Other Seminars

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Wed 4 Apr 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Connections in the AhR: a ticket to multiple destinations

Pedro Moura Alves

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Wed 4 Apr 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Wed 4 Apr 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, level 30 Seminar room , off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

CTL Epitopes in Archived HIV-1 DNA of Patients at Success of cART and According to their HLA Alleles; the Provir/Latitude Project

Pr Herve Fleury, Dr Camille Tumiotto

The scientific and medical community is seeking to cure HIV. Several pathways have been or are being explored: cART intensification, latency reversal agents, monoclonal antibodies, immunomodulators , gene therapy and therapeutic vaccination. Viro-immunological studies have demonstrated the... Read more

The scientific and medical community is seeking to cure HIV. Several pathways have been or are being explored: cART intensification, latency reversal agents, monoclonal antibodies, immunomodulators , gene therapy and therapeutic vaccination. Viro-immunological studies have demonstrated the importance of the CD8+ T cell cytotoxic response and have mainly oriented research on vaccine constructs towards this type of response. The results of the vaccine trials are clearly not commensurate with the hope placed in them. Our team and others (Deng et al, Nature 2015) have drawn attention to the discrepancy between the archived CTL epitopes and the theoretical recognition by the HLA alleles I. Provir/Latitude 45 project aims to identify conserved HIV-1 CTL epitopes in archived DNA of patients at success of cART according to their potential presentation by the HLA alleles; patients are recruited in Bordeaux and Brazil (Rio de Janeiro , Rio do Sul) ; the proviral DNA is sequenced (Sanger and or/NGS on the whole length or at least on pol, gag and nef regions); the HLA alleles are determined by molecular techniques (including NGS); a software (TuTuGenetics) has been set up which is able to link the data from sequencing (Sanger or NGS), HLA alleles , the Los Alamos HIV database and the IEDB simulator. It yields automatically a list per isolate of CTL epitopes and their potential affinity for the HLA grooves. Taking into account the dominant HLA alleles of the investigated population, we plan to define a list of CTL peptides which could be introduced into a vaccine composition. Provir has been extended to a cooperation with McGill and CHUM in Montreal, Canada. We plan to compare the archived CTL epitopes in archived proviral DNA of PBMC and Gut Associated Lymphoid tissues (GLAT) in patients at success of cART using NGS technique and the TuTuGenetics software. Provir/Latitude 45 project is granted by Merck Sharp and Dohme (MSD Avenir DS-2016-005)

Audience: Scientific Community

Organisers: Thomas Johnson

Thu 5 Apr 2018 from 16:30 to 18:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, John Radcliffe Main Building, George Pickering Education Centre Level 3 Academic Centre, Room 2B, Headington OX3 9DU

Systems Based Approaches to Immune Mediators of Inflammatory Disease: Combining Modelling with Experimentation

Dr Mark Coles

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Holm Uhlig

Fri 6 Apr 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

* CANCELLED * Therapeutic targets in Ageing

Professor David Le Couteur

Ageing is the main risk factor for disease and poor outcomes from therapeutic interventions. Studies in animal models have shown that ageing can be manipulated by a variety of genetic, nutritional and pharmaceutical interventions. Drug trials aimed at delaying ageing studies are commencing in... Read more

Ageing is the main risk factor for disease and poor outcomes from therapeutic interventions. Studies in animal models have shown that ageing can be manipulated by a variety of genetic, nutritional and pharmaceutical interventions. Drug trials aimed at delaying ageing studies are commencing in humans. Targeting ageing biology provides a novel approach to improving health of older people and increasing productive health span.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Fri 6 Apr 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Oxford Martin School, Broad Street, Oxford, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Self-Tuning Neurons, Firing Rate Homeostasis, and Sleep/Wake States

Gina Turrigiano

Neocortical networks must generate and maintain stable activity patterns despite perturbations due to learning and experience, and this stability must be maintained across distinct behavioral states with different sensory drive and modulatory tone. There is abundant theoretical and experimental... Read more

Neocortical networks must generate and maintain stable activity patterns despite perturbations due to learning and experience, and this stability must be maintained across distinct behavioral states with different sensory drive and modulatory tone. There is abundant theoretical and experimental evidence that network stability is achieved through homeostatic plasticity mechanisms that adjust synaptic and neuronal properties to stabilize some measure of average activity. This process has been extensively studied in primary visual cortex (V1), where chronic visual deprivation induces an initial drop in activity and ensemble average firing rates (FRs), but over time activity is restored to baseline. I will discuss recent work in which we follow bidirectional FR homeostasis in individual V1 neurons in freely behaving animals, as they cycle between natural periods of sleep and wake. We find that, when FRs are perturbed by visual deprivation or eye re-opening, over time they return precisely to a cell-autonomous set-point. Intriguingly, this FR homeostasis is gated by sleep/wake states in a manner that depends on the direction of homeostatic regulation: upward FR homeostasis occurs selectively during active wake, while downward FR homeostasis occurs selectively during sleep. These data indicate that neocortical plasticity is regulated in a complex manner by vigilance state and raise the possibility that temporal segregation of distinct plasticity mechanisms is important for proper circuit refinement.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Mon 9 Apr 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Regulation of virus-induced inflammation

Dr Ian Humphreys

Immune mechanisms that regulate antiviral immune responses determine whether the host can control pathogen replication and virus-induced immunopathology. The pathogenic human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) establishes chronicity and induces inflammation-associated pathologies. The unrelated influenza virus... Read more

Immune mechanisms that regulate antiviral immune responses determine whether the host can control pathogen replication and virus-induced immunopathology. The pathogenic human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) establishes chronicity and induces inflammation-associated pathologies. The unrelated influenza virus also elicits significant inflammatory cytokine responses during acute infection. Our laboratory uses a combination of in vivo viral infection models and in vitro cellular systems including iPS-derived myeloid cells to understand the cellular factors that regulate the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines upon host recognition of viruses. I will present our recent findings regarding novel positive (IRF5) and negative (IFITM3) regulators of virus-induced cytokine production. ---- Ian Humphreys received a PhD in Biochemistry in 2004 from Imperial College London after studying T-cell costimulation during respiratory viral infections with Tracy Hussell and Gordon Dougan. He completed his postdoctoral training in the laboratories of Carl Ware and Mick Croft at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, studying the role of TNF receptor family members in cytomegalovirus infection. In 2007, Ian established his own laboratory in Cardiff University where he is now a Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow and Reader in the Division of Infection and Immunity. The primary focus of his group is to understand the factors that regulate immune control and infection-induced inflammation during acute and chronic viral infections, and explore the impact that factors such as host and viral genetics may have on these processes.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 9 Apr 2018 from 12:30 to 13:30

Jenner Seminars

Old Road Campus Research Building, Lower Ground Floor Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7DQ

The Bone Marrow Reservoir of Plasmodium vivax

Prof Nicanor Obaldia

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof Simon Draper

Tue 10 Apr 2018 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Achieving Neuroprotection in Parkinson’s Disease

Andy West

Andrew West, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor of Neurology and holds the John A. and Ruth R. Jurenko Endowed Professorship in Neurology. Dr. West received his undergraduate degree from Alma College and his PhD in Molecular Neuroscience from the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine in Rochester, MN. He... Read more

Andrew West, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor of Neurology and holds the John A. and Ruth R. Jurenko Endowed Professorship in Neurology. Dr. West received his undergraduate degree from Alma College and his PhD in Molecular Neuroscience from the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine in Rochester, MN. He then went on to complete a Postdoctoral Fellowship at UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute in Los Angeles in the laboratory of Nigel Maidment and a second postdoctoral fellowship in the laboratory of Ted Dawson at Johns Hopkins, followed by an Instructor faculty position in the Department of Neurology at Johns Hopkins. In 2008, the West laboratory opened at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) with a mission to identify critical pathogenic mechanisms underlying neurologic diseases like Parkinson’s disease, develop new and relevant systems that model these mechanisms, and develop new therapeutics that will address the immediate critical needs of those affected with disease. Dr. West co-directs the UAB Center for Neurodegeneration and Experimental Therapeutics (CNET). CNET consists of 30 laboratories in 10 different departments with primary and peripheral interests in neurodegenerative disease. The goal of CNET is to facilitate collaborative efforts in translational approaches relevant to neurodegenerative disease. Dr. West currently serves as co-chair of the Parkinson’s Disease Biomarker Program for the National Institutes of Health and is a member of the NST-2 study section that reviews K99/R00 and F31 MSTP applications for the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. In a little over a decade, Dr. West has authored more than 50 publications characterizing biochemical mechanisms underlying Parkinson’s disease.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Wed 11 Apr 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Vaccines at the Serum Institute of India

Dr Umesh Shaligram

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Thu 12 Apr 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Oxford Martin School, 34 Broad Street, Oxford, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Temporal Coding-Induced Synaptic Plasticity Determines Clock-Driven Sleep Quality

Dr Mark Wu

Neurons use two fundamental coding schemes to convey information: rate coding (frequency of firing) and temporal coding (timing of firing). Although temporal coding has long been postulated to be important for encoding responses to stimuli or internal states, this hypothesis has been challenging to... Read more

Neurons use two fundamental coding schemes to convey information: rate coding (frequency of firing) and temporal coding (timing of firing). Although temporal coding has long been postulated to be important for encoding responses to stimuli or internal states, this hypothesis has been challenging to test. I will describe how the circadian clock acts via a novel clock output molecule, Wide Awake (WAKE), to tune biophysical properties of spikes to induce regular firing of specific clock neurons at night. Optogenetic experiments demonstrate that these changes in the pattern of firing, in the absence of changes in firing rate, directly alter sleep quality. Computational modeling shows that the rhythmic changes in ionic flux driven by WAKE are sufficient to account for both the dynamic modulation of spike morphology and the regularity of the spike train. Finally, I will show how temporal coding in these clock neurons is transformed to rate coding changes in downstream arousal neurons and demonstrate that temporal coding alone can induce synaptic plasticity that encodes persistent changes in clock-regulated sleep quality.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Fri 13 Apr 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

The Nature of Nurture

Professor Augustine Kong

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Mon 16 Apr 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting rooms 71a, b and c, Headington OX3 7DQ

The role of ATRX during DNA double-strand break repair

Professor Markus Löbrich

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 17 Apr 2018 from 14:00 to 15:00

ARUK Oxford Drug Discovery Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

The Cellular Face of Alzheimer's Disease

Professor Bart De Strooper

Audience: Public

Organisers: Dr John Davis

Wed 18 Apr 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Archaevirology, Uncovering the History of Viral Pathogens

Klaus Hedman

The study of ancient DNA is emerging into a discipline of its own, with the subjects ranging from a plethora of species to extinct (archaic) humans. Accordingly, the information of ancestral pathogens is just beginning to promote our understanding of microbial transmission, epidemics and disease... Read more

The study of ancient DNA is emerging into a discipline of its own, with the subjects ranging from a plethora of species to extinct (archaic) humans. Accordingly, the information of ancestral pathogens is just beginning to promote our understanding of microbial transmission, epidemics and disease pathogenesis. With a long-standing interest in virus genome tissue persistence (Söderlund, Lancet 1997; Norja, PNAS 2006; Pyöriä, Nat Commun 2017), we are time-traveling by PCRs and NGS for viral nucleic acid sequences in archival human tissue remains (skeletal; soft) from a large variety of sources dating back decades, centuries and millennia.

Audience: Scientific Community

Organisers: Dr Proochista Ariana

Please arrive 5 minutes before the Seminar begins to gain building access

Wed 18 Apr 2018 from 12:30 to 13:30

WHG Lunchtime Lab Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Todd and Tzima Lunchtime Lab Talks

Dr Melanie Dunstan, Jamie Inshaw, Dr Vedanta Mehta

John Todd's Group Speaker 1: Dr Melanie Dunstan Title: Dissecting the Functional Heterogeneity of Gut-Resident Regulatory T cells in Type I Diabetes and Coeliac Disease Speaker 2: Jamie Inshaw (DPhil student) Title: Type 1 diabetes genome-wide association studies – past, present and future Ellie Tzima's Group Speaker: Dr Vedanta Mehta Title: A novel ‘touch-me-not’ mechanosensor

John Todd's Group Speaker 1: Dr Melanie Dunstan Title: Dissecting the Functional Heterogeneity of Gut-Resident Regulatory T cells in Type I Diabetes and Coeliac Disease Speaker 2: Jamie Inshaw (DPhil student) Title: Type 1 diabetes genome-wide association studies – past, present and future Ellie Tzima's Group Speaker: Dr Vedanta Mehta Title: A novel ‘touch-me-not’ mechanosensor

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 19 Apr 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Meeting Room 1, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

Ethics training and advice for CUREC and NHS ethics applications

Dr Helen Barnby-Porritt

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dan Richards-Doran

Thu 19 Apr 2018 from 11:15 to 12:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 2 Academic Corridor, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington OX3 9DU

Redirecting the cellular information flow with programmable dCas9-based chimeric receptors

Toni Baeumler

Audience: Members of the University only

Viva Seminar

Thu 19 Apr 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Acute General Medicine Firm D / Infection Microbiology

Dr Adam Darowski

Acute General Medicine Firm D: "A fistful of tablets - The good, the bad and the ugly", Dr Adam Darowski -- Infection Microbiology: "Of Mites and Men", Prof Nick Day -- Chair: Prof Julian Knight

Acute General Medicine Firm D: "A fistful of tablets - The good, the bad and the ugly", Dr Adam Darowski -- Infection Microbiology: "Of Mites and Men", Prof Nick Day -- Chair: Prof Julian Knight

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 19 Apr 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

“Immortal Hematopoietic Stem Cells and Their Epigenetic Regulation”

Margaret (“Peggy”) Goodell

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Mon 23 Apr 2018 from 09:00 to 17:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

Saïd Business School, Park End Street OX1 1HP

Oxford Single Cell Symposium 2018

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Speakers so far confirmed are: Wolf Reik (Babraham Institute); Ido Amit (Weizmann Institute of Science)

Mon 23 Apr 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Infections@BDI Seminar

Dr Caroline Colijn

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Mon 23 Apr 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre , Headington OX3 7LF

Mon 23 Apr 2018 from 14:30 to 15:30

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar: Imaging Genetics of the Human Face

Peter Claes

Peter Claes of KU Leuven will discuss: - modular phenotyping to discover facially related genetic loci - new computational framework to match faces to probe DNA - innovative applications to establish human identity from DNA

Peter Claes of KU Leuven will discuss: - modular phenotyping to discover facially related genetic loci - new computational framework to match faces to probe DNA - innovative applications to establish human identity from DNA

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Tue 24 Apr 2018 from 10:00 to 11:00

Tropical Medicine Seminars

NDM Building, Basement Seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Malaria 2018: What's the Score? AND Malaria in the Asia-Pacific: Pervasive, Singular, Diverse, and Invisible

Professor Kevin Marsh, Professor Kevin Baird

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Jones

Tue 24 Apr 2018 from 12:45 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Student presentations

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Please note earlier start time for these presentations

Tue 24 Apr 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Wed 25 Apr 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

T-reg and T-effector subsets dynamics in viral infections

Nabil Seddiki

Dr Nabila SEDDIKI is a Senior Lecturer at the Paris-Est Créteil University (UPEC). She holds an INSERM “Chaire d’Excellence en Immunologie et Maladies Infectieuses”. She joined the Vaccine Research Institute (Créteil, France) end of 2010. Before that she was a Research Fellow at the... Read more

Dr Nabila SEDDIKI is a Senior Lecturer at the Paris-Est Créteil University (UPEC). She holds an INSERM “Chaire d’Excellence en Immunologie et Maladies Infectieuses”. She joined the Vaccine Research Institute (Créteil, France) end of 2010. Before that she was a Research Fellow at the Centenary Institute (University of Sydney) and then a Senior Scientist at the National Centre for HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research (University of New South Wales). Dr Seddiki’s research interests are focused on the cellular and molecular characterisation of T-cell subsets. She is particularly interested in investigating the dynamics of antigen-specific T regulatory (Treg), T follicular helper and effector CD4+ T-cell subsets in viral infections. More recently, she has been investigating the role of microRNA and chromatin remodeling in the regulation of target molecules during HIV-1 infection. Her talk will focus on “T-reg and T-effector subsets dynamics in viral infections”, i.e HIV-infected and treated patients who received therapeutic vaccination and she will discuss her current work on how to improve therapeutic vaccination. Also, she will share new, non-published data on T-follicular helper cell (Tfh) subsets in influenza infection.

Audience: UK Science Community

Organisers: Dr Proochista Ariana

Please arrive 5 minutes before the Seminar begins to gain building access

Wed 25 Apr 2018 from 12:45 to 14:00

Psychiatry Seminars

Department of Psychiatry, Common Room, Headington OX3 7JX

Wed 25 Apr 2018 from 13:00 to 13:45

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the endothelial to hematopoietic transition

Lucas Greder

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Emma Butterfield

Viva Seminar

Thu 26 Apr 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Stem cell function in homeostasis, aging and cancer: interplay between time, diet and epigenetics

Salvador Aznar Benitah

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 26 Apr 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Clinical Immunology / Dermatology

Dr Adrian Shields, Dr Crystal Williams, Dr Sanju Arianayagam

Clinical Immunology: "Chasing waterfalls: when the complement cascade spills over", Dr Adrian Shields -- Dermatology: "Naughty Neutrophils", Dr Crystal Williams and Dr Sanju Arianayagam -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Clinical Immunology: "Chasing waterfalls: when the complement cascade spills over", Dr Adrian Shields -- Dermatology: "Naughty Neutrophils", Dr Crystal Williams and Dr Sanju Arianayagam -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 27 Apr 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Deep brain stimulation for human brain disorders: Expanding indications and the brain machine interface

Professor Peter Silburn

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 27 Apr 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Enhanced immunogenicity of mitochondrial localised proteins in cancer cells

Dr Gennaro Prota

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 27 Apr 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Functional specificity of excitatory and inhibitory connections in neocortex

Professor Sonja Hofer

To follow

To follow

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sally Collins

Fri 27 Apr 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Understanding and treating lysosomal diseases

Prof Frances Platt

Short abstract: Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs), - designated as "orphan" diseases - are inborn errors of metabolism caused by defects in genes that encode proteins involved in various aspects of lysosomal homeostasis. For many years LSDs were viewed as unattractive targets for the development... Read more

Short abstract: Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs), - designated as "orphan" diseases - are inborn errors of metabolism caused by defects in genes that encode proteins involved in various aspects of lysosomal homeostasis. For many years LSDs were viewed as unattractive targets for the development of therapies owing to their low prevalence. However, the development and success of the first commercial biologic therapy for a LSD - enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for type 1 Gaucher disease - coupled with regulatory incentives, rapidly catalyzed commercial interest in therapeutically targeting LSDs. Despite ongoing challenges, various therapeutic strategies for LSDs now exist, with many agents approved, undergoing clinical trials or in preclinical development. I will review these diseases, the status of therapies and our current work on therapeutic development for Niemann-Pick disease type C. Short bio: Fran Platt was educated at Imperial College (BSc, Zoology) and did her PhD at the University of Bath in Animal Physiology. She went to Washington University Medical School in St Louis USA where she was a post-doctoral fellow. She returned to the UK in 1989 where she joined the Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford. She was awarded a Lister Institute Senior Research Fellowship in 1996. She moved her laboratory to the Department of Pharmacology, University of Oxford in 2006. Her main interest is in lysosomal biology and pathobiology. Her research has led to the development and approval of a drug (miglustat) for substrate reduction therapy for the treatment of glycosphingolipid lysosomal storage diseases. She was elected a fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences in 2011.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Fri 27 Apr 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Life beyond academia: the charity sector, funding bodies, clinical trials and beyond

Dr Sumithra Subramaniam

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Rachel Rigby

Mon 30 Apr 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar: Statistical strategies for enhanced metabolic phenotyping and biomarker recovery

The metabolic phenotype can provide a window onto dynamic biochemical responses to physiological and pathological stimuli. Metabolic profiling platforms for analyzing biosamples, encompassing high-resolution spectroscopic methods (NMR spectroscopy, LC-MS, GC-MS etc) in combination with multivariate... Read more

The metabolic phenotype can provide a window onto dynamic biochemical responses to physiological and pathological stimuli. Metabolic profiling platforms for analyzing biosamples, encompassing high-resolution spectroscopic methods (NMR spectroscopy, LC-MS, GC-MS etc) in combination with multivariate statistical modelling tools, have been shown to be well-suited to generating metabolic signatures reflecting gene-environment interactions. Consequent demand for sensitive, high quality disease diagnostics has facilitated the development of new technological and statistical methods for extracting biomarkers from NMR spectra resulting in improved elucidation of pathological mechanisms. The combination of multiple spectroscopic and statistical approaches is most effective, thus an analytical strategy for spectral alignment, scaling, curve resolution and quantification, statistical correlation and annotation is desirable. An analytical pipeline is presented with particular focus on a series of methods for enhancing biomarker detection via a family of statistical correlation algorithms. Key bottlenecks in integrating metabolic profiling into translational medicine pipelines or workflows include: lack of automated peak/metabolite annotation; introduction of artefacts due to alignment and pre-processing algorithms; lack of standardisation across laboratories; and limited availability of methods capturing dynamic metabolic changes that can accommodate missing data. An outline of the current bottlenecks in data processing, modelling and interpretation is given with suggestions of statistical tools for overcoming some of these limitations focussing on homospectroscopic or heterospectroscopic correlation algorithms, adjustment for multiple confounders and time series analysis as a suite of tools that can be applied to extract new correlates between datasets and establish biological coherence across metabolic pathways and networks.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Mon 30 Apr 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar: Statistical strategies for enhanced metabolic phenotyping and biomarker recovery

The metabolic phenotype can provide a window onto dynamic biochemical responses to physiological and pathological stimuli. Metabolic profiling platforms for analyzing biosamples, encompassing high-resolution spectroscopic methods (NMR spectroscopy, LC-MS, GC-MS etc) in combination with multivariate... Read more

The metabolic phenotype can provide a window onto dynamic biochemical responses to physiological and pathological stimuli. Metabolic profiling platforms for analyzing biosamples, encompassing high-resolution spectroscopic methods (NMR spectroscopy, LC-MS, GC-MS etc) in combination with multivariate statistical modelling tools, have been shown to be well-suited to generating metabolic signatures reflecting gene-environment interactions. Consequent demand for sensitive, high quality disease diagnostics has facilitated the development of new technological and statistical methods for extracting biomarkers from NMR spectra resulting in improved elucidation of pathological mechanisms. The combination of multiple spectroscopic and statistical approaches is most effective, thus an analytical strategy for spectral alignment, scaling, curve resolution and quantification, statistical correlation and annotation is desirable. An analytical pipeline is presented with particular focus on a series of methods for enhancing biomarker detection via a family of statistical correlation algorithms. Key bottlenecks in integrating metabolic profiling into translational medicine pipelines or workflows include: lack of automated peak/metabolite annotation; introduction of artefacts due to alignment and pre-processing algorithms; lack of standardisation across laboratories; and limited availability of methods capturing dynamic metabolic changes that can accommodate missing data. An outline of the current bottlenecks in data processing, modelling and interpretation is given with suggestions of statistical tools for overcoming some of these limitations focussing on homospectroscopic or heterospectroscopic correlation algorithms, adjustment for multiple confounders and time series analysis as a suite of tools that can be applied to extract new correlates between datasets and establish biological coherence across metabolic pathways and networks.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Mon 30 Apr 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting rooms 71a, b and c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Old and new functions of BRCA1

Professor Jo Morris PhD MSc

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 30 Apr 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Health Economics Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Ground Floor , Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Using electronic health records in health economic modelling studies

Professor Martin Gulliford

This talk will outline a possible role of electronic health records in health economic evaluation. The talk will initially discuss the strengths and limitations of primary care electronic health records and linked data. It will go on to describe several studies in which EHRs have been used to... Read more

This talk will outline a possible role of electronic health records in health economic evaluation. The talk will initially discuss the strengths and limitations of primary care electronic health records and linked data. It will go on to describe several studies in which EHRs have been used to estimate costs of health care utilisation, including case studies in obesity and ageing. The final section of the talk will describe the use of EHRs in economic evaluations using either observational or trial data. Speakers Bio: Martin Gulliford is Professor of Public Health in the School of Population Health and Environmental Sciences at King's College London. He qualified in medicine from the University of Cambridge and University College Hospital, London and trained in public health and health services research at Guy’s and St Thomas’ Medical Schools London where he was a Wellcome Training Fellow in Health Services Research. Martin's research interests are in epidemiology as applied to public health and health services research. His current research focuses on the use of electronic health records to evaluate public health interventions. This includes public health trials with either cluster or individual level randomisation, as well as health economic modelling studies. The main areas of application are in obesity, chronic disease prevention, ageing and antimicrobial utilisation.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Brett Doble

Mon 30 Apr 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Infections@BDI Seminar

Ana Rivero

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Mon 30 Apr 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

LAB282: Accelerating Oxford drug discovery

Dr Thomas Hanke

Evotec is a global drug discovery company with a focus on matching scientific diligence with industrial robustness to accelerate preclinical development of novel therapeutics that have the potential to become first- or best-in-class drugs. To improve quality and speed of innovation, Evotec... Read more

Evotec is a global drug discovery company with a focus on matching scientific diligence with industrial robustness to accelerate preclinical development of novel therapeutics that have the potential to become first- or best-in-class drugs. To improve quality and speed of innovation, Evotec developed a novel risk-share paradigm of close collaboration with academic centers of excellence –termed the Academic BRIDGE- where preclinical validation of therapeutic concepts in an integrated business framework aims to significantly shorten the time between drug development idea and commercially attractive preclinical data. With LAB282, in November 2016 the first Academic BRIDGE took shape in Oxford. LAB282 (www.lab282.org) is a £13m partnership between the University of Oxford, OUI, OSI and Evotec that offers Oxford researchers across different therapeutic areas and departments the opportunity to access translational funding to advance therapeutic concepts and create a basis for future commercialization. Since inception, twelve different projects have been awarded funding between £25k and £500k. The presentation will provide insights into the LAB282 concept, discuss learnings after the first 1.5 years and be a forum to discuss how scientists from the Kennedy Institute could benefit from LAB282 in the future. ---- Since December 2016, Thomas is overseeing a growing portfolio of strategic academic partnerships at Evotec, including Lab282 in Oxford. From November 2013 to November 2016, Thomas was responsible for scientific advancement and commercial licensing of Evotec’s preclinical R&D projects in the areas of inflammation and immuno-oncology, with a particular focus on building high-value, performance based drug discovery alliances with academia and pharma. From 2007 to 2013, Thomas was Sourcing Director at the Biopharmaceuticals Research Unit of Novo Nordisk, where he identified and evaluated partnering opportunities related to compounds, targets and technologies within haemophilia, autoimmune/inflammatory diseases, growth disorders and protein technologies. At Novo Nordisk, Thomas initiated a multitude of agreements with academic institutions and biotech companies both in Europe and the US. Prior to joining Novo Nordisk, Thomas was co-founder and Chief Scientific Officer at the German biotech company TeGenero, where he headed the R&D efforts to develop first-in-class immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies (2002-2007). Preceding his entrepreneurial activities, Thomas was group leader and Assistant Professor for Immunobiology at the University of Würzburg (1999-2002) following a PostDoc at the University of California in Berkeley where he researched basic cellular immunology (1996-1999). Thomas received his Ph.D. in Biology from the University of Würzburg in 1995. He is (co-) author of approx. 30 scientific papers in peer-reviewed journals. Today, Thomas has 20+ years of experience in research and drug development in academia, biotech and pharma. Fostering innovation and continuous improvement, Thomas manages cross-functional teams as an assessor / developer, sets directions and builds trust in a company.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo