Other Seminars

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Thu 23 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Renal / Respiratory

Dr Rachel Hoyles, Dr Will Herrington, Dr Doreen Zhu

Renal: "Sweet Victory", Dr Doreen Zhu and Dr Will Herrington -- Respiratory: "Rough hands, dense lungs..sick patient", Dr Rachel Hoyles -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Renal: "Sweet Victory", Dr Doreen Zhu and Dr Will Herrington -- Respiratory: "Rough hands, dense lungs..sick patient", Dr Rachel Hoyles -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 23 May 2019 from 17:00 to 18:30

Lincoln College, Oakeshott Room , Turl Street OX1 3DR

How AI will transform human health

Craig J Mundie

About the speaker: Craig J. Mundie is President of Mundie & Associates. He joined Microsoft in 1992 and retired in 2014 as Chief Research and Strategy Officer (since 2007) and the Principal Technology-Policy Executive (since 1998). Previously he was the CEO and co-Founder of Alliant Computer... Read more

About the speaker: Craig J. Mundie is President of Mundie & Associates. He joined Microsoft in 1992 and retired in 2014 as Chief Research and Strategy Officer (since 2007) and the Principal Technology-Policy Executive (since 1998). Previously he was the CEO and co-Founder of Alliant Computer Systems. He was co-Executive Chairman of Bridgewater Associates (2015-2016). He is a Director of the Institute for Systems Biology. He advises Microsoft, Exicure, Ironnet Cybersecurity, SomaLogic, OpenAI, and the Cleveland Clinic. Craig Mundie served Presidents Clinton, Bush and Obama on the NSTAC and was on Obama’s PCAST.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Jo Peel

Fri 24 May 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Restoring bladder and bowel function by electrical stimulation after spinal cord injury

Professor Graham Creasey

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 24 May 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Proteasomal cut-and-pasting: a small splice of the class I peptide pie?

Dr Wayne Paes

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 24 May 2019 from 10:30 to 11:30

Single Cell Seminars at WHG

The PancrImmune study: Investigating the Adaptive Immune Responses in Pancreatic Pathologies

Dr Rachael Bashford-Rogers

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fabiola Curion

Fri 24 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Henry Wellcome Building of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Seminar Rooms A & B, Roosevelt Drive OX3 7BN

Human Antibody Responses in Dengue and Zika Virus Infections & Advances in antiparasitic chemotherapy

Prof Gavin Screaton, Prof Nick White

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kathryn Smith

Fri 24 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

The Heart of the Brain: the hypothalamus and its hormones

Gareth Leng

Most neurons in the hypothalamus make and secrete at least one peptide in addition to a conventional neurotransmitter and other intercellular messengers. Probably the most extensively characterized of these are the oxytocin and vasopressin neurones of the hypothalamus. Their evolution has been... Read more

Most neurons in the hypothalamus make and secrete at least one peptide in addition to a conventional neurotransmitter and other intercellular messengers. Probably the most extensively characterized of these are the oxytocin and vasopressin neurones of the hypothalamus. Their evolution has been traced back to a single multisensory multifunctional cell type in Urbilateria, wormlike marine organisms that are the last common ancestor of vertebrates, flies, and worms. In Urbilateria, peptide-secreting cells probably responded to cues from the ancient marine environment. These earliest neurons combined properties that we have thought of as separate properties of endocrine cells and neurons. They used a diversity of signaling mechanisms, made both peptides and neurotransmitters, and were endowed with a wide range of specialized senses. They had not a single role to which they were committed, but multiple behavioral and physiological functions. The neurons of the hypothalamus have retained the multifunctionality of their distant ancestors, and their multitude of sensory abilities (1). Magnocellular oxytocin neurons regulate milk ejection, parturition, and sodium excretion by what they secrete into the blood (2). They also govern reproductive and appetitive behaviors, and these are governed reciprocally, not by the oxytocin that is released into the blood but by oxytocin released from dendrites. They are sensitive to multiple chemical cues from the internal environment—they have receptors for glucocorticoids and gonadal steroids, and for leptin, prolactin, and insulin, as well as for many of the peptides released from the brain itself. But to make sense of how single cell populations can simultaneously regulate diverse functions we have to separate hype from hope (3), sense from nonsense (4), and understand the mechanistic basis of independent regulation of secretion from different neuronal compartments (1, 5). 1. Leng, G (2018) The Heart of the Brain: the hypothalamus and its hormones. MIT Press 2. Leng G, Pineda Reyes R, Sabatier N, Ludwig M (2015) 60 YEARS OF NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY: The posterior pituitary: from Geoffrey Harris to our present understanding. J Endocrinol 226:T173-85. 3. Leng G, Ludwig M (2016) Intranasal oxytocin: myths and delusions. BiolPsychiatry 79:243-50. 4. Leng G, Sabatier N (2016) Measuring oxytocin and vasopressin: bioassays, immunoassays and random numbers. J Neuroendocrinol. (10). 5. Leng G, Sabatier N (2017) Oxytocin - The Sweet Hormone? Trends Endocrinol Metab. 28:365-376

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Kristine Krug

Fri 24 May 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Joan Doll Teaching Suite, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Tue 28 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Tue 28 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre , Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar: Are journals an endangered species?

Zoe Mullan

As an increasing number of funding bodies demand evermore-specific open access publishing models, research assessment exercises shift away from their reliance on impact factors, and open science and open peer review become more prevalent, do traditional scientific journals still have any... Read more

As an increasing number of funding bodies demand evermore-specific open access publishing models, research assessment exercises shift away from their reliance on impact factors, and open science and open peer review become more prevalent, do traditional scientific journals still have any relevance? Zoë Mullan is Editor-in-Chief of the open access journal, The Lancet Global Health. She is an Ex-Officio Board Member of the Consortium of Universities for Global Health and an International Advisory Board member of Sun-Yat Sen Global Health Institute, Guangzhou, China. Between 2013 and 2017 she was a Council Member and Trustee of the Committee on Publication Ethics. She trained in Biochemistry at the University of Bath, UK, before joining the publishing industry in 1997 as a Scientific Information Officer with CABI. She moved to The Lancet in 1999, where she has worked since, variously as a technical editor, section editor, and founding editor of The Lancet Global Health.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 28 May 2019 from 14:30 to 15:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, John Clegg Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Glycolipid-peptide vaccination induces liver-resident memory CD8+ T cells that protect against malaria

Professor Gavin Painter

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 29 May 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 Seminar room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Genomic Insights into Herpesviral evolution and pathogenesis

Professor Judith Breuer

Herpesvirus are ancient pathogens that have co-evolved with their cognate hosts. The use of pioneering enrichment methods to sequence herpesvirus genomes directly from clinical material has revealed unexpected insights into the evolution and pathogenesis of these DNA viruses . We find that... Read more

Herpesvirus are ancient pathogens that have co-evolved with their cognate hosts. The use of pioneering enrichment methods to sequence herpesvirus genomes directly from clinical material has revealed unexpected insights into the evolution and pathogenesis of these DNA viruses . We find that recombination is a dominant driver of herpesvirus evolution, with herpes simplex and cytomegalovirus recombining freely, other than in key hotspots. In contrast varicella zoster virus and Epstein Barr virus recombination is constrained leading to evidence of population structure. While the forces shaping the VZV and EBV population structure are unknown the data suggest possible hypotheses that will be explored. Mathematical modelling of sequence data recovered from clinical samples also provides insight into the natural history of these human-restricted viruses in their natural host, leading to new findings and testable hypotheses about pathogenesis and virulence.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof. Paul Klenerman

Please arrive 5 minutes before the talk is due to start to gain access to the building

Wed 29 May 2019 from 12:30 to 13:30

WHG Lunchtime Lab Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A & B , Headington OX3 7BN

Chapman & Dendrou Lunchtime Lab Talks

Peter Yeow, Victor Yeung, Melissa Grant-Peters

Chapman Group Speaker: Peter Yeow Title: ‘Exploiting TRIM37-driven centrosome dysfunction to eliminate 17q23-amplified breast cancer cells’ Dendrou Group Speaker: Melissa Grant-Peters Title: ‘Microspectroscopic and transcriptomic spatially-resolved tissue profiling’ Speaker: Victor... Read more

Chapman Group Speaker: Peter Yeow Title: ‘Exploiting TRIM37-driven centrosome dysfunction to eliminate 17q23-amplified breast cancer cells’ Dendrou Group Speaker: Melissa Grant-Peters Title: ‘Microspectroscopic and transcriptomic spatially-resolved tissue profiling’ Speaker: Victor Yeung Title: ‘Investigating the molecular mode of action of TYK2-mediated protection against immune-mediated diseases’

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Thu 30 May 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Haematology / Psychological Medicine

Dr Susan Shaw

Haematology: -- Psychological Medicine: "Stones, Bones, Moans, and psychic Groans – the neuropsychiatric complications of hypercalcaemia", Dr Susan Shaw -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Haematology: -- Psychological Medicine: "Stones, Bones, Moans, and psychic Groans – the neuropsychiatric complications of hypercalcaemia", Dr Susan Shaw -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 30 May 2019 from 14:00 to 15:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

cGAS STING signalling in cancer

Dr Eileen Parkes

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Butler

Thu 30 May 2019 from 15:00 to 16:00

Manor Road Building, Manor Road OX1 3UQ

3 Minute Thesis Competition Heat

An 80,000 word thesis would take 9 hours to present; how about in just 3 minutes with the aid of a single slide? We are inviting DPhil students to do just that. The 3 Minute Thesis competition challenges doctoral candidates to present a compelling spoken presentation on their research topic and... Read more

An 80,000 word thesis would take 9 hours to present; how about in just 3 minutes with the aid of a single slide? We are inviting DPhil students to do just that. The 3 Minute Thesis competition challenges doctoral candidates to present a compelling spoken presentation on their research topic and its significance in just three minutes to a non-specialist audience. The competition will help you to develop your communication skills, vital to raise awareness of your work, seek support and obtain funding. You will be able to develop ways of explaining complex ideas in a way that is accessible and engaging for a non-specialist audience, raise the profile of your work, enhance your CV, and network with like-minded researchers. Oxford will run a two-stage competition, first the heat to select four finalists. Next the final to find the overall winner. The winner of the Oxford final will be entered into the national semi-finals, and if they are successful they will go on to the national final in Birmingham, with their expenses paid to attend. Up to 4 finalists will all be awarded a prize: 1st prize: £200 Runner-up prizes: £100 There are also prizes for winners in the national final: last year’s winner was awarded a £3,000 grant to spend on public engagement activity, sponsored by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) to promote their research and to enhance their professional development. At the heat you will deliver your Three Minute Thesis to a panel of judges. See rules below. Finalists will then be selected to present at the final on 19 June, 5-6pm at the Manor Road Building. By registering for the heat you confirm that you are available to attend the final on 19 June and are eligible: https://www.mpls.ox.ac.uk/public-engagement/latest/three-minute-thesis-competition-launched-deadline-25-may-training-sessions-available-in-march/#eligibility If you don’t want to compete or want to invite your colleagues, please just show up. Specialist training is available for all to help you develop your pitch. You will be taken through the key ingredients to craft a compelling three minute presentation, and have the chance to get feedback on your presentations. Simply register for a session to suit: 25 March, 09.30am-12.30pm Manor Road Building – register: https://cosy.ox.ac.uk/accessplan/clientinput/course/coursebooker.aspx?coursedateid=95410 OR 27 March, 1.30pm – 4.30pm, Manor Road Building – register: https://cosy.ox.ac.uk/accessplan/clientinput/course/coursebooker.aspx?coursedateid=95411

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

If you do not wish to compete and just want to watch, please just show up. If you wish to compete, please register.

Thu 30 May 2019 from 17:00 to 18:00

Oxford Martin School Lecture Series: Evolving economic thought

Oxford Martin School, Corner of Catte and Holywell Streets, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Is the human species slowing down?

Danny Dorling

In Origin of Species, Charles Darwin described how a population explosion occurs and called the time of population explosion “ favourable seasons", he was not to know it, but such circumstances arose for his own species at around the time of his own birth. However, the favourable seasons for... Read more

In Origin of Species, Charles Darwin described how a population explosion occurs and called the time of population explosion “ favourable seasons", he was not to know it, but such circumstances arose for his own species at around the time of his own birth. However, the favourable seasons for human population growth were not experienced favourably, with times of great social dislocation from small scale enclosure to global colonisation. Now those seasons are over, we have experienced the first ever sustained slowdown in the rate of global human population growth. This has been the case for at least one human generation. However, we are not just slowing down in terms of how many children we have, but in almost everything else we do, other than in the rise in global temperatures that we are recording and that we have to live with. It can be argued that there is even a slowdown in such unexpected areas as debt, publishing, and in the total amount useful information being produced. If this is true - that humanity is slowing down in almost everything that we do – what does this mean? What measurements suggest that slowdown is true? And if so much is still rising, albeit at slower and slower rates - is that such a great change? Finally how might the slowdown impact on economic thought. In many ways economics was the science of the great acceleration; a science that makes most sense when markets are expanding and demand is rising. What kind of an economics is needed in a world where enormous and accelerating growth has stopped being the normality?

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Oxford Martin School

Fri 31 May 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

'Building kids' hospitals in Africa: the need, the realities and the rewards', 'Medicalisation of female genital cutting: decision making dilemmas and competing priorities’ and 'FGM: a global perspective'

Professor Chris Lavy, Dr Katy Newell-Jones, Dr Anita Makins

Dr Katy Newell-Jones will present ‘Medicalisation of female genital cutting: decision making dilemmas and competing priorities’ Dr Anita Makins will present 'FGM: a global perspective' Professor Chris Lavy will present ‘Building kids' hospitals in Africa: the need, the realities and the rewards'

Dr Katy Newell-Jones will present ‘Medicalisation of female genital cutting: decision making dilemmas and competing priorities’ Dr Anita Makins will present 'FGM: a global perspective' Professor Chris Lavy will present ‘Building kids' hospitals in Africa: the need, the realities and the rewards'

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 31 May 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Novel Roles for Hyaluronan and its Receptors in Lymphatic Trafficking

Jackson Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer