Other Seminars

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Thu 1 Jun 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

* CANCELLED * CANCELLED - Building personalised risk maps to improve health outcomes

Darren Wright

The role of preventative services in improving health outcomes has long been recognised. However, outcomes have frequently proven difficult to measure, particularly in relation to socioeconomic factors. At the same time, there is lack of investment in areas such as housing support and access to... Read more

The role of preventative services in improving health outcomes has long been recognised. However, outcomes have frequently proven difficult to measure, particularly in relation to socioeconomic factors. At the same time, there is lack of investment in areas such as housing support and access to employment, which can potentially have a positive impact on health outcomes. This talk will discuss the outcomes measurement system, developed by Inside Outcomes which builds personalised risk maps for individuals. The risk map system is based on a methodology that identifies the full range of risks and protective factors that patients present with to health and wellbeing services. Examples of risks to individual health and wellbeing can range from being the victim of domestic abuse, to smoking, through to unmanaged blood pressure. The removal of these risks will generally lead to an improved health outcome. The flexibility of the system allows it to be equally applicable in primary care, public health commissioned preventative services or more indirect health providers such as housing associations. Equally, as the system is applied in the same manner across very different service types it allows the outcomes from those services to be compared. The seminar will trace the development of using risk maps with individuals, providing examples of their use, and how software has been developed to manage this process. The talk will also highlight the challenges of using such an approach with individuals, the different professional attitudes and the impact their use has had on people who commission services. The talk will also look at how the risks identified in individuals can be linked to the range of National Outcome Frameworks such as the NHS Outcome Framework, Adult Social Care Framework and Public Health Outcome Framework. As these frameworks set the basis for priorities in commissioning services, relating day to day activity to them provides a credible evidence base for why services should continue. By taking a holistic approach to managing the range of risks that people present to services we increase the chances of positive outcomes. The simultaneous management of social and clinical factors present an opportunity to support people to make sustainable changes in their lives. For example, a GP trying to support someone to manage stress and anxiety will get little traction unless other risks around substance misuse and homelessness are simultaneously managed. Through mapping all the issues a patient presents with we can provide a plan for how services can integrate around an individual. For more information see: http://www.insideoutcomes.co.uk/welcome-to-inside-outcomes-limited/risk-maps/ Bio Darren Wright is a director of Inside Outcomes. Inside Outcomes is focussed on supporting organisations that work with individuals, in health and wellbeing, to demonstrate the impact they have. This covers a diverse range of agencies from small voluntary sector agencies to primary care. Previously Darren has worked across the NHS and local authorities designing and commissioning preventative services. He commissioned the Birmingham Life Expectancy Programme from 2008 to 2013 where he identified a need for better outcome measurement. He has also played a leading role, nationally in the develop of Health Overview and Scrutiny functions and the development of Health and Wellbeing Boards.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Chrysanthi Papoutsi

Thu 1 Jun 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1

Radiology / Cardiology

Professor Paul Leeson, Professor Fergus Gleeson

Radiology: "The problems with modern technology", Professor Fergus Gleeson -- Cardiology: "Stress echo: the intelligent decision", Professor Paul Leeson -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Radiology: "The problems with modern technology", Professor Fergus Gleeson -- Cardiology: "Stress echo: the intelligent decision", Professor Paul Leeson -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 2 Jun 2017 from 09:00 to 13:00

BDI seminars

Innovative Phenotyping Methods for Large Cohort Studies - MRC PHRU / BDI Symposium

Michael Gaziano, Joshua Denny

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natasha Bowyer

Fri 2 Jun 2017 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Defence and Counter-Defence: The interplay between Zika virus and innate immunity

Jonny Hertzog

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 2 Jun 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Guest Speaker: Professor Fiona M Gribble, Professor of Endocrine Physiology, Department of Clinical Biochemistry, University of Cambridge - ‘Chemosensory mechanisms in gut endocrine cells’

Professor Fiona M Gribble, Professor of Endocrine Physiology

The gut endocrine system comprises a collection of enteroendocrine cells scattered through the intestinal epithelium. Enteroendocrine cells detect the local luminal composition and release hormones that regulate post-prandial physiology, including gut motility/secretion, and regulation of insulin... Read more

The gut endocrine system comprises a collection of enteroendocrine cells scattered through the intestinal epithelium. Enteroendocrine cells detect the local luminal composition and release hormones that regulate post-prandial physiology, including gut motility/secretion, and regulation of insulin secretion and food intake. They can detect a wide variety of ingested nutrients, via a range of sensory proteins that detect the digestion products of carbohydrates, fats and protein. Most enteroendocrine cells have an apical surface facing into the gut lumen, and express sodium and proton-coupled nutrient transporters typical of the intestinal brush border. Electrogenic transporter-mediated uptake of monosaccharides, amino acids and di/tripeptides generates electrical signals that trigger membrane depolarisation, voltage gated calcium entry and hormone release. Other stimuli are detected by enteroendocrine-specific G-protein coupled receptors, including free fatty acid receptors (FFA1-4), bile acid receptors (GPBAR1) and mono-acylglycerol receptors (GPR119), that activate Gq and Gs dependent signalling pathways and thereby modulate calcium and cAMP concentrations. Gut hormones have proven translational value in the therapeutics of diabetes, obesity and short bowel syndrome, and are dramatically altered after gastric bypass surgery. It is hoped that further exploitation of the enteroendocrine system will lead to the development of new therapies for diabetes and obesity.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Fri 2 Jun 2017 from 14:00 to 15:00

WTCHG Spotlight Series

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting Rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

A vision for an academic-industry hybrid type 2 discovery research institute in Oxford

Prof James Johnson

Audience: Public

Organisers: Professor Catherine Green

Mon 5 Jun 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Inflammation control by inflammasomes

Associate Professor Kate Schroder

Kate Schroder heads the Inflammasome Laboratory at the Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, as an ARC Future Fellow. Kate’s PhD studies defined novel macrophage activation mechanisms (awarded 2005). Her subsequent postdoctoral research identified surprising inter-species... Read more

Kate Schroder heads the Inflammasome Laboratory at the Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, as an ARC Future Fellow. Kate’s PhD studies defined novel macrophage activation mechanisms (awarded 2005). Her subsequent postdoctoral research identified surprising inter-species divergence in the inflammatory programs of human versus mouse macrophages. As an NHMRC CJ Martin Fellow, Kate then trained with the pioneer of inflammasome biology, Jürg Tschopp, in Switzerland. Her current research interests include the molecular mechanisms governing inflammasome activity and caspase activation, the cellular mediators of inflammasome-dependent inflammation, and inflammasome suppression by autophagy and small molecule inhibitors. Kate is Deputy Director of the IMB Centre for Inflammation and Disease Research, and a member of the Scientific Advisory Board for Inflazome, a start-up company that is developing inflammasome inhibitors as therapeutics for human diseases.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Tue 6 Jun 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

How can community-based research support antimicrobial stewardship?

Professor Alastair Hay

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is an important threat to modern global health. Around 75% of health service antibiotics are prescribed in primary care and this prescribing has been shown to contribute to AMR. So it makes sense to develop stewardship interventions for patients and clinicians in... Read more

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is an important threat to modern global health. Around 75% of health service antibiotics are prescribed in primary care and this prescribing has been shown to contribute to AMR. So it makes sense to develop stewardship interventions for patients and clinicians in primary care. However, for every patient seen with an infection in primary care, there could be as many as 12 currently not seeking medical help. Professor Hay will outline how current trends in care and commercial pressures could be encouraging higher consultation rates, and he will outline how the research community could contribute to stemming and reversing these trends

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 6 Jun 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, The Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Tue 6 Jun 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

MRC Translational Activities and Opportunities

Dr. Alex Pemberton

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 6 Jun 2017 from 16:00 to 17:00

DPAG Postdoctoral Society Events

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Postdoctoral Society Talks

Anissa Kempf, Frank Wessely

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mattea Finelli

Wed 7 Jun 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

* CANCELLED * CANCELLED

Professor Adda

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Catia Nicodemo

Thu 8 Jun 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1

Medical Director's Office / Stroke Medicine

Dr Evie Kemp, Dr James Kennedy

Medical Director's Office: "When physicians become patients….occupational health and wellbeing for doctors", Dr Evie Kemp -- Stroke Medicine: "Sliding Doors", Dr James Kennedy -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Medical Director's Office: "When physicians become patients….occupational health and wellbeing for doctors", Dr Evie Kemp -- Stroke Medicine: "Sliding Doors", Dr James Kennedy -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 8 Jun 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI Basement seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

From Protein Complexes Structures to Synthetic Viral Nanosystems

Prof Imre Berger

Bio: Prof Imre Berger, School of Biochemistry, University of Bristol, UK Imre was trained as a biochemist at Leibniz University and Medical School (MHH) in Hannover (Germany), MIT (Cambridge, USA), and ETH Zurich (Switzerland). He researches multiprotein complexes in human health and disease, and... Read more

Bio: Prof Imre Berger, School of Biochemistry, University of Bristol, UK Imre was trained as a biochemist at Leibniz University and Medical School (MHH) in Hannover (Germany), MIT (Cambridge, USA), and ETH Zurich (Switzerland). He researches multiprotein complexes in human health and disease, and develops enabling technologies for this purpose. Imre carried out his PhD work at MIT with the late Alexander Rich, a pioneer in molecular and structural biology. He joined Timothy Richmond at ETH Zurich as a post-doc and research assistant. In 2007, Imre was appointed Group Leader at the EMBL. Since 2014, he is Professor of Biochemistry and Deputy Director of the Bristol synthetic biology centre BrisSynBio at the University of Bristol, UK. Imre has developed the MultiBac system for multiprotein expression which has accelerated research and development in academia and industry world-wide. He holds international patents for multigene delivery and expression technologies, published more than 100 papers in leading periodicals and received numerous distinctions, including the Swiss Technology Award, the W.A. DeVigier Foundation Award and recently the Wellcome Trust Senior Investigator Award for his innovative research.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Thu 8 Jun 2017 from 16:30 to 17:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Academic, Seminar Room 2B, GPEC, Level 3, Headington OX3 9DU

Innate activation of gut-homing T cells

Tianqi Leng

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Carolina Arancibia

Fri 9 Jun 2017 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Should surgical innovation be taught and encouraged?

Mr Henk Giele

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 9 Jun 2017 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Coincidence detection tailors macrophage responses to inflammatory signals

Jelena Bezbradica Mirkovic

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 9 Jun 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Oxysterol regulation of inflammation and immunity

Prof Jason Cyster

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Fri 9 Jun 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500 - See more at: https://talks.ox.ac.uk/talks/id/eb701161-580d-4157-8d7b-aa3fd102973b/#sthash.sQqrlUyT.dpuf, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

INT'L GUEST SPEAKER - Professor Andreas K. Kreiter, Centre for Cognitive Science and Centre for Advanced Imaging, University of Bremen, Germany : 'Dynamic mechanisms underlying selective visual attention in monkey visual cortex'

Professor Andreas Kreiter, Professor Andreas K. Kreiter, Centre for Cognitive Science and Centre for Advanced Imaging

The strong convergence in cortical visual pathways results in neuronal receptive fields of increasing size. Therefore, neurons in extra-striate visual cortex receive under natural viewing conditions simultaneous, competing input from multiple stimuli within their extended receptive fields.... Read more

The strong convergence in cortical visual pathways results in neuronal receptive fields of increasing size. Therefore, neurons in extra-striate visual cortex receive under natural viewing conditions simultaneous, competing input from multiple stimuli within their extended receptive fields. Selective visual attention is well known to resolve this conflict in favour of generating responses to the attended stimulus while ignoring non-attended stimuli. However, the question, which neuronal mechanisms are responsible for such selective processing of the attended stimulus, is under debate. In this talk, it will be discussed, at which site attention intervenes to effect selective stimulus processing and evidence will be presented for a dynamic gating mechanism based on strong and highly selective modulations of effective connectivities. Furthermore, I will show experimental evidence for a causal role of neuronal -band synchronization in attention-dependent selective information routing. From these findings a picture emerges, in which attention flexibly configures effective neuronal networks for selective processing of behaviourally relevant stimuli

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Fri 9 Jun 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

NDM Seminar Series

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Mon 12 Jun 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Bench to bedside and beyond. A journey that cannot get away from clinical trials

Professor Sarah Lamb

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 12 Jun 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Oxford Martin School, Old Indian Institute, Broad Street, Oxford, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Overlapping Mechanisms of Sleep and Sedation

Nicolas Franks

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Mon 12 Jun 2017 from 12:30 to 16:00

Centre for Personalised Medicine Seminars

St Anne's College, Tsuzuki Lecture Theatre, Woodstock Road OX2 6HS

Intellectual Property, Ethics and the Market in the Era of Personalised Medicine

Professor Graham Dutfield, Professor Shobita Parthasarathy, Dr Nick Scott-Ram, Dr Mark Bale, Dr Lawrence Cullen, Dr Siva Thambisetty, Dr Katerina Sideri, Dr Julian Cockbane, Dr Naomi Hawkins, Dr Richard Reschen, Professor Graeme Laurie, Liam Curren, Professor Timo Minssen, Professor Isabelle Huys, Professor Chas Bountra

The second of a three-year conference series on Personalised Medicine, Ethics and the Market, this multidisciplinary two-day conference will focus on Intellectual Property (IP) issues. In particular, the programme will bring together academics, practitioners and industry experts to debate ways to... Read more

The second of a three-year conference series on Personalised Medicine, Ethics and the Market, this multidisciplinary two-day conference will focus on Intellectual Property (IP) issues. In particular, the programme will bring together academics, practitioners and industry experts to debate ways to promote biomedical innovation in the public interest. Although current debate tends to be polarized, a spectrum of opportunities exists between strong proprietary approaches and unrestricted openness, and the conference will discuss ways to address the challenges and opportunities for personalised medicine. Topics to be discussed include innovation in diagnostics, data sharing and access to clinical trial data, open innovation and the impact of patents on clinical practice. A programme for the event can be found here: http://www.well.ox.ac.uk/cpm/intellectual-property-ethics-the-market.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Catherine Lidbetter

Mon 12 Jun 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Transcriptional and epigenetic control of inflammatory gene expression

Gioacchino Natoli

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Mon 12 Jun 2017 from 17:00 to 19:00

Wadham College, Moser theatre, Wadham College, Parks Road OX1 3PN

Nano- and Microfabricated Hydrogels for Regenerative Engineering

Prof. Ali Khademhosseini

Engineered materials that integrate advances in polymer chemistry, nanotechnology, and biological sciences have the potential to create powerful medical therapies. Our group aims to engineer tissue regenerative therapies using water-containing polymer networks, called hydrogels, that can regulate... Read more

Engineered materials that integrate advances in polymer chemistry, nanotechnology, and biological sciences have the potential to create powerful medical therapies. Our group aims to engineer tissue regenerative therapies using water-containing polymer networks, called hydrogels, that can regulate cell behavior. Specifically, we have developed photocrosslinkable hybrid hydrogels that combine natural biomolecules with nanoparticles to regulate the chemical, biological, mechanical and electrical properties of gels. These functional scaffolds induce the differentiation of stem cells to desired cell types and direct the formation of vascularized heart or bone tissues. Since tissue function is highly dependent on architecture, we have also used microfabrication methods, such as microfluidics, photolithography, bioprinting, and molding, to regulate the architecture of these materials. We have employed these strategies to generate miniaturized tissues. To create tissue complexity, we have also developed directed assembly techniques to compile small tissue modules into larger constructs. It is anticipated that such approaches will lead to the development of next-generation regenerative therapeutics and biomedical devices.

Booking Recommended

Audience: Public

Tue 13 Jun 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, The Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Tue 13 Jun 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

GATA2 zinc finger interactions with DNA and FOG1 are structurally encoded

Dr Sarah Nurmohamed

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 13 Jun 2017 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, please note doors are locked at 4pm, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Applications of high throughput single cell analysis and deep learning to iPSC models of Parkinson’s disease and neurotherapeutics

Prof Steven Finkbeiner

Professor Steven Finkbeiner, M.D., Ph.D. is a neurologist and neuroscientist, a professor at the University of California, San Francisco, and associate director at the Gladstone Institutes. He directs an academic research laboratory focused on neurodegenerative diseases and mental illnesses and... Read more

Professor Steven Finkbeiner, M.D., Ph.D. is a neurologist and neuroscientist, a professor at the University of California, San Francisco, and associate director at the Gladstone Institutes. He directs an academic research laboratory focused on neurodegenerative diseases and mental illnesses and directs the Taube/Koret Center for Neurological Disease, which focuses on collaborating with industry to develop neurotherapeutics. https://gladstone.org/our-science/people/steve-finkbeiner Dr. Finkbeiner studies the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for learning, memory, and neurodegeneration. He aims to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms that control memory formation in neurons to discover crucial insights into the development and progression of neurodegenerative diseases—and the memory disorders that often characterize them.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Wed 14 Jun 2017 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Rare diseases as tools to understand autoimmunity

Professor Olle Kämpe

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 15 Jun 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Room 1, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

Parent experiences of neonatal surgery: understanding the long term impact on families

Dr Lisa Hinton

We have a poor understanding of rare congenital anomalies in babies that lead them to require surgery, and there is evidence that the birth prevalence of conditions such as gastroschisis and exomphalos is increasing worldwide. While advances in neonatal care and surgery are improving outcomes, ... Read more

We have a poor understanding of rare congenital anomalies in babies that lead them to require surgery, and there is evidence that the birth prevalence of conditions such as gastroschisis and exomphalos is increasing worldwide. While advances in neonatal care and surgery are improving outcomes, there remain gaps in our knowledge. Surgical management is an under-researched area, as is the lived experience of their parents. What is it like to have an infant that requires such intense complex treatment during his or her early weeks and months? What are the long-term impacts on parents and the wider family? As part of a British Association of Pediatric Surgeons-Congenital Anomaly Surveillance System (BAPS-CASS) study, in-depth narrative interviews were conducted with 44 parents living in the UK who had a baby who needed surgery during the first year of their life. Findings have been published on Healthtalk.org. This seminar will report on the long term impact and support needs of parents and families with children who are often affected by significant long-term morbidity.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Susan Kirkpatrick

Thu 15 Jun 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement meeting room, NDM Research Building, Headington OX3 7FZ

A role for low oxygen and hypoxia inducible factors to regulate viral replication and pathogenesis

Prof Jane McKeating

Chronic viral infection of the liver is a global health problem, with over 500 million individuals infected with hepatitis B (HBV) or C (HCV) viruses that cause liver disease which can progress to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC): a metastatic cancer with limited therapeutic options. We recently... Read more

Chronic viral infection of the liver is a global health problem, with over 500 million individuals infected with hepatitis B (HBV) or C (HCV) viruses that cause liver disease which can progress to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC): a metastatic cancer with limited therapeutic options. We recently discovered that low oxygen environments, naturally found in the liver, enhance HBV and HCV replication and this is mediated by hypoxia inducible transcription factors (HIFs) regulating host pathways that are essential for viral replication. HIFs direct extensive transcriptional responses that enable a cell to respond to diverse physiological or pathophysiological signals. Hepatitis B and C viruses activate HIFs and promote a ‘pseudohypoxic’ state that potentiates viral replication. Current HCC therapies show limited efficacy and recent research efforts have focused on the molecular profiling of tumours to identify gene signatures that predict disease outcome and response to therapy. Understanding how viruses influence host gene transcription is fundamental and profiling HIF-transcriptional targets in infected cells provides a unique opportunity to define the role of HIF in viral-associated HCC heterogeneity and inform stratified approaches for new treatments.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Thu 15 Jun 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1

Neurology / Palliative Care

Dr George Tofaris, Dr Tim Harrison, Dr Luke Solomons

Neurology: "Mitochondrial Parkinsonism: A case study in the era of Personalised Neurology". Dr George Tofaris -- Palliative Care: "End of Life Planning for People with Dementia", Dr Tim Harrison and Dr Luke Solomons -- Chair: Prof Chris O'Callaghan

Neurology: "Mitochondrial Parkinsonism: A case study in the era of Personalised Neurology". Dr George Tofaris -- Palliative Care: "End of Life Planning for People with Dementia", Dr Tim Harrison and Dr Luke Solomons -- Chair: Prof Chris O'Callaghan

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 16 Jun 2017 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Interactions between HIV-1 and the mucosa of the female genital tract; The structure and function of HIV-2 nef – why is it not a T-cell target?

Professor Sarah Rowland-Jones, Dr Sophie Andrews

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 16 Jun 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

GUEST SPEAKER - Professor Giampietro Schiavo, Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, UCL-Institute of Neurology : ‘Basal lamina components as determinants of the uptake and axonal transport of pathogens and growth factors’

Professor Giampietro Schiavo

Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) is amongst the most poisonous substances on Earth and a major cause of neonatal death in non-vaccinated areas. Its very high toxicity is due to an exquisite tropism for the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and its routing to the axonal transport pathway followed by... Read more

Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) is amongst the most poisonous substances on Earth and a major cause of neonatal death in non-vaccinated areas. Its very high toxicity is due to an exquisite tropism for the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and its routing to the axonal transport pathway followed by transcytosis to spinal inhibitory interneurons, which causes a persistent spastic paralysis. TeNT targets the NMJ with high affinity, yet the nature of the TeNT receptor complex was still lacking. We showed that nidogens are the main determinant for TeNT binding at the NMJ and it targets TeNT (as well as other physiological ligands) for sorting to axonal transport organelles. Understanding this mechanism is therefore crucial to better understand ligand sorting at the NMJ and uncovers novel means for tetanus control.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Mon 19 Jun 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

Using planarian flatworms as a model system for stem cells, regeneration and cancer

Aziz Aboobaker

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eric O'Neill

Tue 20 Jun 2017 from 10:30 to 17:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Pembroke College, St Aldates OX1 1DW

Cutting Edge Osteoarthritis Symposium

Cutting Edge Osteoarthritis will again be held at Pembroke College in Oxford on Wednesday 21st June 2017, with a half-day pre-meeting on Tuesday 20th June, giving students and young post-docs the opportunity to network with each other and with leaders in the osteoarthritis field. On 20 June, the... Read more

Cutting Edge Osteoarthritis will again be held at Pembroke College in Oxford on Wednesday 21st June 2017, with a half-day pre-meeting on Tuesday 20th June, giving students and young post-docs the opportunity to network with each other and with leaders in the osteoarthritis field. On 20 June, the meeting will open with a keynote address from Professor Sir John Bell, Regius Professor of Medicine at Oxford. Short talks selected from submitted abstracts and an extended poster session will follow. At the end of the day Professor Luke O'Neill, University of Dublin will give an 'Inspired Careers' talk, which will be followed by an informal dinner in the College.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Tue 20 Jun 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

SEMINAR POSTPONED TO FRIDAY 18 AUGUST 2017 - The story of lumpy skin disease in Europe

Dr Pip Beard

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Tue 20 Jun 2017 from 18:00 to 19:30

SynBio.Oxford

Should we synthesise human genomes?

Piers Millett, Marianne Talbot, Justina Robson, Robert Smith, Max Jamilly

The first synthetic virus self-replicated in 2002. Its DNA molecules were created in a lab using genetic information copied from nature. In 2016 an international project was launched to synthesise and recode entire human genomes, the ‘Genome Project - Write’. Join a... Read more

The first synthetic virus self-replicated in 2002. Its DNA molecules were created in a lab using genetic information copied from nature. In 2016 an international project was launched to synthesise and recode entire human genomes, the ‘Genome Project - Write’. Join a panel to discuss biosecurity and bioethics, science fiction, practical limits and possible futures for humanity and life as we know it. REGISTER ONLINE: http://www.oxscifest.com/

Booking Recommended

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 21 Jun 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Meeting Room 3, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

* CANCELLED * CANCELLED - RCGP impact from research initiative

Alison Marsh

This seminar is hosted by the NIHR Diagnostic Evidence Cooperative Oxford.

This seminar is hosted by the NIHR Diagnostic Evidence Cooperative Oxford.

Booking Recommended

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Phil Turner

Wed 21 Jun 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

BRC3 Gastroenterology and Mucosal Immunity Theme Seminars

Alison Simmons, Graham Ogg

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 21 Jun 2017 from 13:30 to 14:30

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Functional genomic studies of the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN22

Prof Andrew Cope

Andrew Cope graduated in Medicine from the University of London with first class honours. After training in general internal medicine at Northwick Park Hospital, The National Hospital for Nervous Diseases and the Royal Brompton Hospital, he trained in rheumatology with Professor Sir Ravinder Maini... Read more

Andrew Cope graduated in Medicine from the University of London with first class honours. After training in general internal medicine at Northwick Park Hospital, The National Hospital for Nervous Diseases and the Royal Brompton Hospital, he trained in rheumatology with Professor Sir Ravinder Maini and Dr. Barbara Ansell CBE. In 1990, he was awarded a Wellcome Trust Clinical Training Fellowship, studying for a PhD in Cytokine Biology with Professor Sir Marc Feldmann at the Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology. Following a postdoctoral fellowship with Professor Hugh McDevitt at Stanford University, California, studying transgenic models of autoimmunity, he returned to the Kennedy Institute to set up his own laboratory. In 2005 Andrew Cope was appointed Reader in Molecular Medicine at the Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, and in 2008 was recruited to the Arthritis Research UK Chair in Rheumatology at King’s College London. He is currently Head of the Academic Department of Rheumatology and Associate Director of the King’s Clinical Trials Unit. The Cope lab is housed in the Centre for Inflammation Biology and Cancer Immunology (CIBCI) on the Guy’s Campus, Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, King’s College London. Research focuses on two key themes: defining aberrant pathways of T cell activation and differentiation in the context of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis; understanding how allelic variants of immunologically important genes contribute to autoimmune disease pathogenesis. His clinical research interests revolve around aspects of inflammatory arthritis, including very early inflammatory arthritis and disease remission states. He is currently chief investigator of one of the first RA prevention clinical trials – the APIPPRA study. Prof Cope joined the Board of Trustees of the Kennedy Trust for Rheumatology Research in 2015.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Thu 22 Jun 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement meeting room, NDM Research Building, Headington OX3 7FZ

Evolution of the Cancer Genome

Dr David Wedge

In recent years there has been an explosion in both the amount of next-generation sequencing performed on cancers and in the number of computational methods used to analyse the generated data. Focusing on cancer evolution and heterogeneity, I describe the findings of my research through both... Read more

In recent years there has been an explosion in both the amount of next-generation sequencing performed on cancers and in the number of computational methods used to analyse the generated data. Focusing on cancer evolution and heterogeneity, I describe the findings of my research through both large-scale projects such as the International Cancer Genome Consortium and smaller-scale studies of individual tumour types, including prostate, oesophageal, colorectal, breast and haematological cancers. These findings cover a range of topics, including: progression from benign neoplasms to cancer; mechanisms of metastatic spread; changes in mutational processes during cancer progression; variable subclonal response to treatment; the importance of the order of acquisition of driver mutations.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Thu 22 Jun 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Thu 22 Jun 2017 from 14:00 to 17:00

The Hill Expert-in-Residence Programme 2017

The Hill Expert in Residence Digital Health Event

Stefania Marcoli, Neil Bacon, Alex Pasteur, David Cole, Adam Drury

The Hill Expert-in-Residence Programme 2017 Digital health experts will be at the John Radcliffe Hospital on Thursday 22 June to give world-leading expertise on digital health ideas or projects you may be working on. The following experts will be at the John Radcliffe Hospital for one-to-one... Read more

The Hill Expert-in-Residence Programme 2017 Digital health experts will be at the John Radcliffe Hospital on Thursday 22 June to give world-leading expertise on digital health ideas or projects you may be working on. The following experts will be at the John Radcliffe Hospital for one-to-one sessions from 14:00 to 17:00. Stefania Marcoli leads teams in healthcare projects at the world famous frog Design in Milan, Italy. Stefania was involved in designing early Apple products. Dr Neil Bacon is a former nephrologist with a clinical and academic career spanning 18 years. In 1998 he founded the multi-award winning Doctors.net.uk and has also launched iWantGreatCare.org. Dr Alex Pasteur is a partner in F-Prime Capital, a global venture capital firm investing in healthcare and technology, with over $2 trillion in assets under management. David Cole has worked at IBM for over 18 years and now works within IBM’s artificial intelligence arm, Watson. Outside of IBM, David runs Thinking of Oscar, a charity which supports children and their families whilst in hospital care by funding projects and innovation beyond what is supplied by the NHS. Adam Drury is a Director at GE Healthcare Finnamore, with particular expertise in working within the NHS system, health informatics, management consultancy and whole system change. This will be the third of five Digital Health Experts-in-Residence events, a parent programme being run by the Medical Sciences Division at the University of Oxford and The Hill, Oxford's healthcare ideas and innovation lab situated at the heart of Oxford’s medical, academic, digital and entrepreneurial communities, catalysing a generation of globally impactful healthcare innovation. It is open to patients, carers, nurses, doctors, healthcare professionals, designers, developers, researchers, business leaders and investors. There are a limited number of slots, so please register to avoid disappointment. Please register to book a slot with an Expert using this Eventbrite page and email nicholas.DePennington@ouh.nhs.uk https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-hill-experts-in-residence-22nd-june-2017-tickets-35168776758?aff=es2 More information on our Experts-in-Residence can be found on The Hill website - http://www.thehill.co/experts-in-residence/ WHEN - Thursday, 22nd June 2017 from 14:00 to 17:00 WHERE – TBC – Registered attendees will be kept updated once venue has been confirmed.

Booking Required

Audience: It is open to patients, carers, nurses, doctors, healthcare professionals, designers, developers, researchers, business leaders and investors.

Organisers: Nicholas de Pennington

Fri 23 Jun 2017 from 08:00 to 09:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1

Combined Medical-Surgical Grand Round

Dr Alastair Moore

Respiratory Medicine: "Interventional Pulmonology in the management of severe emphysema", Dr Alastair Moore. Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Respiratory Medicine: "Interventional Pulmonology in the management of severe emphysema", Dr Alastair Moore. Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 23 Jun 2017 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Iron and malaria: austerity works. Strong and stable adaptive immunity: yet more irony.

Andrew Armitage, Joe Frost

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 23 Jun 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, BDI seminar room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar: Joint analysis of gene expression levels and histological images identifies genes associated with cellular morphology

Professor Barbara Engelhardt

Histopathological images are used to identify and characterize complex phenotypes such as tumor stage. Our goal is to associate histological image phenotypes with high dimensional genomic markers; the limitations to incorporating histology image phenotypes in genomic studies is that the relevant... Read more

Histopathological images are used to identify and characterize complex phenotypes such as tumor stage. Our goal is to associate histological image phenotypes with high dimensional genomic markers; the limitations to incorporating histology image phenotypes in genomic studies is that the relevant image features are difficult to identify and extract in an automated way, and confounders are difficult to control in this high-dimensional setting. In this work, we use convolutional autoencoders and sparse canonical correlation analysis (CCA) on gene expression levels and pathology images from paired samples to find subsets of genes whose expression values in a tissue sample correlate with subsets of visual features from the stained tissue images. In three data sets, two from TCGA and one from GTEx, we discuss three types of associations with the image phenotypes. In TCGA, we find gene sets associated with the structure of the extracellular matrix and cell wall infrastructure, implicating uncharacterized genes in extracellular processes. Second, we find sets of genes associated with specific cell types, including muscle tissue, neuronal cells, and cell type heterogeneity. Third, in the GTEx data, we find two image features that capture population variation in muscle and neuronal tissues associated with genetic variants, suggesting that genetic variation regulates population variation in cell morphological traits. I will briefly touch on other work, including time series modeling of transcriptional responses to perturbation and electronic medical records data.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Fri 23 Jun 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

From Academia to Medical Communication

Berit Sund, Dr Rebecca Bachmann

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Alice Mayer

Fri 23 Jun 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Getting in the habit: Understanding and harnessing the role of habit in health behaviour

Dr Benjamin Gardner

Much human behaviour occurs habitually; i.e., repetitively and automatically, with minimal control, awareness, or conscious intention. Habitual behaviours are resistant to change, and so persist over time. This talk describes recent work that has adopted a habit-formation approach to the adoption... Read more

Much human behaviour occurs habitually; i.e., repetitively and automatically, with minimal control, awareness, or conscious intention. Habitual behaviours are resistant to change, and so persist over time. This talk describes recent work that has adopted a habit-formation approach to the adoption of health-promoting behaviours, and outlines a set of guidelines for using habit-formation as a behaviour change strategy. Bio: Dr Benjamin Gardner is Senior Lecturer in Psychology at King’s College London. His main research interests lie in developing and applying theory to understand and change behaviour, with an especial focus on habit theory. His current research focuses on trying to locate the precise role(s) of 'habit' in social and health-related behaviours, and using habit-formation as a behaviour change technique and intervention goal. He is also leading a programme of research into understanding and changing sedentary behaviour among office workers.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Morrish

Mon 26 Jun 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

TGF-beta, Immune cells and Microbiota: three ingredients to control gut inflammation and colorectal cancer development

Julien C. Marie, PhD

Julien C. Marie is professor at the University Lyon 1 and director of research at Inserm. He obtained is PhD in 2002 at the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, working on immunosuppression induced by Measles virus (Nature Immunology 2002, Immunity 2001). Granted of a Human Frontier Fellowship, Dr... Read more

Julien C. Marie is professor at the University Lyon 1 and director of research at Inserm. He obtained is PhD in 2002 at the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, working on immunosuppression induced by Measles virus (Nature Immunology 2002, Immunity 2001). Granted of a Human Frontier Fellowship, Dr Marie then joined Prof Alexander Rudensky lab where he investigated the role of TGF-b on T cell Biology (Immunity 2006, J Exp Med 2005). In 2006, Dr Marie obtained a researcher position at Inserm and started his own group focused on TGF-b and the regulation of the immune system. Since then, Dr Marie lab revealed that TGF-b affects the biology of different T cell subsets including NKT cells ( J.Exp.Med 2009), cytotoxic CD8 T Cells (Nature Com 2014, Immunity 2012,) or TFH cells (J. Clin Invest 2014) with direct consequences on autoimmune responses and pathogen elimination. In addition, the Marie Lab assigned a crucial role for TGF-b on Foxp3 regulatory T cells biology (J. Exp.Med 2005 Immunity 2015). The laboratory of Dr Marie is settled in the Immunology, virology and Inflammation department of the Cancer Research Center of Lyon, France and affiliated with the tumor Immunology department of the DKFZ in Heidelberg, Germany

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Tue 27 Jun 2017 from 10:00 to 11:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Missing data in randomised trials: design and analysis

Professor Ian White

Ian White moved at the start of 2017 to a new position as Professor of Statistical Methods for Medicine at the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit at University College London, UK. This follows 16 years as a programme leader at the Medical Research Council Biostatistics Unit in Cambridge.... Read more

Ian White moved at the start of 2017 to a new position as Professor of Statistical Methods for Medicine at the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit at University College London, UK. This follows 16 years as a programme leader at the Medical Research Council Biostatistics Unit in Cambridge. He originally studied mathematics at Cambridge University, and his first career was as a teacher of mathematics in The Gambia, Cambridge and London. He obtained his MSc in statistics from University College London, where he subsequently worked in the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health. He was then Senior Lecturer in the Medical Statistics Unit at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. He received his PhD by publications in 2011. His research interests are in statistical methods for the design and analysis of clinical trials, observational studies and meta-analyses. He is particularly interested in developing methods for handling missing data, correcting for departures from randomised treatment, prognostic modelling, and network meta-analysis. He runs courses on various topics and has written a range of Stata software.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Claire Madigan

Tue 27 Jun 2017 from 13:00 to 14:15

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

MHU Student Presentations

Akiko Hashimoto; Michael Weinberger, Catherine Garnett, Carolline Telfer

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 28 Jun 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Glia Relay Differentiation Cues to Coordinate Neuronal Development in Drosophila

Vilaiwan Fernandes

Neuronal birth and specification must be coordinated across the developing brain to generate the neurons that constitute neural circuits. This is particularly true for sensory systems where topographic maps are built by connecting neurons at different levels of circuitry. I use the ordered... Read more

Neuronal birth and specification must be coordinated across the developing brain to generate the neurons that constitute neural circuits. This is particularly true for sensory systems where topographic maps are built by connecting neurons at different levels of circuitry. I use the ordered Drosophila visual system to investigate how neuronal development is coordinated across different brain regions to establish retinotopy, afeature of all visual systems. Photoreceptors were believed to achieve retinotopy by inducing their target field in the optic lobe, the lamina composed of five neuron types, by a secreted differentiation cue (Epidermal Growth Factor; EGF). I will discuss my recent finding that communication between photoreceptors and lamina precursor cells is indirect, and requires a signaling relay through wrapping glia. Specifically, I have found that in response to EGF from photoreceptors, wrapping glia produce insulin-like peptides, which in turn induce lamina neuronal differentiation. I propose that the signaling relay through glia is a strategy to translate an otherwise homogenous photoreceptor cue into one with spatio-temporal stratification. Additionally, incorporating a relay via glia delays the differentiation cue to the lamina, thus ensuring that lamina ‘unit’ assembly is completed prior to differentiation.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Wed 28 Jun 2017 from 14:00 to 15:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Cues and barriers for lymphocyte emigration and proliferation

Prof Ronen Alon

Prof. Ronen Alon earned his PhD in biophysics at the Weizmann Institute of Science in 1993. For the next several years, he worked as a research fellow at Harvard Medical School's Center for Blood Research under the supervision of Dr. Tim Springer. In 1996, he joined the Weizmann Institute’s... Read more

Prof. Ronen Alon earned his PhD in biophysics at the Weizmann Institute of Science in 1993. For the next several years, he worked as a research fellow at Harvard Medical School's Center for Blood Research under the supervision of Dr. Tim Springer. In 1996, he joined the Weizmann Institute’s Department of Immunology. He is a full professor and the incumbent of the Linda Jacobs Professorial Chair in Immune and Stem Cell Research. Prof. Alon investigates the mechanisms by which white blood cells exit blood vessels at specific sites of inflammation and injury with specific interest in how chemokines and integrin adhesion molecules promote leukocyte crossing of distinct endothelial barriers. He was among the first to propose that integrin adhesiveness and the transendothelial migratory potential of lymphocytes are facilitated by shear forces. Recently, he has become interested in how the endothelial cytoskeleton is remodeled by extravasating immune cells and how metastatic cells use helper immune cells to promote their extravasation in various target organs. He has published more than 130 papers and reviews. Prof. Alon served as the president of the Israeli Immunological Society and is a member of several ethical and promotion committees in his institute. He also serves on scientific advisory boards. In 2012 he was elected as a member of EMBO.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Wed 28 Jun 2017 from 16:00 to 17:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Targeting DNA Repair in Cancer Therapy

Alan D'Andrea

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

NB: this meeting will take place on a Wednesday instead of a Monday

Thu 29 Jun 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

“It might sound weird but I prefer to see the nurse”: young skin condition patient’s experiences with healthcare professionals

Dr Abigail McNiven

Acne, eczema, psoriasis and alopecia are common skin conditions in young people and yet there are knowledge gaps about the specific experiences of this age group. The present study explores the information and support needs of young people with acne, eczema, psoriasis and alopecia. Qualitative... Read more

Acne, eczema, psoriasis and alopecia are common skin conditions in young people and yet there are knowledge gaps about the specific experiences of this age group. The present study explores the information and support needs of young people with acne, eczema, psoriasis and alopecia. Qualitative interviews were conducted in England with 88 young people (age 13-24) about their experiences of eczema, acne, psoriasis and alopecia. Participant’s experiences with healthcare professionals about skin conditions were varied, including their understandings about the distinctions between healthcare professionals seen across both primary and secondary care. The young dermatology patients discussed their experiences with, and perceptions of, medical professionals. In relation to nurses specifically, key themes include: the provision of emotional support and reassurance; fostering a preferable atmosphere (giving a sense of ‘normality’ or making the appointment more ‘fun’); respecting the needs of the individual (for example, boundaries/privacy and preferred pace within appointments); and the provision of opportunities to ask questions and gain explanations about the condition, treatments or other aspects of their healthcare (such as the transition from paediatric to adult dermatology). The paper highlights that dermatology nurses have an important role for young people with eczema, acne, psoriasis and alopecia. The significance of nurses becomes apparent in contextualising young dermatology patient’s experiences with various medical professionals, highlighting aspects of practice greatly valued as well as areas for potential improvement.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Susan Kirkpatrick

Fri 30 Jun 2017 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS