Other Seminars

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Fri 1 Dec 2017 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Updates in multiple sclerosis

Dr Gerardine Quaghebeur

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 1 Dec 2017 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Bacterial sensing through ILC2 presentation of endogenous CD1a lipid antigens

Dr Clare Hardman

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 1 Dec 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Cellular Ecology

Prof Ruslan Medzhitov

Ruslan Medzhitov obtained his PhD from Moscow State University in 1993 and performed his postdoctoral studies with the late Charles A. Janeway Jr. at Yale University School of Medicine. In 1999, he joined the faculty of the Department of Immunobiology and is currently a Sterling Professor of... Read more

Ruslan Medzhitov obtained his PhD from Moscow State University in 1993 and performed his postdoctoral studies with the late Charles A. Janeway Jr. at Yale University School of Medicine. In 1999, he joined the faculty of the Department of Immunobiology and is currently a Sterling Professor of Immunobiology at Yale University School of Medicine, and an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Medzhitov discovered mammalian Toll-like receptors and characterized their role in the immune system. He helped to define the mechanisms of TLR-mediated signaling, gene induction, and inflammatory responses in physiological and pathological conditions. His studies demonstrated the requirement for innate immune recognition for the induction of adaptive immune responses. His awards include the Searle Scholarship, the William B. Coley Award from the Cancer Research Institute, the Emil von Behring Award, the AAI–BD Biosciences Investigator Award, Doctor Honoris Causae from Munich University and Utrecht University, the Blavatnik Award for Young Scientists, the Howard Taylor Ricketts Award, the Lewis S. Rosenstiel Award, the Shaw Prize in Life Science and Medicine, the Vilcek Prize in Life Sciences, the Else Kröner-Fresenius-Foundation inaugural international prize in immunology, and the inaugural Lurie Prize in the Biomedical Sciences. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, USA, a member of the National Academy of Medicine, a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology and a foreign member of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Fri 1 Dec 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

INT'L GUEST SPEAKER: Professor Michael J Hawken, Professor of Neural Science, New York University - 'Linking Structure and Function in the Primate Visual Pathways'

Professor Michael Hawken, Professor of Neural Science

One of the key elements for elucidating the neural underpinning of vision is determining the links between structure and function of the populations of neurons that make up the circuits—from retina to the higher levels of cortex. In visual cortex there has been a long history of seminal studies... Read more

One of the key elements for elucidating the neural underpinning of vision is determining the links between structure and function of the populations of neurons that make up the circuits—from retina to the higher levels of cortex. In visual cortex there has been a long history of seminal studies that have elucidated the connections between structure and function at a number of different levels. In our recent work we have employed a range of new approaches involving large-scale image processing and connectomics to further understand the links between thalamus and cortex in both non-human primates and humans. In addition, we have used functional categorization to study the laminar specificity of neural populations. Using these different approaches we are gaining a detailed understanding of the cortical circuits involved in processing visual information.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Mon 4 Dec 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting rooms 71a, b & c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Novel DNA nuclease function governs cell fate decisions in response to ionizing radiation

Claus Storgaard Sørensen Ph.D.

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 4 Dec 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Cancer cells: the evil companions corrupting good tissue behaviour

Prof Ilaria Malanchi

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 4 Dec 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Cancer cells: the evil companions corrupting good tissue behaviour

Prof Ilaria Malanchi

Each cell, constituting tissues of each organ, has a very specific task; this ensures the entire body functions altogether. Cancer arises when a cell of a certain tissue loses its specialised function, stops contributing to organ activity and importantly starts breaking the rules limiting its... Read more

Each cell, constituting tissues of each organ, has a very specific task; this ensures the entire body functions altogether. Cancer arises when a cell of a certain tissue loses its specialised function, stops contributing to organ activity and importantly starts breaking the rules limiting its growth within the tissue. A cancer-initiating cell restarts the embryonic program of 'construction', activates extensive proliferation and builds new interactions with the surrounding healthy cells of the tissue influencing their behaviour. Consequently the normal cells of a tissue surrounding tumourigenic cells start building a stromal structure and a blood vessels network to support and become part of the tumour growth. If the tumourigenic cells are not cleared early by the immune system, they lead to an abnormal mass that continues to evolve and 'corrupt' the normal host cells locally as well as systemically at distal sites. The powerful growth program is sustained by this crosstalk with host-derived cells, which make the tumour constantly evolve and spread to the entire body. Indeed cancer cells cannot grow without their 'corrupted' surrounded stroma. Therefore, when cancer cells spread from the organ of origin to a distant tissue they must first create a favourable microenvironment (or niche) supporting the growth of a secondary mass. The lab studies the strategies adopted by cancer cells to establish these crucial interactions with their microenvironment (local tissue cells or inflammatory cells) during the process of tumour initiation as well as metastatic spreading. Our final aim is to find approaches to interfere with the tumour-host crosstalk, a fist step toward novel, more effective anti-cancer therapies.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 4 Dec 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Synthetic genetics: beyond DNA and RNA

Professor Philipp Holliger

Audience: Public

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Mon 4 Dec 2017 from 14:00 to 15:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Please arrive 5 minutes early for access to the building, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Meningococcal disease in South Africa

Dr Mignon du Plessis

Mignon du Plessis is a medical scientist in the Centre for Respiratory Diseases and Meningitis at the National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) in South Africa, and holds a joint appointment as lecturer at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg. In her position she manages... Read more

Mignon du Plessis is a medical scientist in the Centre for Respiratory Diseases and Meningitis at the National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) in South Africa, and holds a joint appointment as lecturer at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg. In her position she manages the molecular bacteriology laboratory which includes the detection and characterisation of bacterial respiratory and meningeal pathogens for surveillance, diagnostics and research. Her research interests include the molecular epidemiology of bacterial respiratory pathogens and exploring new molecular diagnostic platforms.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Ramona Kantschuster

Mon 4 Dec 2017 from 18:00 to 18:30

Division of Cardiovascular Medicine

Interrogating fat: will it give away the secrets of the human heart?

Professor Charalambos Antoniades

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 5 Dec 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NPEU Seminar: Born at the threshold of viability: the impact on behaviour problems into adolescence

Louise Linsell

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 5 Dec 2017 from 12:00 to 12:45

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Tue 5 Dec 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

DNA methylation of transcribed CpG islands depends on their transcriptional activity during differentiation and disease

Dr. Danuta Jeziorska

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 5 Dec 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NDPH Seminar: A Tale of Two (Lancet) Commissions – Palliative Care and Pollution in LDCs

Professor David Hunter

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 6 Dec 2017 from 11:00 to 12:30

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Wed 6 Dec 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Oxford Martin School, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Neural Mechanisms for Dynamic Acoustic Communication in Flies

Mala Murthy

Social interactions require continually adjusting behavior in response to sensory feedback. For example, when having a conversation, the sounds or facial expressions from our partner affect our speech patterns in real time. Our speech signals, in turn, are the sensory cues that modify our... Read more

Social interactions require continually adjusting behavior in response to sensory feedback. For example, when having a conversation, the sounds or facial expressions from our partner affect our speech patterns in real time. Our speech signals, in turn, are the sensory cues that modify our partner’s actions. What are the underlying computations and neural mechanisms that govern these interactions? To address these questions, my lab studies the acoustic communication system of Drosophila. Importantly, Drosophila acoustic behaviors are highly quantifiable and robust. During courtship, males produce time-varying songs via wing vibration, while females arbitrate mating decisions. We discovered that, rather than being a stereotyped fixed action sequence, male song structure and intensity are continually sculpted by interactions with the female, over timescales ranging from tens of milliseconds to minutes – and we are mapping the underlying circuits and computations. We have also developed methods to relate song representations in the female brain to changes in her behavior, across multiple timescales. Our focus on natural acoustic signals, either as the output of the male nervous system or as the input to the female nervous system, provides a powerful, quantitative handle for studying the basic building blocks of communication

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Wed 6 Dec 2017 from 12:30 to 13:30

Jenner Seminars

Correlates of risk of TB disease and their back-translation into animal models

Ass. Prof. Helen Fletcher, Dr Andrea Zelmer

This seminar is being streamed online and will also be set up for live viewing at the Centre for Clinical Vaccinology & Tropical Medicine (CCVTM), Churchill Hospital, Oxford. The actual seminar will take place at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. The talk is part of a seminar series... Read more

This seminar is being streamed online and will also be set up for live viewing at the Centre for Clinical Vaccinology & Tropical Medicine (CCVTM), Churchill Hospital, Oxford. The actual seminar will take place at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. The talk is part of a seminar series hosted by the VALIDATE Network (“VAccine deveLopment for complex Intracellular neglecteD pAThogEns”), led by Prof Helen McShane, Jenner Institute, University of Oxford. To view online: http://www.validate-network.org/seminars. The talk will open at 12.30pm on 6th December. It is not necessary to be a LSHTM member to access this link. Abstract: Immune correlates of risk of TB disease have recently been identified in human clinical trials. These correlates indicate that, years before TB disease develops, there is alteration in the host-immune environment which is associated with risk of TB disease. Perhaps these alterations render the immune environment permissive to mycobacterial infection or increased growth, or perhaps they reduce the efficacy of the BCG vaccine? Back translation of immune correlates of risk into animal models will enable us to address these questions and model the immune response of those individuals at greatest risk of TB disease. Non LSHTM viewers will be able to ask questions via Twitter by posting to @NetworkValidate Each VALIDATE seminar will consist of a Group Leader and a Post-doc discussing a topic in their field that they believe will have cross-pathogen interest for VALIDATE members. All seminars are live-streamed and details can be found found here: www.validate-network.org/seminars.

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 6 Dec 2017 from 14:00 to 15:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NHS Data Access Request Service (DARS) Seminar

The Data Access Request Service (DARS) team responsible for the University of Oxford, led by Jennifer Donald, will be holding a one hour seminar for key researchers using NHS Digital data next Wednesday, 6 December, at 2.00pm in BDI Seminar Room 0. The seminar will include some top tips for... Read more

The Data Access Request Service (DARS) team responsible for the University of Oxford, led by Jennifer Donald, will be holding a one hour seminar for key researchers using NHS Digital data next Wednesday, 6 December, at 2.00pm in BDI Seminar Room 0. The seminar will include some top tips for applications, some general news from DARS and Q & A. The team are keen to receive feedback to help improve the service. As you may be aware there has been a slight change to the structure of the NHS Data Access Request Service (DARS) and they are now working to a key accounts model. This means that small teams will now have sole responsibility for individual organisations and all their DARS applications and enquiries. It would help if you registered for the seminar, at training@ndph.ox.ac.uk (at the very least, to ensure we have enough space) but you are also welcome just to come along on the day.

Booking Recommended

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 6 Dec 2017 from 17:15 to 18:15

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

Green Templeton College, Woodstock Road OX2 6HG

Slum Health - Expert talk with Q&A - Global Health Systems Research

Professor Richard Lilford

Professor Richard Lilford is the Chair of Public Health and the Director for Applied Health Research and Delivery at the University of Warwick, working with resource-limited nations to transform health systems and improve health in low and middle-income populations. Professor Lilford’s interest... Read more

Professor Richard Lilford is the Chair of Public Health and the Director for Applied Health Research and Delivery at the University of Warwick, working with resource-limited nations to transform health systems and improve health in low and middle-income populations. Professor Lilford’s interest in slum health materialised after recognising that there was a lot of data collected on poverty and health and urban health, but very little on slums and health. Slum dwelling demonstrates different characteristics when compared to people living urban poverty, providing a different context for healthcare. After receiving his medical degree from the University of Witwatersrand in South Africa, Professor Lilford went on to become Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology for ten years. Lilford moved into the world of health systems research through his experience at the Department of Health and while he was Professor of Epidemiology at the University of Birmingham. From medicine to economics, statistics and psychology, Professor Lilford presents a wealth of diverse experience in the field of health systems research.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Mike English

Thu 7 Dec 2017 from 08:30 to 18:00

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

Saïd Business School, Nelson Mandela Leature Theatre, Morning and afternoon tea and lunch is provided., Park End Street OX1 1HP

Crossing Boundaries 3 - Conference on Global Health Systems

Thursday 7 December, 08:00 - 18:00 Is your research relevant to improving health systems around the world? Oxford Health Systems Collaboration and the Medical and Social Sciences Divisions would like to invite you to Crossing Boundaries 3 – a conference to showcase Oxford’s multidisciplinary... Read more

Thursday 7 December, 08:00 - 18:00 Is your research relevant to improving health systems around the world? Oxford Health Systems Collaboration and the Medical and Social Sciences Divisions would like to invite you to Crossing Boundaries 3 – a conference to showcase Oxford’s multidisciplinary research informing health system strengthening in low and middle income countries (LMICs). Cross-divisional research collaborations With the aim to promote a collaborative approach to global health systems research, talks will range from Biomedical Engineering to Primary Care and Organisational Research. Areas of work include technologies, task shifting, interdisciplinary research methods, antimicrobial resistance, mental health and governance. There will also be opportunities to meet with experts across these fields. Submit your poster Early career researchers, masters and DPhil students are invited to submit poster abstracts on any subject relevant to improving health systems in LMICs. Studies from any disciplinary background will be considered. Those selected to present their work will have two minutes to showcase it as part of a rapid plenary presentation session and will then present their poster during a dedicated poster session. All those submitting abstracts should register as a delegate – those chosen to present their work will have their day delegate fee refunded after the conference. Prizes will be given for best poster. You can submit your abstract to: ohscar@ndm.ox.ac.uk For more information contact: tara.clarke@ndm.ox.ac.uk

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Mike English

Thu 7 Dec 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Combined Medical-Surgical Grand Round -- CANCELLED

Mr Richard Guy, Dr Tim Betts, Dr David Holdsworth

CANCELLED "Kili or cure? High altitude hazards", Mr Richard Guy, Dr Tim Betts and Dr David Holdsworth -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

CANCELLED "Kili or cure? High altitude hazards", Mr Richard Guy, Dr Tim Betts and Dr David Holdsworth -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 7 Dec 2017 from 13:00 to 14:30

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, BDI L1 Ax, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

CPNP Seminar - Changes in drink purchases following the removal of soft drinks and 20 sport and leisure centres

Tara Boelsen-Robinson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Fri 8 Dec 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Molecular mechanisms of DNA replication revealed by structural studies

Prof Luca Pellegrini

Short bio info: 1992-1996 PhD at ETH Zurich, with Prof. Tim Richmond The rest is all at the Department of Biochemistry, in Cambridge: 1996-2003 Postdoc with Prof. Tom Blundell 2003-2008 Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow 2008-2014 Senior Lecturer and Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow 2014-2107 Reader in Structural Biology 2017- Professor of Structural Biology

Short bio info: 1992-1996 PhD at ETH Zurich, with Prof. Tim Richmond The rest is all at the Department of Biochemistry, in Cambridge: 1996-2003 Postdoc with Prof. Tom Blundell 2003-2008 Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow 2008-2014 Senior Lecturer and Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow 2014-2107 Reader in Structural Biology 2017- Professor of Structural Biology

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Mon 11 Dec 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting rooms 71a, b and c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Roles and regulation of the eukaryotic replisome

Professor Karim Labib

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 12 Dec 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Bayesian forecasting of seasonal influenza epidemics

Alex Zarebski

Each year, health-care providers face the challenge of providing a timely and proportionate response to the annual seasonal influenza epidemics. Accurate forecasting of these epidemics can enable these health-care providers to maximize preparedness. For several years now, we have used a mechanistic... Read more

Each year, health-care providers face the challenge of providing a timely and proportionate response to the annual seasonal influenza epidemics. Accurate forecasting of these epidemics can enable these health-care providers to maximize preparedness. For several years now, we have used a mechanistic transmission model coupled with a statistical observation model to generate predictions of key epidemic properties such as peak time and magnitude. Starting in Melbourne, we now generate forecasts for several capital cities around Australia using a particle filter, the state of the art in Bayesian forecasting. In addition to the practical outcome of improving our forecasting capability, this work emphasizes a key strength of the Bayesian paradigm, the capability to seamlessly incorporate prior knowledge. While the issue of "rigged-priors" has made this issue somewhat controversial, we feel the method provides an honest and beneficial approach and will enable more nuanced modelling

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Ramona Kantschuster

Tue 12 Dec 2017 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Parkinson’s Disease Seen from the alpha-Synuclein Perspective

Professor Donato A. Di Monte

The primary goal of Professor Di Monte's research team is to identify mechanisms of neuronal degeneration that could be targeted for the prevention and treatment of human neurodegenerative diseases. Although their research is mainly focused on Parkinson’s disease, they aim to study mechanisms... Read more

The primary goal of Professor Di Monte's research team is to identify mechanisms of neuronal degeneration that could be targeted for the prevention and treatment of human neurodegenerative diseases. Although their research is mainly focused on Parkinson’s disease, they aim to study mechanisms (e.g. protein aggregation and inflammation) and risk factors (e.g. aging) that are shared between Parkinson’s and other neurodegenerative disorders. They believe that bridging different human diseases will help them understand what makes neurons vulnerable to degenerative processes and what can be done to counteract these pathologic events.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Wed 13 Dec 2017 from 11:00 to 12:30

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox seminar - Embedding ethics in global health research collaborations

Prof. Michael Parker

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 13 Dec 2017 from 14:00 to 15:00

ARUK Oxford Drug Discovery Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Synapse degeneration and recovery: a role of Wnt signalling in Alzheimer’s disease

Professor Patricia Salinas

Audience: Public

Organisers: Dr John Davis

Thu 14 Dec 2017 from 10:00 to 11:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Department Christmas Seminars

Trish Greenhalgh – Male leaders are from Mars, Women leaders are from Venus: a light-hearted look at the evidence base for gendered leadership styles Richard Stevens – What's the life expectancy of a New Year's resolution? Carmen Piernas-Sanchez – The BISCUIT-2 Study Karolina Wartolowska –... Read more

Trish Greenhalgh – Male leaders are from Mars, Women leaders are from Venus: a light-hearted look at the evidence base for gendered leadership styles Richard Stevens – What's the life expectancy of a New Year's resolution? Carmen Piernas-Sanchez – The BISCUIT-2 Study Karolina Wartolowska – Has this paper been retracted? Constantinos Koshiaris & Jason Oke – How to practice medicine – Simpsons style

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Please note the new time of 10am.

Thu 14 Dec 2017 from 11:30 to 12:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Identification of Novel Runx1 Targets Involve in HSC Development

Florian Bonkhofer

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Penny Berry

Thu 14 Dec 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NDPH Seminar: The uses of Hippocratic epidemiology

Professor Albert Hoffman

Professor Albert Hofman Chair of the Department of Epidemiology Stephen B. Kay Family Professor of Public Health and Clinical Epidemiology, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health Boston, Massachusetts (USA) Before moving to Harvard, Professor Hofman was chair of the Department of Epidemiology of... Read more

Professor Albert Hofman Chair of the Department of Epidemiology Stephen B. Kay Family Professor of Public Health and Clinical Epidemiology, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health Boston, Massachusetts (USA) Before moving to Harvard, Professor Hofman was chair of the Department of Epidemiology of the Erasmus Medical Center/Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands, from 1988 - 2016. Professor Hofman is the initiator and principal investigator of two population-based, prospective cohort studies in the Netherlands: the Rotterdam Study and the Generation R study. The study of multiple outcomes in these cohorts, in particular neurological, cardiovascular and endocrine diseases, has enabled the investigation of the interrelations of those diseases, and thereby of the co-morbidity and co-etiology of various diseases with a large population burden. The Rotterdam Study was one of the five founding cohorts of the very productive CHARGE consortium which has performed many successful genome-wide association studies that found a large number of genes involved in common diseases. The Rotterdam Study also pioneered new population imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging since 1995. More recently the Generation R study has an MRI facility and is conducting one of the first large-scale populations based brain-imaging studies in children.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 14 Dec 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

NDM Seminar Series

Building health and disaster risk reduction programmes from the bottom up in Asia: What we have learnt

Professor Emily Ying Yang Chan

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kathryn Smith

Lunch available, All welcome

Thu 14 Dec 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Department of Oncology

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Biochemical reconstitution of the Fanconi Anaemia pathway

Dr Andrew Deans

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Andrew Blackford

Thu 14 Dec 2017 from 14:00 to 15:00

Jenner Seminars

Old Road Campus Research Building, Seminar Room, Lower Ground Floor, Headington OX3 7DQ

Rift Valley fever: exploring strategies for intervention and control

Dr Alejandro Brun

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 18 Dec 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting rooms 71a, b and c, Headington OX3 7DQ