Other Seminars

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Tue 17 Sep 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Mechanisms of axon degeneration in injury and disease.

Professor Michael Coleman

We study axon degeneration and its roles in neurodegenerative disease. One focus is proteins regulating the degeneration of injured axons (‘Wallerian degeneration'), which we have linked into a molecular pathway. Disease models involving similar mechanisms include several of peripheral... Read more

We study axon degeneration and its roles in neurodegenerative disease. One focus is proteins regulating the degeneration of injured axons (‘Wallerian degeneration'), which we have linked into a molecular pathway. Disease models involving similar mechanisms include several of peripheral neuropathies, Parkinson’s disease, glaucoma, motor neuron disease and multiple sclerosis. We aim to completely characterize the Wallerian pathway, identify human diseases associated with it and develop drugs to modify it. A second major interest is axonal pathology in Alzheimer’s disease. Using a new organotypic hippocampal slice culture model, we are studying the earliest pathogenic events in amyloid pathology and their dependence on Abeta and tau. We are collaborating on ALS, traumatic brain injury, neuropathic pain and white matter damage in Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, we have a developing interest in roles that rare axonal disease genes could play in axon survival in more common disorders.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Richard Wade-Martins

Please note talk is at noon

Tue 17 Sep 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Tue 17 Sep 2019 from 14:00 to 15:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Tue 17 Sep 2019 from 15:30 to 16:30

Population Health Seminars

Harvard-Oxford Programme in Epidemiology - NDPH Mini Symposium

UK Biobank 15:30 Dietary assessment - Aurora Perez-Cornago 15:45 Nutritional biomarkers: analyses of urinary sodium reproducibility, and association with blood pressure - Jennifer Carter 16:00 Red and processed meat: outcome-wide analyses - Keren Papier EPIC 16:15 Protein food... Read more

UK Biobank 15:30 Dietary assessment - Aurora Perez-Cornago 15:45 Nutritional biomarkers: analyses of urinary sodium reproducibility, and association with blood pressure - Jennifer Carter 16:00 Red and processed meat: outcome-wide analyses - Keren Papier EPIC 16:15 Protein food substitutions and risk of ischaemic heart disease - Tammy Tong Million Women Study 16:30 Diet quality and total mortality - Anika Knuppel China Kadoorie Biobank 16:45 Diet and cardiometabolic health - Huaidong Du 17:00 Close

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 18 Sep 2019 from 11:00 to 12:30

Ethox Centre and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox/WEH Seminar - Newborn Screening for Sickle Cell Disease in Tanzania: Understanding ethical, social and resource based implications

Daima Bukini

Introducing newborn screening services for Sickle Cell Disease in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is proved to be the most cost effective approach to reducing morbidity and mortality associated with the disease. In view of that some countries in SSA are embarking on establishing and piloting newborn... Read more

Introducing newborn screening services for Sickle Cell Disease in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is proved to be the most cost effective approach to reducing morbidity and mortality associated with the disease. In view of that some countries in SSA are embarking on establishing and piloting newborn screening programs for Sickle Cell Disease complemented with comprehensive care services. While these initiatives are commendable, it is imperative to address context-relevant factors that could limit realization of optimal benefits of establishing the screening programs. In this study we used the pilot newborn screening program for Sickle Cell Disease in Tanzania as a platform to understand ethical, socio-cultural and resource based implication of implementing the program in Sub-Saharan Africa. In the first paper, we analyzed the effects of gender norms in the settings before and after newborn screening for Sickle Cell Disease and its influence on the quality of care of the child. In the second paper we highlighted sustainability approaches adapted by the implementers to sustain implementation of the program activities in resource constrained environment.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christa Henrichs

Thu 19 Sep 2019 from 10:00 to 18:00

Population Health Seminars

Oxford-Peking University Joint Symposium on Precision Medicine

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Fri 20 Sep 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Ebola

Dr Julie Xiao, Professor Alain Townsend

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 20 Sep 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, room 71 a,b,c ground floor ORCRB, Headington OX3 7DQ

Developing Affinity-Based Therapies for Targeting Metastatic Cancers

Dr. Yu Rebecca Miao

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Jade Schneiders

Fri 20 Sep 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

From Dopamine to Data Science: My Journey From Neurobiology to Product Analytics

Dr Andrew Hart

As part of the WIMM Careers Seminar series, Andrew will outline his move from neurobiology to data science.

As part of the WIMM Careers Seminar series, Andrew will outline his move from neurobiology to data science.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Rob Beagrie

Fri 20 Sep 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

CKB Workshop

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Sat 21 Sep 2019 from 14:00 to 16:00

History of Science Museum Events

History of Science Museum, Broad Street OX1 3AZ

Family friendly: Cabinet of curiosities

N/A

Discover unusual objects and assemble your own cabinet of curiosities. Drop-in, ages 5–13

Discover unusual objects and assemble your own cabinet of curiosities. Drop-in, ages 5–13

Audience: Public

Mon 23 Sep 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

Zebrafish models of innate immunity

Professor Stephen Renshaw

Diseases of immunity cause much illness in the developed world – on one hand we are beset by a range of antibiotic resistance bacterial infections, while on the other hand our immune systems are responsible for many the common diseases of ageing – heart disease, stroke and COPD. Understanding... Read more

Diseases of immunity cause much illness in the developed world – on one hand we are beset by a range of antibiotic resistance bacterial infections, while on the other hand our immune systems are responsible for many the common diseases of ageing – heart disease, stroke and COPD. Understanding the regulation of innate immune cells, neutrophils and macrophages, in infection and inflammation will help us tune the immune system to the exact level needed to cope with the current level of threat. More host defence to fight antibiotic resistant organisms; less host defence to prevent lung damage in response to environmental pollutants. To improve our understanding, I have set up a model system in which the genes controlling regulation of innate immune cell function can be identified. The model I have chosen is the Zebrafish, which is both genetically manipulable and transparent, leading to easy visualisation of immune cells during infection and inflammation. This model allows me to test the ability of a range of candidate genes to influence host-pathogen interaction and the resolution of inflammation, and additionally to screen for novel genes involved in this process. At the same time, I can see every immune cell during the whole of an infection or an inflammatory episode, where necessary imaging intracellular signalling events in real-time. The small size of our model also lends itself to drug screening and this has identified several potential new therapies for immune disease. I will discuss how this model has informed our understanding of inflammation, sharing new data on regulation of neutrophil function in vivo.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Jennifer Pope

Mon 23 Sep 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Infections@BDI Seminar - The use of Kmer counts to train random forests to predict country of origin for bacterial pathogen sequencing data

Lauren Cowley

Two of the key successes of genomic epidemiology and routine sequencing for public health microbiology are monitoring of outbreaks and source attribution. Since 2014, Public Health England (PHE) have used routine whole genome sequencing for all clinical isolates of Salmonella and Shiga toxigenic... Read more

Two of the key successes of genomic epidemiology and routine sequencing for public health microbiology are monitoring of outbreaks and source attribution. Since 2014, Public Health England (PHE) have used routine whole genome sequencing for all clinical isolates of Salmonella and Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) for those exact purposes. This has generated a huge breadth of data, to date there are >100,000 gastrointestinal pathogens that have been sequenced at PHE. However, large datasets of sequenced pathogens are not unique anymore and many institutions and universities are generating their own large microbial genomics datasets. What is unique about this dataset is the detailed metadata and epidemiological information that is also stored alongside it in PHE’s Gastro Data Warehouse from real clinical cases of patients in the UK. Enhanced surveillance of foodborne pathogens means that each sequenced case of STEC and Salmonella also has collected information about the region of the case, any recent foreign travel of the patient and also what virulence factors were associated with the strain. Here we present work on the use of this wealth of associated metadata in conjunction with the publicly available sequencing data to train random forest algorithms on kmer count data to predict the country that the strain is likely to have originated from for newly generated sequences. This will enable a fully automated method to reproduce source attribution but also monitor international outbreaks. This will build on the two successes of genomic epidemiology in a natural progression to automation of it, that will have the potential to democratize genomic epidemiology by extending its usability to unskilled practitioners not trained in phylogenetics or bioinformatics.

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 24 Sep 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI seminar room (basement), Headington OX3 7FZ

TET-family dioxygenases, immune responses and cancer

Dr Anjana Rao

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Tue 24 Sep 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Floor meeting - 2 groups will give an update on the research work in their laboratory

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Thu 26 Sep 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Jenner Seminars

Fri 27 Sep 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

MAITs: Vaccines and Variation.

Lucy Garner, Dr Nicholas Provine

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 27 Sep 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

“Ribosomopathies: Biology, Diagnosis and New Treatment Directions”

Anu Narla

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Mon 30 Sep 2019 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Radcliffe Humanities, Lecture Hall, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Publishing in BMC Medicine

Professor Lin Lee

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Alex Rushford

Mon 30 Sep 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

Title TBC

Professor Petr Broz

Audience: Public

Organisers: Jennifer Pope

Mon 30 Sep 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

Single-cell and epigenetic approaches to define and regulate macrophages in atherosclerosis

Professor Menno de Winther

In our work we are pursuing a better understanding of macrophage functioning in atherosclerosis and identification of approaches to suppress their detrimental effects in disease. In my talk I will discuss our recent progress using single cell RNAseq of human atherosclerotic plaques to define immune... Read more

In our work we are pursuing a better understanding of macrophage functioning in atherosclerosis and identification of approaches to suppress their detrimental effects in disease. In my talk I will discuss our recent progress using single cell RNAseq of human atherosclerotic plaques to define immune cell populations and their characteristics. Moreover, we are performing studies to identify epigenetic enzymes that are relevant in regulating macrophages in atherosclerotic disease.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Jennifer Pope