Other Seminars

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Fri 19 Oct 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Achieving the Holy-Grail: The Humanising Healthcare Methodology

Mr Hamish Dibley

This talk explores a new and refreshing approach to how we understand and improve healthcare systems. Hamish Dibley outlines his alternative approach to realising better healthcare services at less cost. It begins with looking at healthcare not from a conventional activity perspective, but from a... Read more

This talk explores a new and refreshing approach to how we understand and improve healthcare systems. Hamish Dibley outlines his alternative approach to realising better healthcare services at less cost. It begins with looking at healthcare not from a conventional activity perspective, but from a person-centred one. Abstract The NHS must change the way it operates to effectively meet future challenges. The starting point for improved services at less cost rests on more intelligent use of data to inform future performance improvement through system and service redesign. Hamish Dibley will talk about his work in applying genuine patient-centred principles to healthcare analysis and service design. This alternative approach – The Humanising Healthcare Methodology – to realising better healthcare services and less cost begins with looking at healthcare not from an activity perspective but from a person-centred one. Unlike existing practice, the work establishes time-series data to interpret the true nature of person demand for acute services, to better understand the root cause(s) of service challenges facing commissioners and providers alike. Understanding patient demand is the first step in arriving at intelligent system and service redesign solutions around patient cohorts. This informs a more integrated and preventive system that will successfully alter the nature and consumption curve for care and reduce costs across the system. This radical and elegant approach provides for innovative thinking as to how to propose future improvement schemes, not only to reduce patient demand but also to better respond to, and therefore manage, such demand. This latter aim requires proof of concepts to test new approaches and processes with a small cohort of patients. This work serves to inform and constructively challenge current cost and quality improvement programme plans, as well as provide the basis for healthcare integration. Moreover, this way of working provides a better approach to overcoming the principal performance challenges facing all healthcare economies - A&E breaches, delayed transfers of care, and waiting time lists for planned care.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 19 Oct 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Fri 19 Oct 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Synaptic dynamics in mouse visual cortex following sensory deprivation

Dr Tara Keck

Homeostatic synaptic scaling is thought to occur cell-wide, but recent evidence suggests this form of stabilizing plasticity can be implemented more locally in reduced preparations. To investigate the spatial scales of plasticity in vivo, we used repeated two-photon imaging in mouse visual cortex... Read more

Homeostatic synaptic scaling is thought to occur cell-wide, but recent evidence suggests this form of stabilizing plasticity can be implemented more locally in reduced preparations. To investigate the spatial scales of plasticity in vivo, we used repeated two-photon imaging in mouse visual cortex after sensory deprivation to measure TNF-α dependent increases in spine size as a proxy for synaptic scaling in vivo in both excitatory and inhibitory neurons. We found that after sensory deprivation, increases in spine size are restricted to a subset of dendritic branches, which we confirmed using immunohistochemistry. We found that the dendritic branches that had individual spines that increased in size following deprivation, also underwent a decrease in spine density. Within a given dendritic branch, the degree of spine size increases is proportional to recent spine loss within that branch. Using computational simulations, we show that this compartmentalized form of synaptic scaling better retained the previously established input-output relationship in the cell, while restoring activity levels. We then investigated the relationship between new spines that form after this spine loss and strengthening and find that their spatial positioning facilitates strengthening of maintained synapses.

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 19 Oct 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre , Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar: Cervical Screening in a post-HPV immunisation world

Dr Timothy Palmer

Tim trained in pathology at various hospitals around London, including the Royal Marsden Hospital. Appointed Consultant Pathologist at Guy's in 1989, he moved to Inverness in late 1990. His responsibilities there were for lab aspects of cervical screening and lab computerisation. He was involved... Read more

Tim trained in pathology at various hospitals around London, including the Royal Marsden Hospital. Appointed Consultant Pathologist at Guy's in 1989, he moved to Inverness in late 1990. His responsibilities there were for lab aspects of cervical screening and lab computerisation. He was involved in developing the Scottish Cervical Screening Programme, including the introduction of liquid based cytology, image assisted screening and a national screening computer system. Although retired from full time practice, he is Clinical Lead for Cervical Screening in Scotland. He was closely involved in the development of the business case for primary HPV screening in Scotland and is the Lead Clinician for HPV Primary Screening implementation. He was appointed Honorary Senior Lecturer at Edinburgh University in 2014 to allow continuation of his research interests. Outside pathology, he has diverse interests, including singing early music as a male alto, food and wine, ceramics, renovating an old house, and maintaining a classic sports car. He is currently involved in a research project at Raigmore involving the use of basket-making in rehabilitation from stroke and traumatic/toxic head injury.

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 22 Oct 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting Rooms 71a,b,c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Disassembly of replication machinery at termination of DNA replication forks

Dr Agnieszka Gambus

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Amanda O'Neill

Mon 22 Oct 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Dysregulation of cartilage and bone growth in osteoarthritis

Prof Max Loehning

The Pitzer Laboratory of Osteoarthritis Research investigates cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to the development of osteoarthritis. Our hypothesis is that environmental signals such as overloading, injury or inflammation trigger stress in chondrocytes. Under stress, they then produce... Read more

The Pitzer Laboratory of Osteoarthritis Research investigates cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to the development of osteoarthritis. Our hypothesis is that environmental signals such as overloading, injury or inflammation trigger stress in chondrocytes. Under stress, they then produce inferior cartilage, degrade articular cartilage or undergo apoptosis. In three-dimensional cell cultures of human chondrocytes under hypoxia, we show that stimulation of selected Toll-like receptors impairs cartilage matrix production and induces a catabolic, inflammatory state. Furthermore, we identified candidate genes that may control the growth of blood vessels and bone in the joint area. This finding could be therapeutically useful to limit cartilage ossification and the formation of osteophytes in osteoarthritis. ---- Prof. Dr. Max Löhning is head of the Pitzer Laboratory of Osteoarthritis Research at the German Rheumatism Research Center Berlin (DRFZ) and at the Charité – University Medicine Berlin. M.L. studied Biology at the University of Mainz and did his dissertation in immunology at the Institute of Genetics, University of Cologne (2000). He was a visiting researcher at William E. Paul (NIH, NIAID, Bethesda, MD), and at Kenneth M. Murphy (Washington University-School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO), USA, and then a postdoctoral fellow of Schering Foundation with Rolf M. Zinkernagel and Hans Hengartner at the Institute of Experimental Immunology, ETH and University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland (2003-2006). Then he was appointed Lichtenberg Professor of Experimental Immunology, supported by Volkswagen Foundation, at the Charité – University Medicine Berlin (2006-2015). In 2015, he was appointed University Professor of Osteoarthritis Research at the Charité and head of the Pitzer Laboratory of Osteoarthritis Research, funded by Willy Robert Pitzer Foundation, at the DRFZ Berlin. He was awarded several prizes: the Georges-Köhler-Prize (2010) and Otto-Westphal-Prize (2000) from the German Society for Immunology (DGfI), the Avrion-Mitchison-Prize for Rheumatology (2000) of the Ernst Schering Foundation, and the Robert Koch Foundation’s Postdoctoral Award (2004). He is member of the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and spokesperson of the class Biological Sciences and Medicine.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 22 Oct 2018 from 16:00 to 17:30

Seminars in the History of Science, Medicine and Technology

History Faculty - Lecture Room, https://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/access/dandt/humanities/oldboyshighschool/

Archival ethics from below: the case of an African Cancer Hospital

Dr Marissa Mika

At the Uganda Cancer Institute, lines often blur between past and present, sickness and health, life and death. Founded in 1967 as a small chemotherapy clinical trials facility in Kampala, today the Institute’s 60 beds serve a population catchment of over 40 million living in the Great Lakes... Read more

At the Uganda Cancer Institute, lines often blur between past and present, sickness and health, life and death. Founded in 1967 as a small chemotherapy clinical trials facility in Kampala, today the Institute’s 60 beds serve a population catchment of over 40 million living in the Great Lakes region of Africa. The Institute houses the only continuous collection of patient records documenting cancer treatment and care on the African continent. This talk considers the temporal, methodological, and ethical challenges of preserving patient records at the Uganda Cancer Institute.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Rob Iliffe

Tue 23 Oct 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

CANCELLED: Vector-mediated prophylaxis against airborne infectious viruses

Professor Maria Limberis

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Tue 23 Oct 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar: Livestock, Health, Environment & People

Professor Charles Godfray

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 23 Oct 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Dr Jennifer Trowbridge

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 24 Oct 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Environmental DNA for wildlife epidemiology and outbreak investigation

Dr Sebastien Calvignac

The wildlife component of the human/wildlife interfaces where zoonotic pathogens emerge is usually very poorly characterized. This is true both for the wildlife communities themselves and for their parasites. Ecological and veterinary investigations are absolutely required but the infrastructure... Read more

The wildlife component of the human/wildlife interfaces where zoonotic pathogens emerge is usually very poorly characterized. This is true both for the wildlife communities themselves and for their parasites. Ecological and veterinary investigations are absolutely required but the infrastructure and manpower needed prevent their broad deployment. Fecal sample analyses are now frequently used to magnify our ability to monitor wildlife and their pathogens. In this presentation, I will show how we can extend our toolkit by using other sources of environmental DNA, with a strong focus on invertebrate-derived DNA.

Audience: Members of the scientific community

Organisers: Professor Sunetra Gupta

please arrive five minutes before the seminar to allow entry to the building

Wed 24 Oct 2018 from 14:00 to 15:00

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Advanced single-molecule imaging of cellular proteins, from surface to nucleus

Dr Aleks Ponjavic

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 25 Oct 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

OCDEM / Rheumatology

Prof David Ray, Dr Hamish Reid, Dr Natasha Jones, Dr Ralph Smith, Dr Stefan Kluzek

OCDEM: "Glucocorticoid action, and inaction", Prof David Ray -- Rheumatology: "What can Moving Medicine do for you?", Dr Natasha Jones, Dr Hamish Reid, Dr Ralph Smith and Dr Stefan Kluzek -- Chair: Prof Chris O'Callaghan

OCDEM: "Glucocorticoid action, and inaction", Prof David Ray -- Rheumatology: "What can Moving Medicine do for you?", Dr Natasha Jones, Dr Hamish Reid, Dr Ralph Smith and Dr Stefan Kluzek -- Chair: Prof Chris O'Callaghan

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 25 Oct 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

* CANCELLED * UBVO Seminar: Function of fat. What are the determinants and does it matter?

Marijana Todorčević

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Fri 26 Oct 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Surgical Grand Rounds - Plastics

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 26 Oct 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Exploring the immunology in autoantibody mediated diseases of the central nervous system

Associate Professor Sarosh Irani

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 26 Oct 2018 from 10:30 to 12:00

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, CCMP2 , Headington OX3 7BN

SINGLE CELL SEMINARS - WELLCOME CENTRE FOR HUMAN GENETICS

SINGLE CELL SEMINARS - WELLCOME CENTRE FOR HUMAN GENETICS Friday, October 26, 2018 CCMP2 10:30 - 1200 Adam Cribbs, title TBC for info, please email curion@well.ox.ac.uk

SINGLE CELL SEMINARS - WELLCOME CENTRE FOR HUMAN GENETICS Friday, October 26, 2018 CCMP2 10:30 - 1200 Adam Cribbs, title TBC for info, please email curion@well.ox.ac.uk

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 26 Oct 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Strubi seminars

Determining the energy dependence of radiation damage in electron cryo-microscopy of biological specimens

Dr Christopher Russo

Radiation damage sets the ultimate limit to structure determination using any form of ionizing radia-tion with sufficient energy to resolve the positions of atoms in a molecule. Electrons, since they interact strongly with biological specimen, induce severe radiation damage, but also provide... Read more

Radiation damage sets the ultimate limit to structure determination using any form of ionizing radia-tion with sufficient energy to resolve the positions of atoms in a molecule. Electrons, since they interact strongly with biological specimen, induce severe radiation damage, but also provide maxi-mal contrast per unit damage event when compared to X-rays and neutrons [1]. While the amount of information per unit damage for electrons is thought to be approximately constant over the ener-gy range of 10 to 1000 keV, published measurements of radiation damage to biological specimen are not of sufficient accuracy to determine if there is an advantage, in terms of contrast per unit damage, to reducing or increasing the energy of the electron beam. Recently, our measurements of specimen charging [2-3] and the demonstration of a new method of Ewald sphere correction [4] indicate that neither of these present a barrier for reducing the energy of the electron beam from 300 keV, which is the current standard for most commercial high-resolution electron cryomicro-scopes. Some theoretical estimates indicate that the ratio of the inelastic to elastic scattering cross sections for carbon may drop by as much as 30% from 300 to 100 keV [5]. With this in mind, we wish to understand both theoretically and experimentally, if there is a potential advantage in terms of radiation damage, in changing the energy of the electron from the conventional 300 keV used for most cryoEM. Here we present our recent progress in measuring how the amount of structural information in electron cryomicrographs of biological specimen scales vs. damage when changing the energy of the incident electron beam. We measure the high energy elastic scattering cross sec-tions of carbon to high accuracy using pure carbon specimens. We compare these data to estab-lished theory of electron scattering as well as measurements of damage using the fading of diffrac-tion spots from 2D crystals of paraffin and bacteriorhodopsin (purple membrane). From these measurements, we find that there will likely be an optimum energy for imaging a biological speci-men of a given thickness with electrons, assuming that the various technical hurdles to producing efficient detectors at lower energies, can be overcome. References [1] Henderson, R QRB 1995. [2] Russo CJ & Henderson R, Ultramicroscopy 2018a. [3] Russo CJ & Henderson R, Ultramicroscopy 2018b. [4] Russo CJ & Henderson R, Ultramicroscopy 2018c. [5] Edgerton R. et al. Micron 2014.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Fri 26 Oct 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Genetic regulators of cardiovascular development

Dr Kelly Smith

We are dependent on our cardiovascular system for life support. Defects in the formation of either the heart or vasculature can be fatal in utero, reflecting our dependency on this system from almost the earliest stages of life. The cardiovascular system is remarkably stereotypical in its... Read more

We are dependent on our cardiovascular system for life support. Defects in the formation of either the heart or vasculature can be fatal in utero, reflecting our dependency on this system from almost the earliest stages of life. The cardiovascular system is remarkably stereotypical in its structure, both between individuals and across species. This demonstrates that a strict genetic programme dictates this structure and that the programme is conserved. Focussing primarily on the early stages of heart development, we utilise the zebrafish model for its genetic tractability to identify regulators of cardiovascular development. Using forward genetics, we have discovered several novel regulators of cardiac and vascular development. One such regulator is a novel Hyaluronidase, named Cemip2 (formerly Tmem2), that is required for both cardiac development and angiogenesis. Early data suggests that the function of this protein is conserved in mammals. We have also identified a regulator of N-cadherin trafficking and show that it is required for cardiomyocyte cell adhesion. Whilst exciting for discovery’s sake, this fundamental knowledge is essential for understanding inherited cardiovascular diseases and in plying our knowledge to devise therapeutic strategies.

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 29 Oct 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting rooms 71a,b,c, Headington OX3 7DQ

The role of ATRX in repairing internal and telomeric DNA double-strand breaks

Professor Markus Löbrich

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 29 Oct 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Inflammation and Microbiome in Cancer and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Dr Ze'ev Ronai

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Mon 29 Oct 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Multimodal mass spectrometry imaging of tumours

Prof Josephine Bunch

Mass spectrometry (MS) is one of the most powerful techniques for chemical analysis and when combined with an imaging modality allows molecular chemistry to be visualised in 2D and 3D, from the nano- to the macroscale, in ambient conditions and in real‐time. There are numerous techniques each... Read more

Mass spectrometry (MS) is one of the most powerful techniques for chemical analysis and when combined with an imaging modality allows molecular chemistry to be visualised in 2D and 3D, from the nano- to the macroscale, in ambient conditions and in real‐time. There are numerous techniques each having different modes of operation including label‐free and labelled analyses. In 2017 the CRUK Grand Challenge programme was launched. By pursuing a multiscale (organ to organelle) and multi-omics approach with a range of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) techniques (MALDI, DESI, SIMS and ICP MS), we aim to deepen our understanding of the interplay of genes, proteins, metabolites and the role of the immune system in cancer development and growth. This presentation will review early results and a discussion of the challenges associated with such a large, multi-technique, multi-site, mass spectrometry project. ---- Professor Josephine Bunch is a Principal Scientist and Co-Director of the National Centre of Excellence in Mass Spectrometry Imaging (NiCE-MSI) at NPL and Chair of Biomolecular Mass Spectrometry at Imperial College London. She is currently leading a Cancer Research UK Grand Challenge programme (2017-2022; £16 million). She has expertise in a range of mass spectrometry imaging techniques and her group at NPL comprises a multidisciplinary team of around 20 people. To support innovation and instrument development for MSI, Josephine leads a large programme of research and metrology in MALDI and ambient mass spectrometry imaging, funded by the National Measurement System. Within this project a new transmission mode, atmospheric MALDI ion source, with dual mode post-ionisation has been constructed. The group also hosts and co-supervises Ph.D. students from the University of Nottingham, the University of Birmingham, Imperial College London, Oxford University and the University of Surrey.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 29 Oct 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Salmonella persisters during infection

Dr Sophie Helaine

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Mon 29 Oct 2018 from 15:00 to 16:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Phenome@BDI Seminar: Meta catalogue of OUH clinical databases

James Welch

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Mon 29 Oct 2018 from 16:00 to 17:30

Seminars in the History of Science, Medicine and Technology

History Faculty - Lecture Room, https://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/access/dandt/humanities/oldboyshighschool/

Smallpox eradication in China and emerging narratives of global health, 1949-79

Dr Mary Brazelton

In the Cold War, East Asian nations became involved in a variety of transnational health initiatives. Although Taiwan, South Korea, and Japan all provided support to the World Health Organization and its American-oriented interventions and strategies, the non-aligned People’s Republic of China... Read more

In the Cold War, East Asian nations became involved in a variety of transnational health initiatives. Although Taiwan, South Korea, and Japan all provided support to the World Health Organization and its American-oriented interventions and strategies, the non-aligned People’s Republic of China followed a different path. The public success of mass immunization in China, as determined by the eradication of smallpox and the “control” of other infectious diseases like measles and cholera in the 1950s and 1960s, contributed crucial evidence for the success of Chinese public health more broadly. By the 1970s, immunization was comfortably entrenched in the rural health system that the People’s Republic of China promoted on a global scale via the export of medical materials, personnel, and funds. State agents also cultivated the goodwill of Western observers who traveled to China after 1971. These international activities contributed to the prominence of the PRC in discussions of global health policy, culminating in the World Health Organization’s Alma-Ata Declaration of 1978 and its major policy shift towards promoting primary health care: interventions meant to provide basic clinical services for many people, including those in rural areas. Although the PRC became famous for its “barefoot doctors” as the human faces of the rural health system it promoted, its eradication and control of infectious diseases—a consequence of mass immunization—provided key evidence that helped consolidate its position as a leading national model of public health.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Rob Iliffe

Tue 30 Oct 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Control of Hematopoietic and Leukemic Stem Cells

Professor Andreas Trumpp

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 30 Oct 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar: The genetics of stroke

Professor Hugh Markus

Hugh Markus is Professor of Stroke Medicine and Honorary Consultant Neurologist in the Department of Clinical Neurosciences at the University of Cambridge. He was Professor of Neurology at St George’s, University of London, before moving to his current post in 2013. He spends approximately half... Read more

Hugh Markus is Professor of Stroke Medicine and Honorary Consultant Neurologist in the Department of Clinical Neurosciences at the University of Cambridge. He was Professor of Neurology at St George’s, University of London, before moving to his current post in 2013. He spends approximately half of his time in clinical care of stroke patients. This includes running a National CADASIL/stroke genetics clinic. His main areas of research interest are the genetics of stroke, where he applies genetic and imaging techniques to investigate the pathogenesis of stroke and develop new treatments, cerebral small vessel disease and clinical trials. He was disease lead for the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 2 (WTCCC2) ischaemic stroke study and established the METASTROKE Genetics consortium. He has a particular interest in small vessel disease and vascular cognitive impairment and pursues genetic and MRI approaches to investigate disease mechanisms.

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 30 Oct 2018 from 14:30 to 15:30

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

The gut-microbiota connection in type 1 diabetes

Dr Emma Hamilton-Williams

While disturbances in the gut microbiota have been associated with type 1 diabetes progression, the causes of this dysbiosis and the consequences to the host are largely unknown. Using a unique multi-omic approach, we explore the functional link between the gut, pancreas and microbiota in type 1... Read more

While disturbances in the gut microbiota have been associated with type 1 diabetes progression, the causes of this dysbiosis and the consequences to the host are largely unknown. Using a unique multi-omic approach, we explore the functional link between the gut, pancreas and microbiota in type 1 diabetes. In complementary genetic studies, we show that immune loci linked to type 1 diabetes susceptibility contribute to shaping the gut microbiota.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt