Other Seminars

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Fri 1 Feb 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Stent assisted coil embolization of broad based aneurysm

Dr Wilhelm Kueker

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 1 Feb 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Dustin Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 1 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Understanding the pathways underlying residual visual function after damage to primary visual cortex

Associate Professor Holly Bridge

Damage to the primary visual cortex leads to loss of the visual field contralateral to the damaged cortex. However, in spite of this loss, some patients are still able to detect visual information about stimuli presented within their blind field. A growing area of research aims to exploit this... Read more

Damage to the primary visual cortex leads to loss of the visual field contralateral to the damaged cortex. However, in spite of this loss, some patients are still able to detect visual information about stimuli presented within their blind field. A growing area of research aims to exploit this residual visual function to try to improve visual performance through rehabilitation programmes stimulating the blind field. However, to optimise such programmes it is important to understand the pathways through which this information is conveyed. Here I will present a series of magnetic resonance imaging studies in which we attempted to elucidate these pathways in a group of hemianopic patients. Firstly I will explain how our functional MRI studies use the specific pattern of response to visual stimulation in different visual areas to uncover candidate pathways. I will use diffusion-weighted data to provide support for a pathway between the lateral geniculate nucleus and motion area MT that is consistently intact only in patients showing blindsight abilities. Finally, I will present our most recent data in which we find further support for this pathway using functional connectivity analysis.

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 1 Feb 2019 from 17:00 to 19:00

AfOx insaka - a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research

St Cross College, Lecture Theatre, West Wing, St Giles OX1 3LZ

Mon 4 Feb 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting Rooms 71a,b,c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Title TBC

Violeta Serra

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Amanda O'Neill

Mon 4 Feb 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Title TBC

Prof Professor Keith Channon

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 4 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, MRC WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Chromosome Replication: From Mechanism to Misregulation in Cancer

Prof John Diffley

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Mon 4 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

TDI Seminar Series

NDM Building, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

A multi-purpose in-memory database for life science research

Dr. Mathias Wilhelm

ProteomicsDB (https://www.ProteomicsDB.org) is an in-memory database initially developed for the exploration of large collections of quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics data. To date it contains data across hundreds of human tissues, body fluids and cell lines including but not limited... Read more

ProteomicsDB (https://www.ProteomicsDB.org) is an in-memory database initially developed for the exploration of large collections of quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics data. To date it contains data across hundreds of human tissues, body fluids and cell lines including but not limited to transcriptomics data, protein-protein interaction information, functional annotations, viability results, drug selectivity data and synthetic and predicted reference mass spectra. Accompanied with a rich user interface for real-time exploration, the extended data foundation transformed ProteomicsDB into a multi-purpose resource for life science research.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Benedikt Kessler

Tue 5 Feb 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Redox differences between the Heart and Tumour could provide a Selective Therapeutic Approach for Chemotherapy-Induced Cardiotoxicity

Dr Gopinath Sutendra

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Tue 5 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar: Controversial topics in the epidemiology of chronic lung disease

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 6 Feb 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Cellular mechanics of B cell responses

Dr Pavel Tolar

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 7 Feb 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Chromatin Conformation in Development and Disease

Dr. Juanma Vaquerizas

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 7 Feb 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Health Economics Seminars

Title TBC

Dr Dan Howdon, Senior Research Fellow in Health Ecomonics

Further information to come

Further information to come

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 7 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Geratology / GU Medicine

Dr Emily Lord, Dr Fiona Windsor

Geratology: "When a crisis HITS: an unusual cause of abdominal pain", Dr Fiona Windsor -- GU Medicine: "“SUPER STRENGTH GONORRHOEA STRAIN EMERGES” - But is there a new ‘SUPER-BUG’ on the horizon?”, Dr Emily Lord -- Chair: Chris O'Callaghan

Geratology: "When a crisis HITS: an unusual cause of abdominal pain", Dr Fiona Windsor -- GU Medicine: "“SUPER STRENGTH GONORRHOEA STRAIN EMERGES” - But is there a new ‘SUPER-BUG’ on the horizon?”, Dr Emily Lord -- Chair: Chris O'Callaghan

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 7 Feb 2019 from 16:30 to 17:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, George Pickering Education Centre Level 3 Academic Centre, Room 2B, Headington OX3 9DU

Metabolomics for IBD - are the answers in the blood?

Dr Fay Probert

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Holm Uhlig

Fri 8 Feb 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Neurosurgery

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 8 Feb 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Davis Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 8 Feb 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar: Malaria Elimination Trials and Simulations

Prof Lisa White

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Fri 8 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Medial Temporal Lobe networks and Memory: processing spatial and non-spatial information overtime

Prof. Dr Magdalena Sauvage

Although the contribution of the hippocampus to episodic memory is well-established, much remains to be known about the network mechanisms underlying memory retrieval at this level and the specific involvement of each hippocampal subfield in this process. I will present recent data based on... Read more

Although the contribution of the hippocampus to episodic memory is well-established, much remains to be known about the network mechanisms underlying memory retrieval at this level and the specific involvement of each hippocampal subfield in this process. I will present recent data based on activity-dependent gene mapping, optogenetics and behavioral techniques showing that dissociating CA1’s from CA3‘s contribution and the contribution of their proximal from that of their distal parts, are essential for a better understanding of spatial and non-spatial information processing in the medial temporal lobe for recent (few min) to very remote (1 year-old) memories (Nakamura et al, J. Neurosc., 2013; Lux et al, Elife, 2017; Beer and Vavra, Plos Biology, 2018).

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 11 Feb 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, meeting rooms 71a,b,c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Regulation of ribosome biogenesis by RNA localisation

Faraz Mardakheh

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Amanda O'Neill

Mon 11 Feb 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Deciphering key checkpoints in CD4 T cell responses

Dr David Withers

Costimulatory signals are critical for the success of T cell responses. For CD4 Th1 effector and memory responses, OX40 signals are essential, however, our understanding of the key cellular sources of OX40L in vivo, alongside how expression of OX40L is regulated, is lacking. Here we demonstrate... Read more

Costimulatory signals are critical for the success of T cell responses. For CD4 Th1 effector and memory responses, OX40 signals are essential, however, our understanding of the key cellular sources of OX40L in vivo, alongside how expression of OX40L is regulated, is lacking. Here we demonstrate that provision of OX40L by DC, but not T cells, B cells nor ILC3 is required and determine how DC expression of OX40L is regulated through cross-talk with NK cells. We then contrast cellular provision of OX40L in systemic Th1 responses with the requirments for Th17 responses in the intestine. ---- David Withers qualified with a BSc (Hons) in Virology and Microbiology from the University of Warwick in 2000. He went on to study for a PhD in Immunology at the Institute for Animal Health in conjunction with the University of Bristol. After obtaining his PhD, David continued his studies in the laboratory of Peter Lipsky at NIAMS, NIH, Bethseda (2004-2006). He then returned to the UK to study with Peter Lane at the University of Birmingham, cementing his interest in secondary lymphoid tissue development/structure and how this controlled CD4 T cell responses. Research in the Withers Lab is supported by the Wellcome Trust. In 2011 he was awarded a Wellcome Trust Research Career Development Fellowship to establish his own research group investigating the role of lymphoid tissue inducer cells in lymph nodes. In 2016 he was awarded a Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellowship in Basic Biomedical Science.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 11 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, MRC WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Sex chromosome functions in development and disease

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Mon 11 Feb 2019 from 16:30 to 17:30

Heatley Lecture

University Museum of Natural History, Parks Road OX1 3PW

Harnessing the power of evolution for making new medicines: phage display of peptides and antibodies

Sir Gregory Winter

Sir Gregory Paul Winter CBE FRS FMedSci is a molecular biologist best known for his work on developing technologies to make therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Previously, it had proved impossible to make human mAbs against human self-antigen targets, as required for treatment of... Read more

Sir Gregory Paul Winter CBE FRS FMedSci is a molecular biologist best known for his work on developing technologies to make therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Previously, it had proved impossible to make human mAbs against human self-antigen targets, as required for treatment of non-infectious diseases such as cancer or rheumatoid arthritis - and the corresponding rodent mAbs had provoked immune responses when given to patients. Winter is credited with inventing techniques both to humanise rodent mAbs (1986) and to create fully human mAbs (1990). For his work on "harnessing the power of evolution" Winter was awarded the 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry along with George Smith and Frances Arnold. Winter was cited specifically "for the phage display of peptides and antibodies”, the technology that led to the fully human antibody “Humira”, and which is now the world’s top-selling pharmaceutical drug. He founded three Cambridge-based start-up companies to help develop therapeutic drugs based on his inventions, and his research career has been based almost entirely at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology and the MRC Centre for Protein Engineering, in Cambridge, England. He has been a Fellow of Trinity College Cambridge, and is now Master of the College.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Jo Peel

Although booking is not required this lecture is likely to be very popular so please arrive in good time to secure a seat. Lecture theatre capacity is 300 people. The lecture will be followed by a drinks reception in the main gallery. Please note filming and audio recording of this lecture are prohibited.

Mon 11 Feb 2019 from 17:00 to 18:15

Oxford Martin School, Corner of Catte and Holywell Streets, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Why do we spend so little on preventing ill-health and so much on treating it?

Professor Chris Dye

“Prevention is better than cure”, and yet only 3% of health expenditure in OECD countries is spent on prevention and public health while more than 90% is spent on curative, rehabilitative and long-term care. How can that paradox be explained? What are the obstacles and opportunities for greater investment in staying healthy?

“Prevention is better than cure”, and yet only 3% of health expenditure in OECD countries is spent on prevention and public health while more than 90% is spent on curative, rehabilitative and long-term care. How can that paradox be explained? What are the obstacles and opportunities for greater investment in staying healthy?

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Oxford Martin School

Wed 13 Feb 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Molecular pathways to Parkinson's disease: more than neurons?

Dr. Elisa Greggio

Dr. Elisa Greggio is a molecular physiologist in the Department of Biology at the University of Padova, Italy. RESEARCH INTERESTS: Genetic forms of dominant Parkinson's. Mitochondrial function, axonal transport and cellular pathways in Parkinson's. Biochemical properties of Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2). Oxidative stress in Parkinson's.

Dr. Elisa Greggio is a molecular physiologist in the Department of Biology at the University of Padova, Italy. RESEARCH INTERESTS: Genetic forms of dominant Parkinson's. Mitochondrial function, axonal transport and cellular pathways in Parkinson's. Biochemical properties of Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2). Oxidative stress in Parkinson's.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Note earlier time

Thu 14 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Infection/Microbiology / Renal

Infection/Microbiology: -- Renal: -- Chair: Hugh Watkins

Infection/Microbiology: -- Renal: -- Chair: Hugh Watkins

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 14 Feb 2019 from 14:00 to 17:30

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Childhood Immunisation in the UK

The British Society for Immunology's Vaccine Affinity Group is pleased to bring you a new event 'Childhood immunisation in the UK' in collaboration with the Jenner Institute, University of Oxford. This is a half-day meeting taking place on the afternoon of Thursday 14 February 2019 in Oxford, UK. ... Read more

The British Society for Immunology's Vaccine Affinity Group is pleased to bring you a new event 'Childhood immunisation in the UK' in collaboration with the Jenner Institute, University of Oxford. This is a half-day meeting taking place on the afternoon of Thursday 14 February 2019 in Oxford, UK. The meeting will review childhood vaccines in the UK, focusing on the issues, prospects and promises. We aim to stimulate interest on the extent to which scientific advances and changes in societal attitudes both affect control and prevention of childhood diseases in the UK through vaccination. A full programme will be online shortly. The event will start at 14:00 and will finish with a networking reception at 17:30. Confirmed speakers include Kate Cuschieri (University of Edinburgh), Adam Finn (University of Bristol), Mark Jit (London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine/Public Health England), Heidi Larsson (London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine), and Helen McShane (University of Oxford).

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Fri 15 Feb 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Upper GI

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 15 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Navigating in a three-dimensional world

Associate Professor Theresa Burt de Perera

The ability to navigate efficiently is fundamental to animals’ survival and success; enabling them to find mates, avoid predators and find their way home. To orient around their local environment, animals must recognise their own position with respect to a goal. This task can be achieved through... Read more

The ability to navigate efficiently is fundamental to animals’ survival and success; enabling them to find mates, avoid predators and find their way home. To orient around their local environment, animals must recognise their own position with respect to a goal. This task can be achieved through a representation of space in their brain, built upon learning and remembering environmental features that are inputted through multiple sensory systems. A substantial research effort has sought to understand how animals navigate, but this has been focused on horizontal movement, despite the real world being three-dimensional. Indeed, most animals have some kind of vertical component to their movements, and there are both quantitative and qualitative reasons why navigating through environments with a vertical axis might be different to navigating purely in 2D. This is pushed to the extreme in volumetric environments, such as those inhabited by many fish. By using experimental and theoretical approaches, we consider how pelagic and benthic fish deal with 3D navigation; from the sensory input, to what information is learned and remembered. This not only allows us to unpick the mechanisms that underpin this important behaviour, but can also inform us about the processes behind learning and memory themselves.

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 18 Feb 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting Rooms 71a,b,c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Mechanisms linking DNA replication to cell fate determination under normal and stressful conditions

Dr Vincenzo Costanzo

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Amanda O'Neill

Mon 18 Feb 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Homing and migration dynamics of lymph-borne immune cells

Prof Reinhold Förster

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Tue 19 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Stem cells and differentiation in myelodysplastic syndromes

Professor Eva Hellstrom Lindberg

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 19 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar: Social determinants of health, health behaviours and health inequalities

Professor Kate Hunt

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 21 Feb 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Engineering the cellular microenvironment with functional and living materials

Professor Manuel Salmeron-Sanchez

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 21 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Respiratory / Gastroenterology

Dr Anthony Croft, Dr Satish Keshav, Dr Chris Turnbull

Respiratory: "An unusual case of breathlessness", Dr Chris Turnbull -- Gastroenterology: Dr Anthony Croft and Dr Satish Keshav -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Respiratory: "An unusual case of breathlessness", Dr Chris Turnbull -- Gastroenterology: Dr Anthony Croft and Dr Satish Keshav -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 21 Feb 2019 from 15:00 to 15:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Microbiota, Intestinal Inflammation and Arthritis - Lessons from a Novel Immunodeficiency.

Dr Dominik Aschenbrenner

Mendelian disorders can inform on key pathogenic mechanism in humans. The analysis of a human immunodeficiency disorder suggests a novel link between intestinal microbiota, epithelial barrier function and the immune system leading to intestinal inflammation and arthritis.

Mendelian disorders can inform on key pathogenic mechanism in humans. The analysis of a human immunodeficiency disorder suggests a novel link between intestinal microbiota, epithelial barrier function and the immune system leading to intestinal inflammation and arthritis.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Carolina Arancibia

Fri 22 Feb 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Dr Ahmed Ahmed, Mr Roberto Tozzi

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 22 Feb 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Simon Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Mon 25 Feb 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

New Insights into Mucosal Antibody Responses

Prof Andrea Cerutti

I will discuss our recent frindings on the ontogeny of secretory IgM responses, which emerge from gut plasma cells clonally affiliated to IgM+ memory B cells and some IgA+ memory B cells. I will also discuss new evidence on the biology of human IgA2 and IgD, two largely neglected mucosal... Read more

I will discuss our recent frindings on the ontogeny of secretory IgM responses, which emerge from gut plasma cells clonally affiliated to IgM+ memory B cells and some IgA+ memory B cells. I will also discuss new evidence on the biology of human IgA2 and IgD, two largely neglected mucosal antibodies. Differences between humans and mice will be emphasized. ---- Dr. Cerutti earned his MD in 1990 and specialized in Hematology in 1997 at Padua School of Medicine (Padua, Italy). He joined Weill Medical College of Cornell University (New York, NY) in 1996 as a Postdoctoral Fellow to do research in immunology. After finishing his post-doctoral studies, he climbed the academic ladder at Weill Medical College of Cornell University and was promoted to Assistant Professor in 2001 and Associate Professor in 2006. In 2009 he obtained Tenure and moved to Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (New York, NY) as a Professor. He also took an ICREA Professor position in IMIM (Barcelona, Spain). He published some 130 articles. The major focus of his research relates to the biology of systemic and mucosal B cells, including the regulation of antibody class switching and production. He serves as a reviewer for ERC, NIH, and other national agencies as well as all of the major immunology/biomedicine journals.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 25 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Utilising the totality of mutagenesis for clinical purposes

Dr Serena Nik-Zainal

A cancer genome carries the historic mutagenic activity that has occurred throughout the development of a tumour1. While driver mutations were the main focus of cancer research for a long time, passenger mutational signatures - the imprints of DNA damage and DNA repair processes that have been... Read more

A cancer genome carries the historic mutagenic activity that has occurred throughout the development of a tumour1. While driver mutations were the main focus of cancer research for a long time, passenger mutational signatures - the imprints of DNA damage and DNA repair processes that have been operative during tumorigenesis - are also biologically informative1,2. In this lecture, I provide a synopsis of this concept, describe the insights that we have gained through combinations of computational analysis3,4 and experiments in cell-based systems5, and showcase how we have developed the concept into applications that we hope to translate into clinical utility in the near future3,4. I describe our efforts in a population-derived cohort as well as in individual patients, emphasizing the need for us to be more precise in analyses and interpretation in human cancer genomics. References: 1. Helleday T, Eshtad S, Nik-Zainal S. Mechanisms underlying mutational signatures in human cancers.Nat Rev Genet. 2014 Sep;15(9):585-98. doi: 10.1038/nrg3729. Epub 2014 Jul 1. Review. PubMed PMID: 24981601; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6044419. 2. Alexandrov LB, Nik-Zainal S, et al. Signatures of mutational processes in human cancer. Nature. 2013 Aug 22;500(7463):415-21. doi: 10.1038/nature12477. Epub 2013 Aug 14. Erratum in: Nature. 2013 Oct 10;502(7470):258. Imielinsk, Marcin [corrected to Imielinski, Marcin]. PubMed PMID: 23945592; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3776390. 3. Nik-Zainal S, Davies H, et al. Landscape of somatic mutations in 560 breast cancer whole-genome sequences. Nature. 2016 Jun 2;534(7605):47-54. doi: 10.1038/nature17676. Epub 2016 May 2. PubMed PMID: 27135926; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4910866. 4. Davies H, Glodzik D, et al. and Nik-Zainal S. HRDetect is a predictor of BRCA1 and BRCA2 deficiency based on mutational signatures. Nat Med. 2017 Apr;23(4):517-525. doi: 10.1038/nm.4292. Epub 2017 Mar 13. PubMed PMID: 28288110; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5833945. 5. Zou X, Owusu M, Harris R, Jackson SP, Loizou JI, Nik-Zainal S. Validating the concept of mutational signatures with isogenic cell models. Nat Commun. 2018 May 1;9(1):1744. doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-04052-8. PubMed PMID: 29717121; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5931590.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Tue 26 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Spatial In Vivo Transcription Profiling with Single-Molecule Imaging

Dr Antti Lignell

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 26 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre , Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar: Progress in the management of breast cancer: Trials and tribulations

Professor David Dodwell

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 26 Feb 2019 from 14:30 to 15:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NPEU Seminar: Using qualitative research to shape, inform, and implement global guidelines in maternity care.

Prof. Soo Downe OBE

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 27 Feb 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Dr Mikhail Shugay

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 28 Feb 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Palliative Care / Neurology

Dr Michele Hu

Palliative Care: -- Neurology: "Prodromal Parkinson’s: what’s it all about?", Dr Michele Hu -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Palliative Care: -- Neurology: "Prodromal Parkinson’s: what’s it all about?", Dr Michele Hu -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 28 Feb 2019 from 16:00 to 18:00

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, John Radcliffe Main Building, George Pickering Education Centre Level 3 Academic Centre, Room 2B, Headington OX3 9DU

Precision Medicine in Inflammatory Bowel Disease - Hype or Hope?

Professor Jack Satsangi

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Holm Uhlig