Other Seminars

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Tue 1 May 2018 from 12:30 to 13:30

WHG Lunchtime Lab Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Chapman and Zondervan Lunchtime Lab Talks

Dr Hind Ghezraoui, Dr Cathy Oliveira, Nina Shigesi, Dr Thomas Tapmeier

Chapman Group Speaker: Dr Hind Ghezraoui Title: Rev7 mediates the assembly of Shieldin, a DNA end protection complex essential for 53BP1-dependent non-homologous end joining Speaker: Dr Cathy Oliveira Title: Adaptive immunity and the importance of shieldin(g) DNA breaks Zondervan Group Speaker:... Read more

Chapman Group Speaker: Dr Hind Ghezraoui Title: Rev7 mediates the assembly of Shieldin, a DNA end protection complex essential for 53BP1-dependent non-homologous end joining Speaker: Dr Cathy Oliveira Title: Adaptive immunity and the importance of shieldin(g) DNA breaks Zondervan Group Speaker: Nina Shigesi Title: Endometriosis and autoimmune diseases in the UK biobank study Speaker: Dr Thomas Tapmeier Title: Characterization of Exosomes from Peritoneal Fluid as Potential Biomarkers of Endometriosis

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 1 May 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - Principles and practice of preventive cardiology

Professor Wood is a cardiologist committed to the prevention of cardiovascular disease and he holds joint academic appointments at Imperial College and the National University of Ireland-Galway. He has contributed to international policy and guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention through... Read more

Professor Wood is a cardiologist committed to the prevention of cardiovascular disease and he holds joint academic appointments at Imperial College and the National University of Ireland-Galway. He has contributed to international policy and guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention through the World Health Organisation, World Heart Federation and the European Society of Cardiology. In 2014 he was elected as President-Elect of the World Heart Federation and is currently serving his term as President 2017-2018. He is the principal investigator for the ASPIRE and EUROASPIRE studies across 27 European countries, evaluating standards of preventive cardiology practice in hospital and primary care. He led the EUROACTION and EUROACTION+ trials in preventive cardiology evaluating nurse-led models of preventive care in hospital and general practice across 8 European countries. He enjoys cooking for family and friends and also sailing, presently circumnavigating the UK in a Frances 26 sailing boat!

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 2 May 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

3D microfluidic liver cultures are a physiological model to study Hepatitis B virus

Ana Maria Ortega-Prieto

The in vitro models to study of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) are very limited and only poorly mimic physiological virus-host interaction. Recently, we have demonstrated that 3D microfluidic cultures are a powerful tool to study HBV within its natural target cell. These cultures allow the long-term... Read more

The in vitro models to study of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) are very limited and only poorly mimic physiological virus-host interaction. Recently, we have demonstrated that 3D microfluidic cultures are a powerful tool to study HBV within its natural target cell. These cultures allow the long-term survival of primary human hepatocyte, in the presence and in the absence of Kupffer cells, are highly susceptible to HBV and recapitulate all steps of the HBV life cycle. In addition to mimicking host responses observed in HBV-infected patients, these advantages enable the evaluation of sequential and long-term antiviral treatments targeting any step of the viral cycle and the study of innate immune responses to HBV by hepatocytes and other non-parenchymal cells in the liver.

Audience: The Scientific Community

Organisers: Dr Proochista Ariana

Please arrive 5 minutes before the Seminar begins to gain building access

Wed 2 May 2018 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Human gamma delta T cells – unconventionally adaptive

Professor Benjamin Willcox

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 2 May 2018 from 15:30 to 16:30

WTCHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

Thu 3 May 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Room 3, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

* CANCELLED * CANCELLED: Living whilst dying: exploring ‘a life worth living’ for people with heart failure

Caitlin Pilbeam

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Daniel Long

CANCELLED

Thu 3 May 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Oncology / Gastroenterology

Dr Jack Satsangi, Dr Andrew Eichholz

Oncology: "Malignant Spinal Cord Compression Update", Dr Andrew Eichholz -- Gastroenterology: "Inflammatory bowel disease: back to the future", Dr Jack Satsangi -- Chair: Prof Julian Knight

Oncology: "Malignant Spinal Cord Compression Update", Dr Andrew Eichholz -- Gastroenterology: "Inflammatory bowel disease: back to the future", Dr Jack Satsangi -- Chair: Prof Julian Knight

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 3 May 2018 from 13:00 to 13:30

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting room A , Headington OX3 7BN

“Visualizing the conformational dynamics of viral membrane fusion machines".

Asst. Prof James Munro

Influenza hemagglutinin (HA) is the canonical type-I viral envelope glycoprotein, and provides a template for the membrane fusion mechanisms of numerous viruses. Here, using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) imaging we directly visualized conformational changes of HA... Read more

Influenza hemagglutinin (HA) is the canonical type-I viral envelope glycoprotein, and provides a template for the membrane fusion mechanisms of numerous viruses. Here, using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) imaging we directly visualized conformational changes of HA trimers on the viral surface. These findings reveal the coordination between receptor binding and HA conformational dynamics, which facilitates efficient fusion.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Thu 3 May 2018 from 13:30 to 14:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting room A , Headington OX3 7BN

"Mechanical regulation of B cell activation"

Dr Katelyn Spillane

Functional immune responses require the appropriate activation of antigen-specific B cells from the naïve repertoire. B cell activation is initiated when the B cell receptor (BCR) binds antigens that are displayed on the surfaces of antigen-presenting cells. This binding event triggers the B cell... Read more

Functional immune responses require the appropriate activation of antigen-specific B cells from the naïve repertoire. B cell activation is initiated when the B cell receptor (BCR) binds antigens that are displayed on the surfaces of antigen-presenting cells. This binding event triggers the B cell to internalise, process, and present the antigen to helper T cells, which provide signals required for B cell differentiation and the production of antibodies. The extent of T cell help depends upon the affinity of the BCR for antigen, suggesting that affinity discrimination during antigen acquisition is essential for high-affinity antibody responses. Despite the importance of B cell antigen internalisation for this process, the mechanisms underlying how B cells acquire antigens from the surfaces of other cells remain poorly understood. One limiting factor in studies to date has been the artificial substrates used to mimic antigen-presenting cell membranes. To overcome this limitation, we have developed DNA-based nanosensors that enable us to investigate mechanisms of B cell antigen acquisition and processing from both artificial substrates and live antigen-presenting cells. Our results show that B cell antigen internalisation is regulated by several mechanical signals including BCR affinity for antigen, the strength of the antigen tether, and the flexibility of the membrane substrate. We demonstrate that by tuning these properties we can change the mechanism by which B cells internalise antigen, the amount of antigen that B cells acquire, and the ability of B cells to discriminate low- and high-affinity antigens. These observations highlight a potential role for mechanical forces in the activation and regulation of B cell responses.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Fri 4 May 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Prospective assessment of an innovative and multidisciplinary treatment protocol for chronic tinnitus

Dr Gerald Fain

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 4 May 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Change and Judgement: B Cell Receptor Exchange and Screening in Germinal Centres

Isabelle Stewart

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 4 May 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

NDM Seminar Series

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar Rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

Fri 4 May 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG Sherrington Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, Sherrington Road (off Parks Road) - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

GUEST: Prof Israel Nelken, The Edmond and Lily Safra Center for Brain Sciences and The Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, Hebrew University - ‘Frequency-specific adaptation and stimulus-specific adaptation in the auditory system’

Professor Israel Nelken

Responses of auditory neurons to a repeated, stimulus tend to decrease, but often the decrease does not generalize to other, even rather similar stimuli. These effects have been studied mostly with pure tone stimuli, although they are also present for complex stimuli, and we have named them... Read more

Responses of auditory neurons to a repeated, stimulus tend to decrease, but often the decrease does not generalize to other, even rather similar stimuli. These effects have been studied mostly with pure tone stimuli, although they are also present for complex stimuli, and we have named them stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA). SSA may however be a misnomer, because the specific reduction of the responses to a complex stimulus may be driven by frequency-specific adaptation to its frequency components, so that SSA could be in fact an expression of frequency-specific adaptation (FSA). Here I will discuss critical tests of FSA and SSA in the inferior colliculus and in auditory cortex, suggesting the emergence of SSA in cortex from FSA in the inferior colliculus.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sally Collins

Tue 8 May 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - Environmental impact on child health and development: Have we been looking at the wrong generation?

Professor Jean Golding

Jean Golding read mathematics at Oxford, but then came across epidemiology and fell in love with what she saw as a series of detective stories, and has continued in the discipline ever since. She has concentrated mainly on maternal and child health and has devoted most of her research career to... Read more

Jean Golding read mathematics at Oxford, but then came across epidemiology and fell in love with what she saw as a series of detective stories, and has continued in the discipline ever since. She has concentrated mainly on maternal and child health and has devoted most of her research career to large birth cohort studies in the UK. In the early 1990s she initiated the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), an in depth study starting in early pregnancy and following the parents and their offspring throughout infancy, childhood and adolescence (n~14000 children). She retired from the position of Scientific and Executive Director of the study at the end of 2005, but continues to work on various aspects of the survey. In particular, she works together with Prof Marcus Pembrey on inter- and trans-generational influences on the health and development of the child. She has received honorary doctorates from Bristol and UCL, is a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Science, and has received an OBE for her contributions to science.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 9 May 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities and Ethox Centre

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Concealment and Discovery: The Role of Information Security in Biomedical Data Re-Use

Niccolò Tempini

This paper analyses the role of information security (IS) in shaping the dissemination and re-use of biomedical data, as well as the embedding of such data in the material, social and regulatory landscapes of research. We consider the data management practices adopted by two UK-based data linkage... Read more

This paper analyses the role of information security (IS) in shaping the dissemination and re-use of biomedical data, as well as the embedding of such data in the material, social and regulatory landscapes of research. We consider the data management practices adopted by two UK-based data linkage infrastructures: the Secure Anonymised Information Linkage, a Welsh databank that facilitates appropriate re-use of health data derived from research and routine medical practice in the region; and the Medical and Environmental Data Mash-up Infrastructure, a project bringing together researchers from the University of Exeter, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, the Met Office and Public Health England to link and analyse complex meteorological, environmental and epidemiological data. Through an in-depth analysis of how data are sourced, processed and analysed in these two cases, we show that IS takes two distinct forms: epistemic IS, focused on protecting the reliability and reusability of data as they move across platforms and research contexts; and infrastructural IS, concerned with protecting data from external attacks, mishandling and use disruption. These two dimensions are intertwined and mutually constitutive, and yet are often perceived by researchers as being in tension with each other. We discuss how such tensions emerge when the two dimensions of IS are operationalised in ways that put them at cross purpose with each other, thus exemplifying the vulnerability of data management strategies to broader governance and technological regimes. We also show that whenever biomedical researchers manage to overcome the conflict, the interplay between epistemic and infrastructural IS prompts critical questions concerning data sources, formats, metadata and potential uses, resulting in an improved understanding of the wider context of research and the development of relevant resources. This informs and significantly improves the re-usability of biomedical data, while encouraging exploratory analyses of secondary data sources.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Christa Henrichs

Wed 9 May 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Seasonality and endemicity of Melioidosis: the impact of phages.

Edouard Galyov

Melioidosis, a serious environmentally-acquired bacterial infection, is endemic in tropical and sub-tropical areas. It is often characterised by a noticeable seasonality. Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is commonly found in tropical soil and stagnant waters, which... Read more

Melioidosis, a serious environmentally-acquired bacterial infection, is endemic in tropical and sub-tropical areas. It is often characterised by a noticeable seasonality. Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is commonly found in tropical soil and stagnant waters, which represent environmental reservoir of the disease. In this work, we studied environmental phages capable of infecting B. pseudomallei. A particular clade of phages - which is highly abundant in the endemic area of Thailand - infects B. pseudomallei according to temperature conditions: phages are predominantly lytic at a higher temperature of 37oC and mainly lysogenic at 25oC. In this presentation, I will discuss the potential impact of these phages on seasonality and endemicity of Melioidosis.

Audience: UK Science Community

Organisers: Ramona Kantschuster

Please arrive 5 minutes before the Seminar begins to gain building access

Thu 10 May 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Open Prescribing

Dr Helen Curtis, Dr Alex Walker

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Thu 10 May 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting room B, Headington OX3 7BN

"Intranuclear Movement of Viruses through the Chromatin Network"

ADJUNCT PROFESSOR MAIJA VIHINEN-RANTA

Various DNA viruses such as parvoviruses, herpesviruses and baculoviruses elicit the formation of large nuclear replication compartments alongside with host chromatin marginalization. Newly assembled nucleocapsids travel through the nucleoplasm and chromatin to egress at the nuclear envelope.... Read more

Various DNA viruses such as parvoviruses, herpesviruses and baculoviruses elicit the formation of large nuclear replication compartments alongside with host chromatin marginalization. Newly assembled nucleocapsids travel through the nucleoplasm and chromatin to egress at the nuclear envelope. Parvoviruses and herpesviruses rely on passive diffusion for intranuclear movement, whereas baculoviruses are actively transported in an actin-dependent manner. We have analyzed nuclear dynamics and interactions of viral capsids by employing an interdisciplinary approach, which combines biology and biophysics with state-of-the-art techniques of imaging, advanced image analysis, and biophysical modelling. Our studies with canine parvovirus showed that viral capsids diffuse rapidly within the replication compartment and accumulate close to the nuclear envelope. Herpesvirus studies showed that compacted host chromatin restricts nucleocapsid diffusion. However, herpesvirus capsids are able to reach the nuclear envelope due to interchromatin channels. Numerical modelling of baculovirus particles in a reconstruction of an infected cell nucleus demonstrated that although a significant part of the nucleocapsids become trapped in dense chromatin network, a portion of them is able to navigate through the chromatin when propelled by actin comet tails.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Thu 10 May 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Clinical Genetics / Renal

Dr Anna de Burca, Dr Doreen Zhu, Dr Isabella Bertoni, Dr Christopher Winearls

Clinical Genetics: "Whole Genome Sequencing: Long-awaited answers and new questions", Dr Anna de Burca -- Renal: "Blockade", Dr Doreen Zhu, Dr Isabella Bertoni and Dr Christopher Winearls -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Clinical Genetics: "Whole Genome Sequencing: Long-awaited answers and new questions", Dr Anna de Burca -- Renal: "Blockade", Dr Doreen Zhu, Dr Isabella Bertoni and Dr Christopher Winearls -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 11 May 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Medicine in Art

Professor David Cranston

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 11 May 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Fri 11 May 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Mouse dLGN receives input from a diverse population of retinal ganglion cells with limited convergence

Professor Laura Busse

In the mouse, the parallel output of more than 30 functional types of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) serves as the basis for all further visual processing. Little is known about how the representation of visual information changes between the retina and the dorsolateral geniculate nucleus... Read more

In the mouse, the parallel output of more than 30 functional types of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) serves as the basis for all further visual processing. Little is known about how the representation of visual information changes between the retina and the dorsolateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) of the thalamus, the main relay station between the retina and cortex. Here, we functionally characterized responses of retrogradely labelled dLGN-projecting RGCs and dLGN neurons to the same set of visual stimuli. We found that many of the previously identified functional RGC types innervate the dLGN, which maintained a high degree of functional diversity. Using a sparse linear model to assess functional connectivity between RGC types and dLGN neurons, we found that the responses of dLGN neurons could be predicted as a linear combination of inputs from on average five RGC types, but only two of those had the strongest functional impact. Thus, mouse dLGN receives input from a diverse population of RGCs with limited functional convergence.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sally Collins

Fri 11 May 2018 from 17:00 to 18:30

AfOx insaka - a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research

St Cross College, Lecture Theatre, West Wing, St Giles OX1 3LZ

AfOx insaka - a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research

Professor Peter Horby, J C Nialla, Nzelle Delphine Kayem

The AfOx insaka is a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research with speakers from diverse and varied academic disciplines. There are two events each term. On Friday of Week 3, and Friday of Week 7. Each event will feature two talks by speakers from different disciplines, followed by questions and discussion. Drinks will be served afterwards.

The AfOx insaka is a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research with speakers from diverse and varied academic disciplines. There are two events each term. On Friday of Week 3, and Friday of Week 7. Each event will feature two talks by speakers from different disciplines, followed by questions and discussion. Drinks will be served afterwards.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Africa Oxford Initiative

Mon 14 May 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting rooms 71a, b and c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Allosteric regulation of RING E3 ligases

Professor Helen Walden

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 14 May 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Infections@BDI Seminar

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Mon 14 May 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

'The biology of Interleukin-6 and its role in autoimmunity'

Prof Stefan Rose-John

Cytokines receptors exist in membrane bound and soluble form. The IL-6/soluble IL-6R complex stimulates target cells not stimulated by IL-6 alone, since they do not express the membrane bound IL-6R. We have named this process 'trans-signaling'. The soluble IL-6R is generated via ectodomain shedding... Read more

Cytokines receptors exist in membrane bound and soluble form. The IL-6/soluble IL-6R complex stimulates target cells not stimulated by IL-6 alone, since they do not express the membrane bound IL-6R. We have named this process 'trans-signaling'. The soluble IL-6R is generated via ectodomain shedding by the membrane bound metalloprotease ADAM17. Soluble gp130 is the natural inhibitor of IL-6/soluble IL-6R complex responses. The dimerized recombinant soluble gp130Fc fusion protein is a molecular tool to discriminate between gp130 responses via membrane bound and soluble IL-6R responses. Interestingly, depending on the animal model used, global blockade of IL-6 signaling by neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and selective blockade of IL-6 trans-signaling can lead to different consequences. Inhibition of IL-6 trans-signaling but not global IL-6 blockade was beneficial in several inflammation and cancer models. The extent of inflammation is controlled by trans-signaling via the soluble IL-6R. Using the sgp130Fc protein or sgp130Fc transgenic mice we demonstrate in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease, peritonitis, rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, pancreatitis, lupus erythematodes, colon cancer, ovarian cancer, pancreatic cancer, nephrotoxic nephritis and high fat diet induced obesity that IL-6 trans-signaling via the soluble IL-6R is the crucial step in the development and the progression of the disease. Therefore, sgp130Fc is a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer and it underwent phase I clinical trials as an anti-inflammatory in 2013/2014. Phase II clinical trials in patients with autoimmune diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease have started in 2016.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Irina Udalova

Mon 14 May 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Fine Tuning the CTL response: from genes to membranes

Prof Gillian Griffiths

Audience: Public

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Tue 15 May 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NPEU Seminar - Hard lessons: learning from controversial cases in medical ethics

Prof Dominic Wilkinson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 15 May 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

ARUK Oxford Drug Discovery Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement Seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Understanding the role of the novel TLDc proteins in neurodegeneration

Mattea Finelli

Mattéa Finelli is a postdoctoral research assistant in the University of Oxford (Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics) and a Junior Research Fellow at St Edmund Hall in Oxford. She received a M.Sc. in Engineering from SupAgro (Montpellier, France) and a M.Res. in Biomedical Research from... Read more

Mattéa Finelli is a postdoctoral research assistant in the University of Oxford (Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics) and a Junior Research Fellow at St Edmund Hall in Oxford. She received a M.Sc. in Engineering from SupAgro (Montpellier, France) and a M.Res. in Biomedical Research from Imperial College (London). She completed her D.Phil (2010) in Neurosciences in Prof Dame Kay Davies’ group at the University of Oxford. She then completed a first two-year postdoctoral project at Mount Sinai School of Medicine (New York, NY). She has been working in Prof Peter Oliver’s group at the University of Oxford since 2013.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Dr John Davis

Tue 15 May 2018 from 12:45 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Student presentations

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Please note earlier start time for these presentations

Wed 16 May 2018 from 10:30 to 11:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Wed 16 May 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Vaccination to prevent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

Prof Mark Hatherill

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof Helen McShane

Wed 16 May 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities and Ethox Centre

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Responsibility in Healthcare: Empowerment Without Blame?

Rebecca Brown

Whilst responsibility commonly plays a role in a variety of social contexts, the appropriate role for responsibility in healthcare is debatable. Upon its launch in 1948, three core principles were to guide the NHS: that it meet the needs of everyone; that it be free at the point of delivery; and... Read more

Whilst responsibility commonly plays a role in a variety of social contexts, the appropriate role for responsibility in healthcare is debatable. Upon its launch in 1948, three core principles were to guide the NHS: that it meet the needs of everyone; that it be free at the point of delivery; and that care be based on clinical need, not ability to pay. Much has changed since then, and now chronic disease is responsible for the majority of the global disease burden. It is thought that chronic disease can often be avoided through the adoption of ‘healthy lifestyles’: quitting smoking, drinking less alcohol, eating healthily and exercising regularly. As a result, there is renewed interest in exploring how responsibility can be used to promote health. Much of this is framed as ‘empowering healthy choices’ rather than ‘punishing bad behaviour.’ This paper explores the possibility of using responsibility in this selective way, and considers the philosophical consistency of ‘holding responsible’ in the context of habitual behaviours.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Christa Henrichs

Wed 16 May 2018 from 11:00 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

From frameworks to frameworking: the paradox of defining an evidence base for patient and public involvement in research.

Professor Trish Greenhalgh, Dr Lisa Hinton

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Wed 16 May 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

The Population Genetics of Malaria-Blocking Mutations

Bridget Penman

Individuals with the Duffy negative blood group are highly resistant to blood stage infection with the malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax. Duffy negativity is so widespread in sub Saharan Africa that transmission of P. vivax malaria cannot be maintained in this region. But why has Duffy negativity... Read more

Individuals with the Duffy negative blood group are highly resistant to blood stage infection with the malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax. Duffy negativity is so widespread in sub Saharan Africa that transmission of P. vivax malaria cannot be maintained in this region. But why has Duffy negativity not reached similar frequencies in other parts of the world where P. vivax is endemic? Are malaria blocking mutations, or, more broadly, infection blocking mutations, likely or unlikely to reach high frequencies in populations? In this talk I will present a theoretical framework with which to explore these questions, and demonstrate a possible explanation for the global distribution of the Duffy blood group.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Thomas Johnson

Please arrive 5 minutes before the seminar begins to gain access to the building

Wed 16 May 2018 from 12:30 to 13:30

WHG Lunchtime Lab Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Bowden and Taylor Lunchtime Lab Talks

Elizabeth Allen, Ilona Rissanen, Dr Carme Camps, Lukas Lange

Bowden Group Speaker: Elizabeth Allen Title: Molecular determinants of antibody mediated neutralization of Rift Valley Fever Virus Speaker: Ilona Rissanen Title: Structural studies of an emergent henipavirus reveal unexpected diversity in modes of host-cell recognition Taylor Group Speaker: Dr... Read more

Bowden Group Speaker: Elizabeth Allen Title: Molecular determinants of antibody mediated neutralization of Rift Valley Fever Virus Speaker: Ilona Rissanen Title: Structural studies of an emergent henipavirus reveal unexpected diversity in modes of host-cell recognition Taylor Group Speaker: Dr Carme Camps Title: Translation of whole genome sequencing into clinical practice Speaker: Lukas Lange Title: Using phenotypic and tissue-specific expression data to inform genome sequencing analyses for Rare Disease

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 16 May 2018 from 15:00 to 15:45

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

Inauguration Talk: "An atomic view of biology"

Prof Jim Naismith

Life is a series of chemical reactions governed by thermodynamics and kinetics. Being able to correctly position atoms in biomolecules transforms our understanding of biological processes. Rosalind Franklin's diffraction image of DNA fibre was an early example of the power of structural biology, it... Read more

Life is a series of chemical reactions governed by thermodynamics and kinetics. Being able to correctly position atoms in biomolecules transforms our understanding of biological processes. Rosalind Franklin's diffraction image of DNA fibre was an early example of the power of structural biology, it stimulated Watson and Crick to construct the DNA double helix model that directly led to the molecular biology revolution. Structural biology and its cousin chemical biology, have grown to encompass a wide range of techniques in addition to X-ray diffraction. In my lecture I will cover some examples where atomic level study of proteins has uncovered new insights, led to new biotechnology and provided a starting point for a new antimicrobials.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Wed 16 May 2018 from 15:45 to 16:30

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

Inauguration Talk: "Structural Mechanisms of Macromolecular Assemblies: from HIV-1 Capsid to Bacterial Chemosensory Arrays"

Prof Peijun Zhang

Structural Biology using single particle cryoEM and molecular/cellular cryo-electron tomography (cryoET) has become a major tool for studying macromolecular assemblies that are intrinsically flexible and dynamic, and often function in higher-order assemblies that are difficult to purify. The study... Read more

Structural Biology using single particle cryoEM and molecular/cellular cryo-electron tomography (cryoET) has become a major tool for studying macromolecular assemblies that are intrinsically flexible and dynamic, and often function in higher-order assemblies that are difficult to purify. The study of these complexes in situ using cryoET and sub-tomogram averaging at near atomic resolution, coupled with cryoFIB and correlative/integrative imaging, opens a new frontier in structural cell biology, as exemplified in virus infection and bacterial chemotaxis signaling.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Wed 16 May 2018 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, 2nd floor, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Local and global facets of sleep regulation

Prof. Vlad Vyazovskiy

Sleep is a phenomenon of astounding complexity, which makes it difficult to understand and even define unequivocally. It can be viewed as behaviour, a brain state and a process, which are intricately interrelated, and manifest themselves at many distinct spatio-temporal scales. Sleep is regulated... Read more

Sleep is a phenomenon of astounding complexity, which makes it difficult to understand and even define unequivocally. It can be viewed as behaviour, a brain state and a process, which are intricately interrelated, and manifest themselves at many distinct spatio-temporal scales. Sleep is regulated by circadian time, preceding sleep-wake history, and, while asleep, the brain switches periodically between two markedly different states – NREM sleep and REM sleep, which are distinguished by specific types of brain activity. Specifically, a closer look at NREM sleep reveals that it is characterised by a regular occurrence of local and global slow cortical oscillations, visible at the level of the EEG as slow waves. Throughout NREM sleep, especially during its lighter stages and towards a transition into REM sleep, another type of activity is apparent, so-called sleep spindles. These involve the thalamus and through dynamic cortico-thalamic interactions emerge quasi-independently at specific brain locations and never across the whole brain at once. In contrast, during REM sleep the brain is about as active as it is in waking, and the EEG in both humans and animals is dominated by theta- and faster rhythms, which arise from bidirectional interactions of cortical, hippocampal and subcortical networks. Are all these sleep-related phenomena related to each other and what is the functional meaning of the overall complexity of the sleep process? Our aim is to understand the mechanisms governing the spatio-temporal dynamics of brain activity during sleep. This will help us to understand not only what sleep is, but also why it is necessary.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Thu 17 May 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Stable epigenetic inheritance of DNA methylation through pathway integration

Daniel Zilberman

Cytosine methylation provides a mechanism to heritably alter plant and animal genomes without permanent modification of the DNA sequence. In flowering plants, DNA methylation patterns are faithfully reproduced across many generations, so that methylation shapes the inheritance of plant traits. I... Read more

Cytosine methylation provides a mechanism to heritably alter plant and animal genomes without permanent modification of the DNA sequence. In flowering plants, DNA methylation patterns are faithfully reproduced across many generations, so that methylation shapes the inheritance of plant traits. I will present our recent results that elucidate how plants ensure the accurate and reliable inheritance of DNA methylation.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 17 May 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

OCDEM / Respiratory

Dr Tim Hinks, Dr Stephanie Miles, Dr Alistair Lumb

OCDEM: "It can’t be DKA, the glucose is normal", Dr Stephanie Miles and Dr Alistair Lumb -- Respiratory: "A perfect storm", Dr Tim Hinks -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

OCDEM: "It can’t be DKA, the glucose is normal", Dr Stephanie Miles and Dr Alistair Lumb -- Respiratory: "A perfect storm", Dr Tim Hinks -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 18 May 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Global Surgery: Paediatric Surgical Team

Miss Kokila Lakhoo

Ms Shannon Gunawardana (student) will talk about 'Explore' Ms Kathryn Ford (trainee) will speak on 'Trainees and global surgery' Professor Kokila Lakhoo (consultant) will discuss 'Global initiative for children's surgery'

Ms Shannon Gunawardana (student) will talk about 'Explore' Ms Kathryn Ford (trainee) will speak on 'Trainees and global surgery' Professor Kokila Lakhoo (consultant) will discuss 'Global initiative for children's surgery'

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 18 May 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

"An RNA-encoded virus assembly manual: mechanisms and consequences for viral evolution and therapy"

Prof Reidun Twarock

Based on a unique combination of inter-dependent bespoke modelling and experiment we have been able to demonstrate that multiple dispersed, sequence-specific interactions between (pre)genomic RNA and capsid protein promote assembly in a number of viruses infecting different hosts. In this talk, I... Read more

Based on a unique combination of inter-dependent bespoke modelling and experiment we have been able to demonstrate that multiple dispersed, sequence-specific interactions between (pre)genomic RNA and capsid protein promote assembly in a number of viruses infecting different hosts. In this talk, I will introduce different manifestations of this mechanism with emphasis on the examples of Human Parechovirus, Hepatitis B virus and HIV. Using the Parechoviruses as an example, I will demonstrate that characteristic features of this mechanism are shared across a viral genus, thus paving the way for broad-spectrum anti-viral therapy. Using models of viral evolution in the context of an infection, I will assess the merits of therapy directed against such features and highlight potential advantages over current therapies targeting virally-encoded enzymes. Finally, I will show that the assembly instruction manual can be isolated and repurposed for the production of VLPs, with potential for vaccination and gene delivery applications.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Fri 18 May 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Perceptual and neural consequences of early auditory experience

Professor Dan Sanes

A general theory of development holds that a heightened period of neural plasticity is associated with greater vulnerability to the deprivation of sensory experience. For example, auditory deprivation during a discrete age range in gerbils induces long-lasting cortical synaptic deficits that can... Read more

A general theory of development holds that a heightened period of neural plasticity is associated with greater vulnerability to the deprivation of sensory experience. For example, auditory deprivation during a discrete age range in gerbils induces long-lasting cortical synaptic deficits that can account for perceptual impairments. In contrast, little is known about the neural mechanisms associated with skill learning in juveniles. To address this issue, we recorded telemetrically from auditory cortex of juvenile and adult gerbils as they trained and improved on a psychometric task. Juveniles learned more slowly than adults, consistent with human studies (Huyck and Wright, 2011; Pattwell et al., 2012), and auditory cortex neuron sensitivity to the acoustic stimuli displayed smaller improvements during training. Together, these findings suggest that while juvenile animals display profound long-term benefits from practice, the cortical mechanisms that support skill learning are limited in the short-term.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sally Collins

Fri 18 May 2018 from 13:00 to 14:15

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

"Career paths, work/life balance and equality/diversity"

Anne Bridgeman, Mira Kassouf, Tiago Luis

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Emma Butterfield

Mon 21 May 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar - The genetics of actigraphy-based estimates of sleep characteristics

Dr Andrew Wood

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Mon 21 May 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Infections@BDI Seminar: Connecting genomic data with vaccine design in pneumococcus

Dr Caroline Colijn

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Mon 21 May 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Coming to our Census: Engineering and Rewilding the Gut Microbiome

Prof Justin Sonnenburg, Dr Erica Sonnenburg

The Sonnenburg lab is focused on understanding basic principles governing diet-gut microbiome dynamics, and how these interactions influence human biology. Using an evolutionary lens, we investigate what defines a healthy microbiome, how industrialization has altered the microbiome, and whether... Read more

The Sonnenburg lab is focused on understanding basic principles governing diet-gut microbiome dynamics, and how these interactions influence human biology. Using an evolutionary lens, we investigate what defines a healthy microbiome, how industrialization has altered the microbiome, and whether those of us in the industrialized world are harboring a community of microbes that is now incompatible with our human biology. Our lab also applies systems approaches and uses genetic tools to gain mechanistic insight into emergent properties of the host-microbial super-organism, as well as utilizing principles of synthetic biology to engineer gut bacteria to diagnose and treat disease. ---- Erica Sonnenburg, PhD. is a senior research scientist at the Stanford University School of Medicine in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology. Her work on the influence of diet on the gut microbiota has been published in top journals including Cell, Science, and Nature. Justin Sonnenburg, PhD. is an Associate Professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He is the recipient of an NIH Director’s New Innovator Award, the Burroughs Wellcome Fund Investigators in Pathogenesis of Infectious Disease Award, and most recently the NIH Director's Pioneer Award. Together they lead the Sonnenburg lab, which is currently focused on understanding basic principles that govern interactions within the intestinal microbiota and between the microbiota and the host. To pursue these aims, the lab utilizes both gnotobiotic mice and humans as model systems to understand the role of the microbiota in health and disease. The lab also applies systems approaches (e.g. functional genomics), and uses genetic tools for the host and microbes to gain mechanistic insight into emergent properties of the host-microbial super-organism.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 21 May 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Novel mechanisms of tumour-stroma crosstalk

Prof Erik Sahai

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Mon 21 May 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

NDM Seminar Series

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar Rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

Genetic diagnosis in practice & Functional Characterisation of T2D GWAS loci: Going from one to many

Prof Hugh Watkins, Prof Anna Gloyn

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kathryn Smith

Mon 21 May 2018 from 16:00 to 17:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Inaugural Lecture: Time flies: two decades of dissecting the aetiology of common complex traits

Professor Cecilia Lindgren

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 22 May 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Charting the cellular and molecular journey of single stem cells in ageing and cancer

Dr David Kent

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 22 May 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - Tobacco industry distortion of science: Some lessons learned

Professor Mark Petticrew

Mark Petticrew is Professor of Public Health Evaluation in the Faculty of Public Health and Policy at London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. He is Director of the Public Health Research Consortium (PHRC), and is also a member of the Policy Innovation Research Unit (PIRU), both of which are... Read more

Mark Petticrew is Professor of Public Health Evaluation in the Faculty of Public Health and Policy at London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. He is Director of the Public Health Research Consortium (PHRC), and is also a member of the Policy Innovation Research Unit (PIRU), both of which are funded by the Department of Health Policy Research Programme. His recent research includes the evaluation of the Public Health Responsibility Deal. This policy, launched in 2012, involved voluntary agreements between government and the alcohol and food industries, among others. His main research interests are in evidence-based policymaking, and the evaluation of the health effects of social and other policies, as well as having a focus on the commercial determinants of health.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 23 May 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Impact Case Studies for the REF

Professor Trish Greenhalgh

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 24 May 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Health Economics Seminars

Richard Doll Building, 1st Floor Main Meeting Room , Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Sensitivity analysis for not-at-random missing data in trial-based cost-effectiveness analysis

Baptiste Leurent, Assistant Professor

Abstract: Missing data is a common issue in cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) of randomised trials. Methods such as multiple imputation are now commonly used to account for the missing values, assuming the data to be ‘missing at random’ (MAR). In many settings, it seems however plausible that... Read more

Abstract: Missing data is a common issue in cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) of randomised trials. Methods such as multiple imputation are now commonly used to account for the missing values, assuming the data to be ‘missing at random’ (MAR). In many settings, it seems however plausible that the data may be ‘missing not at random’ (MNAR, or ‘informative’). For example, patients whose health status is relatively poor may be less likely to return quality-of-life questionnaires. In these circumstances, guidelines recommend assessing whether conclusions are robust to different missing data assumptions. But this is rarely done in practice, perhaps due to a lack of clear guidance on how to conduct such sensitivity analysis. In this presentation, I will start by a review of the current practice for addressing missing data in trial-based CEA. I will then outline several possible approaches for conducting sensitivity analysis, and focus on one particularly accessible approach based on multiple imputation. Its’ implementation will be illustrated with a trial of a brief intervention for weight loss in primary care. I will finish by discussing an alternative method for longitudinal data, where the missing data are imputed assuming a distribution borrowed from a reference group. Biography: Baptiste Leurent is an assistant professor in medical statistics and epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM). He is currently conducting a NIHR-funded PhD on missing data in cost-effectiveness analysis, in the Medical Statistics Department. Previously he worked as a statistician in different research institutions in the UK and Thailand (PHPT, UCL, MRC), on clinical trials and epidemiological studies in HIV, mental health and primary care. Before starting his PhD, he worked at LSHTM with the ACT Consortium, looking at improving the use of artemisinin-based combination therapy for malaria. He is particularly interested in applied methods to improve the design and analysis of randomised trials.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: HERC

https://www.herc.ox.ac.uk/upcoming-events

Thu 24 May 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Haematology / Psychological Medicine

Dr Noémi Roy, Mrs Sandy Hayes, Prof Michael Sharpe

Haematology: "World Sickle Day- nothing 'benign' about sickle cell disease", Dr Noémi Roy and Mrs Sandy Hayes -- Psychological Medicine: "Medicine and 'Mental Health'", Prof Michael Sharpe -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Haematology: "World Sickle Day- nothing 'benign' about sickle cell disease", Dr Noémi Roy and Mrs Sandy Hayes -- Psychological Medicine: "Medicine and 'Mental Health'", Prof Michael Sharpe -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 24 May 2018 from 14:00 to 15:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Clinically-relevant cell cross-talk networks in the lung tumor microenvironment interactome

Andrew Gentles

Tumors comprise a complex microenvironment of interacting malignant and stromal cell types. Much of our understanding of the tumor microenvironment comes from in vitro studies isolating the interactions between malignant cells and a single stromal cell type, often along a single pathway. To develop... Read more

Tumors comprise a complex microenvironment of interacting malignant and stromal cell types. Much of our understanding of the tumor microenvironment comes from in vitro studies isolating the interactions between malignant cells and a single stromal cell type, often along a single pathway. To develop a deeper understanding of the interactions between cells within human lung tumors we performed RNA-seq profiling of flow-sorted malignant cells, endothelial cells, immune cells, fibroblasts, and bulk cells from freshly resected human primary non-small-cell lung tumors. We mapped the cell-specific differential expression of prognostically-associated secreted factors and cell surface genes, and computationally reconstructed cross-talk between these cell types to generate a novel resource we call the Lung Tumor Microenvironment Interactome (LTMI). Using this resource, we identified and validated a prognostically unfavourable influences of fibroblasts on proliferation of malignant lung adenocarcinoma cells. We also found a favorable association between infiltration of specific immune cells and less aggressive tumor cell behavior. These results illustrate the utility of the LTMI as a resource for generating hypotheses concerning tumor-microenvironment interactions that may have prognostic and therapeutic relevance.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Fri 25 May 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Preventing recurrence after Crohn’s disease surgery

Mr Bruce George

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 25 May 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Exploring DNA sensing with genome-wide CRISPR screens

Jan Rehwinkel

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 25 May 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

CANCELLED: Translating Immunity: Literally

Professor Jon Yewdell

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 25 May 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Synaptic learning rules in the cortex: From spike timing-dependent to network state-dependent synaptic plasticity

Professor Ole Paulsen

Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) has emerged as a computationally attractive learning rule for cortical circuit refinement during development. In STDP, the order and precise timing of pre- and postsynaptic action potentials determine the polarity of synaptic change: If the presynaptic input... Read more

Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) has emerged as a computationally attractive learning rule for cortical circuit refinement during development. In STDP, the order and precise timing of pre- and postsynaptic action potentials determine the polarity of synaptic change: If the presynaptic input is active before the postsynaptic spike, then long-term potentiation (LTP) occurs, whereas long-term depression (LTD) is induced if this order is reversed. Both LTP and LTD require NMDA receptors, but whereas LTP always requires postsynaptic NMDA receptors, activation of presynaptic NMDA receptors may induce LTD. This raises the possibility that LTD could be induced without involvement of the postsynaptic neuron. Indeed, specific spike patterns in the presynaptic neuron can induce LTD without any requirement of postsynaptic mechanisms. That result calls for investigations into the plasticity rules that operate in vivo. Using whole-cell recordings and optogenetic stimulation of presynaptic input in urethane-anesthetized mice, which exhibit slow-wave-sleep (SWS)-like activity, we show that synaptic plasticity rules are gated by cortical dynamics: Active network states are biased towards synaptic depression, with presynaptic stimulation alone leading to LTD. This latter plasticity rule provides an attractive mechanism for SWS-related synaptic downscaling and circuit refinement. In conclusion, synaptic plasticity rules are diverse and network state-dependent.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sally Collins

Tue 29 May 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Novel metabolic regulators of haematopoietic stem cell biology and leukaemic transformation

Kamil Kranc

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 29 May 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - Diabetes No More! Results from the DiRECT trial

Professor Mike Lean

Professor Mike Lean trained in medicine at Cambridge University and St Barts Hospital, London, before taking up the position of MRC Clinical Scientist in the Cambridge University Dunn Nutrition Unit. In his present position at the University of Glasgow, since 1993, he established the Department of... Read more

Professor Mike Lean trained in medicine at Cambridge University and St Barts Hospital, London, before taking up the position of MRC Clinical Scientist in the Cambridge University Dunn Nutrition Unit. In his present position at the University of Glasgow, since 1993, he established the Department of Human Nutrition. It is based on a ‘broad-focus’ strategy toward translational, integrative, research and teaching, encompassing the full range of scientific disciplines within Human Nutrition: basic sciences, epidemiology, clinical studies and community/population-directed interventions. As well as scientific work, outputs include regular writing for the general public in newspapers and TV for Public Understanding of Science. In this seminar he will discuss the rationale for, and results of, the DiRECT trial which was supported by the biggest research grant ever awarded by Diabetes UK. DiRECT was conducted in primary care and compared an intensive weight loss programme to best-practice care in patients with type 2 diabetes. Remission of diabetes occurred in nearly half the patients allocated to the weight loss programme.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 30 May 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

NIHR CLAHRC OXford

Gavin Hubbard, Dr Esther Williamson

Find out more about what the NIHR CLAHRC Oxford is and what it does, with a special emphasis on how we're working to implement interventions proven in clinical trials in the real-world NHS. Dr Esther Williamson of the 'Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences'... Read more

Find out more about what the NIHR CLAHRC Oxford is and what it does, with a special emphasis on how we're working to implement interventions proven in clinical trials in the real-world NHS. Dr Esther Williamson of the 'Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences' will talk about her findings and work developing online tools for training patients and therapists in two clinically proven and NICE recommended interventions: 1) iBeST a group-based cognitive behavioural intervention for low back pain, the leading cause of disability worldwide, that has been shown to significantly reduce disability and pain compared to conventional treatments, and for longer; and 2) the SARAH programme, a proven and effective exercise-based therapy used alongside drugs to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA) of the hand.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Wed 30 May 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

"Structure and assembly in the order Picornavirales"

Dr Shabih Shakeel

The order Picornavirales comprises of several virus families which infect humans, animals and insects. Even though all viruses in this order are icosahedrally-symmetric and are made of three capsid proteins, there are several distinct features found in their capsids. Additionally, the capsid... Read more

The order Picornavirales comprises of several virus families which infect humans, animals and insects. Even though all viruses in this order are icosahedrally-symmetric and are made of three capsid proteins, there are several distinct features found in their capsids. Additionally, the capsid assembly was thought to be conserved across virus families. However, our recent work suggests otherwise. I will discuss two examples, human parechovirus (family: Picornaviridae) and norovirus (family: Dicistoviridae) from the order Picornavirales whose structures and assemblies do not follow not so common path.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Thu 31 May 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Modern Pathology Platforms to Support Basic and Translational Research

Professor Manuel Salto-Tellez

Molecular Pathology is the interrogation of clinical samples to a) understand better the nature of diseases; or b) to diagnose, prognosticate or decide on therapeutic intervention of diseases. As such, it is a relevant component of basic and translational research operations. This lecture will... Read more

Molecular Pathology is the interrogation of clinical samples to a) understand better the nature of diseases; or b) to diagnose, prognosticate or decide on therapeutic intervention of diseases. As such, it is a relevant component of basic and translational research operations. This lecture will provide examples on how Molecular Pathology has helped in the generation of laboratory information to support hypothesis on molecular mechanisms of disease, or to understand the clinical relevance of basic science discoveries. In the process, we will discuss the technical approaches to these applications and how molecular pathology can be integrated in research institutes to facilitate discovery and translation.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 31 May 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Radiology / Neurology

Prof Fergus Gleeson, Dr Chrystalina Antoniades

Radiology: "Earlier or early diagnosis; an important or a semantic distinction?", Prof Fergus Gleeson -- Neurology: "The OxQUIP study", Dr Chrystalina Antoniades -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Radiology: "Earlier or early diagnosis; an important or a semantic distinction?", Prof Fergus Gleeson -- Neurology: "The OxQUIP study", Dr Chrystalina Antoniades -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.