Other Seminars

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Tue 8 Jan 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Wed 9 Jan 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Inaugural Lecture - Preventing infections using pathogen genomics and mathematical modelling: HIV and beyond

Professor Christophe Fraser

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Wed 9 Jan 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Title TBC

Professor Mart Saarma

Mart Saarma's work has focused on the in vivo roles, therapeutic effects and receptors of the neurotrophic factors including GDNF and the novel neurotrophic factor CDNF discovered by his research group. They have shown that CDNF very efficiently protects and repairs dopamine neurons in vivo. Prof.... Read more

Mart Saarma's work has focused on the in vivo roles, therapeutic effects and receptors of the neurotrophic factors including GDNF and the novel neurotrophic factor CDNF discovered by his research group. They have shown that CDNF very efficiently protects and repairs dopamine neurons in vivo. Prof. Saarma’s work has been instrumental in understanding the therapeutic potential of these neurotrophic factors for neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Parkinson’s disease. He has published more than 200 scientific articles. His group has characterized several new GDNF family receptors and demonstrated that RET receptor tyrosine kinase is the signaling receptor for GDNF. Mart Saarma's research group is investigating the signalling and biological functions of GDNF family ligands and endoplasmic reticulum located CDNF/MANF neurotrophic factor families, both within and outside of the nervous system. They are also interested in the therapeutic potential of these proteins in various diseases, so they are testing their efficacy in animal models of Parkinson’s, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke and diabetes mellitus. One of the highlights of their research has been, in 2017, the initiation of phase I-II clinical trials of CDNF protein in Parkinson’s disease patients by the Finnish company Herantis Pharma Plc.

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 10 Jan 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Cardiology / Acute General Medicine Firm B

Prof Robin Choudhury

Cardiology: "Coronary disease in diabetes – sweet memories", Prof Robin Choudhury -- Acute General Medicine Firm B: -- Chair: TBA

Cardiology: "Coronary disease in diabetes – sweet memories", Prof Robin Choudhury -- Acute General Medicine Firm B: -- Chair: TBA

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 10 Jan 2019 from 16:30 to 18:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, John Radcliffe Main Building, George Pickering Education Centre Level 3 Academic Centre, Room 2B, Headington OX3 9DU

From Genetics to Clinic in Autoimmune Diabetes

Professor John Todd

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Holm Uhlig

Fri 11 Jan 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Controlling two helminth infections, cysticercosis and echinococcosis, using highly effective recombinant antigen vaccines

Prof Marshall Lightowlers

Audience: Public

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

The seminar will be followed by a buffet lunch in the Doll Building Atrium

Mon 14 Jan 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, MRC WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Reconstructing the immune system using single cell RNA sequencing

Prof Muzlifah Haniffa

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Tue 15 Jan 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

MHU Student Presentations

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 16 Jan 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Molecular archaeology of cancer

Dr Peter Van Loo

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 17 Jan 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Understanding the immune response to persistent human T-cell leukaemia virus (HTLV-I) infections (exact title tbc)

Professor Charles Bangham

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 17 Jan 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

AICU / Oncology

AICU: -- Oncology: -- Chair: TBA

AICU: -- Oncology: -- Chair: TBA

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 17 Jan 2019 from 14:30 to 15:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, Lecture Theatre 1, Academic Centre, Level 3, Headington OX3 9DU

Enteric viral infection in childhood and coeliac disease

Dr Michael Fitzpatrick

Coeliac disease is a common immune condition where susceptible individuals develop inflammation of the gut in response to gluten, a protein in wheat. Whilst genetics play an important role in the development of coeliac disease, there is evidence that an environmental trigger is required for coeliac... Read more

Coeliac disease is a common immune condition where susceptible individuals develop inflammation of the gut in response to gluten, a protein in wheat. Whilst genetics play an important role in the development of coeliac disease, there is evidence that an environmental trigger is required for coeliac disease to develop. Circumstantial evidence has suggested that viral infections in childhood could be that trigger, but definitive proof remains elusive. A recent study has suggested that reovirus, a virus affecting the gut that generally causes no symptoms, can trigger a condition like coeliac disease in mice under experimental conditions, however it remains unclear if this infection is associated with coeliac disease in humans. The discovery of infections that can trigger coeliac disease could have a profound impact on the prevention of the development of coeliac disease, as well as on the prevention of diseases associated with it, such as Type 1 Diabetes. We will test the association between reovirus, along with a number of other viral infections that affect the gut, and the development of coeliac disease by using stored samples from a recent study of diagnostic methods of coeliac disease in children. This large, well-described, cohort of children with and without coeliac disease provides an ideal group in which to test for an association between viral infection and coeliac disease. We will perform tests to measure antibody responses to these viruses in children with and without coeliac disease.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Carolina Arancibia

Thu 17 Jan 2019 from 15:30 to 16:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, Lecture Theatre 1, Academic Centre, Level 3, Headington OX3 9DU, Headington OX3 9DU

An investigation into the stability of the adaptive and innate immune compartments within a transplanted small bowel: A pilot study

Dr Philip Allan

Intestinal failure, where the gut fails to absorb sufficient nutrients, is a debilitating condition which requires treatment with intravenous parenteral nutrition. Unfortunately, this treatment can be complicated by severe infections and venous blood clots, and in such circumstances intestinal... Read more

Intestinal failure, where the gut fails to absorb sufficient nutrients, is a debilitating condition which requires treatment with intravenous parenteral nutrition. Unfortunately, this treatment can be complicated by severe infections and venous blood clots, and in such circumstances intestinal transplantation can be an effective treatment. However intestinal transplantation suffers from high rates of graft rejection, as well as cases of graft versus host disease (GVHD) and has only a 60% 5-year survival. Large numbers of immune cells from the donor are transferred into an intestinal transplant, and the interactions of the immune cells from donor and recipient, the survival of donor immune cells in the transplant, and the mechanisms that allow colonisation of the transplanted tissue by recipient immune cells are not well understood. Our work will study these questions through studying intestinal immune cell populations in recipients of intestinal transplants at the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust transplantation unit, one of only two centres offering adult intestinal transplantation in the United Kingdom. These results will have direct patient benefit by elucidating the mechanisms that drive graft rejection and GVHD in intestinal transplantation, and by identifying strategies that might prevent these complications. Moreover, these results may provide insights into more fundamental questions in human immunology, including the dynamics of tissue residency of immune cells in the gut.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Carolina Arancibia

Fri 18 Jan 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Communication in Healthcare: A Failure in Need of Rescue?

Professor Amir A. Ghaferi

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 18 Jan 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Strubi seminars

Probing the mechanism of the SAMHD1 HIV-1 restriction factor

Dr Ian Taylor

SAMHD1 is a post-entry cellular restriction factor that inhibits HIV-1 replication in myeloid-lineage and resting CD4+ T cells. The mechanism of SAMHD1 restriction has been disputed but the predominant theory is that SAMHD1 dNTP triphosphohydrolase activity blocks HIV-1 infection by reducing the... Read more

SAMHD1 is a post-entry cellular restriction factor that inhibits HIV-1 replication in myeloid-lineage and resting CD4+ T cells. The mechanism of SAMHD1 restriction has been disputed but the predominant theory is that SAMHD1 dNTP triphosphohydrolase activity blocks HIV-1 infection by reducing the cellular dNTP pool to a level that does not support viral reverse transcription. A large body of structural and biochemical studies have demonstrated that the active form of SAMHD1 is a protein tetramer that contains four regulatory allosteric sites each accommodating a deoxynucleotide/nucleotide pair and four active sites that hydrolyse the dNTP substrates. In addition, other studies have shown that the dNTP triphosphohydrolysis reaction is regulated by tetramer stability, controlled by SAMHD1 phosphorylation at residue T592. However, although, this wealth of information has contributed significantly to our understanding of SAMHD1 restriction, regulation and activation the exact nature of SAMHD1 cellular activity that restricts HIV-1 and the molecular details catalytic mechanism of dNTP hydrolysis have remained unclear. Therefore, to elucidate the molecular mechanism of dNTP triphospho-hydrolysis by SAMHD1, we have undertaken virological studies together with comprehensive, enzymological studies employing deoxynucleotide substrate and activator analogues and determined crystal structures of catalytically active SAMHD1 with dNTP-mimicking, competitive inhibitors. The SAMHD1-inhibitor co-crystal structures show in atomic detail how dNTP substrates are coordinated at the SAMHD1 active site and reveal how the activated protein cleaves the phospho-ester bond in the dNTP substrate. In conclusion, these studies now clarify the anti-HIV-1 activity of SAMHD1 and provide the molecular details of the SAMHD1 reaction mechanism demonstrating how dNTP substrates are hydrolysed and enable more accurate prediction of whether new and existing antiviral and anticancer drugs are hydrolysed by SAMHD1.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Fri 18 Jan 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

NDM Seminar Series

Henry Wellcome Building of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Seminar Rooms A & B, Roosevelt Drive OX3 7BN

Title TBC

Dr David Wedge, Annabelle Lewis

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kathryn Smith

Tue 22 Jan 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Dr Lars Jansen

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Thu 24 Jan 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Horton Hospital / Rheumatology

Dr Lorraine O’Neill

Horton Hospital: -- Rheumatology: Dr Lorraine O’Neill -- Chair: TBA

Horton Hospital: -- Rheumatology: Dr Lorraine O’Neill -- Chair: TBA

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Mon 28 Jan 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting rooms 71 a,b,c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Publishing and Careers at Nature Research

Dr Anne Mirabella

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Amanda O'Neill