Other Seminars

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Wed 12 Dec 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

Ethox Centre and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox and WEH Seminar - On balancing security and privacy

Dr Carissa Veliz

When duties arising from two different rights are incompatible with one another, the rights in question can be said to be in conflict. Public discourse is flooded with claims about the incompatibility between the right to privacy and the right to security. According to popular belief, the more... Read more

When duties arising from two different rights are incompatible with one another, the rights in question can be said to be in conflict. Public discourse is flooded with claims about the incompatibility between the right to privacy and the right to security. According to popular belief, the more privacy individuals enjoy, the less the state is able to provide security, and vice versa. According to former NSA security consultant Ed Giorgio, ‘[p]rivacy and security are a zero-sum game’ (cited by Wright 2008)—meaning that for every increase in one, there is a decrease in the other. In other words, the state seems to have incompatible duties: on the one hand, to respect its citizens’ right to privacy by refraining from spying on them, and on the other hand, to guarantee its citizens’ right to security, which, so the argument goes, cannot be done without spying on the general population. In this presentation I focus on the supposed trade-off between privacy and security and argue that, more often than not, a decrease in privacy entails a decrease in security. In the context of terrorist threats and mass surveillance, I argue that the latter may be as risky for the security of citizens as the former.

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 12 Dec 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 1, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Big Data Ethics Forum: HIV phylogenetic research and public health - challenges and opportunities

Professor Christophe Fraser

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Wed 12 Dec 2018 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, Sherrington Library, 2nd floor Sherrington Building, DPAG, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Challenges and Opportunities of Translational Neurogenomics

Dr Sonja Scholz

Dr. Scholz is a Neurologist and Neurogeneticist specialized in movement disorders. She received her medical degree from the Medical University Innsbruck, Austria. Following graduation, she was a post-doctoral fellow at the Laboratory of Neurogenetics (NIA) under the supervision of Drs. Andrew... Read more

Dr. Scholz is a Neurologist and Neurogeneticist specialized in movement disorders. She received her medical degree from the Medical University Innsbruck, Austria. Following graduation, she was a post-doctoral fellow at the Laboratory of Neurogenetics (NIA) under the supervision of Drs. Andrew Singleton and John Hardy. She obtained a Ph.D. in Neurogenomics from the University College London, UK in 2010. She then moved to Baltimore to complete her neurology residency training at Johns Hopkins. In 2015, Dr. Scholz received the McFarland Transition to Independence Award for Neurologist-Scientists. She is an Assistant Clinical Investigator within the Neurogenetics Branch (NINDS). Her laboratory focuses on identifying genetic causes of neurodegenerative diseases, such as dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy, and frontotemporal dementia.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Thu 13 Dec 2018 from 09:30 to 10:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Thu 13 Dec 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

Ethox Centre and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities

Big Data Institute, L1 Meeting Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox and WEH Seminar: Deploying Epigenetics to Identify Genetically Influenced Social Inequalities

Dr Benjamin Gregg

The epigenome is the set of potentially heritable changes in gene expressions that occur in the absence of changes to the DNA sequence itself. The transfer from parent to offspring may be accompanied by some of the negative consequences of a particular environment (of the mother, of both parents,... Read more

The epigenome is the set of potentially heritable changes in gene expressions that occur in the absence of changes to the DNA sequence itself. The transfer from parent to offspring may be accompanied by some of the negative consequences of a particular environment (of the mother, of both parents, even of grandparents) for the fetus and postnatal life. I advance four arguments: (1) Epigenetics can be politically salient with respect to identifying negative determinants of human health with epigenetic sources. Such salience remains hypothetical today given the absence of clear, causal evidence of a well-understood epigenetic mechanism. (2) The epigenetic porosity between environment and body raises political issues where toxic environments are human constructions, such as those characterized for example by poverty, malnutrition, pollution, or inadequate health care. Further, If scientists cannot establish some kind of “natural” epigenetic normality that holds for all humans, then are epigenetic variants natural phenomena that can be evaluated in any objective sense? (3) Moral responsibility for health-endangering environments (in utero or in early life) does not follow simply from determining the causal connection between epigenetic mechanism and environmental exposure. For example, the lifestyles and health habits of vulnerable individuals may reflect a range of unhealthy behaviors. While this observation raises questions about a lack of personal responsibility, it might also be invoked to reject the remediation of toxic environments. (4) Still, epigenetic research may offer political promise if it can ever expose some “natural” inequalities as, in fact, epigenetically influenced.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 13 Dec 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

VIVA - "Acquired Alpha Thalassaemia in Myelodysplastic Syndrome"

Pak Leng Cheong

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Thu 13 Dec 2018 from 13:30 to 14:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

VIVA - ‘The molecular and cellular basis for oncogene collaboration in acute myeloid leukaemia’

Cristina Di Genua

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Butler

Thu 13 Dec 2018 from 14:30 to 15:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Main Meeting Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

HERC Seminar: Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis for Comparative Value Assessment throughout the Drug Lifecycle

Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) has been proposed as appropriate methodology for supporting many key decisions in the drug lifecycle, including regulatory authorization, health technology assessment (HTA) and prescription. The relevant decision criteria are different in these three... Read more

Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) has been proposed as appropriate methodology for supporting many key decisions in the drug lifecycle, including regulatory authorization, health technology assessment (HTA) and prescription. The relevant decision criteria are different in these three settings: regulatory MCDAs are mostly concerned with assessing treatment benefit-risk profiles, prescription ones additionally consider convenience and patient satisfaction, and HTAs value cost and equity aspects. This presentation will question whether any single methodology can support decisions as diverse as these, but it will also argue for the value of MCDA as a general framework for structuring comparative treatment assessments. I will demonstrate the use of MCDA in benefit-risk assessment, discuss flaws present in most applications of MCDA in HTA, and argue against application of MCDA in prescription setting.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 13 Dec 2018 from 16:00 to 18:00

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, George Pickering Education centre, Level 3 Academic centre, Room 2B, Headington OX3 9DU

Standards of gastritis assessment – implications for clinical practice and research

Dr Jan Bornschein

While most research on inflammatory conditions in the UK focuses on the intestine, the stomach has been somewhat neglected. Although advanced endoscopic techniques often make biopsies unnecessary, structured and standardised tissue sampling is still required to investigate certain clinical conditions and to allow building up an adequate biobank repository.

While most research on inflammatory conditions in the UK focuses on the intestine, the stomach has been somewhat neglected. Although advanced endoscopic techniques often make biopsies unnecessary, structured and standardised tissue sampling is still required to investigate certain clinical conditions and to allow building up an adequate biobank repository.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jan Borschein

Fri 14 Dec 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

CAREER SEMINAR “A story of development and differentiation – from red blood cells to career moves”

Dr Maria Suciu

As a scientist at Genomics plc, I split my time between working on our collaboration with Vertex and leading the integration of functional genomics data with GWAS data. The focus of my research training has been on long-range gene regulation by non-coding elements and the impact of variants on... Read more

As a scientist at Genomics plc, I split my time between working on our collaboration with Vertex and leading the integration of functional genomics data with GWAS data. The focus of my research training has been on long-range gene regulation by non-coding elements and the impact of variants on these elements, with an emphasis on open chromatin data in red blood cells. I undertook my doctoral studies in the laboratories of Jim Hughes and Doug Higgs at the Weatherall Institute for Molecular Medicine supported by the Wellcome Trust, followed by a brief postdoctoral role with the WIGWAM Consortium. Before joining Genomics plc, I worked for SevenBridges, a biomedical data analysis startup, as an Algorithmics R&D Scientist.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Natalia Sampaio

Mon 17 Dec 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Can we end epidemics? - NOW STARTING 9.15AM

Dr Richard Hatchett, CEO

Audience: Public

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

The seminar will be followed by coffee & pastries in the Doll Building Atrium.

Mon 17 Dec 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Can we cure rheumatoid arthritis?

Prof John Isaacs

The past 20 years have seen a revolution in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) management, due to earlier and more intensive treatment, and targeted therapies. However, less than 50% of patients achieve disease remission, and most will relapse if therapy is stopped. In this seminar I will discuss our... Read more

The past 20 years have seen a revolution in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) management, due to earlier and more intensive treatment, and targeted therapies. However, less than 50% of patients achieve disease remission, and most will relapse if therapy is stopped. In this seminar I will discuss our current experimental medicine studies which focus on improving RA outcomes. These include therapeutic tolerance induction, targeting of the RA synovial fibroblast, and developing a better understanding of remission and relapse biology in the context of RA. ---- John Isaacs is Professor of Clinical Rheumatology at Newcastle University. His work focusses on the potential of novel immunotherapies to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ranging from target identification to early- and late-stage clinical trials. He has performed several pioneering experimental medicine studies in patients with inflammatory disease, challenging existing dogma and informing the design of subsequent generations of therapeutic agents. He was the first to demonstrate immunogenicity of a humanised therapeutic antibody, CAMPATH-1H (Lancet). Professor Isaacs runs a research group focussed on therapeutic tolerance induction. Recently his team developed, and completed a phase 1 study of, tolerogenic dendritic cell therapy in inflammatory arthritis patients. In 1999, Professor Isaacs received the British Society for Rheumatology Michael Mason Medal and, in 2010, he presented the Heberden Round to the Society. From 2007 to 2017 Professor Isaacs chaired ARUK’s Clinical Study Group for Adult Inflammatory Arthritis, developing a competitive research agenda for the UK. He also led the MRC/ABPI RA-MAP consortium, seeking prognostic and therapeutic biomarkers for RA. He is a PI of the NIHR Translational Research Collaboration for inflammatory disease, and a member of the MRC’s Translational Research Group. He has published over 200 peer-reviewed manuscripts. Current grant funding as principal applicant, £7.1m; total current grant funding £43.8m.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Tue 18 Dec 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS