Other Seminars

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Wed 24 Apr 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

Iron and the infant gut microbiome

Prof. Michael Zimmermann

Michael B. Zimmermann received his M.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, USA and did his postgraduate training at the University of California in San Francisco and in Berkeley, USA. He is currently Professor in the Department of Health Sciences and Technology, at the Swiss Federal... Read more

Michael B. Zimmermann received his M.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, USA and did his postgraduate training at the University of California in San Francisco and in Berkeley, USA. He is currently Professor in the Department of Health Sciences and Technology, at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich, Switzerland. He is jointly a Visiting Professor in Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition at the University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland. He has published over 250 papers and has received several awards, including the 2013 International Endocrinology Award from the American College of Endocrinology, and is a 2018 Highly Cited Researcher (top 1%), Web of Science, Cross-Field Category.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Holm Uhlig

A TGU Lecture series Special

Thu 25 Apr 2019 from 09:30 to 10:30

Tropical Medicine Seminars

World Malaria Day seminar 2019 - Antimalarial treatments for vulnerable groups

Prof Joel Tarning, Dr Makoto Saito

Professor Joel Tarning, Head of Clinical Pharmacology at MORU, and Head WWARN's Pharmacometrics Group will present highlights on population PK/PD modelling to assess the dosing of antimalarial drugs in vulnerable groups. Dr Makoto Saito will share highlights from his research on antimalarial treatment efficacy during pregnancy

Professor Joel Tarning, Head of Clinical Pharmacology at MORU, and Head WWARN's Pharmacometrics Group will present highlights on population PK/PD modelling to assess the dosing of antimalarial drugs in vulnerable groups. Dr Makoto Saito will share highlights from his research on antimalarial treatment efficacy during pregnancy

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Claire-Lise Kessler

Thu 25 Apr 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

Mitochondria and cancer: metabolism and beyond

Dr Christian Frezza

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Thu 25 Apr 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Infection/Microbiology / Acute General Medicine Firm D

Dr Alex Mentzer, Dr Harjit Bains, Prof Nick White, Prof Nick Day

Infection/Microbiology: "Blackwater Fever", Prof Nick White and Prof Nick Day -- Acute General Medicine Firm D: "Diagnosing fever without a fever?", Dr Alex Mentzer and Dr Harjit Bains -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Infection/Microbiology: "Blackwater Fever", Prof Nick White and Prof Nick Day -- Acute General Medicine Firm D: "Diagnosing fever without a fever?", Dr Alex Mentzer and Dr Harjit Bains -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 25 Apr 2019 from 15:00 to 16:00

SGC Seminars

Hidden treasures of the RNA World: from moonlighting to riboregulation

Prof Matthias Hentze

Short Bio: Matthias Hentze is currently the Director of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) and Co-Director of the Molecular Medicine Partnership Unit (MMPU) in Heidelberg (Germany). Following medical studies in Germany and the U.K., and his qualification as a medical doctor, he... Read more

Short Bio: Matthias Hentze is currently the Director of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) and Co-Director of the Molecular Medicine Partnership Unit (MMPU) in Heidelberg (Germany). Following medical studies in Germany and the U.K., and his qualification as a medical doctor, he obtained his postdoctoral training at the NIH (USA) in the late eighties, when he and his colleagues discovered “iron-responsive elements” initiating his interests in RNA biology (translation, mRNA stability, NMD, miRNAs) and diseases of iron metabolism (anemias, hemochromatosis, degenerative diseases). Recent work by the Hentze group has uncovered hundreds of new RNA-binding proteins, including many metabolic enzymes. Their current work uncovers new functions for RNA in the direct regulation of protein function (‘riboregulation’) and elucidates connections between metabolism and gene regulation. Prof. Hentze is a co-founder of the MMPU, a joint interdisciplinary and translational research unit of the Medical Faculty of Heidelberg University and the EMBL, which bridges between medicine and molecular biology. Matthias Hentze’s research contributions have been recognized in numerous ways including Germany’s most prestigious scientific award, the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize in 2000, the 2007 Lautenschläger Research Prize of Heidelberg University, and the 2015 Feodor Lynen Medal of the German Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. In 2017, he was awarded the Doctor of Science honoris causa by the Australia National University (ANU) in Canberra. He is an elected member of the European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO), the German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, and the Academia Europaea. In 2016, he became the first German scientist elected as a Corresponding Member of the Australian Academy of Science. In 2018, he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Matthias Hentze was a co-founder of Anadys Pharmaceuticals (San Diego), and serves on numerous international scientific advisory and editorial boards. Current activities in science administration include innovative approaches to international collaborations and to academia-industry partnerships.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Fri 26 Apr 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Cocaine Place Conditioning Strengthens Location-Specific Hippocampal Inputs to the Nucleus Accumbens

Luke Sjulson

Conditioned place preference (CPP) is a widely used model of addiction-related behavior whose underlying mechanisms are not understood. We used dual-site silicon optoprobe recordings in freely moving mice to examine interactions between the hippocampus and nucleus accumbens in cocaine CPP. We found... Read more

Conditioned place preference (CPP) is a widely used model of addiction-related behavior whose underlying mechanisms are not understood. We used dual-site silicon optoprobe recordings in freely moving mice to examine interactions between the hippocampus and nucleus accumbens in cocaine CPP. We found that CPP was associated with recruitment of D2-positive nucleus accumbens medium spiny neurons to fire in the cocaine-paired location, and this recruitment was driven predominantly by selective strengthening of coupling with hippocampal place cells that encode the cocaine-paired location. These findings suggest that the synaptic potentiation in the accumbens caused by repeated cocaine administration preferentially affects inputs that were active at the time of drug exposure and provide a potential physiological mechanism by which drug use becomes associated with specific environmental contexts.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Mon 29 Apr 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

Neurodegeneration: mechanism to medicines

Prof Giovanna Mallucci

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Mon 29 Apr 2019 from 15:00 to 16:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 1, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Phenome@BDI Seminar Series: Inside the Cranial Vault: Tracking Fetal Brain Development from Ultrasound Images

Ana Namburete

Ultrasound (US) imaging is one of the first steps in a continuum of pregnancy care. During the fetal period, the brain undergoes dramatic structural changes, which are informative of healthy maturation. The resolution of modern US machines enables us to observe and measure brain structures in... Read more

Ultrasound (US) imaging is one of the first steps in a continuum of pregnancy care. During the fetal period, the brain undergoes dramatic structural changes, which are informative of healthy maturation. The resolution of modern US machines enables us to observe and measure brain structures in fetuses from as early as 14 weeks. Capitalizing on recent breakthroughs in machine learning, my group develops bespoke methods to automatically align brain images and track spatiotemporal patterns of intra-uterine brain development. In this talk, I will summarise our work on the design of data-driven techniques to build the first US-based atlas of the fetal brain. We envision that this atlas will serve as a population reference against which individuals can be compared, and hence enable detection of developmental deviations in routine clinical care.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Tue 30 Apr 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MHU Student Presentations

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose