Other Seminars

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Mon 10 Dec 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting rooms 71a,b,c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Epigenome maintenance in response to DNA damage

Sophie Polo, PhD

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 10 Dec 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 1, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Confidence Bands in Functional data - The Bootstrap or Gaussian Kinematic formula?

In this talk we study simultaneous confidence bands (SCBs) for functional parameters. We introduce a new Multiplier Bootstrap and a "parametric approach" using the Gaussian Kinematic Formula (GKF) for construction of SCBs. The GKF as introduced by Jonathan Taylor can be use to approximate the... Read more

In this talk we study simultaneous confidence bands (SCBs) for functional parameters. We introduce a new Multiplier Bootstrap and a "parametric approach" using the Gaussian Kinematic Formula (GKF) for construction of SCBs. The GKF as introduced by Jonathan Taylor can be use to approximate the distribution of the maximum of Gaussian related processes for large thresholds. One of the main results of this talk will be an error bound on the asymptotical coverage rate of SCBs constructed using the GKF, which basically requires only a functional CLT for the estimator of the functional parameter and some regularity assumptions on the limiting process. We also shortly discuss a strategy how these ideas can be extended to discretely observed functional processes contaminated by observation noise, where we build on Scale Spaces introduced by Chaudhuri and Marron in the early 2000’s. The theoretical discussion will be accompanied by simulation studies for the population mean in signal plus noise models and an application of a two sample situation in DTI fibers. In the end we will give a short outlook on different settings our method can also be applied to, e.g. Signal-to-Noise ratios (Cohen's d) or General linear Models, which are of interest in statistical analysis of fMRI data.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Mon 10 Dec 2018 from 11:30 to 12:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Mon 10 Dec 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Immunomodulation via the cardiac lymphatic system to improve heart repair

Professor Paul Riley

The lymphatic vasculature is a blind-ended network covering most tissues and organs of the body and is essential for vertebrate development and homeostasis. During pathological conditions lymphatic vessels expand via lymphangiogenesis to aid the clearance of interstitial fluid and reduce... Read more

The lymphatic vasculature is a blind-ended network covering most tissues and organs of the body and is essential for vertebrate development and homeostasis. During pathological conditions lymphatic vessels expand via lymphangiogenesis to aid the clearance of interstitial fluid and reduce inflammation. Whilst the response of the lymphatics to injury and inflammation has been well documented at peripheral sites, there is minimal insight into their role(s) during pathophysiology of organ systems such as the heart. We investigated the response of the cardiac lymphatic vessels to myocardial infarction (MI) and observed a significant lymphangiogenic response, underpinned by reactivation of the developmental lymphatic programme. VEGF-C treatment significantly augmented lymphangiogenesis post-MI resulting in improved cardiac function. To determine whether this effect might be mediated by immunomodulation, we flow-sorted immune cells from VEGF-C treated hearts and observed increased clearance of macrophages to mediastinal lymph nodes by day 7 post-MI. The molecular phenotype of cleared versus retained macrophages was equivalent, suggesting that a reduction in macrophage load in the heart alone was sufficient to correlate with improved outcome. Finally, we examined macrophage trafficking in Lyve-1 knock-out mice, which have impaired immune cell uptake, and observed significantly reduced macrophage clearance, which correlated with reduced cardiac output, elevated fibrosis and increased pathological remodelling. These data suggest that invoking developmental lymphangiogenesis to modulate the innate immune response may represent a therapeutic target to promote optimal cardiac repair following injury. ---- Paul Riley is a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences (elected 2014) and is the British Heart Foundation (BHF) Professor of Regenerative Medicine. He currently occupies the Chair of Development and Cell Biology in the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics at the University of Oxford. He is Director of the BHF Oxbridge Centre for Regenerative Medicine (from 2013; https://www.cardioscience.ox.ac.uk/bhf-centre-of-regenerative-medicine); co-founder of the Oxford spin-out OxStem Cardio (from 2016; https://www.oxstem.com/product-pipeline/cardio) and co-academic lead on the Oxford Medical Sciences Division’s Institute of Developmental and Regenerative Medicine (project completion 2021; https://www.bhf.org.uk/research-projects/funding-towards-a-new-oxford-institute-of-developmental-and-regenerative-medicine-idrm). He was formerly Professor of Molecular Cardiology at the UCL-Institute of Child Health, London, where he was a principal investigator within the Molecular Medicine Unit at UCL-ICH (1999-2011). Prior to this, he obtained his PhD at UCL (1992-1995) and completed post-doctoral fellowships at the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Toronto, Canada and the Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Oxford (1996-1999). In 2008, Professor Riley was awarded the Outstanding Achievement Award of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Basic Sciences. Currently Professor Riley’s team is focusing on exploiting the full potential of activated resident epicardium-derived cells and coronary lymphatic endothelium towards regenerating the adult heart and understanding the mechanisms of activation of these distinct lineages to extrapolate to human patients suffering from cardiovascular disease. For further information please visit: http://www.dpag.ox.ac.uk/research/riley-group-1

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 10 Dec 2018 from 14:00 to 16:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Radcliffe Humanities, Seminar Room, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Workshop on public co-applicants

Doreen Tembo, Martin Lodemore

This is for anyone who is considering having or being a public co-applicant in a funding application for health research. There will be talks, followed by discussions based on the draft NIHR Guidance on public co-applicants and our questions will be used to further develop that document.

This is for anyone who is considering having or being a public co-applicant in a funding application for health research. There will be talks, followed by discussions based on the draft NIHR Guidance on public co-applicants and our questions will be used to further develop that document.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Bernard Gudgin

Mon 10 Dec 2018 from 14:30 to 15:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

VIVA - “Cancer cell killing using engineered antibody fragments”

Jennifer Chambers

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 10 Dec 2018 from 15:00 to 16:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Phenome@BDI Seminar

Dr. Antoniya Georgieva, Dr Bartek Papiez

Re-using routinely collected maternity data for the development of a new diagnostic tool during childbirth Dr Antoniya Georgieva, Oxford Centre for Fetal Monitoring Technologies, Big Data Institute Monitoring continuously the fetal heart rate during childbirth is the gold standard to assess... Read more

Re-using routinely collected maternity data for the development of a new diagnostic tool during childbirth Dr Antoniya Georgieva, Oxford Centre for Fetal Monitoring Technologies, Big Data Institute Monitoring continuously the fetal heart rate during childbirth is the gold standard to assess whether a baby is at risk of oxygen starvation. This is achieved with a cardiotocogram, CTG, showing continuously the fetal heart rate and contraction signals (Figure 1). This is to identify babies that could benefit from an emergency operative delivery (e.g. Caesarean section), in order to prevent death or permanent brain injury of the baby. The long, dynamic and complex heart rate patterns are poorly understood and known to have high false positive and false negative rates. Visual interpretation by clinicians in real-time is challenging and fetal monitoring in labour remains an enormous unmet medical need. Complex motion modelling for medical imaging applications Dr Bartek Papiez, Rutherford Fund Fellow at Health Data Research UK, Big Data Institute During this talk, I will present an overview of my work on the development of accurate, thus complex and realistic but still computationally efficient models of organ motion. The presented framework has established a solid foundation both to remove unwanted motion and motion-related imaging artefacts to perform image analysis, and to construct atlases (or shape models) from imaging. The previous application of this framework supported various cancer imaging modalities primarily providing reliable quantitative image analysis of lung and liver tumour. In this talk, I will also present our initial results on constructing a 3D atlas from ultrasound (US) volumes. Our method simultaneously aligns a set of images from population to a reference space thereby representing the population average. The resulting atlas shows high structural(anatomical) overlap, and correspondence between the US-based and an age-matched fetal MRI-based atlas is also observed.​

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Tue 11 Dec 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Oxford Martin School, Oxford Martin School, 34 Broad Street, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Sleep: A Window on Consciousness

Prof Giulio Tononi

How does consciousness come about, and how can the brain create a world even when it is disconnected from the environment? Consciousness never fades when we are awake. However, when awakened from sleep, we sometimes recall dreams and sometimes recall no experiences. Traditionally, dreaming has been... Read more

How does consciousness come about, and how can the brain create a world even when it is disconnected from the environment? Consciousness never fades when we are awake. However, when awakened from sleep, we sometimes recall dreams and sometimes recall no experiences. Traditionally, dreaming has been identified with rapid eye-movement (REM) sleep, characterized by wake-like, globally ‘activated’, high-frequency EEG activity. However, dreaming also occurs in non-REM (NREM) sleep, characterized by prominent low-frequency activity. Recent work using no-task, within-state paradigms has identified a ‘posterior hot zone’ where the EEG must be activated for subjects to experience dreams. Localized, content-specific activations occur depending on whether one dreams of faces, places, movement, and speech. These findings highlight the likely neural substrate of our own experiences and suggest some of the necessary and sufficient conditions for consciousness.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Tue 11 Dec 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Wed 12 Dec 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 1, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Big Data Ethics Forum: HIV phylogenetic research and public health - challenges and opportunities

Professor Christophe Fraser

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Wed 12 Dec 2018 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, Sherrington Library, 2nd floor Sherrington Building, DPAG, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Challenges and Opportunities of Translational Neurogenomics

Dr Sonja Scholz

Dr. Scholz is a Neurologist and Neurogeneticist specialized in movement disorders. She received her medical degree from the Medical University Innsbruck, Austria. Following graduation, she was a post-doctoral fellow at the Laboratory of Neurogenetics (NIA) under the supervision of Drs. Andrew... Read more

Dr. Scholz is a Neurologist and Neurogeneticist specialized in movement disorders. She received her medical degree from the Medical University Innsbruck, Austria. Following graduation, she was a post-doctoral fellow at the Laboratory of Neurogenetics (NIA) under the supervision of Drs. Andrew Singleton and John Hardy. She obtained a Ph.D. in Neurogenomics from the University College London, UK in 2010. She then moved to Baltimore to complete her neurology residency training at Johns Hopkins. In 2015, Dr. Scholz received the McFarland Transition to Independence Award for Neurologist-Scientists. She is an Assistant Clinical Investigator within the Neurogenetics Branch (NINDS). Her laboratory focuses on identifying genetic causes of neurodegenerative diseases, such as dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy, and frontotemporal dementia.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Thu 13 Dec 2018 from 09:30 to 10:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Thu 13 Dec 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

VIVA - "Acquired Alpha Thalassaemia in Myelodysplastic Syndrome"

Pak Leng Cheong

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Thu 13 Dec 2018 from 13:30 to 14:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

VIVA - ‘The molecular and cellular basis for oncogene collaboration in acute myeloid leukaemia’

Cristina Di Genua

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Butler

Thu 13 Dec 2018 from 14:30 to 15:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Main Meeting Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

HERC Seminar: Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis for Comparative Value Assessment throughout the Drug Lifecycle

Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) has been proposed as appropriate methodology for supporting many key decisions in the drug lifecycle, including regulatory authorization, health technology assessment (HTA) and prescription. The relevant decision criteria are different in these three... Read more

Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) has been proposed as appropriate methodology for supporting many key decisions in the drug lifecycle, including regulatory authorization, health technology assessment (HTA) and prescription. The relevant decision criteria are different in these three settings: regulatory MCDAs are mostly concerned with assessing treatment benefit-risk profiles, prescription ones additionally consider convenience and patient satisfaction, and HTAs value cost and equity aspects. This presentation will question whether any single methodology can support decisions as diverse as these, but it will also argue for the value of MCDA as a general framework for structuring comparative treatment assessments. I will demonstrate the use of MCDA in benefit-risk assessment, discuss flaws present in most applications of MCDA in HTA, and argue against application of MCDA in prescription setting.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 13 Dec 2018 from 16:00 to 18:00

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, George Pickering Education centre, Level 3 Academic centre, Room 2B, Headington OX3 9DU

Standards of gastritis assessment – implications for clinical practice and research

Dr Jan Bornschein

While most research on inflammatory conditions in the UK focuses on the intestine, the stomach has been somewhat neglected. Although advanced endoscopic techniques often make biopsies unnecessary, structured and standardised tissue sampling is still required to investigate certain clinical conditions and to allow building up an adequate biobank repository.

While most research on inflammatory conditions in the UK focuses on the intestine, the stomach has been somewhat neglected. Although advanced endoscopic techniques often make biopsies unnecessary, structured and standardised tissue sampling is still required to investigate certain clinical conditions and to allow building up an adequate biobank repository.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jan Borschein

Fri 14 Dec 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

CAREER SEMINAR “A story of development and differentiation – from red blood cells to career moves”

Dr Maria Suciu

As a scientist at Genomics plc, I split my time between working on our collaboration with Vertex and leading the integration of functional genomics data with GWAS data. The focus of my research training has been on long-range gene regulation by non-coding elements and the impact of variants on... Read more

As a scientist at Genomics plc, I split my time between working on our collaboration with Vertex and leading the integration of functional genomics data with GWAS data. The focus of my research training has been on long-range gene regulation by non-coding elements and the impact of variants on these elements, with an emphasis on open chromatin data in red blood cells. I undertook my doctoral studies in the laboratories of Jim Hughes and Doug Higgs at the Weatherall Institute for Molecular Medicine supported by the Wellcome Trust, followed by a brief postdoctoral role with the WIGWAM Consortium. Before joining Genomics plc, I worked for SevenBridges, a biomedical data analysis startup, as an Algorithmics R&D Scientist.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Natalia Sampaio

Mon 17 Dec 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Can we end epidemics? - NOW STARTING 9.15AM

Dr Richard Hatchett, CEO

Audience: Public

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

The seminar will be followed by coffee & pastries in the Doll Building Atrium.

Mon 17 Dec 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Can we cure rheumatoid arthritis?

Prof John Isaacs

The past 20 years have seen a revolution in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) management, due to earlier and more intensive treatment, and targeted therapies. However, less than 50% of patients achieve disease remission, and most will relapse if therapy is stopped. In this seminar I will discuss our... Read more

The past 20 years have seen a revolution in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) management, due to earlier and more intensive treatment, and targeted therapies. However, less than 50% of patients achieve disease remission, and most will relapse if therapy is stopped. In this seminar I will discuss our current experimental medicine studies which focus on improving RA outcomes. These include therapeutic tolerance induction, targeting of the RA synovial fibroblast, and developing a better understanding of remission and relapse biology in the context of RA. ---- John Isaacs is Professor of Clinical Rheumatology at Newcastle University. His work focusses on the potential of novel immunotherapies to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ranging from target identification to early- and late-stage clinical trials. He has performed several pioneering experimental medicine studies in patients with inflammatory disease, challenging existing dogma and informing the design of subsequent generations of therapeutic agents. He was the first to demonstrate immunogenicity of a humanised therapeutic antibody, CAMPATH-1H (Lancet). Professor Isaacs runs a research group focussed on therapeutic tolerance induction. Recently his team developed, and completed a phase 1 study of, tolerogenic dendritic cell therapy in inflammatory arthritis patients. In 1999, Professor Isaacs received the British Society for Rheumatology Michael Mason Medal and, in 2010, he presented the Heberden Round to the Society. From 2007 to 2017 Professor Isaacs chaired ARUK’s Clinical Study Group for Adult Inflammatory Arthritis, developing a competitive research agenda for the UK. He also led the MRC/ABPI RA-MAP consortium, seeking prognostic and therapeutic biomarkers for RA. He is a PI of the NIHR Translational Research Collaboration for inflammatory disease, and a member of the MRC’s Translational Research Group. He has published over 200 peer-reviewed manuscripts. Current grant funding as principal applicant, £7.1m; total current grant funding £43.8m.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Tue 18 Dec 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS