Other Seminars

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Thu 2 May 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

The Ying and Yang of Diabetes & Cancer

Professor Anna Gloyn

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 2 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Clinical Immunology / Dermatology

Dr Dhruvkumar Laheru, Dr Rachel Fisher

Clinical Immunology: -- Dermatology: Dr Dhruvkumar Laheru and Dr Rachel Fisher -- Chair: TBA

Clinical Immunology: -- Dermatology: Dr Dhruvkumar Laheru and Dr Rachel Fisher -- Chair: TBA

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 2 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

NDM Building, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Causal Inference in Epidemiology Seminar: Automating causal inference using Mendelian randomisation

Professor Tom Gaunt

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 2 May 2019 from 16:30 to 17:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, John Radcliffe Main Building, George Pickering Education Centre Level 3 Academic Centre, Room 2B, Headington OX3 9DU

The Genetics of IBD-An update

Dr Carl Anderson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Holm Uhlig

Fri 3 May 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Paediatrics

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Thu 9 May 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Aberrant chromatin changes in leukaemia

Professor Tom Milne

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 9 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Oncology / Gastroenterology

Dr Tom Thomas, Dr Holm Uhlig, Dr Simon Travis

Oncology: -- Gastroenterology: Dr Tom Thomas, Dr Holm Uhlig and Dr Simon Travis -- Chair: TBA

Oncology: -- Gastroenterology: Dr Tom Thomas, Dr Holm Uhlig and Dr Simon Travis -- Chair: TBA

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 10 May 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Cardiothoracic

Mr Andre Simon

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Mon 13 May 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting Rooms 71a,b,c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Homologous recombination DNA repair is the major driver of PARPi sensitivity in breast cancer

Violeta Serra

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Amanda O'Neill

Mon 13 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Prof Adrian Hayday

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Tue 14 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Asymmetric stem cell division to tissue engineering

Dr Shukry Habib

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 14 May 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Title TBC

Professor Mart Saarma

Mart Saarma's work has focused on the in vivo roles, therapeutic effects and receptors of the neurotrophic factors including GDNF and the novel neurotrophic factor CDNF discovered by his research group. They have shown that CDNF very efficiently protects and repairs dopamine neurons in vivo. Prof.... Read more

Mart Saarma's work has focused on the in vivo roles, therapeutic effects and receptors of the neurotrophic factors including GDNF and the novel neurotrophic factor CDNF discovered by his research group. They have shown that CDNF very efficiently protects and repairs dopamine neurons in vivo. Prof. Saarma’s work has been instrumental in understanding the therapeutic potential of these neurotrophic factors for neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Parkinson’s disease. He has published more than 200 scientific articles. His group has characterized several new GDNF family receptors and demonstrated that RET receptor tyrosine kinase is the signaling receptor for GDNF. Mart Saarma's research group is investigating the signalling and biological functions of GDNF family ligands and endoplasmic reticulum located CDNF/MANF neurotrophic factor families, both within and outside of the nervous system. They are also interested in the therapeutic potential of these proteins in various diseases, so they are testing their efficacy in animal models of Parkinson’s, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke and diabetes mellitus. One of the highlights of their research has been, in 2017, the initiation of phase I-II clinical trials of CDNF protein in Parkinson’s disease patients by the Finnish company Herantis Pharma Plc.

Audience: Members of the University only

New date!

Wed 15 May 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Seminar room, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3SY, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

The MHC class-II HLA-DR receptor mediates bat influenza A-like H17N10 virus entry into mammalian cells

Efstathios Giotis

Bats are notorious reservoirs of diverse, potentially zoonotic viruses, exemplified by the evolutionarily distinct, influenza A-like viruses H17N10 and H18N11 (BatIVs). The surface glycoproteins [haemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N)] of BatIVs neither bind nor cleave sialic acid receptors,... Read more

Bats are notorious reservoirs of diverse, potentially zoonotic viruses, exemplified by the evolutionarily distinct, influenza A-like viruses H17N10 and H18N11 (BatIVs). The surface glycoproteins [haemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N)] of BatIVs neither bind nor cleave sialic acid receptors, which suggests that these viruses employ cell attachment and entry mechanisms that differ from those of classical influenza A viruses (IAVs). Identifying the cellular factors that mediate entry and determine susceptibility to infection will help assess the host range of BatIVs. Here, we investigated a range of cell lines from different species for their susceptibility to infection by pseudotyped viruses (PV) bearing bat H17 and/or N10 envelope glycoproteins. We show that a number of human haematopoietic cancer cell lines and the canine kidney MDCK II (but not MDCK I) cells are susceptible to H17-pseudotypes (H17-PV). We observed with microarrays and qRT-PCR that the dog leukocyte antigen DLA-DRA mRNA is over expressed in late passaged parental MDCK and commercial MDCK II cells, compared to early passaged parental MDCK and MDCK I cells, respectively. The human orthologue HLA-DRA encodes the alpha subunit of the MHC class II HLA-DR antigen-binding heterodimer. Small interfering RNA- or neutralizing antibody-targeting HLA-DRA, drastically reduced the susceptibility of Raji B cells to H17-PV. Conversely, over expression of HLA-DRA and its paralogue HLA-DRB1 on the surface of the unsusceptible HEK293T/17 cells conferred susceptibility to H17-PV. The identification of HLA-DR as an H17N10 entry mediator will contribute to a better understanding of the tropism of the virus and will elucidate its zoonotic transmission.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Proochista Ariana

Please arrive 5 minutes before the seminar starts to gain access to the building.

Thu 16 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Clinical Genetics / Clinical Ethics

Clinical Genetics: -- Clinical Ethics: -- Chair: TBA

Clinical Genetics: -- Clinical Ethics: -- Chair: TBA

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 16 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Jenner Seminars

NDM Building, Seminar Room, Lower Ground Floor, Headington OX3 7FZ

Simplifying rabies pre- and post-exposure prophylaxis

Dr Patrick Soentjens

Audience: Public

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Fri 17 May 2019 from 14:00 to 15:00

WHG High Profile Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A & B , Headington OX3 7BN

The new world of RNA biology

Professor John Mattick

The new world of RNA biology John Mattick Green Templeton College, Oxford The genomic programming of complex organisms appears to have been misunderstood. The human genome contains just ~20,000 protein-coding genes, similar in number and with largely orthologous functions as those in other... Read more

The new world of RNA biology John Mattick Green Templeton College, Oxford The genomic programming of complex organisms appears to have been misunderstood. The human genome contains just ~20,000 protein-coding genes, similar in number and with largely orthologous functions as those in other animals, including simple nematodes. By contrast, the extent of non-protein-coding DNA increases with increasing developmental complexity, reaching 98.5% in humans, presumably due to an expanded regulatory architecture. Moreover, it is now clear that the majority of the genome is differentially and dynamically transcribed to produce not only mRNAs but also tens if not hundreds of thousands of short and long non-protein-coding RNAs that show highly specific expression patterns and subcellular locations, with many shown to play important aetiological roles in development, brain function, cancer and other diseases. These ‘noncoding’ RNAs function at many different levels of gene expression and cell biology, including translational control, subcellular domain formation, and guidance of the epigenetic processes that underpin development, brain function and physiological adaptation, augmented by the superimposition of plasticity by RNA editing, RNA modification and retrotransposon mobilization. The evidence is now overwhelming that there is a massive hidden layer of RNA-mediated regulatory and architectural functions in humans and other complex organisms and that the current model of gene regulation is incomplete. The challenge now is to determine the structure-function relationships of these RNAs and their mechanisms of action, as well as their place in the decisional hierarchy that controls human development, physiology, cognitive function and susceptibility to disorders.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Tue 21 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Dr Benjamin Fairfax

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Thu 23 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Renal / Respiratory

Dr Rachel Hoyles

Renal: -- Respiratory: Dr Rachel Hoyles -- Chair: TBA

Renal: -- Respiratory: Dr Rachel Hoyles -- Chair: TBA

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 24 May 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Joan Doll Teaching Suite, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Tue 28 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Dr Ashley Sanders

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 28 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre , Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar: Are journals an endangered species?

Zoe Mullan

As an increasing number of funding bodies demand evermore-specific open access publishing models, research assessment exercises shift away from their reliance on impact factors, and open science and open peer review become more prevalent, do traditional scientific journals still have any... Read more

As an increasing number of funding bodies demand evermore-specific open access publishing models, research assessment exercises shift away from their reliance on impact factors, and open science and open peer review become more prevalent, do traditional scientific journals still have any relevance? Zoë Mullan is Editor-in-Chief of the open access journal, The Lancet Global Health. She is an Ex-Officio Board Member of the Consortium of Universities for Global Health and an International Advisory Board member of Sun-Yat Sen Global Health Institute, Guangzhou, China. Between 2013 and 2017 she was a Council Member and Trustee of the Committee on Publication Ethics. She trained in Biochemistry at the University of Bath, UK, before joining the publishing industry in 1997 as a Scientific Information Officer with CABI. She moved to The Lancet in 1999, where she has worked since, variously as a technical editor, section editor, and founding editor of The Lancet Global Health.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 30 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Haematology / Psychological Medicine

Haematology: -- Psychological Medicine: -- Chair: TBA

Haematology: -- Psychological Medicine: -- Chair: TBA

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.