Other Seminars

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Mon 22 Jul 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Mon 22 Jul 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

Changing neighbours: bone marrow HSC niche remodelling during ageing and age-related myeloproliferative disorders

Dr Simón Méndez-Ferrer

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Jennifer Pope

Wed 24 Jul 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 1, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar: Genetics studies for cardiometabolic traits facilitated by the Million Veterans Program

Benjamin J Voight

The Million’s Veterans Program was established in 2011 as a national research initiative to determine how genetic variation influences the health of the diverse population of US military veterans. The goal of the program is to generate genetic data on over one million veterans, through genotyping... Read more

The Million’s Veterans Program was established in 2011 as a national research initiative to determine how genetic variation influences the health of the diverse population of US military veterans. The goal of the program is to generate genetic data on over one million veterans, through genotyping and sequencing, connected to phenotype data extracted from electronic health records spanning a median of 10 years of follow-up. With over 500,000 individuals with genetic data available currently, this cohort enables a range of causal inference experiments and genetic analysis at scale in diverse ancestries. I will describe our ongoing work, focused on the genetic analysis for type 2 diabetes as well as studies for association with T2D complications. In addition, large-scale genetic analyses of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, enabled by an electronic health record definition of disease, including causal inference and genetic correlation studies for this trait.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Wed 24 Jul 2019 from 11:00 to 11:30

Ethox Centre and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox and WEH Seminar - Making Breathlessness Visible: a medical humanities approach

Professor Jane Macnaughton

Research in medical humanities is taking a radical new turn. Not content to be the ‘handmaiden’ of clinical practice, we are now getting engaged in the complexities of clinical science, aiming to work alongside colleagues who are seeking to answer some of the most difficult questions in... Read more

Research in medical humanities is taking a radical new turn. Not content to be the ‘handmaiden’ of clinical practice, we are now getting engaged in the complexities of clinical science, aiming to work alongside colleagues who are seeking to answer some of the most difficult questions in clinical practice. For example, the symptom of breathlessness presents a dilemma in that symptom experience does not correlate well with measured lung function. In this lecture I will describe how an interdisciplinary medical humanities project combines research and insights from across humanities, social science and clinical science to understand this problem. Avoiding destructive ‘two culture’ clashes we have developed collaborations that we hope will improve the lives of patients.

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 25 Jul 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71 a, b, c ground floor, Headington OX3 7DQ

Degrading activities: Regulation of cellular biology by the ubiquitous pathway

Professor David P. Toczyski

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Jade Schneiders

Fri 26 Jul 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

NDM Seminar Series

Henry Wellcome Building of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Seminar Rooms A & B, Roosevelt Drive OX3 7BN

Translating whole genome sequencing pathogens: will it become the new normal in practice & The role of genetics and evolution in Staphylococcus aureus infection.

Prof Derrick Crook, Associate Professor Daniel Wilson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kathryn Smith

Fri 26 Jul 2019 from 16:15 to 17:00

TDI seminars (monthly)

NDM Building, Seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Identification of an O2-sensing system that is conserved across biological kingdoms

Dr Norma Masson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kate Humphrey

Mon 29 Jul 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

A microbiome perspective on metabolic diseases.

Dr Jethro Johnson

The gut microbiome is a critical mediator in the interaction between an individual and their nutritional environment. As such, it has great potential as a target for the prevention and treatment of diet-related metabolic diseases. This talk reports recent large-scale, multi-omic studies of the... Read more

The gut microbiome is a critical mediator in the interaction between an individual and their nutritional environment. As such, it has great potential as a target for the prevention and treatment of diet-related metabolic diseases. This talk reports recent large-scale, multi-omic studies of the gut microbiome in type 2 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. In doing so, it addresses the role of microbially-mediated inflammation in the onset and development of both diseases. It also highlights the challenges inherent in microbiome studies, where causality may be attributed at the level of a single species, a clade, or a complex community.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Jennifer Pope

Tue 30 Jul 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Radcliffe Humanities, Colin Matthew Room, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Answering policy questions with discrete choice experiments: applications in the US tobacco market

John joined HERC in May 2019 as a Senior Researcher from the Yale School of Public Health. He will be working with Philip Clarke on obesity, and with Sarah Wordsworth and James Buchanan on genomics. John’s interests include experimental approaches to understanding health behaviours and econometric modelling

John joined HERC in May 2019 as a Senior Researcher from the Yale School of Public Health. He will be working with Philip Clarke on obesity, and with Sarah Wordsworth and James Buchanan on genomics. John’s interests include experimental approaches to understanding health behaviours and econometric modelling

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 30 Jul 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

Toward rationale therapy for sclerdoderma

Prof John Varga

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Jennifer Pope

Wed 31 Jul 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

Development & Cell Biology Theme Guest Speakers (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Modelling congenital malformations in mice - why genetic background matters

Prof. Loydie Jerome-Majewska

In humans, fetal survival depends on proper patterning and morphogenesis of the embryo and its accompanying placenta. Abnormal morphogenesis in the embryo underlies developmental abnormalities such as DiGeorge syndrome and Mandibulofacial dysostosis with microcephaly (MFDM), and results in... Read more

In humans, fetal survival depends on proper patterning and morphogenesis of the embryo and its accompanying placenta. Abnormal morphogenesis in the embryo underlies developmental abnormalities such as DiGeorge syndrome and Mandibulofacial dysostosis with microcephaly (MFDM), and results in increased morbidity and mortality. We use the mouse model to study the genetic and cellular basis of morphogenesis during the embryonic period; furthermore, the availability of next generation sequencing has enabled the rapid identification of genes associated with developmental abnormalities. The goals of my research program are (1) to use forward genetics to identify the genes responsible for malformations in human and mouse during pregnancy; (2) to use reverse genetics in the mouse model to characterize the cellular pathways regulated by genes implicated in developmental syndromes.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof Shankar Srinivas