Other Seminars

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Wed 2 Oct 2019 from 11:00 to 12:30

Ethox Centre and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Big Data Institute, L1 Ax Meeting Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox/WEH Seminar - Reclaiming a Sense of Common Humanity: A Confucian Ethical Vision

Professor Jing-Bao Nie

The idea of a common humanity constitutes a foundational ethical perception across the centuries and geographical boundaries. However, from the first half of twentieth century and in spite of sweeping globalization, such a moral sense has been substantially undermined -- at times totally shattered... Read more

The idea of a common humanity constitutes a foundational ethical perception across the centuries and geographical boundaries. However, from the first half of twentieth century and in spite of sweeping globalization, such a moral sense has been substantially undermined -- at times totally shattered -- by a series of events of inhumanity, socio-political forces and intellectual movements including wartime medical atrocities, nationalism, postmodernism and multiculturalism. This talk aims to demonstrate how a sense of common humanity should and can be reclaimed, or in the Confucian term, cultivated through engaging with thought of Meng Zi (Mencius, c. 372-289 BCE), a founder of Confucianism, and traditional Chinese medical ethics on moral sentiments and universalism.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christa Henrichs

Wed 2 Oct 2019 from 14:30 to 15:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

NO TIME TO DIE: how herpesviruses and host ensure their survival

Prof. Melanie Brinkmann

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 4 Oct 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Using the immune system’s Trojan horse for vaccination

Dr Lise Chauveau

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 4 Oct 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

Development & Cell Biology Theme Guest Speakers (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

The dynamics of cell identity: explorations in mammalian embryos

Anna-Katerina Hadjantonakis

Developmental and stem cell biologist Anna-Katerina (Kat) Hadjantonakis is a Member of the Developmental Biology Program at the Sloan Kettering Institute and a Professor at Cornell University in New York, USA. Her lab seeks to understand how cells regulate their identity, and how they coordinately... Read more

Developmental and stem cell biologist Anna-Katerina (Kat) Hadjantonakis is a Member of the Developmental Biology Program at the Sloan Kettering Institute and a Professor at Cornell University in New York, USA. Her lab seeks to understand how cells regulate their identity, and how they coordinately and reproducibly build complex organs in mammalian embryos, and in in vitro stem cell and organoid models. She received a BSc in Biochemistry in 1990, and PhD in Molecular Genetics in 1995, from Imperial College London, UK. She then undertook postdoctoral training, first with Drs. Andras Nagy at the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Toronto, Canada, and thereafter with Dr. Virginia Pappaioannou at Columbia University, New York, USA. She established her independent research group at Sloan Kettering in 2004. She currently serves on the editorial boards of journals including Developmental Cell, Development and Developmental Biology. She is a standing member of grant review panels and advisory committees for the NIH, the NSF, the UK’s Wellcome Trust, and the European Research Council.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Katherine McNeil

Mon 7 Oct 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Human Dendritic Cell Subsets in the High-Dimensional Era

Prof. Juliana Idoyaga

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Mon 7 Oct 2019 from 14:00 to 15:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Ludwig seminar room, basement of ORCRB, Headington OX3 7DQ

Clinical relevance of hyper-recombination in cancer

Dr. Anand Jeyasekharan

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Jade Schneiders

Tue 8 Oct 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Dr Mads Gyrd-Hansen

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 9 Oct 2019 from 09:30 to 10:30

Tropical Medicine Seminars

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

TropMed webinar: Mapping and Tracking Malaria

Prof Arjen Dondorp, Dr Susan Rumisha

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Claire-Lise Kessler

The seminar will be shared via Zoom. Contact Claire-Lise Kessler if you want to join

Thu 10 Oct 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

ARUK Oxford Drug Discovery Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Modelling Microglia to Understand Neurodegeneration and Aging

Professor David Brown

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kate Humphrey

Fri 11 Oct 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Surgical Grand Rounds - Plastics

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 11 Oct 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Simmons Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Mon 14 Oct 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Human immune systems are shaped by environmental exposures early in Life

Assoc Prof Petter Brodin

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Mon 14 Oct 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

Burdon Sanderson Cardiac Science Centre Lecture Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Cardiovascular diseases and drugs: hiPSC models moving forward

Christine Mummery

Cardiovascular cells derived from hPSC are of growing interest for drug discovery and toxicity. Our lab has been investigating microphysiological solutions using multicellular cardiac microtissues to quantify the outcomes of drug and disease mutation responses in situ. Isogenic pairs of hiPSC have... Read more

Cardiovascular cells derived from hPSC are of growing interest for drug discovery and toxicity. Our lab has been investigating microphysiological solutions using multicellular cardiac microtissues to quantify the outcomes of drug and disease mutation responses in situ. Isogenic pairs of hiPSC have proven essential to compensate interline variability. We have shown that iPSC derived cardiomyocytes with mutations in ion channel genes can accurately predict changes in cardiac electrical properties and reveal drug sensitivities also observed in patients. Biography: Christine Mummery studied physics at the University of Nottingham, UK and has a PhD in Biophysics from the University of London. After positions as postdoc and tenured group leader at the Hubrecht Institute, she became professor at the University Medical Centre Utrecht in 2002. After a sabbatical at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute in 2007, she introduced human iPS cells to the Netherlands. In 2008, she became Professor of Developmental Biology at Leiden University Medical Centre in the Netherlands and head of the Department of Anatomy and Embryology. Her research concerns heart development and the differentiation of pluripotent human stem cells into the cardiac and vascular lineages and using these cells as disease models, for safety pharmacology and drug discovery. Immediate interests are on developing biophysical techniques for characterization and functional analysis of cardiovascular cells from hPSC. In 2015 she became guest professor at the Technical University of Twente to develop organ-on-chip models. She was recently awarded a multimillion grant for this purpose and is awardee of a prestigious European Research Council Advanced Grant. She is a member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Science (KNAW), and board member and incoming president of the International Society of Stem Cell research (ISSCR); she is also former board of the KNAW and the Netherlands Medical Research Council (ZonMW). She was awarded the Hugo van de Poelgeest Prize for Animal Alternatives in research, has co-authored a popular book on stem cells “Stem Cells: scientific facts and Fiction” (2nd edition 2014) and is editor in chief of the ISSCR journal Stem Cell Reports. She is also on the editorial boards of Cell Stem Cell, Cardiovascular Research and Stem Cells.

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 14 Oct 2019 from 17:00 to 18:00

Oxford Martin School Public Lectures

Oxford Martin School, Corner of Catte and Holywell Streets, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

The technology trap - capital, labour and power in the age of automation

Dr Carl Benedikt Frey

In this book talk the Author, Carl Benedikt Frey, will discuss how the Industrial Revolution was a defining moment in history, but how few grasped its enormous consequences at the time. Now that we are in the midst of another technological revolution how can the lessons of the past can help us to... Read more

In this book talk the Author, Carl Benedikt Frey, will discuss how the Industrial Revolution was a defining moment in history, but how few grasped its enormous consequences at the time. Now that we are in the midst of another technological revolution how can the lessons of the past can help us to more effectively face the present? This talk will be followed by a book sale, signing and drinks reception. All welcome.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Oxford Martin School

Tue 15 Oct 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Floor meeting - 2 groups will give an update on the research work in their laboratory

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 15 Oct 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Striatal synaptic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease

Professor Paolo Calabresi

In the last two decades, Prof. Calabresi’s research has investigated the synaptic communication between the cerebral cortex and the basal ganglia, focussing on corticostriatal synapses and their activity-dependent plasticity. In particular, Prof. Calabresi’s group has extensively investigated... Read more

In the last two decades, Prof. Calabresi’s research has investigated the synaptic communication between the cerebral cortex and the basal ganglia, focussing on corticostriatal synapses and their activity-dependent plasticity. In particular, Prof. Calabresi’s group has extensively investigated how corticostriatal communication depends on the activation of dopamine receptors and how it is affected by pathological conditions such as Parkinson’s disease. The research group coordinated by Prof. Calabresi has been the first, in 1992, to describe a novel form of striatal synaptic plasticity, named long-term-depression (LTD). This vital feature of corticostriatal synapses has then be synaptic plasticity, named long-term-depression (LTD). This vital feature of corticostriatal synapses has then been fully characterised by Prof Calabresi’s group from a pharmacological and electrophysiological point of view.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Richard Wade-Martins

Wed 16 Oct 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Zoology Research and Administration Centre, Seminar room

Moving forward with spatial disease models: Movement ecology improves predictions for disease spread

David Daversa

Global change is altering patterns of wildlife movement, and in turn, how they spread parasites over the landscape. Infectious disease outbreaks from parasite spread threaten public health and biodiversity. Yet, there remains much uncertainty over the extent to which wildlife movements contribute... Read more

Global change is altering patterns of wildlife movement, and in turn, how they spread parasites over the landscape. Infectious disease outbreaks from parasite spread threaten public health and biodiversity. Yet, there remains much uncertainty over the extent to which wildlife movements contribute to parasite spread that hinders disease control efforts. For this talk, I will present a new model for predicting the impact of host migrations, dispersal and other movements on the spatial spread of parasites, and use the model to explain the factors that determine whether wildlife movements facilitate or inhibit parasite spread. I will also present my field and experimental studies of amphibians that quantified the effect of their movements on the dynamics of the fungal parasite, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Suki Kenth

Thu 17 Oct 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, NDMRB (TDI) seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

“A multifaceted interplay between metabolism and epigenetics determines how CAFs remodel the tumour stroma”

Professor Sara Zanivan

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Thu 17 Oct 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, 1st Floor meeting room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Fri 18 Oct 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Surgical Grand Rounds - Upper GI

Professor Michael Griffin

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 18 Oct 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Draper Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 18 Oct 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

Jenner Seminars

NDM Building, Seminar Room, Lower Ground Floor, Headington OX3 7FZ

Title TBC

Dr Mark Feinberg

Audience: Public

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Fri 18 Oct 2019 from 17:00 to 18:00

Oxford Martin School Public Lectures

Oxford Martin School, Corner of Catte and Holywell Streets, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Psychologically informed micro-targeted political campaigns: the use and abuse of data

Dr Jens Koed Madsen

Data-driven micro-targeted campaigns have become a main stable of political strategy. As personal and societal data becomes more accessible, we need to understand how it can be used and mis-used in political campaigns and whether it is relevant to regulate political candidates’ access to data. This book talk will be followed by a drinks reception and book sale, all welcome.

Data-driven micro-targeted campaigns have become a main stable of political strategy. As personal and societal data becomes more accessible, we need to understand how it can be used and mis-used in political campaigns and whether it is relevant to regulate political candidates’ access to data. This book talk will be followed by a drinks reception and book sale, all welcome.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Oxford Martin School

Mon 21 Oct 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

C1q in health and disease – roles outside the complement system

Prof Marina Botto

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Tue 22 Oct 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Dr Jan Korbel

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 23 Oct 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Professor David Finlay

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 24 Oct 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI seminar room, lower ground floor, Headington OX3 7FZ

Rho GTPase signalling in cancer migration and invasion

Professor Anne Ridley

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Thu 24 Oct 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

61 Banbury Road, School of Anthropology, 61 Banbury Road OX2 6PF

Unit for Biocultural Variation and Obesity (UVBO) Seminar - Nutrient timing and human health

James Betts

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Fri 25 Oct 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Surgical Grand Rounds - Cardiac

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 25 Oct 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Pugh Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Mon 28 Oct 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Small Lecture Theatre (2nd Floor), off Parks Road OX1 3PT

The magic in the web of it: How a rare disorder is helping to untangle the mysteries of Parkinson’s disease

Dr Ellen Sidransky

Dr. Sidransky, chief of the Molecular Neurogenetics Section, is a pediatrician and clinical geneticist in the Medical Genetics Branch of the National Human Genome Research Institute at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. Dr. Sidransky has been a tenured investigator at NIH and... Read more

Dr. Sidransky, chief of the Molecular Neurogenetics Section, is a pediatrician and clinical geneticist in the Medical Genetics Branch of the National Human Genome Research Institute at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. Dr. Sidransky has been a tenured investigator at NIH and a section chief since 2000. Her research includes both clinical and basic research aspects of Gaucher disease and Parkinson's disease, and her group first identified glucocerebrosidase as a risk factor for parkinsonism. She has spearheaded two large international collaborative studies regarding the genetics of Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. Her current work also focuses on understanding the complexity encountered in "simple" Mendelian disorders, the association between Gaucher disease and parkinsonism and the development of small molecule chaperones as therapy for Gaucher disease and potentially parkinsonism. Dr. Sidransky directs two NIH clinical protocols, one evaluating patients with lysososmal storage disorders and the second prospectively studying patients and relatives with parkinsonism who carry mutations in GBA.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Wed 30 Oct 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Zoology Research and Administration Centre, Seminar room

Understanding rotavirus dynamics in response to vaccination

Virgina Pitzer

The recent introduction of rotavirus vaccines into the national immunization schedules of the United States and other countries has led to substantial reductions in the incidence of severe diarrhea in children. However, there is concern over whether indirect protection evident in high-income... Read more

The recent introduction of rotavirus vaccines into the national immunization schedules of the United States and other countries has led to substantial reductions in the incidence of severe diarrhea in children. However, there is concern over whether indirect protection evident in high-income countries in the short term will extend to low-income countries and to the long term, and whether the selective pressures imposed by vaccines will lead to the emergence of non-vaccine-type strains. Using data-driven models for the transmission dynamics of rotavirus, we generate predictions about rotavirus dynamics in response to vaccination by relating individual-level protection offered by vaccines to population-level effects. I will discuss how models were able to predict the post-vaccination emergence of a biennial pattern of epidemics in the US, why rotavirus genotypes tend to cycle, and possible explanations for the lower vaccine effectiveness observed in countries such as Malawi.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Suki Kenth

Thu 31 Oct 2019 from 11:30 to 12:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

VIVA - How do Gata1 and cohesin gene mutations contribute to the development of myeloid leukaemia?

Catherine Garnett

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Emma Butterfield