Other Seminars

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Tue 2 May 2017 from 12:30 to 13:30

Tropical Medicine Seminars

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Molecular assessment of resistance markers for antimalarial drugs in Tanzania

Dr Deborah Sumari

Antimalarial drug resistance is one of the biggest threats to the treatment and control of malaria, with resistance now confirmed to all currently available antimalarials although critically resistance to the most pivotal artemisinins has not yet reached Africa but it currently confined to the... Read more

Antimalarial drug resistance is one of the biggest threats to the treatment and control of malaria, with resistance now confirmed to all currently available antimalarials although critically resistance to the most pivotal artemisinins has not yet reached Africa but it currently confined to the Greater Mekong Subregion. New approaches, knowledge and skills-sharing are urgently needed to advance malaria control in Tanzania. One important way to track drug resistance and guide treatment policy is through genotyping polymorphisms in the parasite DNA that are associated with resistance to particular antimalarials. Therefore the current study aims to conduct a molecular surveillance to assess resistant molecular markers associated with Artemisinin-based combination therapies which are commonly used as first line antimalarial treatment in Tanzania.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Dr Georgina Humphreys

Tue 2 May 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Dysregulated haematopoiesis in chronic inflammatory diseases

Dr. Thibault Griseri

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 2 May 2017 from 14:00 to 15:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Thu 4 May 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Have you been mis-sold PPI? (Making sense of patient and public involvement in the real world)

Come and hear 6 researchers talking honestly about the PPI they have done and what did & did not work. Air your views openly on the reality of what you have experienced in PPI. Learn some tips that will help you in the real world. Discussion chaired by Professor Louise Locock from the Health... Read more

Come and hear 6 researchers talking honestly about the PPI they have done and what did & did not work. Air your views openly on the reality of what you have experienced in PPI. Learn some tips that will help you in the real world. Discussion chaired by Professor Louise Locock from the Health Experience Research group. John MacArtney Phil Turner Julie McLellan Heather Rutter James Sheppard Susan Kirkpatrick Geoff Wong

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 4 May 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement meeting room, NDM Research Building, Headington OX3 7FZ

Identifying metabolic dependencies in pancreatic cancer

Prof Alec Kimmelman

Pancreatic cancers are highly resistant to currently available therapeutics which results in a 5-year survival rate of approximately 6%. We believe that this resistance points toward altered cell metabolic pathways. In this regard we have previously shown that that oncogenic Kras promotes a... Read more

Pancreatic cancers are highly resistant to currently available therapeutics which results in a 5-year survival rate of approximately 6%. We believe that this resistance points toward altered cell metabolic pathways. In this regard we have previously shown that that oncogenic Kras promotes a rewiring of pancreatic cancer metabolism allowing carbon sources to be utilized in a variety of biosynthetic pathways. Importantly, several of these metabolic pathways are critical for tumor growth and therefore represent potential therapeutic targets. Ongoing studies from our group are exploring targeting various aspects of metabolism as therapeutic approaches. Additional studies from our group have demonstrated pancreatic cancers have elevated basal autophagy which is required for their continued growth. Importantly, inhibition of autophagy pharmacologically or genetically leads to decreased oxidative phosphorylation, a drop in ATP production, and ultimately growth inhibition. These findings have implicated autophagy as a key component of pancreatic cancer metabolism and have motivated the opening of multiple clinical trials assessing the efficacy of hydroxychloroquine as an autophagy inhibitor in pancreatic cancer. Recently, we have identified an autophagy-dependent metabolic cross-talk that exists between pancreatic tumor cells and the surrounding stroma. Ongoing work from our group seeks to understand the metabolic contributions that autophagy makes in pancreatic tumors. These and other aspects of pancreatic cancer metabolism will be discussed.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Thu 4 May 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Oncology / Gastroenterology

Dr Andrew Eichholz, Dr Tom Marjot, Dr Michael Pavlides

Oncology: "Malignant Spinal Cord Compression: Cases and Discussion", Dr Andrew Eichholz -- Gastroenterology: "Magnetised by the liver", Dr Tom Marjot and Dr Michael Pavlides -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Oncology: "Malignant Spinal Cord Compression: Cases and Discussion", Dr Andrew Eichholz -- Gastroenterology: "Magnetised by the liver", Dr Tom Marjot and Dr Michael Pavlides -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 4 May 2017 from 16:30 to 17:30

Metabolism & Endocrinology Theme Guest Speakers (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Planet Earth II: The Making of a Natural History Blockbuster

Mike Gunton

Mike Gunton is the Creative Director of the BBC’s Natural History Unit, and has been making award-winning wildlife films for over 30 years (including Life, Africa, Attenborough, and Life Story). He is also responsible for the Natural History Unit’s most recent blockbuster success - Planet... Read more

Mike Gunton is the Creative Director of the BBC’s Natural History Unit, and has been making award-winning wildlife films for over 30 years (including Life, Africa, Attenborough, and Life Story). He is also responsible for the Natural History Unit’s most recent blockbuster success - Planet Earth II. In this illustrated lecture he explores and discusses the trials, tribulations and the approach taken to create a landmark series of this scale.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sara Bouskela

Thu 4 May 2017 from 16:30 to 17:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital, GPEC Level 3 Seminar Room 2B, Headington OX3 9DU

Fri 5 May 2017 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Innovations in access surgery

Dr Simon Knight, Mr James Gilbert

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 5 May 2017 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Rejuvenation of the aged adaptive immune response and the discovery of a novel autophagy pathway

Hanlin Zhang

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 5 May 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Professor Robert MacLaren MD, Professor of Ophthamology, Oxford Eye Hosptial - ‘Developing new genetic treatments for eye disease’

Professor Robert MacLaren MD, Professor of Ophthamology

I was first introduced to the concept of gene therapy during experiments performed during my D Phil in the Department of Human Anatomy in the 1990s Gene therapy has since rapidly established itself as a viable treatment for patients with inherited retinal degenerations. In this talk I will outline... Read more

I was first introduced to the concept of gene therapy during experiments performed during my D Phil in the Department of Human Anatomy in the 1990s Gene therapy has since rapidly established itself as a viable treatment for patients with inherited retinal degenerations. In this talk I will outline some challenges we have met in dealing with large genes and genes need to be recoded using codon optimisation. We are currently running several gene therapy trials across a number of centres worldwide. We are also developing other treatments for retinal disease, such as the electronic retina and also a robotic system for operating safely in the back of the eye.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Mon 8 May 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Investigating the mechanisms of regulatory T-cell differentiation in vivo by novel Fluorescent Timer reporters

Dr Masahiro Ono, MD, PhD

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

The talk has been rescheduled to 09/10/2017

Mon 8 May 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Regenerative medicine by somatic stem cells: the paradigm of epithelial stem cells

Michele De Luca

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Mon 8 May 2017 from 15:30 to 16:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Pluripotent stem cells to model human hemato-lymphoid development

Professor Dan Kaufman

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 9 May 2017 from 10:30 to 11:15

BDI seminars

Title TBC

Dr Nicholas Timpson

Nic is working on ALSPAC ( Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children) at the University of Bristol and is interested in discussing the data with the BDI (or at least the longitudinal and omics data - + MR and causality).

Nic is working on ALSPAC ( Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children) at the University of Bristol and is interested in discussing the data with the BDI (or at least the longitudinal and omics data - + MR and causality).

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Tue 9 May 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Jenner Seminars

Old Road Campus Research Building, Jenner/Ludwig Seminar Room (Lower Ground Floor), Headington OX3 7DQ

Genetic Diversity in Latin America and its implications in medical genomics

Dr Andres Moreno Estrada

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Tue 9 May 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Aberrant chromatin programming in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

Professor Constanze Bonifer

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 9 May 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Postdoctoral Society Events

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Postdoctoral Society Talks

Natalie Connor-Robson, Tomoko Yamagata

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mattea Finelli

Tue 9 May 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, The Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminars: Safeguarding health in the Anthropocene Epoch

Professor Sir Andy Haines

Audience: Public

Organisers: Natasha Bowyer

Tue 9 May 2017 from 13:00 to 13:40

BDI seminars

In the trenches of systems medicine: Genomic risk scores & new biomarkers

A/Prof Mike Inouye

I'll be presenting recent and new material on a genomic risk score for coronary heart disease (doi:https://doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/ehw450), the GlycA biomarker (doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cels.2015.09.007); and a map of immunometabolism in blood (doi:https://doi.org/10.1101/089839).

I'll be presenting recent and new material on a genomic risk score for coronary heart disease (doi:https://doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/ehw450), the GlycA biomarker (doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cels.2015.09.007); and a map of immunometabolism in blood (doi:https://doi.org/10.1101/089839).

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Wed 10 May 2017 from 09:30 to 10:45

Kyoto Prize at Oxford

Blavatnik School of Government, Accessible building, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter OX2 6GG

Public Lecture with Dr Tasuku Honjo: Serendipities of Acquired Immunity

If the greatest enemies of humankind in the 20th century were infectious diseases, cancer has clearly become the major foe in the 21st century. Acquired immunity holds the keys to overcoming both of these difficult medical challenges. Dr Honjo presents the fortuitous developments that he has... Read more

If the greatest enemies of humankind in the 20th century were infectious diseases, cancer has clearly become the major foe in the 21st century. Acquired immunity holds the keys to overcoming both of these difficult medical challenges. Dr Honjo presents the fortuitous developments that he has experienced during his time as a researcher, leading to the discovery that PD-1 inhibition could be effective in treating cancer. This new breakthrough immunotherapy is being hailed as a 'penicillin moment' in cancer treatment. Dr Tasuku Honjo is the 2016 Kyoto Prize Laureate for Basic Sciences. The Kyoto Prize is an international award to honour those who have contributed significantly to the scientific, cultural, and spiritual betterment of humankind. The Blavatnik School of Government is pleased to host the Kyoto Prize Laureates as part of the inaugural Kyoto Prize at Oxford events.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Wed 10 May 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

The organization of and social practices in a Danish emergency department – possible explanations of the ‘weekend effect’

Iben Duvald

Studies have shown that acute patients admitted to hospitals during weekends experience worse outcomes than those admitted on a weekday (i.e. 30-days mortality, length of stay and number of adverse events). My interdisciplinary PhD-project explores whether the organization of and the social... Read more

Studies have shown that acute patients admitted to hospitals during weekends experience worse outcomes than those admitted on a weekday (i.e. 30-days mortality, length of stay and number of adverse events). My interdisciplinary PhD-project explores whether the organization of and the social practices in an Danish emergency department can explain the existence of this ‘weekend effect’ in the emergency department. The existing studies of the weekend effect are based on epidemiologic analysis. They can explain that a weekend effect exist, but are not able to explain why. The answer to why these variations occur remains unclear. My study is a prolonged 6-months ethnographic study. Fieldwork consisted of app. 700 hours of participant observations in an emergency department, 25 in-depth interviews with nurses, physicians, secretaries, therapists and the management of the department, and 4 focus groups with 16 nurses in total. The empirical material was generated in autumn 2015 in a medium-sized regional hospital in Denmark. In addition I have done a descriptive observational study consisting of 229 adverse events, occurred in the emergency department, reported to the mandatory national reporting system during a two year period (2014-2015). Another possible explanation for the weekend effect is changes in patient characteristics, e.g. disease severity. The existing studies have suggested this may be an explanation. A register-based cohort study is done as well.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Susan Kirkpatrick

Wed 10 May 2017 from 11:00 to 12:30

BDI seminars

Ethical issues in individual-cluster trials: beyond the Ottawa Statement

Cory Evan Goldstein

The conduct of pragmatic randomized controlled trials is increasing due to their societal importance and their role within the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) initiative “to improve the quality and relevance of evidence available to help patients, caregivers, clinicians,... Read more

The conduct of pragmatic randomized controlled trials is increasing due to their societal importance and their role within the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) initiative “to improve the quality and relevance of evidence available to help patients, caregivers, clinicians, employers, insurers, and policy makers make informed health decisions.” Cluster randomized trials (CRTs), in which groups rather than individuals are randomized to intervention and control conditions, naturally tend to be more pragmatic. CRTs may be categorized as “individual-cluster trials” where the intervention is delivered directly to individuals, or “cluster-cluster trials” where interventions are not divisible at the individual-level. The Ottawa Statement is the first comprehensive ethical guidance document specific to CRTs. Whereas the Ottawa Statement generally presumes that informed consent will be sought for individual-cluster trials, such trials—when used to evaluate usual care interventions—raise particular ethical issues that require further analysis and guidance. This paper has three objectives: to (1) describe current practices and reporting of ethical issues in published individual-cluster trials; (2) present an in-depth ethical analysis of an individual-cluster trial randomizing dialysis centers to two different usual care interventions; and (3) identify ethical issues that require further analysis and guidance.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Please note: If you are not a member of the Ethox Team and are planning on coming, please can you email me in advance to let me know

Wed 10 May 2017 from 11:30 to 13:15

Kyoto Prize at Oxford

Blavatnik School of Government, Accessible building, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter OX2 6GG

Public Lecture with Dr Martha Craven Nussbaum: Ageing and Stigma

Age is the only category of discrimination that includes all humans. However, ageing people are stigmatised in popular culture and discourse, and regarded with a disgust closely linked to fear. Dr Nussbaum argues that stigma against the ageing is a social problem, producing unhappiness and... Read more

Age is the only category of discrimination that includes all humans. However, ageing people are stigmatised in popular culture and discourse, and regarded with a disgust closely linked to fear. Dr Nussbaum argues that stigma against the ageing is a social problem, producing unhappiness and injustice such as discrimination in employment and social interactions, not to mention what she calls a ‘huge social evil’ – that of compulsory retirement. Dr Martha Craven Nussbaum is the 2016 Kyoto Prize Laureate for Arts and Philosophy. The Kyoto Prize is an international award to honour those who have contributed significantly to the scientific, cultural, and spiritual betterment of humankind. The Blavatnik School of Government is pleased to host the Kyoto Prize Laureates as part of the inaugural Kyoto Prize at Oxford events.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Wed 10 May 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI Basement seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Public Private Partnerships at NIH’s National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) to Translate Promising Therapies into Treatments for Rare and Neglected Diseases

Dr Nora Yang

Short bio: Senior Scientist, Therapeutics for Rare and Neglected Diseases and Director, Portfolio Management and Strategic Operations, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health Dr. Yang is a leading expert on improving the efficiency and effectiveness of... Read more

Short bio: Senior Scientist, Therapeutics for Rare and Neglected Diseases and Director, Portfolio Management and Strategic Operations, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health Dr. Yang is a leading expert on improving the efficiency and effectiveness of translational sciences, particularly at the intersection of science and business. She directs initiatives to establish novel public-private partnerships to develop new ways of financing biomedical research that maximize benefits for all stakeholders, particularly underserved patient populations. She uses rare disease drug development projects as case studies to work on common translational medicine issues and simulate solutions to affect biomedical research more broadly. Dr. Yang’s other research interests include quantitative and qualitative portfolio impact analyses to promote real-time and data-driven strategic planning and monitoring as a means to facilitate scientific advances. Prior to joining NIH, Dr. Yang led global teams to contribute to the successful development of novel therapies at Eli Lilly & Co. and Amgen, Inc. She also worked with entrepreneurs and VCs to build startup companies. Nora holds a PhD degree in chemistry from the University of California, San Diego, and a Master’s degree in business management from Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Wed 10 May 2017 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

A novel pathway controlling metabolite sensing and ILC function in the intestine

Dr Tim Willinger

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 10 May 2017 from 14:30 to 15:45

Kyoto Prize at Oxford

Blavatnik School of Government, Accessible building, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter OX2 6GG

Public Lecture with Dr Takeo Kanade: Think like an Amateur, Do as an Expert: Fun Research in Computer Vision and Robotics

For Dr Kanade, good research derives from solving real-world problems and delivering useful results to society. As a roboticist, he participated in developing a wide range of computer-vision systems and autonomous robots, including human-face recognition, autonomously-driven cars, computer-assisted... Read more

For Dr Kanade, good research derives from solving real-world problems and delivering useful results to society. As a roboticist, he participated in developing a wide range of computer-vision systems and autonomous robots, including human-face recognition, autonomously-driven cars, computer-assisted surgical robots, robot helicopters, biological live cell tracking through a microscope, and EyeVision, a system used for sports broadcast. Dr Kanade will share insights into his projects and discuss how his “Think like an amateur, do as an expert” maxim interacts with problems and people. Dr Takeo Kanade is the 2016 Kyoto Prize Laureate for Advanced Technology. The Kyoto Prize is an international award to honour those who have contributed significantly to the scientific, cultural, and spiritual betterment of humankind. The Blavatnik School of Government is pleased to host the Kyoto Prize Laureates as part of the inaugural Kyoto Prize at Oxford events.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Wed 10 May 2017 from 17:30 to 19:00

Science, Medicine and Culture in the 19th Century

St Anne's College, Seminar Room 3, Woodstock Road OX2 6HS

Ada Lovelace in her Mathematical Context

Professor Ursula Martin

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 11 May 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

The Ubiquitin System: From Signalling to Cancer

Dr Daniele Guardavaccaro

Research in our laboratory focuses on studying the molecular mechanisms through which the ubiquitin system controls cell growth and proliferation and understanding how deregulation of this network contributes to malignant transformation. We are especially interested in the role of Cullin-RING... Read more

Research in our laboratory focuses on studying the molecular mechanisms through which the ubiquitin system controls cell growth and proliferation and understanding how deregulation of this network contributes to malignant transformation. We are especially interested in the role of Cullin-RING complexes, the largest class of E3 ubiquitin ligases in eukaryotes. Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) share a common catalytic core consisting of a Cullin scaffold and a RING protein which functions as the docking site for ubiquitin conjugating enzymes. The catalytic core of CRL assembles with numerous substrate receptors, which target specific substrates for ubiquitylation. Due to the great diversity of their substrate receptor subunits, over 350 distinct CRLs are present in eukaryotic cells, establishing these enzymes as major mediators of ubiquitin conjugation and key regulators of a wide array of biological processes. Despite their importance, our knowledge of the biological functions, mechanism of action, regulation and physiological partners for most CRLs remains poor. Moreover, the majority of CRLs remains with no established substrates. Therefore, the major goal of our research program is to study the functions of orphan CRLs and systematically identify their biologically significant substrates as well as investigate how deregulation of CRL-mediated ubiquitylation leads to aberrant cell growth and oncogenesis.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Thu 11 May 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1 , Headington OX3 9DU

Clinical Genetics / Renal Unit

Dr Helen Stewart, Prof Chris Winearls, Dr Thomas Connor

Clinical Genetics: "Innovations in genomic medicine", Dr Helen Stewart -- Renal Unit: "CKD; cause uncertain – an energetic search", Dr Thomas Connor and Prof Chris Winearls -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Clinical Genetics: "Innovations in genomic medicine", Dr Helen Stewart -- Renal Unit: "CKD; cause uncertain – an energetic search", Dr Thomas Connor and Prof Chris Winearls -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 12 May 2017 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

When surgeons become patients: occupational health and wellbeing for doctors

Dr Evie Kemp

Dr Evie Kemp is the lead Occupational Health consultant at the Centre for Occupational Health and Wellbeing, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. She has a special interest in physician health and lectures and has run seminars on health and wellbeing for doctors in the UK, Europe and... Read more

Dr Evie Kemp is the lead Occupational Health consultant at the Centre for Occupational Health and Wellbeing, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. She has a special interest in physician health and lectures and has run seminars on health and wellbeing for doctors in the UK, Europe and North America. She is a member of the Faculty of Occupational Medicine Health for Health Professionals steering group, which coordinates enhanced competency training for Occupational Health physicians who see doctors as patients. She is also the Occupational Health physician for Oxford Deanery and sees junior doctors in need of support. Evie is qualified in cognitive behavioural therapy skills and is interested in the role of cognitive behaviour therapy in the Occupational Health consultation.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 12 May 2017 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

A novel innate immune pathway induces antigen presentation to CD8+ T cells

Dr Daniele Corridoni

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 12 May 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Mon 15 May 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI Basement seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

"Vaccination against chronic diseases" by Prof Bachmann & “VLP Vaccine approach for Parkinson’s Disease” by Dr. El-Turabi

Prof Martin Bachmann, Dr. Aadil El-Turabi

Bio: Prof Martin Bachmann (Jenner Institute, University of Oxford) Martin Bachmann (48) grew up near Winterthur and studied Cell Biology at the ETH Zurich. He then went on to perform his doctoral studies in Immunology at the lab of Hans Hengartner and Rolf Zinkernagel in Zurich. Both his diploma... Read more

Bio: Prof Martin Bachmann (Jenner Institute, University of Oxford) Martin Bachmann (48) grew up near Winterthur and studied Cell Biology at the ETH Zurich. He then went on to perform his doctoral studies in Immunology at the lab of Hans Hengartner and Rolf Zinkernagel in Zurich. Both his diploma and doctoral thesis were honored with a silver medal from the ETH. After graduating he worked for two year as a post-doc in the lab of Prof Pam Ohashi in Toronto and then became a member at the Basel Institute for Immunology. From the end of 1999 to 2012 Martin Bachmann was the CSO for Cytos Biotechnology in Schlieren. After leaving Cytos, he held various positions as guest lecturer at the University of Zurich, professor of Immunology in Oxford, research director of the cancer center in Doha, Quatar and full professor in Bern. The focus of his research is the translation of novel immunological insights into therapeutics with clinical applications. He has helped develop 7 immune therapeutics from bench to bedside and clinical efficacy of several vaccines and immune modulators has been proven. CAD106, a vaccine against Alzheimer’s disease, is in phase III trials with Novartis at the moment. Martin is the author of over 240 scientific publications and his work has been cited over 20’000 times. He is the inventor on more than 40 filed or granted patents. As the successor of Beda Stadler he now works as tenured professor for Immunology in Bern. Bio: Dr. Aadil El-Turabi (Jenner Institute, University of Oxford) Dr. Aadil El-Turabi Over a varied research career spanning academia, biotech and pharma including periods at Covance, Novartis and iQur (in the UK, Switzerland and Jordon), Aadil's interests have squarely focused on translational research projects with therapeutic and diagnostic potential. He initially read Biochemistry with Molecular Biology (BSc(Hons)) at the University of Leeds, and enjoyed the natural beauty of the Yorkshire Dales so much that he stuck around to pick up a PhD whilst studying human Adenovirus receptors (in the lab of Prof G. Eric Blair). This was followed up with a postdoctoral position in Molecular Virology (with Prof Dave Rowlands) that brought him in to the world of virus-like particles (VLPs). He was awarded an Enterprise Research Fellowship that paved the way for a licensing deal that saw him move to iQur Ltd, a SME specialising in detection, treatment and monitoring of Hepatitis C and other liver diseases. There he was involved with initiating research programs that soon focused on therapeutic VLP vaccine approach, and he became Head of Protein Production and Bioprocessing. In 2014, Aadil joined the University of Oxford as a founding member of the newly formed Bachmann group at the Jenner Institute. Since then he has enjoyed pursuing several ambitious vaccine targets in the fields of neurodegeneration and inflammatory disorders (e.g. Parkinson’s Disease and Psoriasis, to name a few)."

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Mon 15 May 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71a, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

Mon 15 May 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Regulatory T cell Fitness in Type 1 Diabetes - using a gene signature

Anne M Pesenacker, PhD

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 15 May 2017 from 12:30 to 13:30

WTCHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

Family-based integrative approaches to elucidate the genetic architecture of spondyloarthritis

Félicie Costantino

Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is a common chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease with a strong genetic component. More than 40 susceptibility loci have been uncovered but they explain only a small fraction of disease predisposition. Some of the missing heredity probably lies in rare variants with large... Read more

Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is a common chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease with a strong genetic component. More than 40 susceptibility loci have been uncovered but they explain only a small fraction of disease predisposition. Some of the missing heredity probably lies in rare variants with large effects and family-based designs might help to identify them. Study of a large set of multiplex families from the French genetic group of SpA led to the identification of a chromosomal region showing significantly linked with SpA on 13q13. Analysis of the ultra-deep sequencing of this region is underway. Context-specific gene expression and epigenetic processes are also useful to better understand SpA genetic architecture. Study of gene expression in monocyte-derived dendritic cells from SpA patients and their unaffected siblings has highlighted an unexpected dysregulated pathway: lipid metabolism regulation. It also revealed that SpA-associated ERAP1 haplotypes influence gene expression. Biography Félicie Costantino, MD, PhD, is Assistant Professor in the Rheumatology Department of Ambroise Paré University Hospital (Boulogne-Billancourt, France) headed by Prof. Maxime Breban. She obtained a PhD in Genetics from Paris-Descartes University in 2013 and works in the INSERM UMR 1173 “Infection and Inflammation” Research Unit led by Prof. Gilles Chiocchia at Versailles-Saint-Quentin University. Her research interest is focused on SpA and her main goal is to identify the genetic determinants of the disease by combining genetic and functional genomic studies in family context. Key publications - A family-based genome-wide association study reveals an association of spondyloarthritis with MAPK14. Costantino F. et al (2017) Ann Rheum Dis, 75:310-314. - Whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism-based linkage analysis in spondyloarthritis multiplex families reveals a new susceptibility locus in 13q13. Costantino F. et al (2016) Ann Rheum Dis, 75, 1380-1385. - ERAP1 gene expression is influenced by non-synonymous polymorphisms associated with predisposition to spondyloarthritis. Costantino F. et al (2015) Arthritis Rheumatol, 67, 1525-1534.

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 15 May 2017 from 14:00 to 15:00

WTCHG Seminars

Big Data Institute, Lower Ground Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Bayesian multivariate re-analysis of large genetic studies identifies many novel associations

Michael Turchin

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are now a common tool to identify genetic variants that affect traits of interest. To date, the NHGRI GWAS Catalog has over 24,000 SNP-phenotype associations. However, the vast majority of these GWAS are conducted in univariate frameworks, ie when genetic... Read more

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are now a common tool to identify genetic variants that affect traits of interest. To date, the NHGRI GWAS Catalog has over 24,000 SNP-phenotype associations. However, the vast majority of these GWAS are conducted in univariate frameworks, ie when genetic variants are only tested against a single phenotype one at a time. This is in contrast to multivariate frameworks where genetic variants are tested against different combinations of traits simultaneously. Under many biological scenarios, taking into account the context of multiple phenotypes drastically increases power. Additionally, by testing combinations of traits, multivariate frameworks allow researchers to investigate a greater level of biological complexity. Despite these clear advantages, multivariate analyses are seldom implemented. Univariate GWAS already involve a large computational and statistical burden; performing an additional, exponentially greater number of tests is highly deterring. Furthermore, it is often unclear how to properly compare different multivariate models even when they can be efficiently conducted. Here, we present a framework and R package that alleviates these obstacles -- Bayesian multivariate analysis of summary statistics, or bmass. bmass runs solely using univariate GWAS summary statistics. bmass can quickly conduct all possible multivariate analyses for up to 8 phenotypes. And bmass provides Bayes factors for each multivariate analysis, thus allowing models to be directly compared. Running bmass on various publicly available GWAS datasets consistently show an increase in power up to 40% over univariate approaches while keeping FDRs as low as 15%. bmass identifies many new significant associations as well as the phenotypic combinations driving these associations, thus providing novel levels of biological insight. Overall, bmass is a powerful tool that should further enable researchers to perform multivariate analysis of GWAS.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Gil McVean

Mon 15 May 2017 from 14:00 to 15:00

BDI seminars

Bayesian multivariate re-analysis of large genetic studies identifies many novel associations

Michael Turchin

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are now a common tool to identify genetic variants that affect traits of interest. To date, the NHGRI GWAS Catalog has over 24,000 SNP-phenotype associations. However, the vast majority of these GWAS are conducted in univariate frameworks, ie when genetic... Read more

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are now a common tool to identify genetic variants that affect traits of interest. To date, the NHGRI GWAS Catalog has over 24,000 SNP-phenotype associations. However, the vast majority of these GWAS are conducted in univariate frameworks, ie when genetic variants are only tested against a single phenotype one at a time. This is in contrast to multivariate frameworks where genetic variants are tested against different combinations of traits simultaneously. Under many biological scenarios, taking into account the context of multiple phenotypes drastically increases power. Additionally, by testing combinations of traits, multivariate frameworks allow researchers to investigate a greater level of biological complexity. Despite these clear advantages, multivariate analyses are seldom implemented. Univariate GWAS already involve a large computational and statistical burden; performing an additional, exponentially greater number of tests is highly deterring. Furthermore, it is often unclear how to properly compare different multivariate models even when they can be efficiently conducted. Here, we present a framework and R package that alleviates these obstacles -- Bayesian multivariate analysis of summary statistics, or bmass. bmass runs solely using univariate GWAS summary statistics. bmass can quickly conduct all possible multivariate analyses for up to 8 phenotypes. And bmass provides Bayes factors for each multivariate analysis, thus allowing models to be directly compared. Running bmass on various publicly available GWAS datasets consistently show an increase in power up to 40% over univariate approaches while keeping FDRs as low as 15%. bmass identifies many new significant associations as well as the phenotypic combinations driving these associations, thus providing novel levels of biological insight. Overall, bmass is a powerful tool that should further enable researchers to perform multivariate analysis of GWAS.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natasha Bowyer

Mon 15 May 2017 from 15:00 to 16:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Room 3, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

Thinking of Incentivizing Care? The Effect of Demand Subsidies on Informal Caregiving and Intergenerational Transfers

Sergi Jimenez

We still know little about what motivates the informal care arrangements provided in old age. Evidence from demand-side subsidies such as unconditional caregiving allowances (cash benefits designed either to incentivize the purchase of care, or compensate for the loss of employment of informal... Read more

We still know little about what motivates the informal care arrangements provided in old age. Evidence from demand-side subsidies such as unconditional caregiving allowances (cash benefits designed either to incentivize the purchase of care, or compensate for the loss of employment of informal caregivers) provide an opportunity to gain a further understanding of the matter. We exploit a quasi-natural experiment to identify the effects of the inception in 2007 (and reduction in 2012) of a universal caregiving allowance on the supply of informal care, and subsequent intergenerational transfer flows. We find evidence of a 30% rise in informal caregiving, which amounts to 27% of long-term care expenditure, and an increase (reduction) in downstream (upstream) intergenerational transfers of 29% (and 15%). The effects were attenuated by a subsequent policy intervention; the reduction of the subsidy amidst austerity cuts in 2012. Individuals in middle and lower income and wealthy quintiles mainly drive these effects.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Catia Nicodemo

Mon 15 May 2017 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, please note new date, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Molecular and structural determinants of Alpha-Synuclein aggregation, toxicity and pathology spreading in Parkinson's disease: From mechanisms to novel biomarkers and therapies

Hilal Lashuel

Professor Hilal Lashuel is an Associate Professor of Life Sciences and Director of the Laboratory of Chemical Biology of Neurodegeneration, Brain Mind Institute at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne, Switzerland. Research efforts in Lashuel’s laboratory cover the following... Read more

Professor Hilal Lashuel is an Associate Professor of Life Sciences and Director of the Laboratory of Chemical Biology of Neurodegeneration, Brain Mind Institute at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne, Switzerland. Research efforts in Lashuel’s laboratory cover the following topics: (1) Elucidating the structural basis of amyloid-associated toxicity in neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases; (2) Developing innovative chemical approaches and novel tools to monitor and control protein folding, self-assembly and post-translational modification in vitro and in vivo; (3) Identifying and validating new therapeutic targets for treating Parkinson’s disease; (4) Developing novel therapeutic strategies to treat neurodegenerative diseases based on modulation of protein aggregation and clearance. http://lashuel-lab.epfl.ch/

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sara Bouskela

PLEASE NOTE New Date

Tue 16 May 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, The Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

* CANCELLED * Richard Doll Seminars: Measuring and visualising worldwide trends in cardiovascular risk factors

Professor Majid Ezzati

Please note that this seminar has been postponed until the autumn.

Please note that this seminar has been postponed until the autumn.

Audience: Public

Wed 17 May 2017 from 11:30 to 12:30

BDI seminars

Getting numbers out of cells - applications of deep neural networks to microscopy image compendia

Dr Leopold Parts

High throughput microscopy generates high-dimensional data that are far from straightforward to analyze. I will describe our work in using deep neural networks to derive qualitative descriptors (e.g. subcellular localization of a fluorescent protein, or tissue of a histopathology image) and... Read more

High throughput microscopy generates high-dimensional data that are far from straightforward to analyze. I will describe our work in using deep neural networks to derive qualitative descriptors (e.g. subcellular localization of a fluorescent protein, or tissue of a histopathology image) and quantitative features (such as abundance of a tagged protein in cell membrane) from images. We apply these ideas to the publicly available GTEX tissue histology dataset, and yeast GFP collection micrographs.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Wed 17 May 2017 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Exploiting neo-antigens for cancer immunotherapies

Dr John Castle

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 17 May 2017 from 16:00 to 18:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Room 1, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

* CANCELLED * Title TBC

Professor Conti

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Catia Nicodemo

Thu 18 May 2017 from 09:30 to 10:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Highly multiplexed imaging of tissues with subcellular resolution by imaging mass cytometry

Dr Hartland W. Jackson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 18 May 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Medical Ethics / OCDEM

Prof John Paris (Boston College), Dr Shoaib Khan, Dr Aparna Pal, Dr Victoria Hedges

Medical Ethics: "The ethics of Voluntary Stopping of Eating and Drinking in Palliative care", Dr Victoria Hedges and Prof John Paris (Boston College) -- OCDEM: "Funny TFTs", Dr Shoaib Khan and Dr Aparna Pal -- Chair: Prof Chris O'Callaghan

Medical Ethics: "The ethics of Voluntary Stopping of Eating and Drinking in Palliative care", Dr Victoria Hedges and Prof John Paris (Boston College) -- OCDEM: "Funny TFTs", Dr Shoaib Khan and Dr Aparna Pal -- Chair: Prof Chris O'Callaghan

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 18 May 2017 from 18:00 to 19:30

Green Templeton College, E P Abraham lecture Theatre, Woodstock Road OX2 6HG

The complexity of low value care

Roberto Grilli

There is a growing awareness that resources are wasted in clinical practice through the overutilisation of health services, whenever interventions of low clinical value are used or, alternatively, when effective ones are adopted but in clinical indications in which their risk/benefit profile is... Read more

There is a growing awareness that resources are wasted in clinical practice through the overutilisation of health services, whenever interventions of low clinical value are used or, alternatively, when effective ones are adopted but in clinical indications in which their risk/benefit profile is unfavourable. However, tackling health services overuse is challenging, and several practical, methodological, and policy problems have to be overcome to allow the assessment of its prevalence, the identification of its main determinants and, eventually, design and implementation of interventions able to achieve the desirable changes in clinical practice. The presentation is aimed at exploring some of those aspects, outlining how they are addressed in the Local Health Authority of Reggio Emilia, the local organisation of the Italian NHS responsible for the provision of care to the 500,000 residents of that province.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Ruth Loseby

Fri 19 May 2017 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

William Osler and his Legacy to Medicine

Professor David Cranston

Sir William Osler was a Canadian physician and one of the four founding professors of Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S. Osler created the first residency programme for specialty training of physicians, and he was the first to bring medical students out of the lecture hall for... Read more

Sir William Osler was a Canadian physician and one of the four founding professors of Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S. Osler created the first residency programme for specialty training of physicians, and he was the first to bring medical students out of the lecture hall for bedside clinical training. He has frequently been described as the "Father of Modern Medicine" and one of the "greatest diagnosticians ever to wield a stethoscope". In this talk, Professor David Cranston, tells the story of William Osler's life and career.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 19 May 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

A/Professor Tudor Fulga, WIMM - 'A multiplex genome engineering platform for in situ functional discovery of RNA cis-regulatory elements'

A/Professor Tudor Fulga

RNA regulatory elements (RREs) are an important yet relatively under-explored facet of gene regulation. Deciphering the prevalence and functional impact of this post-transcriptional control layer requires technologies for disrupting the endogenous activity of RREs without perturbing cellular... Read more

RNA regulatory elements (RREs) are an important yet relatively under-explored facet of gene regulation. Deciphering the prevalence and functional impact of this post-transcriptional control layer requires technologies for disrupting the endogenous activity of RREs without perturbing cellular homeostasis. We have developed the genome-engineering based evaluation of RNA regulatory element activity (GenERA) approach, a CRISPR/Cas9 arrayed screening platform for high-content functional analysis of native RREs. The conceptual framework of this technology entails generation of complex sets of NHEJ-induced genomic deletions tiled over RREs, and precisely assessing the impact of each individual event on transcript abundance. We use GenERA to survey the entire regulatory landscape of a candidate 3’UTR, and apply it in a multiplex fashion to analyze combinatorial interactions between sets of miRNA response elements (MREs). We also demonstrate that GenERA is amenable to analysis of large numbers of RREs, and employ it to probe the functionality of a MRE network under cellular homeostasis.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Fri 19 May 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

From Academia to Biotech Account Management

Dr Clare Marchant

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Alice Mayer

Mon 22 May 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

Regulation of genome maintenance throughout the cell cycle

Marcel A.T.M van Vugt PhD

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eric O'Neill

Mon 22 May 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Krebs Cycle reprogrammed for Cytokines

Professor Luke O’Neill

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 22 May 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Stem cell niches in bone marrow

Sean Morrison

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Tue 23 May 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI Basement seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Modelling breast cancer using human tumour explants

Prof Carlos Caldas

Bio: Professor Caldas holds the Chair of Cancer Medicine at the University of Cambridge since 2002. He heads the Breast Cancer Functional Genomics Laboratory at the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Research Institute. He is an Honorary Consultant Medical Oncologist at Addenbrooke’s Hospital, and... Read more

Bio: Professor Caldas holds the Chair of Cancer Medicine at the University of Cambridge since 2002. He heads the Breast Cancer Functional Genomics Laboratory at the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Research Institute. He is an Honorary Consultant Medical Oncologist at Addenbrooke’s Hospital, and Director of the Breast Cancer Programme at the CRUK Cancer Centre. He is Fellow of the American College of Physicians, the Royal College of Physicians and the Royal College of Pathologists. He has been elected a Fellow of the Academy of the Medical Sciences, a Fellow of the European Academy of Cancer Sciences, and an EMBO Member. In 2016 he received the ESMO Hamilton Fairley Award. Professor Carlos Caldas is a graduate from the University of Lisbon Medical School and trained in Internal Medicine at UT Southwestern, Dallas and Medical Oncology at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore. He then completed a research fellowship at the Institute of Cancer Research in London. In 1996 he moved to Cambridge where he has directed a research group working on the genetic alterations underlying human epithelial malignancies, with a particular focus on breast cancer. His current research focus is in the functional genomics of breast cancer and its biological and clinical implications. His main clinical interest is in breast cancer chemotherapy and novel molecularly targeted therapies. He has published over 300 peer-reviewed papers including in New England Journal of Medicine, Nature, Cell, Nature Genetics, Nature Medicine, Cancer Cell, Science Translational Medicine, PNAS, Cancer Research, Clinical Cancer Research, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Genome Biology, PLOS Biology, PLOS Medicine, Lancet Oncology, Breast Cancer Research and Oncogene.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Tue 23 May 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Alarmin HMGB1 orchestrates tissue regeneration

Marco E. Bianchi

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Tue 23 May 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

MHU Student Presentations

Hannah Ralph; Helen Doolittle; Helena Francis

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 23 May 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, The Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminars: Predicting and evaluating the impact of the UK Sugar Drink Industry Levy

Associate Professor Peter Scarborough

Audience: Public

Organisers: Natasha Bowyer

Tue 23 May 2017 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Small Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Cerebrospinal and serum alpha-synuclein species as potential biomarkers for Parkinson’s disease

Prof. Omar El-Agnaf

Developing effective treatments for neurodegenerative diseases is one of the greatest medical challenges of the 21st century. Parkinson’s disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are very common neurological disorders of the elderly. Although many of these clinical entities have been... Read more

Developing effective treatments for neurodegenerative diseases is one of the greatest medical challenges of the 21st century. Parkinson’s disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are very common neurological disorders of the elderly. Although many of these clinical entities have been recognized for more than a hundred years, it is only during the past fifteen years that the molecular events that precipitate the diseases have begun to be understood. Mutations in the alpha-synuclein gene cause early-onset PD, often associated with dementia. Neuropathologically these diseases are characterized by the presence of Lewy bodies, intraneuronal inclusions mostly composed of alpha-synuclein protein fibrils. Despite the progress that has been made in understanding the underlying disease mechanisms of PD and DLB, there remains an urgent need to develop methods for use in diagnosis. The development of reliable surrogate markers for the presence and abundance of alpha-synuclein lesions (Lewy bodies) in the brain would naturally facilitate a more streamlined work-up during the early care of PD and DLB patients, and importantly, allow for the biologically guided evaluation of future drug trials aimed at neuroprotection in the synucleinopathies. In this seminar, I will present the progress which has been made so far by our group to explore the use of CSF α-synuclein and its modified forms as biomarkers for PD and related disorders. About Prof Omar El-Agnaf: Prof. El-Agnaf is considered a pioneer in the field of Parkinson’s disease and related disorders. Several inventions have emerged from his research, and his discoveries have greatly impacted the scientific research community, provided further insight into the molecular pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease, and offered new opportunities for the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic tools for Parkinson’s disease. His research has also been translated into clinical studies to evaluate the potential use of α-synuclein in body fluids as diagnostic marker for Parkinson’s disease and related disorders.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Please note, talk in small lecture theatre

Wed 24 May 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Alternatives to face-to-face consultations in primary and secondary care

Anne-Marie Boylan, Sara Shaw, Joe Wherton, Sue Ziebland

Technologically-supported alternatives to face-to-face consultations (e.g. Skype, email) are often viewed as a solution to the complex challenges of delivering healthcare to an ageing and increasingly diverse population. Concerns have been expressed that alternative consultations may be clinically... Read more

Technologically-supported alternatives to face-to-face consultations (e.g. Skype, email) are often viewed as a solution to the complex challenges of delivering healthcare to an ageing and increasingly diverse population. Concerns have been expressed that alternative consultations may be clinically unsafe and less acceptable to patients and that they bring significant technical, logistical and regulatory challenges. The current evidence base, however, remains weak. This seminar will examine the potential of alternatives to face-to-face consultations through a series of short talks on four separate research studies in primary and secondary care. Individual talks will be followed by panel discussion and Q&A with the audience. Virtual online consultations in general practice Sara Shaw, Interdisciplinary Research in Health Sciences (IRIHS), Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences The potential of alternatives to face to face consultation in general practice, and the impact on different patient groups Sue Ziebland, Health Experiences Research Group (HERG), Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences A content analysis of email consultations between general practitioners and patients in two general practices Anne-Marie Boylan, Health Experiences Research Group (HERG), Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences VOCAL: online remote consultations in diabetes and cancer Joe Wherton, Interdisciplinary Research in Health Sciences (IRIHS), Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences This seminar follows from an event on ‘Digital Health in Primary Care’ organised by Digital Health Oxford (DHOx) in 2016. For more information please visit the event page (https://www.meetup.com/Digital-Health-Oxford/events/230141103/) and recordings of presentations by Helen Atherton from Warwick Medical School (https://vimeo.com/169835364), Steve Lillywhite from WebGP (https://vimeo.com/169834896) and Matteo Berlucchi from your.MD (https://vimeo.com/169083326).

Booking Recommended

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Chrysanthi Papoutsi

Wed 24 May 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

John Radcliffe West Wing and Children's Hospital, Seminar Room A/B, Level 6, West Wing, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington OX3 9DU

Detection of RNA in the central and peripheral nervous system using the RNAscope® in situ hybridization assay Application of RNAscope® and BaseScope™ in Neuroscience Research

Faraia Shah, Matthew Nolan

The nervous system consists of numerous specialized cell types that remain to fully cataloged and characterized at the molecular level. Due to the high degree of structural and functional heterogeneity and the intricate spatial organization of these cells, it is of special importance to analyze... Read more

The nervous system consists of numerous specialized cell types that remain to fully cataloged and characterized at the molecular level. Due to the high degree of structural and functional heterogeneity and the intricate spatial organization of these cells, it is of special importance to analyze gene expression in the presence of full morphological and spatial contexts. Due to the lack of specific antibody reagents, especially for lncRNAs, G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and ion channels, mapping of specific transcripts by in situ hybridization offers an excellent alternative approach. The RNAscope® assay provides a powerful method to detect gene expression within the spatial and morphological tissue context. BaseScopeTM is a novel in situ hybridization technology that allows visualization of splice junctions between adjacent exons and/or retained introns in highly specific and sensitive manner, allowing characterization of alternative splicing and circular RNAs in cells and tissues.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Matthew Nolan

Wed 24 May 2017 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

When MAITs matter – microbial defence and drug modulation

Dr Sidonia Eckle

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 24 May 2017 from 13:30 to 14:30

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Ludwig Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7DQ

Early Observations on the Use of EGFRvIII-directed CART cells for Human Glioblastoma: Clinical Results and Future Directions

Donald M. O’Rourke, M.D

We initiated a first-in-human pilot study of intravenous delivery of a single dose of autologous T cells re-directed to the EGFR variant III (EGFRvIII) mutation by means of a lentiviral vector encoding a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). We report our findings on the first ten recurrent glioblastoma... Read more

We initiated a first-in-human pilot study of intravenous delivery of a single dose of autologous T cells re-directed to the EGFR variant III (EGFRvIII) mutation by means of a lentiviral vector encoding a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). We report our findings on the first ten recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) patients treated. We found that manufacturing and infusion of CART- EGFRvIII cells is feasible and safe, without evidence of off-tumor toxicity or cytokine release syndrome. One patient has had residual stable disease for over 18 months of follow-up. All patients demonstrated detectable transient expansion of CART-EGFRvIII cells in peripheral blood. Seven patients had post-CART surgical intervention, which allowed for tissue-specific analysis of CART-EGFRvIII trafficking to the tumor, phenotyping of tumor-infiltrating T cells and the tumor microenvironment in situ, and analysis of post-therapy EGFRvIII target antigen expression. Imaging findings after CART immunotherapy were complex, further reinforcing the need for pathologic sampling in infused patients. We found trafficking of CART-EGFRvIII cells across the blood brain barrier to regions of active glioblastoma accompanied by CART cell activation, with antigen decrease in five of these seven patients. In situ evaluation of the tumor environment demonstrated increased and robust expression of inhibitory molecules and infiltration by regulatory T cells after CART infusion, compared to pre-CART infusion tumor specimens. Our initial experience with CAR T cells in recurrent glioblastoma suggests that although intravenous infusion results in CART cell bioactivity in the brain, overcoming the adaptive changes in the local tumor microenvironment and addressing the antigen heterogeneity may improve the efficacy of EGFRvIII-directed strategies in GBM.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne-Marie Honeyman-Tafa

Thu 25 May 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Reflections on the Complex Molecular and Clinical Nature of Li-Fraumeni Syndrome

Prof David Malkin

The causal association of germline TP53 mutations with development of cancer in individuals with the Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS) cancer predisposition phenotype was initially described in 1990. Since then, technical advances in genetic and genomic sequencing, enhanced understanding of the biology of... Read more

The causal association of germline TP53 mutations with development of cancer in individuals with the Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS) cancer predisposition phenotype was initially described in 1990. Since then, technical advances in genetic and genomic sequencing, enhanced understanding of the biology of p53, creation and study of mouse models of p53 deficiency and mutant p53, and extensive annotation of the evolving clinical phenotype has improved our knowledge of this relatively rare syndrome. Several challenges remain to be overcome; these include 1) the molecular landscape of cancers associated with germline TP53 mutations is poorly understood; 2) effective means of tumor prevention and treatment are lacking; and 3) prediction of tumor type or age of onset are difficult. This lecture will examine the progress made to date in understanding the molecular and clinical aspects of the p53-LFS relationship and will explore early clues that will help address the remaining challenges.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Thu 25 May 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Haematology / Psychological Medicine

Dr Michael Yousif, Prof Paresh Vyas

Haematology: "Tracking cancer through treatment to improve outcome – using Acute Myeloid Leukaemia as an examplar: opportunities and challenges for the NHS", Prof Paresh Vyas -- Psychological Medicine: "Enforced treatment; medicine and the law", Dr Michael Yousif -- Chair: Prof Chris Pugh

Haematology: "Tracking cancer through treatment to improve outcome – using Acute Myeloid Leukaemia as an examplar: opportunities and challenges for the NHS", Prof Paresh Vyas -- Psychological Medicine: "Enforced treatment; medicine and the law", Dr Michael Yousif -- Chair: Prof Chris Pugh

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 25 May 2017 from 14:30 to 15:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Radcliffe Humanities, Colin Matthew Room, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Patient and Public Involvement in Medical Research - Q&A Session

Lynne Maddocks

An open session of questions and answers for all medical research staff working in Oxford. Whatever your PPI questions this is the place to air them. Our hosts can offer expert advice and guidance on all your PPI queries. Each session begins with a 10 minute introductory talk by the host on topics... Read more

An open session of questions and answers for all medical research staff working in Oxford. Whatever your PPI questions this is the place to air them. Our hosts can offer expert advice and guidance on all your PPI queries. Each session begins with a 10 minute introductory talk by the host on topics suggested by previous questions. Places are limited, if you are coming please let the host know at least a day before the event. If you want to send your question in advance please contact that session’s host

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Lynne Maddocks

Fri 26 May 2017 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Key hole implantation of a new aortic valve in the conscious patient: TAVI in 2017

Professor Adrian Banning

Professor Adrian Banning has been a Consultant Interventional Cardiologist at the John Radcliffe Hospital since 1999. He uses coronary stents to treat patients with angina and heart attack and since 2009 has been implanting new aortic valves (TAVI) from the femoral artery. This technology continues... Read more

Professor Adrian Banning has been a Consultant Interventional Cardiologist at the John Radcliffe Hospital since 1999. He uses coronary stents to treat patients with angina and heart attack and since 2009 has been implanting new aortic valves (TAVI) from the femoral artery. This technology continues to transform treatment of valvular disease to the extent that day case replacement of a heart valve is “just around the corner”.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 26 May 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

NDM Seminar Series

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Central T cell tolerance: How to stay out of trouble and Emerging roles of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Tumor Suppression and Therapy

Prof Georg Hollander, Professor Gareth Bond

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kathryn Smith

Fri 26 May 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

A/Professor Ulrike Gruneberg MD, A/Professor of Experimental Pathology - 'Regulation of chromosome segregation in mammalian cells'

A/Professor Ulrike Gruneberg MD

Cell division is the fundamental basis for growth and development of an organism. Millions of cell divisions have to occur before an organism reaches its final size, and throughout the life span of an organism blood, skin and intestinal cells have to be constantly replaced by further cell... Read more

Cell division is the fundamental basis for growth and development of an organism. Millions of cell divisions have to occur before an organism reaches its final size, and throughout the life span of an organism blood, skin and intestinal cells have to be constantly replaced by further cell divisions. High fidelity of cell division is therefore critical to prevent chromosome mis-segregation. Indeed, aneuploidy, the consequence of incorrect chromosome segregation, is considered a hallmark as well as a driving force for tumorigenesis. The goal of my lab’s research is to elucidate the mechanisms that ensure accurate microtubule-kinetochore attachment and chromosome segregation during mammalian mitosis. In particular, we are interested in understanding how stable attachments of the chromosomes to the microtubules - a pre-requisite for accurate chromosome segregation - are achieved and how this is monitored within the cell.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Fri 26 May 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

"The role of histone demethylase LSD1/KDM1A in zebrafish haematopoiesis"

Makoto Kobayashi

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Tue 30 May 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, BDI seminar room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar: eScience and Accelerometry

Dr Vincent van Hees

Abstract: In this talk I will summarise what we do at the Netherlands eScience Center in Amsterdam, and I will give some examples of the projects I have been working on in Epilepsy detection, radio astronomy, and deep learning for time series. Next, I will zoom in on my work in relation to raw data... Read more

Abstract: In this talk I will summarise what we do at the Netherlands eScience Center in Amsterdam, and I will give some examples of the projects I have been working on in Epilepsy detection, radio astronomy, and deep learning for time series. Next, I will zoom in on my work in relation to raw data accelerometry. Here, I will touch on the heuristic methods I embedded in my R package GGIR, and my current explorations to enhance these conventional methods with Python based Hidden semi-Markov models. Biography: Vincent holds a PhD in Epidemiology from the University of Cambridge and did a post-doc at Newcastle University. Central theme of Vincent’s work has been the development of algorithms to process data from wearable movement sensors as used for population research on human behaviour. At the Netherlands eScience Center, Vincent’s current focus is on novel approaches for time series and sensor data analysis. Vincent published several journal articles on algorithms for automatic interpretation of movement sensor data, and translated his expertise in a generic open source R package GGIR (vignette, github), which has so far been used in over 20 academic publications.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Tue 30 May 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Towards the understanding of molecular mechanisms of epigenetic reporgramming in vivo

Dr. Petra Hajkova

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 30 May 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, The Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminars: Professor David Taggart

Professor David Taggart

Audience: Public

Organisers: Natasha Bowyer

Wed 31 May 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

“Tailoring” of evidence-based messages: worth the effort?

Dr Ingmarie Skoglund

Background: Marketing theory suggests that for effective knowledge translation, we should tailor the way we present scientific evidence to take account of the beliefs, attitudes and motivation of our intended audience. The evidence on how to tailor evidence-based messages is limited. This study, in... Read more

Background: Marketing theory suggests that for effective knowledge translation, we should tailor the way we present scientific evidence to take account of the beliefs, attitudes and motivation of our intended audience. The evidence on how to tailor evidence-based messages is limited. This study, in Swedish general practice, sought to test the impact of a systematic approach to message tailoring. Aim: Using ACE inhibitor prescribing for hypertension, to test the hypothesis that evidence-based drug information provided to GPs in “tailored” format (that is, adjusted according to their initial attitudes and motivation) would have more influence on prescribing behaviour than evidence based drug information provided with no tailoring, and to identify the key drivers influencing their prescribing decision. Study design: Three-phase study comprising exploratory focus groups, cross-sectional survey of attitudes and randomised controlled trial (RCT). Methods: Focus groups with 16 GPs explored attitudes to evidence-based medicine and drug prescribing. These findings fed into the design and refinement of a postal survey to 368 GPs to generate quantitative data on these attitudes. In the RCT, 14 medical information officers providing drug information were pair-wise matched and randomized into an intervention or control group. The intervention group was trained to provide evidence-based drug information tailored by motivational interviewing with the GP and also based on key findings from the focus group study. The control group provided standard evidence-based drug information without tailoring. In total, 991 GPs were included in the study (408 intervention and 583 control). The primary outcome measure was change in proportion of ACE inhibitor prescribed relative to the sum of ACE inhibitors and Angiotensin II receptor blockers, during 0–3 and 4–6 months after the intervention. These data were analyzed with multiple linear regression, by intention-to-treat and per protocol. Results: Focus group data indicated strongly that the primary influence on GPs’ drug prescribing decisions was an expectation of “prompt and pragmatic benefit”. The survey indicated a range of views on evidence-based medicine and information from the pharmaceutical industry, with most GPs (especially women) perceiving the information from industry as excessive and the quality of public information as high and useful. The category “prompt and pragmatic benefit” was used to influence the training of medical information officers in the intervention group, so that they focused primarily on this element when providing information to GPs. The RCT demonstrated statistically significant improvements in the primary outcome measure in both groups following the intervention, but no statistically significant differences between the groups. General conclusions and implications: Whilst it is possible to tailor evidence-based information to GPs and train medical information officers to deliver a personalized information service, the impact on prescribing behaviour may be no better than when standard information is provided. This study calls into question the recommendation to tailor information. A discussion on the benefit of tailoring will be invited from the audience.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof Trish Greenhalgh