Other Seminars

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Thu 5 Sep 2019 from 16:30 to 18:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital, John Radcliffe Hospital Main Building, John Radcliffe Main Building, George Pickering Education Centre Level 3 Academic Centre, Room 2B, Headington OX3 9DU

Probiotics: where did they come from, where are they going?

Professor Ian Rowland

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Holm Uhlig

Thu 12 Sep 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI seminar room, lower ground floor, Headington OX3 7FZ

"Dying to get noticed: Immunogenic cell death in infection and cancer"

Professor Andrew Oberst

how a cell dies—not simply whether it dies—is a key determinant of the innate and adaptive immune response that follows. We use engineered forms of cell death proteins and knockout mouse models to understand how different forms of cell death occur, and to compare the immune response triggered... Read more

how a cell dies—not simply whether it dies—is a key determinant of the innate and adaptive immune response that follows. We use engineered forms of cell death proteins and knockout mouse models to understand how different forms of cell death occur, and to compare the immune response triggered by each in vivo in the context of infection, cancer, and autoimmunity. Specific questions currently under investigation include: What are the determinants of the immune response to necroptotic cells? Necroptosis is a form of cellular suicide involving both lytic cell death and the production of inflammatory cytokines. We are investigating how these two immunogenic events are linked, in both engineered cellular models and viral infection. How does pathogen sensing engage cell death? Activation of innate immune pattern-sensing pathways such as the Toll-like receptors, RIG-I-like receptors, NOD-like receptors or the cGAS-STING pathway can trigger immune cytokine production. These pathways can also lead to apoptosis, pyroptosis, or necroptosis, depending on the cell and tissue context in which they occur. We study the causes and consequences of these cell death programs. Are there death-independent roles of the cell death machinery? (Yes, there are.) Mice lacking necroptotic effector proteins are highly susceptible to multiple types of viral infection. Surprisingly however, in some cases this susceptibility is not due to a failure to trigger cell death, but rather to non-death functions of these proteins in innate immune signaling. How does activation of inflammatory cell death alter models of cancer and autoimmunity? Promoting inflammation and an immune response to dying cells may be beneficial in the context of infection or cancer, but an overexuberant immune response to dying cells can lead to autoimmunity. We have created engineered cell death effectors that allow us to induce specific forms of cell death in vivo. We are applying these systems to models of tumorigenesis, type-I diabetes, and lupus.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Tue 17 Sep 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Mechanisms of axon degeneration in injury and disease.

Professor Michael Coleman

We study axon degeneration and its roles in neurodegenerative disease. One focus is proteins regulating the degeneration of injured axons (‘Wallerian degeneration'), which we have linked into a molecular pathway. Disease models involving similar mechanisms include several of peripheral... Read more

We study axon degeneration and its roles in neurodegenerative disease. One focus is proteins regulating the degeneration of injured axons (‘Wallerian degeneration'), which we have linked into a molecular pathway. Disease models involving similar mechanisms include several of peripheral neuropathies, Parkinson’s disease, glaucoma, motor neuron disease and multiple sclerosis. We aim to completely characterize the Wallerian pathway, identify human diseases associated with it and develop drugs to modify it. A second major interest is axonal pathology in Alzheimer’s disease. Using a new organotypic hippocampal slice culture model, we are studying the earliest pathogenic events in amyloid pathology and their dependence on Abeta and tau. We are collaborating on ALS, traumatic brain injury, neuropathic pain and white matter damage in Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, we have a developing interest in roles that rare axonal disease genes could play in axon survival in more common disorders.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Richard Wade-Martins

Please note talk is at noon

Thu 19 Sep 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Tue 24 Sep 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Floor meeting - 2 groups will give an update on the research work in their laboratory

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Fri 27 Sep 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

“Ribosomopathies: Biology, Diagnosis and New Treatment Directions”

Anu Narla

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose