Other Seminars

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Thu 1 Mar 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Radcliffe Primary Care, Atrium, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Why every healthcare consultation needs a dose of empathy

Dr Jeremy Howick

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Thu 1 Mar 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

THE PIDDOSOME IN PLOIDY CONTROL AND TISSUE REGENERATION

Dr Andreas Villunger

The PIDDosome is often used as the alias for a multi-protein complex that includes the p53-induced death domain protein 1 (PIDD1), the bipartite linker protein CRADD (also known as RAIDD) and the pro-form of an endopeptidase belonging to the caspase family, i.e. caspase-2. Yet, PIDD1 variants can... Read more

The PIDDosome is often used as the alias for a multi-protein complex that includes the p53-induced death domain protein 1 (PIDD1), the bipartite linker protein CRADD (also known as RAIDD) and the pro-form of an endopeptidase belonging to the caspase family, i.e. caspase-2. Yet, PIDD1 variants can also interact with a number of other proteins that include RIPK1 (also known as RIP1) and IKBKG (also known as NEMO), PCNA and RFC5, as well as nucleolar components such as NPM1 or NCL. This promiscuity in protein binding is facilitated mainly by autoprocessing of the full-length protein into various fragments that contain different structural domains. As a result, multiple responses can be mediated by protein complexes that contain a PIDD1 domain. This suggests that PIDD1 acts as an integrator for multiple types of stress that need instant attention. Examples are various types of DNA lesion but also the presence of extra centrosomes that can foster aneuploidy and, ultimately, promote DNA damage. I will discuss the role of PIDD1 in response to DNA damage and highlight novel functions in centrosome surveillance and scheduled polyploidisation during organogenesis.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 1 Mar 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

WIMM / Cardiology

Dr Mohsin Badat, Professor Charalambos Antoniades

WIMM: "CRISPR/CAS9 Editing of the Major Alpha-Globin Regulatory Element as a Curative Strategy for Beta-Thalassaemia", Dr Mohsin Badat -- Cardiology: "Cardiovascular CT in modern diagnostics: New developments", Professor Charalambos Antoniades -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

WIMM: "CRISPR/CAS9 Editing of the Major Alpha-Globin Regulatory Element as a Curative Strategy for Beta-Thalassaemia", Dr Mohsin Badat -- Cardiology: "Cardiovascular CT in modern diagnostics: New developments", Professor Charalambos Antoniades -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 2 Mar 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Treating a patient with multiple cancers - the endocrine surgeon's perspective

Dr Andreas Selberherr

Andreas Selberherr is a Consultant Endocrine Surgeon at the General Hospital of the Medical University of Vienna and he is currently working with Professor Rajesh Thakker at the University of Oxford on epigenetic modifiers as therapeutic agents for neuroendocrine tumours. He completed his specialty... Read more

Andreas Selberherr is a Consultant Endocrine Surgeon at the General Hospital of the Medical University of Vienna and he is currently working with Professor Rajesh Thakker at the University of Oxford on epigenetic modifiers as therapeutic agents for neuroendocrine tumours. He completed his specialty training in general and visceral surgery in 2016 and became a Fellow of the European Board of Surgery in the field of Endocrine Surgery in 2017.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 2 Mar 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Defining the involvement of monocytes in lung fibrosis

Prof Ling-Pei Ho

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 2 Mar 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

* CANCELLED * Mechanisms of plasticity in mouse visual cortex

Professor Frank Sengpiel

Research in my lab focuses on experience dependent plasticity of binocular integration in the primary visual cortex (V1). My talk will cover • Cellular mechanisms of visual cortex plasticity • Effects of dark exposure on ocular dominance plasticity • Relevance of plasticity in V1 for behavioural performance

Research in my lab focuses on experience dependent plasticity of binocular integration in the primary visual cortex (V1). My talk will cover • Cellular mechanisms of visual cortex plasticity • Effects of dark exposure on ocular dominance plasticity • Relevance of plasticity in V1 for behavioural performance

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sally Collins

Cancelled due to weather and transport issues

Fri 2 Mar 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

* CANCELLED * Bringing a structural perspective to antimicrobial resistance; can we predict whether individual mutations confer resistance or not?

Dr Philip Fowler

Clinical microbiology is steadily undergoing a genetic revolution; instead of being cultured, clinical samples will instead be sequenced using whole-genome sequencing (WGS) technologies and the effectiveness of a panel of antibiotics inferred from the presence or absence of mutations in a set of... Read more

Clinical microbiology is steadily undergoing a genetic revolution; instead of being cultured, clinical samples will instead be sequenced using whole-genome sequencing (WGS) technologies and the effectiveness of a panel of antibiotics inferred from the presence or absence of mutations in a set of known resistance genes. This has already happened in the UK; last March Public Health England switched to using WGS for routine diagnosis of tuberculosis. A major problem is that this approach cannot make a prediction if it encounters novel or rare mutations in the set of resistance genes. We will show how structural biology, combined with molecular simulation, is able to predict whether mutations confer resistance (or not) to (a) trimethoprim in S. aureus [1] and (b) rifampicin in M. tuberculosis (unpublished). Looking forward, this approach, or ones like it, could be extended to minimise the number of “escape routes” a protein has to abrogate the action of a novel antibiotic, which would help de-risk antibiotic drug development.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

CANCELLED DUE TO WEATHER CONDITIONS.

Fri 2 Mar 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Career seminar: "Life beyond academia: the charity sector, funding bodies, clinical trials and beyond...”

Dr Sumithra Subramaniam

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Rachel Rigby

Fri 2 Mar 2018 from 17:00 to 18:30

AfOx insaka - a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research

St Cross College, Lecture Theatre, West Wing, St Giles OX1 3LZ

AfOx insaka - a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research

Amma Panin, Prof Garret Cotter

The AfOx insaka is a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research with speakers from diverse and varied academic disciplines Register: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/afox-insaka-tickets-42120366149

The AfOx insaka is a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research with speakers from diverse and varied academic disciplines Register: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/afox-insaka-tickets-42120366149

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Africa Oxford Initiative

Mon 5 Mar 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting Rooms 71a, b and c, Headington OX3 7DQ

The interplay between nuclear, mitochondrial DNA repair and autophagy

Professor Sherif El-Khamisy, Professor of Molecular Medicine

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 5 Mar 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

* CANCELLED * Temporally regulated amino acid uptake through SLC7A5 is required for CD4+ effector T cell differentiation

Dr Linda Sinclair

T follicular helper cells (TFH) are critical cells for germinal center (GC) formation and for the production of high affinity, isotype-switched antibody responses. Using a novel single cell assay for System L amino acid transport, we show that the in vivo differentiation of TFH is accompanied by... Read more

T follicular helper cells (TFH) are critical cells for germinal center (GC) formation and for the production of high affinity, isotype-switched antibody responses. Using a novel single cell assay for System L amino acid transport, we show that the in vivo differentiation of TFH is accompanied by sustained regulation of System L amino acid transport capacity. The System L transporter, SLC7A5, has a key role in activated T cells to transport the essential amino acid methionine. Methionine is required for de novo protein synthesis and is also the biosynthetic precursor for S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), the main methyl donor used in the DNA, RNA and histone modifications that regulate cellular transcriptional programs. In particular, regulated methionine delivery to the cell interior is rate limiting for RNA methylation and for coordinating epigenetic histone modifications in immune activated T cells. SLC7A5 expression is thus a critical metabolic checkpoint linking nutrient supply to key processes required for effector T cell differentiation. ---- Linda was born in Lund, Sweden and had a varied international primary and secondary schooling, finally coming to rest in Scotland; she received her undergraduate degree in Immunology from Edinburgh, followed by her PhD from Dundee. Since then she has continued working with Doreen Cantrell to advance understanding on how nutrient availability impacts upon the immune system, specifically on the activation, differentiation and function of T lymphocytes. – demonstrating a novel role for the metabolic sensor mTOR in regulating lymphocyte homing (Nat Imm 2008) – demonstrating that regulated expression of SLC7A5 (an amino acid transporter) is required to co-ordinate the metabolic reprogramming of cytotoxic T cells upon antigen stimulation, both to sustain mTOR signalling and c-MYC expression (Nat Imm 2013, EMBO 2015)

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 5 Mar 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

KEAP1-NRF2 Antioxidant Response System and Sickle Cell Anemia

Professor Masayuki Yamamoto

Audience: Public

Organisers: Kevin Clark

Mon 5 Mar 2018 from 15:30 to 16:30

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Big Data Institute, Oxford, OX3 7LF, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar: Lessons learned from moving the Broad Institute's computing into the 21st century

Dr Eric Banks

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Tue 6 Mar 2018 from 10:00 to 14:00

BDI seminars

BDI Seminar and Workshop: Hail: Scalable genomic association analysis

Dr Cotton Seed

Cotton is one of the key architects behind Hail, an open-source, scalable framework for exploring and analyzing genomic data. Hail was invented to empower the worldwide genetics community to harness the flood of genomes to discover the biology of human disease. Hail has been used for dozens of... Read more

Cotton is one of the key architects behind Hail, an open-source, scalable framework for exploring and analyzing genomic data. Hail was invented to empower the worldwide genetics community to harness the flood of genomes to discover the biology of human disease. Hail has been used for dozens of major studies and is the core analysis platform of large-scale genomics efforts. The functionalities in Hail are exposed through Python and backed by distributed algorithms built on top of Apache Spark to efficiently analyze gigabyte-scale data on a laptop or terabyte-scale data on a cluster, without the need to manually chop up data or manage job failures. Users can script pipelines or explore data interactively through Jupyter notebooks that flow between Hail with methods for genomics, PySpark with scalable SQL and machine learning algorithms, and pandas with scikit-learn and Matplotlib for results that fit on one machine. Hail also provides a flexible domain language to express complex quality control and analysis pipelines with concise, readable code. WORKSHOP SCHEDULE: 10:00-11:00 Talk Dr. Cotton Seed: “Hail: Scalable Genomic Association Analysis”. Room: BDI Seminar room 1. 11:00-12:00 Hands-on tutorial, showing potential users what you can do in Hail to get users excited. Room: BDI Seminar room 0. 12:00-13:00 Lunch break 13:00-14:00 Hands-on tutorial, focussing on high-level, operational and strategic questions involved in implementing Hail. Room: BDI Seminar room 0.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Tue 6 Mar 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Bacterial interactions with long-lived gastrointestinal stem cells and their niches - recipe for disaster?

Michael Sigal

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Tue 6 Mar 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Gene therapy for hemoglobinopathies: where we are and future perspectives

Professor Giuliana Ferrari

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 6 Mar 2018 from 13:00 to 15:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - The future of population health research: A ‘new public health’?

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 7 Mar 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Malaria drug resistance and vector transmission

Ana Rivero

The fate of drug resistant mutations depends on factors, which we may be able to control, such as the rate and pattern of drug use. However, it also depends on factors over which we have no control, the most important of which is the biological cost that resistance imposes on the fitness of... Read more

The fate of drug resistant mutations depends on factors, which we may be able to control, such as the rate and pattern of drug use. However, it also depends on factors over which we have no control, the most important of which is the biological cost that resistance imposes on the fitness of parasites. Drug resistance mutations are known to disrupt the parasite's metabolism, generating fitness costs. In drug-treated hosts, these costs are largely compensated by the benefits conferred by the resistance. In untreated hosts, however, the magnitude of these costs will determine whether these mutations will persist and spread in the population. Current views about the costs of drug resistance in malaria parasites are almost entirely based on data regarding parasitic infections in the vertebrate host. The costs of resistance in the mosquito vector have either been ignored entirely or been given only cursory attention. I will present data and ideas arising from a new project that aims to investigate the costs of drug resistance over the whole life cycle of Plasmodium.

Audience: UK Science Community

Organisers: Ramona Kantschuster

Please arrive 5 minutes before the Seminar begins to gain building access

Wed 7 Mar 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Oxford Martin School, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Time Units for Learning and their Implementation Through Neuronal Assemblies

Pico Caroni

In learning, repeated experiences might be integrated individually as they occur, or they might be combined within dedicated time windows, possibly promoting quality control. I will discuss recent findings from our laboratory providing evidence that in Pavlovian, incremental, and incidental... Read more

In learning, repeated experiences might be integrated individually as they occur, or they might be combined within dedicated time windows, possibly promoting quality control. I will discuss recent findings from our laboratory providing evidence that in Pavlovian, incremental, and incidental learning, related information acquired within time windows of 5 hours (time units for learning) is combined to determine whether and what mice learn. Trials required for learning have to occur within 5 hours, when learning-related shared partial cues can produce association and interference with learning. Upon acquisition, cFos expression is elevated during 5 hours throughout specific system-wide neuronal assemblies. Time unit function depends on network activity and local cFos activity, which is required for distant assembly recruitment through network activity and distant BDNF. Activation of learning-related cFos assemblies is sufficient and necessary for time unit function. Therefore, learning processes consist of dedicated 5-hour time units, involving maintenance of specific system-wide neuronal assemblies through network activity and cFos expression.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Wed 7 Mar 2018 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Metabolic adaptation as a protective strategy against infectious diseases

Dr Miguel Soares

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 8 Mar 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

* CANCELLED * CANCELLED - OpenPrescribing.net

Dr Helen Curtis, Dr Alex Walker

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Thu 8 Mar 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

“Regulating Pol II transcription for genome stability”

Dr Taka Nojima

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Thu 8 Mar 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Clinical Biochemistry / Emergency Medicine

Dr Nishan Guha, Dr Moya Dawson, Dr Jo Poulton, Dr David Lewis

Clinical Biochemistry: "Unexplained Metabolic Acidosis", Dr Nishan Guha, Dr Jo Poulton and Dr David Lewis -- Emergency Medicine: "Saved by the bell – when your stars align and when they don’t", Dr Moya Dawson -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Clinical Biochemistry: "Unexplained Metabolic Acidosis", Dr Nishan Guha, Dr Jo Poulton and Dr David Lewis -- Emergency Medicine: "Saved by the bell – when your stars align and when they don’t", Dr Moya Dawson -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 9 Mar 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Oesophageal cancer: past, present and the future

Professor Tim Underwood

Tim Underwood is Professor of Gastrointestinal Surgery at the University of Southampton. Following a Medical Research Council (MRC) Clinician Scientist Fellowship, he became a Cancer Research UK & Royal College of Surgeons of England Advanced Clinician Scientist Fellow in April 2017. Professor... Read more

Tim Underwood is Professor of Gastrointestinal Surgery at the University of Southampton. Following a Medical Research Council (MRC) Clinician Scientist Fellowship, he became a Cancer Research UK & Royal College of Surgeons of England Advanced Clinician Scientist Fellow in April 2017. Professor Underwood leads a programme of research studying the role of the tumour microenvironment in cancer development and progression. His team develop and apply advanced technologies to understand tumour complexity in oesophageal cancer including highly parallel genome-wide expression profiling of single cells using nanoliter droplets (DropSeq) and the generation of multicellular organoid models. Professor Underwood is a member of the National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Upper GI Clinical Studies Group and he is a member of the Steering Committee of the Oesophageal Cancer Clinical and Molecular Stratification (OCCAMS) consortium. He is a past Chairman of the Oesophageal Cancer Westminster Campaign and a trustee of Heartburn Cancer UK.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 9 Mar 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Cytoskeletal control of antigen dependent T-cell activation

Dr Huw Colin-York

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 9 Mar 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Oesophageal Cancer; past, present and the future

Professor Tim Underwood

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Fri 9 Mar 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A& B, Headington OX3 7BN

Finding new effectors of the bacterial cell cycle by X-ray crystallography

Prof Rick Lewis

Bacterial cell division requires precise spatiotemporal regulation of the synthesis and remodelling of the peptidoglycan layer that surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane. GpsB is a cytosolic protein that affects cell wall synthesis by binding to the cytoplasmic minidomains of peptidoglycan synthases... Read more

Bacterial cell division requires precise spatiotemporal regulation of the synthesis and remodelling of the peptidoglycan layer that surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane. GpsB is a cytosolic protein that affects cell wall synthesis by binding to the cytoplasmic minidomains of peptidoglycan synthases to ensure their correct subcellular localisation. A combination of structural biology, biochemistry and bacterial genetics has revealed features critical for the interaction of GpsB from different bacteria with peptidoglycan synthases. We have used these data to predict and confirm novel partners of GpsB, illuminating the role of this key regulator of peptidoglycan synthesis. Given the importance of GpsB in pathogenic bacteria, this study presents a start point for the design of much needed new antibiotics.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Fri 9 Mar 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Attention dependent coding and information exchange within and between visual cortical areas

Professor Alexander Thiele

Attention is critical to high level cognition and it improves perceptual abilities. Many studies have delineated how attention affects neuronal firing rates, rate variability, and neuronal correlations, but a detailed understanding how this differs between cortical areas, layers and different cell... Read more

Attention is critical to high level cognition and it improves perceptual abilities. Many studies have delineated how attention affects neuronal firing rates, rate variability, and neuronal correlations, but a detailed understanding how this differs between cortical areas, layers and different cell types is only just emerging. To address these questions, we recorded simultaneously from multiple layers in areas V1 and V4, while monkeys performed a covert feature based spatial attention task. The presentation will delineate how attention affects different cell types in different layers of area V1 and V4, how attention affects oscillatory activity in these areas, and how it affects the information transfer between layers within an area and between areas.

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 9 Mar 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Ludwig Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7DQ

Mechanisms of oncogene-induced DNA replication stress

Professor Thanos Halazonetis

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 12 Mar 2018 from 09:00 to 10:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

Understanding cancer using integrative network models

Marieke Kuijjer

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Mon 12 Mar 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting rooms 71a, b and c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Advancing Precision Oncology by Computational Modelling

Professor Walter Kolch

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 12 Mar 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

What do glucocorticoids really do to macrophages, and how?

Prof Andy Clark

I will describe the regulation of inflammatory gene expression via the phosphorylation of the RNA-binding protein tristetraprolin (TTP), and discuss evidence that this process is modulated by glucocorticoids as an anti-inflammatory mechanism. In the second half of the seminar I will discuss... Read more

I will describe the regulation of inflammatory gene expression via the phosphorylation of the RNA-binding protein tristetraprolin (TTP), and discuss evidence that this process is modulated by glucocorticoids as an anti-inflammatory mechanism. In the second half of the seminar I will discuss unpublished data concerning two novel anti-inflammatory mechanisms of glucocorticoids. The first of these involves a member of the interferon response factor family of transcription factors; the second involves a microRNA that is believed to regulate mitochondrial function. ---- Andy Clark qualified from the University of Cambridge with a Masters degree in Natural Sciences in 1987, then did a PhD on the transcription of insulin genes at the University of Birmingham. After postdoctoral positions at the University of Birmingham and ICRF (now known as Cancer Research UK) he was recruited as a lecturer at the Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, London. He worked there with Jerry Saklatvala and Jon Dean between 1996 and 2012, defining a mechanism for the control of inflammatory gene expression by the MAPK p38 pathway in macrophages. He also became interested in how glucocorticoids inhibit inflammatory responses of macrophages, and published several seminal papers on this question. In 2012 Andy was appointed Professor of Inflammation Biology at the University of Birmingham. His research interests continue to centre on mechanisms that constrain the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators by macrophages.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 12 Mar 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Airway epithelia under attack: influenza, interferons and pollutants

Andreas Wack

Audience: Public

Organisers: Kevin Clark

Tue 13 Mar 2018 from 09:15 to 10:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Analysis of a gain-of-function mutation that produces a new transcriptional unit in the α-globin locus

Yavor Bozhilov

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Viva Seminar

Tue 13 Mar 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Lymphocyte cytotoxicity in health and disease

Yenan Bryceson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Tue 13 Mar 2018 from 13:00 to 13:40

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Student presentations

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 13 Mar 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Dr P McPherson "Intracellular membrane trafficking in neurological disease", & Dr T Durcan "Open science meets Stem cells: A new approach for developing therapies against disorders of the brain"

Dr Peter McPherson, Dr Thomas Durcan

Bio: Dr. Peter S. McPherson, Ph.D., FRSC, is a James McGill Professor of Neurology and Neurosurgery and Anatomy and Cell Biology at the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) of McGill University where he is the Director of the Neurodegenerative Disease Research Group. He is also a Fellow of the... Read more

Bio: Dr. Peter S. McPherson, Ph.D., FRSC, is a James McGill Professor of Neurology and Neurosurgery and Anatomy and Cell Biology at the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) of McGill University where he is the Director of the Neurodegenerative Disease Research Group. He is also a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and recently was appointed director of the Proteomics platform at the RI MUHC. Bio: Dr Thomas M. Durcan is an assistant professor in the department of Neurology and Neurosurgery at McGill University and is a member of the Centre for Neurodegenerative disease group at the MNI. From Dublin, Ireland, Dr Durcan received his Bachelor of Science from University College Dublin before moving to the USA where he obtained his PhD in Cell and Molecular Biology from the University of Notre Dame in 2007. For his postdoctoral research, Dr Durcan joined the Parkinson’s research group of Dr Edward Fon, were he focused on the function of deubiquitinating enzymes in Parkinson’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Tue 13 Mar 2018 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Gene therapies for Parkinson's disease

Stephane Palfi

Stephane's team works on translational medicine projects, concerning neurodegenerative diseases, essentially Parkinson disease, Huntington disease, and Psychiatric disorders Their major research programs relevant for Parkinson’s disease and related disorders as well as Psychiatric disorders are... Read more

Stephane's team works on translational medicine projects, concerning neurodegenerative diseases, essentially Parkinson disease, Huntington disease, and Psychiatric disorders Their major research programs relevant for Parkinson’s disease and related disorders as well as Psychiatric disorders are funded by national and/or European institutions as well as by private partnerships. The aim of those projects are: 1- The neurological and neurosurgical assessment of biotherapies for neurodegenerative diseases at initial phase of clinical development following the demonstration of safety and efficacy in non-clinical experiments. 2- The development of neuromodulation approaches for drug-resistant psychiatric and neurological diseases using optogenetic technology to better understand brain circuitry abnormalities and define new therapeutic targets. 3- The development of new neurosurgical tools and devices to assess or administrate drugs, viral vectors, cells as well as electrical or light sources devices with the help of neuronavigation system and surgical robot.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Thu 15 Mar 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Launch of Inventive Involvement

Lynne Maddocks

Anne-Marie Boylan and Lynne Maddocks will launch the directory of Inventive Involvement - different ways to do PPI and enable you to trial some of the techniques. Ways of doing PPI not in an advisory group, stakeholder group or trial steering committee. Or ways of doing PPI differently in those settings. Suitable for research staff only.

Anne-Marie Boylan and Lynne Maddocks will launch the directory of Inventive Involvement - different ways to do PPI and enable you to trial some of the techniques. Ways of doing PPI not in an advisory group, stakeholder group or trial steering committee. Or ways of doing PPI differently in those settings. Suitable for research staff only.

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 15 Mar 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Jenner Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar Rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

Human nasal mucosal immune responses to grass pollen, rhinovirus and resiquimod

Dr Akhilesh Jha, Dr Ryan Thwaites, Prof Trevor Hansel

Please contact brenda.cooley@ndm.ox.ac.uk if you wish to meet with one of the speakers after the seminar.

Please contact brenda.cooley@ndm.ox.ac.uk if you wish to meet with one of the speakers after the seminar.

Audience: Members of the University only

The seminar will be followed by a buffet lunch.

Thu 15 Mar 2018 from 14:00 to 15:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Cryo-EM structures illuminate binding sites and gating mechanisms in the pancreatic Katp channel.

Gregory Martin

Abstract: The pancreatic ATP-sensitive K+ channel (Katp) is a key regulator of insulin secretion due to its ability to couple the membrane potential to changes in intracellular glucose metabolism and is the receptor for the widely-used anti-diabetic sulfonylurea drugs. Greg, a PhD student with... Read more

Abstract: The pancreatic ATP-sensitive K+ channel (Katp) is a key regulator of insulin secretion due to its ability to couple the membrane potential to changes in intracellular glucose metabolism and is the receptor for the widely-used anti-diabetic sulfonylurea drugs. Greg, a PhD student with Prof. Show-Ling Shyng in Portland Oregon, has been using recent advances in cryo-EM to reveal near-atomic details of channel gating and regulation by sulfonylureas, while also confirming many of the in-depth functional experiments conducted over the last three decades.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Fri 16 Mar 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Combined Medical-Surgical Grand Round

Dr Alex Ramsden, Dr Andrew Brent, Dr Matt Scarborough

Bone Infection Unit: "Why we do what we do in BIU", Dr Alex Ramsden, Dr Andrew Brent and Dr Matt Scarborough -- Chair: Prof Chris O'Callaghan

Bone Infection Unit: "Why we do what we do in BIU", Dr Alex Ramsden, Dr Andrew Brent and Dr Matt Scarborough -- Chair: Prof Chris O'Callaghan

Audience: Public

Mon 19 Mar 2018 from 10:00 to 11:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Macrophage heterogeneity in cancer metastasis and therapy resistance

Dr Bin-Zhi Qian

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Mon 19 Mar 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting Rooms 71a, b and c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Functional DNA repair testing for cancer risk assessment, prevention and early detection: Lung Cancer and more

Professor Zvi Livneh

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Grigory Dianov

Mon 19 Mar 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Regenerative Medicine: From Stem Cell Biology to Therapeutics

Prof Thomas Rando

Thomas A. Rando, MD, PhD is Professor of Neurology and Neurological Sciences and Director of the Glenn Laboratories for the Biology of Aging at Stanford University School of Medicine. Research in the Rando laboratory concerns the basic biology of stem cells, how stem cells function in adult tissue... Read more

Thomas A. Rando, MD, PhD is Professor of Neurology and Neurological Sciences and Director of the Glenn Laboratories for the Biology of Aging at Stanford University School of Medicine. Research in the Rando laboratory concerns the basic biology of stem cells, how stem cells function in adult tissue homeostasis, and how their function is altered in degenerative diseases and during aging. Groundbreaking work from his laboratory, using heterochronic parabiosis, showed that the age-related decline in stem cell function is due to influences of the aged environmental. Dr. Rando has received numerous awards, including a Paul Beeson Physician Faculty Scholar in Aging, a Senior Scholar Award from the Ellison Medical Foundation, and a “Breakthroughs in Gerontology” Award from the American Federation for Aging Research. He is a recipient of the received the prestigious NIH Director’s Pioneer Award for his work at the interface between stem cell biology and the biology of aging, and he received a Transformative Research Award from the NIH for studies of the mechanisms of the enhancement of cognitive function by physical activity and changes that occur in this “muscle-brain axis” that occur during aging. Dr. Rando is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 19 Mar 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Infections@BDI Seminar: New Horizons for Vaccines

Prof Adrian Hill

Vaccine research and development activities at Oxford have expanded considerably in recent years to form one of the largest university-based translational research programmes anywhere. This encompasses a large set of multi-disciplinary activities centred on the Jenner Institute. Several key vaccine... Read more

Vaccine research and development activities at Oxford have expanded considerably in recent years to form one of the largest university-based translational research programmes anywhere. This encompasses a large set of multi-disciplinary activities centred on the Jenner Institute. Several key vaccine technologies have been identified and championed by Oxford researchers leading to the clinical development of leading vaccine candidates against malaria, HIV, tuberculosis, pandemic influenza and other globally significant diseases. Development of new T cell inducing vaccines has recently been extended to exploring therapeutic efficacy in several areas. Another new frontier is the development of candidate vaccines against chronic inflammatory diseases. Building on Oxford’s rapid response to the Ebola outbreak in 2014, a range of new non-commercial vaccines against outbreak pathogens are being developed. In parallel, new human genetic analyses are yielding insights into the causes of inter-individual variability in vaccine responses. I will overview some of these activities in the Institute and select examples, including malaria and cancer vaccines, to illustrate recent progress.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Tue 20 Mar 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

How do gene families evolve?

Ed Tunnacliffe

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 21 Mar 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox Seminar: Public Health Policy and the Ethics of the Long Game

ABSTRACT The Chief Medical Officer for England, Professor Sally Davies, and colleagues argue that it is time for a ‘fifth wave’ of public health, and influential organisations are seeking to advance this agenda. The fifth wave would progress from earlier shifts in public health, through... Read more

ABSTRACT The Chief Medical Officer for England, Professor Sally Davies, and colleagues argue that it is time for a ‘fifth wave’ of public health, and influential organisations are seeking to advance this agenda. The fifth wave would progress from earlier shifts in public health, through structural, biomedical, clinical, and, most recently, social waves, towards a wave wherein the public’s health is recognised as a common good to be actively promoted through participation of the public as a whole. Davies and colleagues categorise this fifth wave as cultural, emphasising the cultivation through institutional, social, and physical environments of shared beliefs, values, and behaviours in which pro-health attitudes—individually and at a societal level—are normalised. They advocate for their agenda within a political context that has undermined the highest attainable standards of health through an individualism that defies what is shown by epidemiological studies on the social determinants of health. Focusing on the practical case study of the ‘tobacco endgame’, my paper examines the fifth wave agenda through a public health ethics and law perspective. It critically explores the viability of political justifications for a public health policy strategy that works through a long-game, cross-sector approach of progressive achievement of change. This requires a study both of the justification of the goal that is aimed at and, crucially, the means of achieving it. Given the dominant political context, it is unsurprising that efforts are made to find ‘neutral’ normative framings, such as those promoted by reference to ‘libertarian paternalism’. It is argued, however, that these are inherently deficient as coherent sources of legitimacy: there may be strategic or ‘real politics’ reasons to frame justifications in this way, but the philosophical foundations of efforts to promote the public’s health require a greater—and more contestable—critical depth. BIOGRAPHY John Coggon is Professor of Law, and Co-Director of the Centre for Health, Law, and Society, at the University of Bristol School of Law. He has published widely on questions concerning the roles of law and governance, and the place of ethics, in public health. This includes his books What Makes Health Public? (Cambridge University Press, 2012) and, with Keith Syrett and A.M. Viens, Public Health Law: Ethics, Governance, and Regulation (Routledge, 2017). Professor Coggon is editor of the journal Health Care Analysis, and is on the editorial board of Public Health Ethics. As well as researching in public health ethics and law, he has pioneered education in the field, leading the development of University teaching on the subject, and developing and delivering training in ethics and law for the public health workforce. He also co-authored, with A.M. Viens, Public Health Ethics in Practice: An overview of public health ethics for the UK Public Health Skills and Knowledge Framework (Public Health England, 2017). In 2016, Professor Coggon was made an Honorary Member of the UK Faculty of Public Health, and is a member of the Faculty’s ethics committee. If you would like to attend, please e-mail Jane Beinart at jane.beinart@ethox.ox.ac.uk.

Booking Recommended

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 21 Mar 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Freeing Virus-Specific T Cells from their Antigen Burden: Full Recovery or Long-term Disability?

Georg M Lauer

T cell exhaustion is a central mechanism of immune evasion for viruses and malignancies. Despite recent scientific and medical breakthroughs demonstrating that T cell exhaustion can be overcome, important questions remain regarding the specific cellular programs governing T cell exhaustion. It is... Read more

T cell exhaustion is a central mechanism of immune evasion for viruses and malignancies. Despite recent scientific and medical breakthroughs demonstrating that T cell exhaustion can be overcome, important questions remain regarding the specific cellular programs governing T cell exhaustion. It is also unclear to what degree removal of persistent antigen, as the original cause for T cell exhaustion, can lead to recovery of T cell functions and memory formation. Here we utilized the unique new hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapies with direct acting antivirals (DAA) as a highly specific perturbation in a persistent viral infection in humans, as these therapies control and terminate viral replication within days of initiation of therapy. We designed a trial around DAA therapy with sampling of leukapheresis products and liver fine needle aspirates before and after treatment, enabling us to perform comprehensive immune analysis in both the blood and the liver as the site of infection. Our key findings are that virus specific CD8 T cells recover in phenotype, but little in antiviral functions post HCV cure. With regards to HCV-specific CD4 T cells, we find no significant improvement of the response in patients with treatment of chronic infection, but a rescue of these responses if treatment is initiated early after exposure. Overall our results indicate that antigen-specific T cell responses undergo partial recovery after termination of viremia, unlikely to mediate protection from re-infection. The cells might, however, be amenable to additional immunomodulatory interventions targeting remaining molecular road blocks to full functional recovery. Finally, recovery of the CD4 T cell response might be only possible during a much shorter window of opportunity after establishment of persistent viremia.

Audience: UK Scientific Community

Organisers: Thomas Johnson

Thu 22 Mar 2018 from 10:00 to 11:00

ARUK Oxford Drug Discovery Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

AMPK - a drug target in diabetes, cancer, and even neurodegenerative diseases – too good to be true?

Professor Grahame Hardie

Professor D. Grahame Hardie graduated in Biochemistry from Cambridge University in 1971, and became Professor of Cellular Signalling at the University of Dundee in 1994. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society, the Royal Society of Edinburgh, and the UK Academy of Medical Sciences. He was awarded the... Read more

Professor D. Grahame Hardie graduated in Biochemistry from Cambridge University in 1971, and became Professor of Cellular Signalling at the University of Dundee in 1994. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society, the Royal Society of Edinburgh, and the UK Academy of Medical Sciences. He was awarded the Rolf Luft prize for Endocrinology and Metabolism in 2008 and the Novartis Medal of the UK Biochemical Society in 2010. He has published over 350 scientific papers and given over 200 invited lectures. His major research achievement was to define the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) stem, showing it to be a key player in obesity and Type 2 diabetes that is a target for the anti-diabetic drug metformin and the anti-inflammatory drug aspirin. He also discovered that the tumour suppressor LKB1 acted upstream of AMPK, which led to the current worldwide interest in the role of AMPK in cancer and cancer treatment.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Dr John Davis

Fri 23 Mar 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

SGC Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room, Basement floor, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

From mucolipidosis type IV to Ebola: insights into function and pharmacology of endolysosomal cation channels

Dr Christian Grimm

My group is interested in the analysis of cation channels of the TRP (transient receptor potential) superfamily within the trafficking network of the endolysosomal system. Lysosomal dysfunction can result in endolysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) such as mucolipidoses or mucopolysaccharidoses but... Read more

My group is interested in the analysis of cation channels of the TRP (transient receptor potential) superfamily within the trafficking network of the endolysosomal system. Lysosomal dysfunction can result in endolysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) such as mucolipidoses or mucopolysaccharidoses but is also implicated in metabolic diseases, the development of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, retinal diseases and pigmentation disorders, trace metal deficiencies, infectious diseases and cancer. Highly critical for the proper function of lysosomes, endosomes, and lysosome-related organelles (LROs) is the tight regulation of various fusion and fission processes, the regulation of proton and other cation concentrations within the endolysosomal system (ES), the regulation of autophagy processes as well as endolysosomal phago- and exocytosis processes. TRPML cation channels (TRPML1, 2 and 3) and Two-pore channels (TPCs) have recently emerged as important regulators of such processes within the ES and appear to be essential for a proper communication between the various endolysosomal vesicles. We use endolysosomal patch-clamp techniques, molecular and cellular biology techniques, pharmacological approaches as well as genetic mouse models to study the physiological roles and activation mechanisms of these ion channels in-depth.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Fri 23 Mar 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Fri 23 Mar 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

NDM Seminar Series

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar Rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

Mon 26 Mar 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting Rooms 71a, b and c, Headington OX3 7DQ

CRL4 ubiquitin ligase regulates the response to UV- and cisplatin-DNA damage

Professor Hanspeter Naegeli

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 26 Mar 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Oxford Martin School, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Specific impairments of consolidation, reconsolidation and LTMm lead to memory erasure. Targeting memories as a new therapeutic approach to psychopathologies.

Karim Nader

Memory reconsolidation is the process in which reactivated long-term memory (LTM) becomes transiently sensitive to amnesic agents that are effective at consolidation. The phenomenon was first described more than 50 years ago but did not fit the dominant paradigm that posited that consolidation... Read more

Memory reconsolidation is the process in which reactivated long-term memory (LTM) becomes transiently sensitive to amnesic agents that are effective at consolidation. The phenomenon was first described more than 50 years ago but did not fit the dominant paradigm that posited that consolidation takes place only once per LTM item. Reconsolidation was revitalized a decade ago using auditory fear conditioning in the rat and was shown to involve neural circuitry in the basolateral amygdala. Since then, reconsolidation has been demonstrated with many species, tasks, and amnesic agents, and cellular and molecular correlates of reconsolidation have been identified. I will discuss the evidence on which reconsolidation is based, and why specific impairments in consolidation, reconsolidation and LTM maintenance always lead to memory erasure. I will also refer to potential clinical implications of reconsolidation. These include the ability to cause the synaptic circuit manifestations of a variety of psychopathologies to become transiently un-stored. If the mechanisms mediating restabilization of these circuit changes are prevented by behavioral or pharmacological intervention, an individual’s psychopathology could be reduced within a single session. This approach has been shown to work for PTSD, drug-cue induced craving, and Phobias.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Mon 26 Mar 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Measuring and manipulating the adaptive immune repertoire: A comparative approach

Prof Adrian Smith

We have been employing T and B cell receptor repertoire analysis tools to explore the nature of adaptive immune responses under different circumstances and in different vertebrate species. The seminar will focus on our work in mice and chickens considering how repertoire analyses can provide... Read more

We have been employing T and B cell receptor repertoire analysis tools to explore the nature of adaptive immune responses under different circumstances and in different vertebrate species. The seminar will focus on our work in mice and chickens considering how repertoire analyses can provide insight into the basic biology of T cells, infection-driven T cell tumours and microbiome-immune relationships. I will also introduce a murine system that employs restricting T cell repertoires as a tool that supports identification of protective antigens in relation to vaccine development against antigenically complex infectious agents. ---- My scientific career began in Glasgow and Nottingham, considering the relationships between infection and immunity, particularly focussing on immune mechanisms in the gut. I continued this theme during a post doc in Adrian Hayday’s laboratory at Yale principally working on gut immune mechanisms and the function of TCR T cells. In 1997 I established my Enteric Immunology group at the Institute for Animal Health focussing on immunity to infection in rodent and avian systems. In 2008 I relocated my group to the Department of Zoology, Oxford where we have continued to work on aspects of innate and adaptive immunity widening our comparative approach to include an ever-widening collection of different species. Part of the group work on the evolution of pattern recognition receptors whilst others focus on adaptive immunity (including repertoire analysis) and various infection systems. Some of the group also work with ancient DNA of pathogens and their hosts.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 26 Mar 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Infections@BDI Seminar: From Jericho to Headington: Enteric fever in Oxford

Professor Andy Pollard

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Mon 26 Mar 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Neutralizing Antibodies Prevent Zika Virus Infection and can Reduce Zika Replication After Infection

David Watkins

We isolated human neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against the Zika virus and tested their ability to both block infection in non-human primates and to control viral replication after infection of pregnant macaques

We isolated human neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against the Zika virus and tested their ability to both block infection in non-human primates and to control viral replication after infection of pregnant macaques

Audience: The Scientific Community

Organisers: Thomas Johnson

Tue 27 Mar 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Innate immune evasion of chronic viral infections via exploitation of epigenetic regulation

Dr Marcus Dorner

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Tue 27 Mar 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Health Economics Seminars

Richard Doll Building, First Floor Meeting Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Methodological developments in mapping to the EQ-5D (provisional title)

Monica Hernandez Alava

Further information coming soon

Further information coming soon

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: HERC

Tue 27 Mar 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Single Cell Data Analysis Using Partek Flow

Ivan Lukic, Alison Hargreaves

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 28 Mar 2018 from 16:00 to 17:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Inaugural Seminar: The Malaria Atlas Project — Mapping the past, present and future of a global disease

Professor Pete Gething

Since the inception of the Malaria Atlas Project (MAP) in 2005, the importance of geospatial modelling for reliably measuring malaria transmission, stratifying risk, and evaluating the impact of control strategies has become accepted as integral to the success of malaria control and elimination.... Read more

Since the inception of the Malaria Atlas Project (MAP) in 2005, the importance of geospatial modelling for reliably measuring malaria transmission, stratifying risk, and evaluating the impact of control strategies has become accepted as integral to the success of malaria control and elimination. Where malaria surveillance has historically been weak, geospatial modelling has played a key role in compensating for limited data and providing richer and more robust evidence to support decision making. However, malaria surveillance systems are rapidly evolving and the granularity, reliability and richness of malariometric data increase year-on-year. This data explosion presents enormous opportunities for more precise, evidence based malaria control and elimination strategies. This Seminar will review the past, present and future work of MAP in advancing the science of geospatial disease modelling and its contributions to more effective disease control.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John