Other Seminars

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Tue 2 Jul 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

The 'Aspirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly' (ASPREE) Trial

Professor Mark Nelson

ASPREE was a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial of 100 mg enteric coated aspirin conducted 2010-2017 in community-dwelling men and women in Australia and the United States. It enrolled 19,114 community-dwelling participants, 16,703 in Australia and 2,411 in the United States.... Read more

ASPREE was a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial of 100 mg enteric coated aspirin conducted 2010-2017 in community-dwelling men and women in Australia and the United States. It enrolled 19,114 community-dwelling participants, 16,703 in Australia and 2,411 in the United States. Published in the NEJM, the trial found that using low-dose aspirin as a primary prevention strategy in older adults did not show a benefit for the composite primary outcome of disability free survival and suggested harm in a significantly higher risk of major hemorrhage and a higher all-cause mortality primarily due to cancer-related death. Mark Nelson is Professor and Chair, Discipline of General Practice, School of Medicine and Senior Member Menzies Institute for Medical Research where he is also medical director of the Blood Pressure Clinic, both at the University of Tasmania, Hobart Australia. He is also an Adjunct Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne Australia. His research interests are around large-scale clinical trials in in primary care. He has 265 peer reviewed scientific publications, has been awarded more than AU$80 million in competitive grants and is a principal investigator on the NIH sponsored ASPREE / ASPREE-XT study (N = 19,000) investigating if aspirin extends healthy active life, and the NHMRC sponsored STAREE (recruitment to date >5000) similarly investigating if statins extend healthy active life. He also has been an author on multiple guidelines for cardiovascular disease prevention and treatment and remains in clinical general practice in Hobart Australia.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Lucy Curtin

Tue 2 Jul 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Genetic engineering of human hematopoiesis for treating inherited diseases and cancer

Dr Luigi Naldini

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Thu 4 Jul 2019 from 16:30 to 18:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, George Pickering Education centre, Level 3 Academic centre, Room 2B, Headington OX3 9DU, Headington OX3 9DU

When the computer takes over: automated digital endoscopic scoring in IBD

Dr Peter Bossuyt

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Holm Uhlig

Fri 5 Jul 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Mon 8 Jul 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting Rooms 71a,b,c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Impaired ribosome biogenesis and diseases

Prof Sinisa Volarevic

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Amanda O'Neill

Tue 9 Jul 2019 from 10:30 to 11:30

Population Health Seminars

NDM Building, Seminar room, basement, Headington OX3 7FZ

NPEU Research Seminar - Women and cardiovascular disease: an odd couple?

Professor Mark Woodward

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 11 Jul 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Small Lecture Theatre (2nd Floor), off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Title TBC

Austen Milnerwood

Austen Milnerwood’s research centers on cell biological, electrophysiological and optical investigation of neural development, connectivity, transmission and plasticity. With a major focus on the early pathophysiology of adult-onset diseases such as movement disorders and dementia, his laboratory... Read more

Austen Milnerwood’s research centers on cell biological, electrophysiological and optical investigation of neural development, connectivity, transmission and plasticity. With a major focus on the early pathophysiology of adult-onset diseases such as movement disorders and dementia, his laboratory aims to develop neuroprotective treatments. A strong theme has emerged from studying several proteins harbouring mutations that are autosomal dominantly linked to Parkinson’s disease, in other words, genes transmitted down the family line that are highly predictive for developing PD. There are several proteins that cause “familial PD,” e.g. LRRK2, VPS35 and synuclein. Milnerwood's laboratory is finding that these proteins are involved in the same cellular functions. By learning more about what these proteins are supposed to do and what goes wrong with the mutations present, Milnerwood hopes to work out the common neuronal dysfunction of many forms of parkinsonism and then develop appropriate treatments.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Please note this talk is at noon in the small lecture theatre

Fri 12 Jul 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

NDM Seminar Series

Henry Wellcome Building of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Seminar Rooms A & B, Roosevelt Drive OX3 7BN

Title TBC

Prof Derrick Crook, Associate Professor Daniel Wilson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kathryn Smith

Tue 16 Jul 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Interrogating LRRK2 kinase pathway in human bio-samples in Parkinson’s disease

Esther Sammler

The MRC PPU has a track record of elucidating critical signal transduction pathways in Parkinson’s disease (PD), mainly related to protein kinases and E3-ubiquitin-ligases associated with PD. The expectation is that the translation of such knowledge will be relevant to idiopathic PD. As a... Read more

The MRC PPU has a track record of elucidating critical signal transduction pathways in Parkinson’s disease (PD), mainly related to protein kinases and E3-ubiquitin-ligases associated with PD. The expectation is that the translation of such knowledge will be relevant to idiopathic PD. As a clinician scientist, Esther is interested in accelerating the application of scientific discoveries via target validation to facilitate the development of biomarkers and novel treatments. To achieve this, she collaborates with other researchers, clinicians, and people affected by PD – my patients. She is also one of directors of the newly established Dundee Edinburgh Parkinson’s Initiative. She is uniquely positioned to bridge the divide between the clinical environment and the research laboratory and ensure that research advances have an immediate translational impact.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Thu 18 Jul 2019 from 14:30 to 15:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, John Radcliffe Main Building, Lecture Theatre 1, Academic Street , Headington OX3 9DU

Development of invasive and non-invasive markers for the early detection of GI neoplasia and risk stratification.

Dr Elizabeth Bird-Lieberman

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Carolina Arancibia

Fri 19 Jul 2019 from 14:00 to 15:00

Jenner Seminars

NDM Building, Seminar Room, Lower Ground Floor, Headington OX3 7FZ

Spy and Snoop protein superglues applied to vaccine development

Prof Mark Howarth

Audience: Public

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg