skeletal features are frequent, with osteopenia, osteoporosis, episodes of osteonecrosis – as well as osteolytic lesions, and, occasionally, multiple myeloma. Before specific therapy was available, many patients required splenectomy to improve their haematological condition; but while splenectomy induces a risk of infection and can be obviated, many patients with a history of this intervention have severe and crippling skeletal disease which requires intensive multi-disciplinary care. Chronic neuronopathic disease (type 3) is part of the severe spectrum of the condition: while neurological features declare themselves early in this sub-variant, the manifestations in the skeleton are prominent causes of pain and disability – and together with coincident visceral and haematological disease respond to judicious treatment in the early phases before irreversible injury is established. The clinical features of Gaucher disease are diverse and pathological expression is equally varied. However, even today, as a multisystem disorder involving complex biochemical and immunological changes, much of its pathogenesis remains elusive. As with other rare disorders due to changes at single genetic loci with large effects, Gaucher disease holds continued promise for better understanding of human physiology and several other disorders of universal medical importance. Here I will review the diversity of Gaucher disease and the fascinating evolution of its therapy.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 14 Dec 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Inducing intestinal immunity with live oral vaccines: lessons from poliovirus

Prof Nick Grassly

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Mon 14 Dec 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Stimulating fetal haemoglobin expression for sickle cell disease

Dr Mitch Weiss

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 15 Dec 2015 from 11:00 to 11:45

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Analysis of transcription factor binding at cis-regulatory elements during blood development and differentiation

Maria Suciu

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Viva Seminar

Wed 16 Dec 2015 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

ImmTAcs - Can a Biologic Eestablish the Missing Link Between Cancer and T Cells?

Dr Bent Jakobsen

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 18 Dec 2015 from 10:30 to 11:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

The Use of Dendritic Cells in Cancer Immunotherapy

Professor Derek Hart

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Mon 21 Dec 2015 from 13:00 to 13:45

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS