Other Seminars

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Mon 21 Oct 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

Environment control of T cell function

Professor Doreen Cantrell

The T lymphocyte response to pathogens is shaped by the T cell microenvironment and key environmental signals are provided by amino acids, glucose and oxygen. Environmental sensors in T cells include the nutrient-sensing serine/threonine kinases, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and... Read more

The T lymphocyte response to pathogens is shaped by the T cell microenvironment and key environmental signals are provided by amino acids, glucose and oxygen. Environmental sensors in T cells include the nutrient-sensing serine/threonine kinases, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 and signaling pathways regulated by intracellular protein O-GlcNAcylation. Other environmental sensors are transcription factors such as c-myc and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha.The present talk will explore the molecular basis for the impact of environmental signals on the differentiation of conventional T cell receptor αβ T cells and how the T cell response to immune stimuli can coordinate the T cell response to environmental cues.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Jennifer Pope

Mon 21 Oct 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

C1q in health and disease – roles outside the complement system

Prof Marina Botto

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Mon 21 Oct 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, CEU Meeting Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NDPH Special Seminar - Could cigarette smoking really protect against a few types of cancer?

Dr John A. Baron

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 22 Oct 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Single-cell analysis of structural variations and complex rearrangements with tri-channel-processing

Dr Jan Korbel

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 22 Oct 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - Chronic kidney disease of unknown cause: the epidemic you’ve never heard of

Professor Neil Pearce

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 23 Oct 2019 from 10:00 to 11:40

Old Road Campus Research Building, Seminar Room 71a, Headington OX3 7DQ

The Conversation - training sessions for researchers

Editor of The Conversation

Have you thought about writing for The Conversation (https://theconversation.com/uk) but aren't sure how it works? If the answer is YES, register for this training session with an Editor from The Conversation to find out more. The session will include an 'Introduction to The Conversation', followed... Read more

Have you thought about writing for The Conversation (https://theconversation.com/uk) but aren't sure how it works? If the answer is YES, register for this training session with an Editor from The Conversation to find out more. The session will include an 'Introduction to The Conversation', followed by an interactive workshop on 'Writing for a Public Audience', with opportunity for questions. There are also a small number of 20 minute one-to-one sessions with the editor available.This may be useful if you have an idea for a story but would like to some advice on how best to pitch it. The editor can give you a steer and encouragement on the best angles for turning your research and expertise into articles. Please register your interest on the link below and we will be in contact with you. These are available on a strict first come, first served basis. To find out more about The Conversation, please visit www.ox.ac.uk/research/support-researchers/using-research-engage/conversation.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Janice Young

Wed 23 Oct 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Zoology Research and Administration Centre, Seminar room

Ebola virus: Vaccines, survivors and molecular epidemiology

Miles Carroll

The 2013-2016 West African Ebola virus outbreak had devastating effects on the local region. However, the large number of Ebola virus disease cases has allowed researchers to assess; the efficacy of novel vaccines, characteristics of naturally acquired immunity and the existence of sub-symptomatic... Read more

The 2013-2016 West African Ebola virus outbreak had devastating effects on the local region. However, the large number of Ebola virus disease cases has allowed researchers to assess; the efficacy of novel vaccines, characteristics of naturally acquired immunity and the existence of sub-symptomatic infections. Additionally, as it was the most extensively sequenced outbreak in history it has provided opportunities to assess virus mutation patterns and develop tools to support molecular epidemiology. The seminar will include an overview of a unique longitudinal analysis of two cohorts of survivors in Guinea and compare naturally acquired and vaccine induced immunity. Aspects of the utility of real-time field sequencing of EBOV in an outbreak setting will also be described.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Suki Kenth

Please arrive 5 minutes before the start of the seminar to gain entrance

Wed 23 Oct 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Metabolic control of Natural Killer Cell anti-tumour responses

Professor David Finlay

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 23 Oct 2019 from 14:00 to 15:40

Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, EPA Seminar Room, South Parks Road OX1 3RE

The Conversation - training sessions for researchers

Editor of The Conversation

Have you thought about writing for The Conversation (https://theconversation.com/uk) but aren't sure how it works? If the answer is YES, register for this training session with an editor from the The Conversation to find out more. The session will include an 'Introduction to The Conversation',... Read more

Have you thought about writing for The Conversation (https://theconversation.com/uk) but aren't sure how it works? If the answer is YES, register for this training session with an editor from the The Conversation to find out more. The session will include an 'Introduction to The Conversation', followed by an interactive workshop on 'Writing for a Public Audience', with opportunity for questions. There are also a small number of 20 minute one-to-one sessions with the editor available.This may be useful if you have an idea for a story but would like to some advice on how best to pitch it. The editor can give you a steer and encouragement on the best angles for turning your research and expertise into articles. Please register your interest on the link below and we will be in contact with you. These are available on a strict first come, first served basis. To find out more about The Conversation, please visit www.ox.ac.uk/research/support-researchers/using-research-engage/conversation.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Janice Young

Wed 23 Oct 2019 from 14:00 to 17:00

DPAG Guest Speakers

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Fourth Annual Oxosome Meeting

Dr Stefan Balint, Dr Sascha Raschke, Dr Shih-Jung Fan, Dr Naveed Akbar, Dr Cheng Jiang, Lizzie Dellar, Dr Dimitri Aubert, Scott Bonner

Chairs: Dr Cláudia Mendes (Wilson and Goberdhan Labs) and Aashika Sekar (Wilson Lab) 2.05pm - Opening comments 2.15pm - Dr Stefan Balint (Dustin Lab, The Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, University of Oxford) - Supramolecular attack particles- a non-vesicular ~100 nm particle mediating T cell... Read more

Chairs: Dr Cláudia Mendes (Wilson and Goberdhan Labs) and Aashika Sekar (Wilson Lab) 2.05pm - Opening comments 2.15pm - Dr Stefan Balint (Dustin Lab, The Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, University of Oxford) - Supramolecular attack particles- a non-vesicular ~100 nm particle mediating T cell killing 2.30pm - Lizzie Dellar (Carter Lab, Dept. of Biological and Medical Sciences, Oxford Brookes University/ Baena Lopez lab, Sir Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford) - Unpacking the molecular principles facilitating RNA-loading in extracellular vesicles 2.45pm - Technical talk by Dr Sascha Raschke (Particle Metrix) - Phenotyping Extracellular Vesicles using Tetraspanins and fluorescence-NTA 3pm - Dr Shih-Jung Fan (Goberdhan Lab, Dept. of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford) - Glutamine Deprivation Regulates the Origin and Functions of Cancer Cell Exosomes 3.15pm - Refreshments Break in the Sherrington Foyer Chairs: Dr Genevive Melling (Carter Lab) and Dr Yvonne Couch (Buchan Lab) 4pm - Dr Naveed Akbar (Choudhury Lab, Radcliffe Dept. of Medicine, University of Oxford) - Extracellular Vesicles Mediate Immune Cell Mobilisation and Transcriptional Activation Following Acute Myocardial Infarction 4.15pm - Dr Cheng Jiang (Tofaris Lab, Nuffield Dept. of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford) - Differential egress of α-synuclein and clusterin in serum neuronal exosomes precedes and predicts Parkinson’s disease 4.30pm - Technical Talk by Dr Dimitri Aubert (NanoFCM) - Nano-Flow Cytometry: A Platform for Comprehensive EV Analysis 4.45pm - Scott Bonner (Wood Lab, Dept. of Paediatrics, University of Oxford) - Characterisation of tumour-derived extracellular vesicle subpopulations and their role in cancer development 5pm - Closing comments Talk Summaries Supramolecular attack particles- a non-vesicular ~100 nm particle mediating T cell killing Dr Stefan Balint (Dustin Lab, The Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, University of Oxford) T cells respond to cancer-associated antigens by releasing extracellular particles that combine determinants of antigen specificity and effector function. Extracellular vesicles produced by helper T cells bud directly from the centre of the immunological synapse upon engagement of the T cell receptor. We refer to these as synaptic ectosomes and have recently shown that they contain tetraspanins as well as CD40 ligand, a protein that is involved in B-T cell communication. In contrast, detailed examination of the released particles by cytotoxic T cells identified a new type of particles that we refer to as Supra-Molecular Attack Particles (SMAPs). SMAPs are non-membranous particles formed by a glycoprotein shell and contain a core of cytotoxic proteins, chemokines and cytokines. Thus, different subsets of T cells release distinct particles which could be a powerful tool for cancer immunotherapies. Unpacking the molecular principles facilitating RNA-loading in extracellular vesicles Lizzie Dellar (Carter Lab, Dept. of Biological and Medical Sciences, Oxford Brookes University/ Baena Lopez lab, Sir Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford) Our work makes use of Drosophila as a model system to understand the basic biological properties that facilitate the packing of RNA cargo into EVs. We have first characterised the RNA content of Drosophila S2R+-cell-derived EVs from both control and oxidative stress conditions. We then developed a bioinformatic pipeline for identification of sequence motifs and secondary structures that are enriched in EV-loaded RNAs. Using this approach, our analysis has identified several emerging properties of EV-loaded and cell-retained RNAs, findings which previous literature indicate may be evolutionary conserved. Our comparative analysis has also uncovered a subset of genes that are enriched in EVs under oxidative stress. Currently, we are validating our findings using an in vivo Cre-LoxP-based reporter system in Drosophila. Phenotyping Extracellular Vesicles using Tetraspanins and fluorescence-NTA Dr Sascha Raschke (Particle Metrix) In addition to determining the size and concentration of extracellular vesicles (EVs), phenotyping of these particles is another important factor in EV research. With our ZetaView® QUATT, we demonstrate a 4-laser NTA instrument that uses fluorescence- (f) NTA to quantitate EVs and determine ratios in a sample of different EVs by using different surface markers. For example, CD9-, CD81- and CD63-positive EVs can be distinguished by using fluorescence-labelled antibodies in 3 of the 4 fluorescence channels. The fourth fluorescence channel was used for the membrane dye CMDR to verify the presence of membranous particles. With the ZetaView® QUATT, it is possible for the first time to quantify from a sample of diverse extracellular vesicles those EVs by surface markers that are of particular interest. Glutamine Deprivation Regulates the Origin and Functions of Cancer Cell Exosomes Dr Shih-Jung Fan (Goberdhan Lab, Dept. of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford) Exosomes are generally thought to be made in late endosomal multivesicular bodies. We show that exosomes carrying unique cargos including Rab11a, are also made in recycling endosomes. Depletion of glutamine, a key metabolic nutrient, or suppression of nutrient-regulated mTORC1 signalling in cancer cells increases secretion of Rab11a-exosomes and other extracellular vesicle subtypes. These vesicles promote tumour cell turnover and blood vessel growth in xenograft mouse models. Antibodies against Amphiregulin (EGFR ligand) compromise their growth-promoting activity. We hypothesise that release of these stress-induced vesicles changes growth factor signalling in different regions of the tumour and thereby promotes tumour adaptation. Extracellular Vesicles Mediate Immune Cell Mobilisation and Transcriptional Activation Following Acute Myocardial Infarction Dr Naveed Akbar (Choudhury Lab, Radcliffe Dept. of Medicine, University of Oxford) Neutrophils and monocytes are rapidly mobilised from reserve such as the spleen to peripheral blood following acute myocardial infarction. Mobilised cells undergo transcriptional activation en route to the injured myocardium and mediate further injury. We have shown that endothelial cell derived extracellular vesicles mobilise neutrophils and monocytes from the spleen and induce their transcriptional programming. Targeting neutrophil and monocyte transcriptomes in AMI with bioengineered EVs may salvage the myocardium in the immediate hours after injury. Nano-Flow Cytometry: A Platform for Comprehensive EV Analysis Dr Dimitri Aubert (NanoFCM) Though of great importance, sizing, counting and molecular profiling of individual extracellular vesicles (EVs) are technically challenging due to their nanoscale particle size, minute quantity of analytes, and overall heterogeneity. NanoFCM has developed Nano-Flow Cytometry (nFCM), a technology that allows light scattering and fluorescence detection of single EVs down to 40 nm. nFCM-based approach for quantitative multiparameter analysis of EVs, which is highly desirable to decipher their biological functions and promote the development of EV-based liquid biopsy and therapeutics. Differential egress of α-synuclein and clusterin in serum neuronal exosomes precedes and predicts Parkinson’s disease Dr Cheng Jiang (Tofaris group, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford) Among 638 individuals tested cross-sectionally, neuron-derived exosomal α-synuclein was elevated by 2-fold in prodromal and clinical Parkinson’s disease but not in unrelated neurodegenerative diseases. In longitudinal serum samples, exosomal α-synuclein was stably increased with PD progression and consistent when tested across cohorts. Mean exosomal clusterin was increased in other proteinopathies but not α-synucleinopathies. Combined exosomal α-synuclein and clusterin measurement improved the predictive value of a primary α-synucleinopathy versus an alternative proteinopathy (AUC =0.98). Characterisation of tumour-derived extracellular vesicle subpopulations and their role in cancer development Scott Bonner (Wood Lab, Department of Pediatrics, University of Oxford) Extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent a heterogeneous population of membrane enclosed vesicles that function as mediators of intercellular communication. In the context of tumour-derived EVs as mediators of cancer development and progression, this heterogeneity could cause certain EV subpopulations to have unique roles in the intricate biological processes underlying cancer biology. For example, we have observed that only a certain subpopulation of EVs supports ovarian cancer cell adhesion to matrixes in a CD29-dependent manner, suggesting involvement of this subpopulation in tumour metastasis. Following up on these observations, in this study we further characterised EV subpopulations from ovarian cancer cells both on a single vesicle and proteomics level. We analysed biomarker colocalization using the Nanoview ExoView R100, peptide mass fingerprints via MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and assessed integrin beta 1 (CD29) expression on EVs using super-resolution microscopy techniques. The data gained highlights the relevance of EV heterogeneity, with particular regard to the role of EVs in the progression and development of cancer.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dave Carter

Followed by a wine reception in the Sherrington Foyer

Thu 24 Oct 2019 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI seminar room, lower ground floor, Headington OX3 7FZ

Rho GTPase signalling in cancer migration and invasion

Professor Anne Ridley

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Thu 24 Oct 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

61 Banbury Road, School of Anthropology, 61 Banbury Road OX2 6PF

Unit for Biocultural Variation and Obesity (UVBO) Seminar - Nutrient timing and human health

James Betts

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 24 Oct 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Respiratory / Acute General Medicine Firm C

Prof Ian Pavord, Dr Simon Couillard De L'Espinay, Dr Praveen Weeratunga, Dr Giles Bond-Smith, Dr Judy Martin

Respiratory: "Aspirin-induced asthma: mechanisms and treatment options", Prof Ian Pavord and Dr Simon Couillard De L'Espinay -- Acute General Medicine Firm C: "A common surgical problem on the medical take", Dr Praveen Weeratunga, Dr Giles Bond-Smith and Dr Judy Martin -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Respiratory: "Aspirin-induced asthma: mechanisms and treatment options", Prof Ian Pavord and Dr Simon Couillard De L'Espinay -- Acute General Medicine Firm C: "A common surgical problem on the medical take", Dr Praveen Weeratunga, Dr Giles Bond-Smith and Dr Judy Martin -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 24 Oct 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

Metabolism & Endocrinology Theme Guest Speakers (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Room (2nd Floor), off Parks Road OX1 3PT

From breastfeeding to independent feeding: the origins of homeostatic sensing

Marcelo de Oliveira Dietrich, M.D., Ph.D.

All mammals transition from breastfeeding to independent feeding during the lactation period. In humans and other mammals, this critical transition is important for later in life metabolic control and, consequently, for the development of obesity and diabetes. Here, Dr. Dietrich will discuss the... Read more

All mammals transition from breastfeeding to independent feeding during the lactation period. In humans and other mammals, this critical transition is important for later in life metabolic control and, consequently, for the development of obesity and diabetes. Here, Dr. Dietrich will discuss the work of his lab studying the function of hypothalamic neurons involved in homeostatic control during the transition from breastfeeding to independent feeding. His work illuminates novel properties of hypothalamic neurons in early life, suggesting mechanisms by which early life events shape homeostatic regulation throughout the individual’s lifespan.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor David Paterson

Fri 25 Oct 2019 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Organ preservation research in Oxford – an update

Mr Simon Knight, Mr James Hunter

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 25 Oct 2019 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Interactions between hypoxia and immunity – a chance discovery leading to opportunities for collaboration’

Professor Chris Pugh

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 25 Oct 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

GL Brown Prize Lecture: Tackling the pathophysiology of motor neuron disease (MND): a translational neuroscience approach

Professor Dame Pamela Shaw

Motor neuron disease (MND) is one of the 3 commonest adult onset neurodegenerative disorders with a prevalence of approximately 6-8/100,000. The clinical features are caused by injury and cell death usually of both upper motor neurons in the brain and lower motor neuron groups in the brainstem and... Read more

Motor neuron disease (MND) is one of the 3 commonest adult onset neurodegenerative disorders with a prevalence of approximately 6-8/100,000. The clinical features are caused by injury and cell death usually of both upper motor neurons in the brain and lower motor neuron groups in the brainstem and spinal cord. Death in most patients results from neuromuscular respiratory failure. The rapidity of disease progression in many cases causes MND to be regarded as one of the most feared diseases in medicine. The heterogeneity and complexity of MND has poses a challenge for neuroprotective therapy development. This lecture will cover 5 areas of topical interest in relation to this neurodegenerative condition. 1. An introduction to the intricate and fascinating properties of the human motor system and what goes wrong to cause the clinical and pathological features of MND. 2. A discussion on current thinking in relation to disease pathogenesis ie why motor neurons die. New generation genetic sequencing techologies have enable rapid progress in unravelling genetic causes of motor neuron degeneration. Insights into disease pathophysiology arising from study of experimental models of MND will be discussed, including our ability now to reprogamme skin cells do create a human model of MND in the laboratory. Pathophysiological changes at cellular and in vivo in rodent models and human patients will be highlighted. 3. New scientific approaches that can be applied to the problem of MND will be considered. These include laser capture microdissection to isolate motor neurons and study their properties in great detail. In addition, the repertoire of cellular gene and protein expression of motor neurons in health and disease states, can be studied using transcriptomic and proteomic approaches respectively. The other new approach is to investigate the contribution of the “neighbourhood” cells in the nervous system eg astrocytes in the initiation and/or propagation of motor neuron injury. 4. The next section of this presentation will consider whether we are winning in terms of the translation of recent scientific research into benefits for patients who develop MND. Progress in neuroprotective therapy development, including gene therapy approaches and in improving life expectancy and quality of life by advances in symptom management will be considered. 5. The final section will consider how the relationships between scientific researchers and patients, the public and society are changing and the positive value emerging from this two-way relationship. Two illustrative examples include the creation of SITraN and the development of a new, recently marketed device for neuromuscular disorders.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor David Paterson

Mon 28 Oct 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

The magic in the web of it: How a rare disorder is helping to untangle the mysteries of Parkinson’s disease

Dr Ellen Sidransky

Dr. Sidransky, chief of the Molecular Neurogenetics Section, is a pediatrician and clinical geneticist in the Medical Genetics Branch of the National Human Genome Research Institute at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. Dr. Sidransky has been a tenured investigator at NIH and... Read more

Dr. Sidransky, chief of the Molecular Neurogenetics Section, is a pediatrician and clinical geneticist in the Medical Genetics Branch of the National Human Genome Research Institute at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. Dr. Sidransky has been a tenured investigator at NIH and a section chief since 2000. Her research includes both clinical and basic research aspects of Gaucher disease and Parkinson's disease, and her group first identified glucocerebrosidase as a risk factor for parkinsonism. She has spearheaded two large international collaborative studies regarding the genetics of Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. Her current work also focuses on understanding the complexity encountered in "simple" Mendelian disorders, the association between Gaucher disease and parkinsonism and the development of small molecule chaperones as therapy for Gaucher disease and potentially parkinsonism. Dr. Sidransky directs two NIH clinical protocols, one evaluating patients with lysososmal storage disorders and the second prospectively studying patients and relatives with parkinsonism who carry mutations in GBA.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Mon 28 Oct 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

Lymphoid stromal cells are essential components of macrophage niches

Dr Marc Bajénoff

Although the myeloid community recently made tremendous progress in understanding the origin and roles of tissue-resident Mϕ, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms supporting their homeostasis is lacking. . The concept of the Mϕ niche postulates that Mϕ homeostasis is locally... Read more

Although the myeloid community recently made tremendous progress in understanding the origin and roles of tissue-resident Mϕ, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms supporting their homeostasis is lacking. . The concept of the Mϕ niche postulates that Mϕ homeostasis is locally regulated by “niches” that provide both an anchoring and nurturing scaffold to Mϕ. Here, I will present recent data suggesting that lymphoid stromal cells represent essential components of the Mϕ niche in lymphoid organs.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Jennifer Pope

Mon 28 Oct 2019 from 14:00 to 15:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NPEU Seminar - TBC

Associate Professor Charle Roehr

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Mon 28 Oct 2019 from 15:00 to 16:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Phenome@BDI Seminar - Additional dimensions in mass spectrometry: velocity-map imaging

Professor Claire Vallance

molecular fragments. In biological applications, mass spectrometry is used to characterise a wide variety of biomolecules, including sugars, proteins, and oligonucleotides; for example, sequencing of proteins and peptides and identification of post-translational modifications. While methods such... Read more

molecular fragments. In biological applications, mass spectrometry is used to characterise a wide variety of biomolecules, including sugars, proteins, and oligonucleotides; for example, sequencing of proteins and peptides and identification of post-translational modifications. While methods such as ion mobility spectrometry and H/D exchange techniques have been implemented in order to obtain additional structural information from mass spectra, none yield direct information on atomic connectivity within the structure. We have recently developed a new technique known as Coulomb-explosion covariance-map imaging, a variation on the velocity-map imaging method employed widely within the field of chemical reaction dynamics. While so far only applied to small molecules, our new approach provides direct structural information, and even promises the ability to follow structural change on the femtosecond timescale over which chemical change occurs.

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 29 Oct 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - Prostate cancer screening and treatment: what is the trial evidence and linked epidemiology

Professor Athene Lane

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 30 Oct 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Zoology Research and Administration Centre, Seminar room

Understanding rotavirus dynamics in response to vaccination

Virgina Pitzer

The recent introduction of rotavirus vaccines into the national immunization schedules of the United States and other countries has led to substantial reductions in the incidence of severe diarrhea in children. However, there is concern over whether indirect protection evident in high-income... Read more

The recent introduction of rotavirus vaccines into the national immunization schedules of the United States and other countries has led to substantial reductions in the incidence of severe diarrhea in children. However, there is concern over whether indirect protection evident in high-income countries in the short term will extend to low-income countries and to the long term, and whether the selective pressures imposed by vaccines will lead to the emergence of non-vaccine-type strains. Using data-driven models for the transmission dynamics of rotavirus, we generate predictions about rotavirus dynamics in response to vaccination by relating individual-level protection offered by vaccines to population-level effects. I will discuss how models were able to predict the post-vaccination emergence of a biennial pattern of epidemics in the US, why rotavirus genotypes tend to cycle, and possible explanations for the lower vaccine effectiveness observed in countries such as Malawi.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Suki Kenth

Wed 30 Oct 2019 from 12:30 to 13:30

WHG Lunchtime Lab Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Bashford-Rogers & Buck Lunchtime Lab Talks

Timothy Wright, Bobby Bojovic, Bo Sun

Bashford-Rogers (Immunology) https://www.well.ox.ac.uk/research/research-groups/bashford-rogers Speaker: Bo Sun Title: ‘Dissecting pathogenic antibody responses in autoimmune encephalitis’ Buck (High Throughput Genomics) https://www.well.ox.ac.uk/ogc/ Speaker 1: Speaker: Bobby Bojovic Title:... Read more

Bashford-Rogers (Immunology) https://www.well.ox.ac.uk/research/research-groups/bashford-rogers Speaker: Bo Sun Title: ‘Dissecting pathogenic antibody responses in autoimmune encephalitis’ Buck (High Throughput Genomics) https://www.well.ox.ac.uk/ogc/ Speaker 1: Speaker: Bobby Bojovic Title: ‘Lab Notebooks going digital’ Speaker 2: Timothy Wright Title: ‘Integration of the NovaSeq 6000 into a High-Throughput Service’

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Thu 31 Oct 2019 from 11:30 to 12:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

VIVA - How do Gata1 and cohesin gene mutations contribute to the development of myeloid leukaemia?

Catherine Garnett

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Emma Butterfield

Thu 31 Oct 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

WHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Whole-genome sequencing of rare disease patients in a national healthcare system

Ernest Turro

In my talk, I will describe three recently completed research projects I have led or co-led. Firstly, I will describe a genetic association method for rare Mendelian diseases called BeviMed. Secondly, I will present the results of the analyses of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data for 13,037... Read more

In my talk, I will describe three recently completed research projects I have led or co-led. Firstly, I will describe a genetic association method for rare Mendelian diseases called BeviMed. Secondly, I will present the results of the analyses of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data for 13,037 participants in an NIHR-funded study, of whom 9,802 had a rare disease. Briefly, we provided a genetic diagnosis to 1,138 patients, we identified 99 BeviMed associations between genes and rare diseases, we showed that rare alleles can explain the presence of some UK Biobank participants in the tails of a quantitative red blood cell trait, and we reported 4 novel non-coding variants which cause disease through the disruption of transcription. Finally, I will describe our analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences, generated as a by-product of WGS, suggesting that mitochondrial DNA is under selective forces exerted by the nuclear genome.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Thu 31 Oct 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Renal / Gastroenterology

Dr Timothy Ambrose

Renal: Gastroenterology: "Intestinal Transplantation – Quality and Quantity?", Dr Timothy Ambrose. Chair: Prof Richard Cornall

Renal: Gastroenterology: "Intestinal Transplantation – Quality and Quantity?", Dr Timothy Ambrose. Chair: Prof Richard Cornall

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.