Other Seminars

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Wed 1 Feb 2017 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

A DaNGeRous talk about dendritic cells

Professor Caetano Reis e Sousa

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 2 Feb 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Filling the void: How to lose weight and keep it off

Professor Colin Greaves

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 2 Feb 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, TDI/NDM Research Building (please note: not ORCRB), Headington OX3 7FZ

Targeting Micrometastases for the Treatment of Ovarian Cancer

Prof Ahmed Ahmed

Unlike many other solid tumours, ovarian cancer seldom spreads outside the abdominal cavity. The most common cause of death is malnutrition secondary to intestinal obstruction because of abdominal metastasis. Understanding the key mechanisms involved in driving abdominal metastases is important for... Read more

Unlike many other solid tumours, ovarian cancer seldom spreads outside the abdominal cavity. The most common cause of death is malnutrition secondary to intestinal obstruction because of abdominal metastasis. Understanding the key mechanisms involved in driving abdominal metastases is important for the development of novel strategies to prevent metastasis. In this talk, Dr. Ahmed will present his group’s recent work on enhancing chemotherapy response and preventing ovarian cancer metastasis as well as his ongoing work on monitoring the evolution of micrometastasis on a genome-wide scale.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Thu 2 Feb 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1

Rheumatology / Horton Hospital

Dr Jonathan Marshall, Prof Raashid Luqmani

Rheumatology: "Why can’t we call it vasculitis?", Prof Raashid Luqmani -- Horton Hospital: "’A two year weight", Dr Jonathan Marshall -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Rheumatology: "Why can’t we call it vasculitis?", Prof Raashid Luqmani -- Horton Hospital: "’A two year weight", Dr Jonathan Marshall -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 3 Feb 2017 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

The Challenge of Aortic Therapy: The Search for new Solutions

Professor Sebastian Debus

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 3 Feb 2017 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

A novel cytokine-stromal cell axis that promotes pathogenic intestinal inflammation

Dr Nathaniel West

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 3 Feb 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Guest Speaker - Professor Sarah Tarbrizi, UCL Inst Neurology : “Meeting the Therapeutic Challenge in Huntington's disease”

Professor Sarah Tarbrizi

Huntington’s disease (HD) is a devastating autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease for which there is currently no effective disease modifying therapy. The genetic predictability of HD provides an opportunity for early therapeutic intervention many years before overt symptom... Read more

Huntington’s disease (HD) is a devastating autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease for which there is currently no effective disease modifying therapy. The genetic predictability of HD provides an opportunity for early therapeutic intervention many years before overt symptom onset and at a time when reversal or prevention of neural dysfunction may still be possible. As HD is monogenetic, fully penetrant, and characterised by a long premanifest phase, it is emerging as a potential model for studying therapeutic intervention in other neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease where no preclinical diagnostic tests exist. Understanding of HD pathogenesis is evolving, and there are a number of candidate therapeutics with potential disease-modifying effects that are currently being tested. In my talk, I will update on insights into HD pathogenesis, new data to understand the neurobiology of the preclinical phase of neurodegeneration and neural compensation and plasticity in HD, and give an overview on exciting advances working towards HD gene silencing in humans.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Mon 6 Feb 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Differentiation and function of regulatory B cells: what goes wrong in autoimmunity

Prof Claudia Mauri

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 6 Feb 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

The challenge of translating new therapies to patients for Parkinson's Disease

Roger Barker

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Tue 7 Feb 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Can unbiased single-cell analysis of immune cells improve data-driven selection of tailored therapies in human atherosclerosis?

Chiara Giannarelli, MD, PhD

Atherosclerosis is a heterogenous disease characterized by immune infiltration of the arterial wall in response to tissue damage and systemic inflammation. Gaining a deeper knowledge of the immune contexture of atherosclerotic tissue, disease-specific molecular signatures and cell variation in... Read more

Atherosclerosis is a heterogenous disease characterized by immune infiltration of the arterial wall in response to tissue damage and systemic inflammation. Gaining a deeper knowledge of the immune contexture of atherosclerotic tissue, disease-specific molecular signatures and cell variation in patients is needed to design tailored therapies targeting the inflammatory dysfunction in these patients.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Thu 9 Feb 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Young women’s alcohol consumption: acknowledging the unconscious

Dr Melissa Stepney

Alcohol consumption and its well-publicised consequences have come to signify a number of highly charged social, political and economic debates. Much alcohol discourse is however stuck in a logical, rational and conscious narrative. The drive in health policy towards ‘sensible drinking’... Read more

Alcohol consumption and its well-publicised consequences have come to signify a number of highly charged social, political and economic debates. Much alcohol discourse is however stuck in a logical, rational and conscious narrative. The drive in health policy towards ‘sensible drinking’ appears to promote a neutral, in-between ‘space’ – which is perfectly understandable and difficult to challenge because it relies on a language of ‘common sense’. Yet it seeks to rationalise behaviour by eliminating ambiguity – that very ambiguity we need to understand. It sometimes seems too obvious to ask questions about who drunkenness lets you be (perhaps someone else or more yourself? Or perhaps a bit of both?). Might there be something else to say about drinking? In this presentation, I examine young women’s social drinking practices and their involvement in normative drinking practices, drawing on qualitative research with young women in the UK and the Netherlands. I use psychoanalytic and feminist insights, specifically those of Melanie Klein and Angela McRobbie to tease out the contradictions and ambivalences in both the young women’s own narratives about their drinking behaviour and wider discourse on women’s drinking in public spaces. Finally I consider the implications of this for safer drinking initiatives and health policy messages on ‘sensible drinking’.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Susan Kirkpatrick

Thu 9 Feb 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Advanced oligonucleotide therapeutics for neuromuscular disease

Professor Matthew Wood

Oligonucleotide-based therapies have potential for treating a range of inherited neuromuscular disorders via modulating gene expression e.g. via splice modulation or RNA silencing. The classical example is Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), where modulation of pre-mRNA splicing of the DMD gene can... Read more

Oligonucleotide-based therapies have potential for treating a range of inherited neuromuscular disorders via modulating gene expression e.g. via splice modulation or RNA silencing. The classical example is Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), where modulation of pre-mRNA splicing of the DMD gene can restore a viable reading frame and the expression of functional protein. This approach is currently being evaluated in clinical trials. However, a major challenge in the application of such approaches to neuromuscular disease is poor delivery to affected tissues including skeletal muscle, heart and to the nervous system across the blood brain barrier. We have developed a range of peptide- and extracellular vesicle-based platform technologies to overcome this challenge. Peptide-oligonucleotide compounds provide greatly improved delivery and enhanced potency and are being developed for future clinical applications in both DMD and for other neuromuscular disorders, such as spinal muscular atrophy. Future prospects will be discussed. References 1. Fairclough RJ, Wood MJ, Davies KE. Therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: renewed optimism from genetic approaches. Nature Reviews Genetics 2013 Jun;14(6):373-8 2. Hammond SM, Hazell G, Shabanpoor F, Saleh AF, Bowerman M, Sleigh JN, Meijboom KE, Zhou H, Muntoni F, Talbot K, Gait MJ, Wood MJ. Systemic peptide-mediated oligonucleotide therapy improves long-term survival in spinal muscular atrophy. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2016 Sep 27;113(39):10962-7 3. EL Andaloussi S, Mäger I, Breakefield XO, Wood MJ. Extracellular vesicles: biology and emerging therapeutic opportunities. Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 2013 May;12(5):347-5 4. Alvarez-Erviti L, Seow Y, Yin H, Betts C, Lakhal S, Wood MJ. Delivery of siRNA to the mouse brain by systemic injection of targeted exosomes. Nature Biotechnology 2011 Apr;29(4):341-5

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Thu 9 Feb 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1

Geratology / Respiratory Medicine

Dr Sarah Pendlebury, Dr Henry Bettinson

Geratology: "Cognitive co-morbidity, mortality and readmission in acute medicine: are we getting it right?", Dr Sarah Pendlebury -- Respiratory Medicine: "Extra-corporeal respiratory support. Which patient, which device?", Dr Henry Bettinson -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Geratology: "Cognitive co-morbidity, mortality and readmission in acute medicine: are we getting it right?", Dr Sarah Pendlebury -- Respiratory Medicine: "Extra-corporeal respiratory support. Which patient, which device?", Dr Henry Bettinson -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 10 Feb 2017 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

The mesentery: congenital and acquired disorders of a new organ

Mr Kalle Landerholm

The speakers are Miss Pam Sivathondan (Colorectal SpR), and Mr Kalle Landerholm (Colorectal Senior Fellow) and Mr Diederik Meylemans (Colorectal Senior Fellow) from Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

The speakers are Miss Pam Sivathondan (Colorectal SpR), and Mr Kalle Landerholm (Colorectal Senior Fellow) and Mr Diederik Meylemans (Colorectal Senior Fellow) from Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 10 Feb 2017 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Collective T cell decisions during immune responses

Dr Audrey Gérard

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 10 Feb 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Ludwig Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7DQ

Fri 10 Feb 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

WTCHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Headington OX3 7BN

The Polycomb system in X inactivation and beyond

Professor Neil Brockdorff

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Philipp Becker

Fri 10 Feb 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

INT'L GUEST SPEAKER- Professor Stefan Treue PhD, Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, German Primate Center, Göttingen: ‘Visual cortical area V5/MT - a prototype for shaping sensation into perception’

Professor Stefan Treue PhD

Area V5/MT in primate visual cortex is arguably the best understood area in primate extrastriate visual cortex in terms of its representation of the incoming (bottom-up) sensory information. MT is considered to be of critical importance for our ability to perceive the visual motion patterns in our... Read more

Area V5/MT in primate visual cortex is arguably the best understood area in primate extrastriate visual cortex in terms of its representation of the incoming (bottom-up) sensory information. MT is considered to be of critical importance for our ability to perceive the visual motion patterns in our environment. This level of understanding of the neural representation of sensory information in one cortical area is an excellent basis for investigating the top-down influences exerted by various types of attention onto sensory information processing. The talk will give an overview of the multitude of attentional effects that have been discovered with this focused approach, ranging from effects of spatial, feature-based and object-based attention on target and distractor stimuli encoding to multiplicative and non-multiplicative modulations of tuning curves, perisaccadic effects, as well as effects on the representation of change events in the environment and neural responses that are not modulated by attention. From these investigations a clear pattern emerges that turns MT into a model area for the interaction of sensory (bottom-up) signals with cognitive (top-down) modulatory influences that characterises visual perception. These findings also document how this interaction enables visual cortex to actively generate a neural representation of the environment that combines the high-performance sensory periphery with selective modulatory influences for producing an “integrated saliency map’ of the environment.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Tue 14 Feb 2017 from 10:00 to 11:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI Basement seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Phase contrast cryo-electron microscopy

Maryam Khoshouei

Phase contrast microscopy has been used in light microscopy for imaging unstained biological material for more than 80 years, opens up new possibilities in structural biology by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Recently, “Volta phase plate cryo-EM of the small protein complex Prx3” was shown... Read more

Phase contrast microscopy has been used in light microscopy for imaging unstained biological material for more than 80 years, opens up new possibilities in structural biology by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Recently, “Volta phase plate cryo-EM of the small protein complex Prx3” was shown that it is feasible to obtain near atomic resolution of a very small protein complex (250 kDa) with phase contrast single particle analysis. Images of unstained and frozen-hydrated biological material produce very little contrast, since such samples interact weakly with high-energy electrons. The only way to produce contrast in cryo-EM (until recently) was to intentionally defocus the image at the expense of altering high-resolution structural information. Despite the various efforts made in the development of EM phase plates, the technique was not readily applicable for cryo-EM, mainly due to the very short ‘life time’ of a phase plate and its complicated use. However, we have developed the new generation of the thin film phase plate at Max-Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried, Germay, which succeeded in creating a device called the Volta phase plate (VPP) that nowadays is routinely used for data collection in cryo-EM and cryo-tomography. As a result, it creates contrast for observation of weak phase objects by boosting the low frequency information, without the need of defocusing. Here, I will show how in-focus phase contrast cryo-EM enables single particle analysis of very challenging samples in terms of size, heterogeneity and flexibility that are difficult to solve by any other approach. Because of the high contrast it provides, VPP imaging could moreover become ideal tool for quick sample screening and/or initial model building. Moreover, I will present a recent published paper “Subtomogram analysis using the Volta phase plate” which shows the capability and contribution of this technique in the field of cryo-electron tomography at sub-nanometer resolution. This method could open a new pathway for cellular cryo-electron tomography to have better understanding about localization of macromolecular complex within a cell in their natural context.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Tue 14 Feb 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, , off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Deadly cargoes: extracellular synuclein and Parkinson's disease progression

Kostas Vekrellis

Since 2002 Dr. Vekrellis has been a Researcher in the Division of Basic Neurosceiences at the Biomedical Research Foundation of the Academy of Athens (BRFAA). In April 2012, he was appointed a visiting professorship at the the University of Oxford, Division of Exerimental Medicine, Nuffield... Read more

Since 2002 Dr. Vekrellis has been a Researcher in the Division of Basic Neurosceiences at the Biomedical Research Foundation of the Academy of Athens (BRFAA). In April 2012, he was appointed a visiting professorship at the the University of Oxford, Division of Exerimental Medicine, Nuffield department of Medicine. Dr. Vekrellis has extensive experience in cellular and animal models of neurodegeneration, as well as human histopathology, particularly related to Alzheimer's Disease. His lab interests lie in the role of protein oligomerization, misfolding and aggregation, with respect to neurodegenerative disease. The Vekrellis Lab is investigating mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Many neurodegenerative diseases, including prion disease, Alzhmeimer's and Parkinson's Disease are characterized by the accumulation of proteins with specific conformational states harboring beta sheet-rich secondary structures. These result in oligomeric species and plaque and tangle formation or formation of intracellular fibrillar aggregates. Such aberrant conformations appear to be toxic to neurons and to lead to death in the adult nervous sytem, but exactly which species are involved is unclear. Although speculated, a direct effect between α-synuclein oligomers and neuronal dysfunction has not yet been demonstrated. Furthermore, the mechanisms through which intracellular soluble oligomers exert their aberrant effects on neurons are largely unknown.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sara Bouskela

Please note TALK AT NOON. Entrance to the Sherrington building will be via the temporary reception at the entrance to The Burdon Sanderson Cardiac Science Centre

Tue 14 Feb 2017 from 16:00 to 17:00

DPAG Mabel FitzGerald Annual Lecture Series

Sherrington Building, The Large Lecture Theatre, , off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Pain and the Developing Brain, 3rd Annual Mabel FitzGerald Lecture

Professor Maria Fitzgerald

Pain is an individual experience. But how and when do we become aware that something hurts? In this lecture, Maria Fitzgerald presents the neurophysiological basis for developing pain experience in infancy and childhood and presents evidence that tissue injury in early life can affect sensitivity to pain in adults.

Pain is an individual experience. But how and when do we become aware that something hurts? In this lecture, Maria Fitzgerald presents the neurophysiological basis for developing pain experience in infancy and childhood and presents evidence that tissue injury in early life can affect sensitivity to pain in adults.

Booking Recommended

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Victoria Bullett

Wed 15 Feb 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, Post Grad Centre Level 3, Headington OX3 9DU

Human Focus Group: Uhlig Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Carolina Arancibia

Wed 15 Feb 2017 from 12:30 to 13:30

John Radcliffe Hospital, Entrance Foyer 2 room, outside Tingewick Hall

Patient & Public Involvement in Medical Research

Various Speakers

Have a burning question about your PPI work? Know what PPI you want to do but not sure how to make it work? New to PPI and want some tips on getting started? Drinks will be provided. Places are limited so if you want to come please let the host know at least a day before the event If you want to... Read more

Have a burning question about your PPI work? Know what PPI you want to do but not sure how to make it work? New to PPI and want some tips on getting started? Drinks will be provided. Places are limited so if you want to come please let the host know at least a day before the event If you want to send your question in advance please send it to the host. Whatever your PPI questions this is the place to air them. Our three hosts will be present at each session, offering expert advice and guidance on all your PPI queries.

Booking Recommended

Audience: An open session of questions and answers for all research staff working in Oxford.

Wed 15 Feb 2017 from 14:30 to 15:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Room 1, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

Positive action towards gender equality? Evidence from the Athena SWAN charter in UK medical schools

Dr Ian Gregory-Smith

This paper provides evidence on the effectiveness of voluntary positive action in addressing inequality between female and male careers. The setting is UK medical schools where two natural experiments are exploited. The first is the introduction of the Athena SWAN charter in 2005, whereby 12 UK... Read more

This paper provides evidence on the effectiveness of voluntary positive action in addressing inequality between female and male careers. The setting is UK medical schools where two natural experiments are exploited. The first is the introduction of the Athena SWAN charter in 2005, whereby 12 UK universities signed up to the principles of the charter. The second is the announcement in 2011 by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), to only shortlist medical schools with a `silver' Athena SWAN award for certain research grants. This second change potentially impacts schools that are further away from silver status than those that were already close in 2011. While there is a marked improvement of women succeeding in medical schools between 2004 and 2013, early Athena SWAN adopters have not increased female participation by more than other schools whose institution signed up later. In addition, tying funding to Athena SWAN silver status has yet to have an impact on female careers, although medical schools have invested in efforts to achieve silver status. Together, these results emphasise the challenges associated with addressing gender equality through voluntary self-regulation. Please email catia.nicodemo@economics.ox.ac.uk if you would like to talk with the speaker

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Catia Nicodemo

**PLEASE NOTE NEW START TIME**

Thu 16 Feb 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room (please note, not ORCRB), Headington OX3 7FZ

Cellular responses to DNA damage: mechanistic insights and applications in cancer therapy

Prof. Steve Jackson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Thu 16 Feb 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1

ICU / Renal Unit

Dr Adrian Wong, Prof Dominic Wilkinson, Dr Jane Walker, Dr Matt Bottomley, Dr Matt Brook, Dr Paul Harden

ICU: "The Most Difficult Easy Decision", Dr Adrian Wong, Prof Dominic Wilkinson and Dr Jane Walker. -- Renal Unit: "Between a rock and a hard place - Mineral bone disease in ESRF", Dr Matt Bottomley, Dr Matt Brook and Dr Paul Harden -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

ICU: "The Most Difficult Easy Decision", Dr Adrian Wong, Prof Dominic Wilkinson and Dr Jane Walker. -- Renal Unit: "Between a rock and a hard place - Mineral bone disease in ESRF", Dr Matt Bottomley, Dr Matt Brook and Dr Paul Harden -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 17 Feb 2017 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

The positive and negative selection of B cells during ontogeny

Xijin Xu (Cornall group)

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 17 Feb 2017 from 09:30 to 10:30

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Improving the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy

Prof. Benoit van den Eynde

Audience: Public

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Mon 20 Feb 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

New paradigms in leukocyte trafficking in acute inflammation and chronic inflammatory disease

Professor Ed Rainger

My area of research interest is regulation of inflammation, with particular focus on the recruitment and organisation of the leukocytic infiltrate. This is a broad remit because I believe it is essential to characterise physiological resolving inflammation, in order to understand chronic... Read more

My area of research interest is regulation of inflammation, with particular focus on the recruitment and organisation of the leukocytic infiltrate. This is a broad remit because I believe it is essential to characterise physiological resolving inflammation, in order to understand chronic inflammatory disease. To facilitate studies in this area I utilise sophisticated in vitro models of vascular inflammation, including unique co-culture platforms. In addition I have developed animal models of inflammation and inflammatory disease in which to conduct translational work. I work under 3 major themes: 1) The cellular pathology of Athersclerosis: This theme has drawn long term support from the BHF, including 10 years of Personal Fellowship. Our recent work investigates the role of platelets in monocyte recruitment during atherogenesis. 2) Regulation of the inflammatory response by omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3-PUFAs): The affects of n-3 PUFAs on endothelial cell biology is my niche area in this field, and we are using our in vitro modelling skills, to identify new steps in the regulation of leukocyte recruitment. 3) Regulation of the inflammatory response by a novel peptide derived from the 14.3.3. zeta/delta protein: We have identified an endogenous peptide mediated mechanism by which T cell recruitment is regulated. We believe that this unique pathway may be important in many auto-immune and/or chronic inflammatory diseases in which T cells contribute to the cellular pathology. I am currently on the BHF projects grant committee, as well as being on the committee of the British Atherosclerosis Society. I Chaired the committee for UK Cell Adhesion Society for a number of years.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 20 Feb 2017 from 12:30 to 13:30

WTCHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room B , Headington OX3 7BN

The Africa Health Research Institute- a new multidisciplinary HIV and TB centre in South Africa

Prof. Deenan Pillay

The KwaZulu-Natal Research Institute for TB-HIV (K-RITH) and Africa Centre for Population Health have joined to form an exciting new interdisciplinary research institute, called the Africa Health Research Institute. They aim to become a source of fundamental discoveries into the susceptibility,... Read more

The KwaZulu-Natal Research Institute for TB-HIV (K-RITH) and Africa Centre for Population Health have joined to form an exciting new interdisciplinary research institute, called the Africa Health Research Institute. They aim to become a source of fundamental discoveries into the susceptibility, transmission and cure of HIV and TB and related diseases. Prof Pillay will describe this new centre and opportunities for collaboration.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Christophe Fraser

Mon 20 Feb 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Dynamic interactions of healthy and malignant haematopoietic stem cells with the bone marrow microenvironment

Cristina Lo Celso

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kevin Clark

Tue 21 Feb 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

MHU Student Presentations

Yavor Bozhilov; Laura Godfrey; Andrew King

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 22 Feb 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI Basement seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Pioneering- one of our core values and how it influences everything we do

David Jenkinson

Over the past forty years the proportion of people who survived for ten years after leukaemia diagnosis has increased more than six fold. Over the same period ten year survival has merely doubled for those with a brain tumour. This shows that something different, pioneering and innovative needs to... Read more

Over the past forty years the proportion of people who survived for ten years after leukaemia diagnosis has increased more than six fold. Over the same period ten year survival has merely doubled for those with a brain tumour. This shows that something different, pioneering and innovative needs to be done. The Brain Tumour Charity is at the forefront of the fight to defeat brain tumours, making a difference every day to the lives of people with a brain tumour and their families. We fund pioneering research to increase survival, raise awareness of the symptoms and effects of brain tumours and provide support for everyone affected to improve quality of life. We are relentless in the pursuit of our vision, seeking new ways to make a difference. We are determined to remain at the forefront of this disease, funding pioneering, innovative research that makes breakthroughs to save lives. Biography: David has over 20 years' experience in oncology research after gaining a degree in biochemistry from Brunel University. He undertook a PhD at University of London before joining Cancer Research UK as a postdoctoral researcher. David then led the biology at a company developing therapeutics to control the switching 'on' and 'off' of genes in cancer. Up till now, David worked for Cancer Research Technology where he gained experience in technology assessment, protection, development and licensing. Whilst in this post, he introduced several innovative approaches to ensure the progression of discoveries towards patients, such as securing orphan designations, industry co-funding agreements and the establishment of industry-academia drug discovery alliances. David has a passion for ensuring basic research is translated into the clinic for patient benefit and early diagnosis where tumours are spotted at a stage that is more easily treatable. He brings his collaborative approach to the brain tumour field and is determined to make a difference for those affected by these hard to treat tumours.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Wed 22 Feb 2017 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Pathogenesis of arbovirus-induced diseases: role of follicular dendritic cells

Professor Massimo Palmarini

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 23 Feb 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

The kinetic-segregation model and immunoreceptor signaling

Professor Simon Davis

The T-cell receptor (TCR) has no intrinsic enzymatic activity and is instead phosphorylated by the Src tyrosine kinase, Lck. There are three main explanations for how this occurs, including the kinetic-segregation (KS) model. The KS model postulates that the state of TCR phosphorylation is... Read more

The T-cell receptor (TCR) has no intrinsic enzymatic activity and is instead phosphorylated by the Src tyrosine kinase, Lck. There are three main explanations for how this occurs, including the kinetic-segregation (KS) model. The KS model postulates that the state of TCR phosphorylation is maintained by an equilibrium between kinases and phosphatases. This equilibrium is disturbed locally in favour of kinases when TCRs engage their ligands, owing to the exclusion of large receptor-type tyrosine phosphatases such as CD45 from the regions of contact. Importantly, the KS model predicts that TCR signaling is not strictly ligand dependent. I will discuss evidence offering strong support for the KS model, based on the crystal structure of the extracellular region of CD45, and the behaviour of the phosphatase at new structures we call “close-contacts". We also propose that signaling by the TCR co-stimulatory receptor CD28 induced by superagonistic antibodies is also explained, at least in part, by the physical segregation of the receptor from large phosphatases. Antibody superagonism could, in principle, be harnessed clinically to dampen immune responses by activating inhibitory receptors, but I will also refer to new opportunities for therapeutic blockade of these receptors in cancer.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Thu 23 Feb 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Health Economics Seminars

New Richards Building, Ground Floor Meeting Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LG

Prospects for the use of Mendelian Randomization in Economic Evaluation

Dr Padraig Dixon

Audience: Public

Organisers: HERC

Thu 23 Feb 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1

GU Medicine / Gastroenterology

Dr Simon Travis, Dr Holm Uhlig, Dr Bret Palmer, Lucy Dorrell

GU Medicine: "Keeping a positive outlook", Dr Bret Palmer and Prof Lucy Dorrell -- Gastroenterology: "When IBD isn’t", Prof Simon Travis and Prof Holm Uhlig -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

GU Medicine: "Keeping a positive outlook", Dr Bret Palmer and Prof Lucy Dorrell -- Gastroenterology: "When IBD isn’t", Prof Simon Travis and Prof Holm Uhlig -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 24 Feb 2017 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Monocyte-derived macrophages and pulmonary fibrosis

Emily Fraser

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 24 Feb 2017 from 11:30 to 12:30

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

The Cancer Cell Map Initiative : Using Network Biology to Interpret Cancer Genomic Data

Professor Nevan Krogan

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 24 Feb 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Guest Speaker - Professor Anthony Galione FRS, Dept of Pharmacology : ‘Calcium signalling from the lysosome’

Calcium (Ca2+) is familiar as a structural component of teeth and bones, but has a more fundamental role in intracellular signalling as the universal regulator of cellular functions. Multiple small messenger molecules target specific ion channels on organelles to evoke the complex Ca2+ signalling... Read more

Calcium (Ca2+) is familiar as a structural component of teeth and bones, but has a more fundamental role in intracellular signalling as the universal regulator of cellular functions. Multiple small messenger molecules target specific ion channels on organelles to evoke the complex Ca2+ signalling patterns that determine the specificity of this ion in controlling an enormous array of cellular responses. My overarching research question in cell signalling is how the Ca2+ ion as the most common signal transduction element can specifically control a myriad of cellular processes. During cellular communication, a multitude of extracellular signals are transduced to kinetically variable intracellular Ca2+ signals of variable magnitude in various subcellular cellular compartments that dictate changes in cell responses. The three major messengers regulating Ca2+ signaling are inositol trisphosphate (IP3), cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) and nicotinic adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP). Whilst IP3 and cADPR activate Ca2+ release channels of the “neutral” endoplasmic reticulum (ER), NAADP is unique in that it evokes Ca2+ release from organelles of the “acidic’ endolysosomal system: a new role for these important organelles. My recent work has highlighted the role of a novel family of endolysosomal channels, the two-pore channels (TPCs) in NAADP-mediated Ca2+ signalling. In this talk, I will discuss the role of lysosome-based NAADP-mediated Ca2+ release as a widespread trigger for intracellular calcium signalling and how studies of TPCs have enhanced our understanding of this process. This work has informed fundamental pathophysiological cellular processes as diverse as Ebola virus disease infection, fertilisation and embryology, cardiac contractility, T cell activation and neuronal excitability. The discovery of lysosomes as calcium stores mobilized by NAADP has identified an entirely new signalling role for these organelles in health and disease.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Fri 24 Feb 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

The windy road of a scientific career - “connecting the dots looking backwards”

Dr Namir Hassan

Namir is VP of the Infectious Diseases organisation and a member of the management team at Immunocore Ltd. In his time at the company, Namir has been responsible for building the biology and translational organisation to deliver novel immunotherapies, based on the company’s platform technology,... Read more

Namir is VP of the Infectious Diseases organisation and a member of the management team at Immunocore Ltd. In his time at the company, Namir has been responsible for building the biology and translational organisation to deliver novel immunotherapies, based on the company’s platform technology, into early phase trials. Namir has also been overseeing the first in human trial with the first in class IMCgp100 immunotherapy for the treatment of malignant melanoma and, is now overseeing the company’s Infectious Diseases Unit. Prior to joining Immunocore in April 2009, Namir was a Group Leader at GSK within Discovery Research, delivering novel assays for the screening of compounds targeting a variety of disease indications. Namir received his DPhil from the Cellular Immunology Unit at the University of Oxford, and has given talks, authored papers and book chapters on the application of immunotherapies to cancers and infectious diseases.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Deborah Hatherley

Mon 27 Feb 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

Controlling nucleases that determine our genetic make-up

Joao Matos

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 27 Feb 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

(Big) Data driven inference of clinically relevant pharmacogenomic interactions in cancer

Dr Francesco Iorio

Systematic studies of cancer genomes are providing unprecedented insights into the molecular nature of human cancer. Using this information to guide the development and application of therapies in the clinic is challenging. We have performed a large-scale integrative study of pharmacogenomic data... Read more

Systematic studies of cancer genomes are providing unprecedented insights into the molecular nature of human cancer. Using this information to guide the development and application of therapies in the clinic is challenging. We have performed a large-scale integrative study of pharmacogenomic data encompassing the characterisation of 1,001 cancer cell lines and 11,289 primary tumours from 29 different tissues. Results from this analysis show that cancer-driving alterations identified in primary tumors (integrating mutations, copy-number alterations, methylation and gene expression) are informative of the response to 265 compounds profiled in human cancer cell-lines. Additionally, cell-lines recapitulate partially but faithfully the landscape of oncogenic aberrations identified in tumors, and many of these aberrations interact statistically with drug sensitivity or resistance. Finally, logic-based modeling uncovers combinations of aberrations that specifically sensitize to drugs, and machine-learning techniques can be used to explore the ability of different data omics (and their combinations) in predicting drug response. In my talk, I will illustrate how these analyses were performed, showing representative results and proposing associated datasets and web-portals as possible resources for the identification of novel therapeutic options for selected sub-populations of cancer patients.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Mon 27 Feb 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Continuing to pursue Edward Jenner’s revenge: Sterilizing vaccines in chemotherapy for tuberculosis

Prof William R. Jacobs

Audience: Public

Please contact lisbeth.soederberg@ndm.ox.ac.uk to set up a meeting with the speaker.

Mon 27 Feb 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Host-pathogen interactions: understanding viral infection and inflammation in airway epithelial cells

Dr Lisa Parker

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 27 Feb 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Chromosome 21: its critical role in childhood leukaemia (other than Down Syndrome)

Christine Harrison

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Tue 28 Feb 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

A view of haematopoietic development and disease from the Petri dish

Dr. Andrea Ditadi

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 28 Feb 2017 from 14:00 to 15:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

Old Road Campus Research Building, Ludwig Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7DQ

Epigenetic inheritance and reprogramming in early mammalian development

Dr Wei Xie

Fertilization triggers drastic epigenetic reprogramming that converts terminally differentiated oocyte and sperm to totipotent embryos. However, how chromatin is reprogrammed at the DNA level in early mammalian development is poorly understood. Furthermore, whether histone modifications, the... Read more

Fertilization triggers drastic epigenetic reprogramming that converts terminally differentiated oocyte and sperm to totipotent embryos. However, how chromatin is reprogrammed at the DNA level in early mammalian development is poorly understood. Furthermore, whether histone modifications, the crucial epigenetic regulators, can be passed on from parents to the next generation is a long-standing question that remains elusive. By developing cutting-edge technologies, we recently investigated dynamic regulation of chromatin and histone modifications from gametes to early embryos in mice. In addition, we also showed how parental memory is controlled by a simple isoform switch of an epigenetic regulator. Our studies not only revealed extremely dynamic, non-canonical epigenomic reprogramming that accompanies early embryogenesis, but also shed lights on the fundamental principles underlying epigenetic inheritance between generations.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Chunxiao Song