Other Seminars

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Thu 1 Sep 2016 from 16:30 to 17:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, Level 3 PGCE- Lecture Room 3, Headington OX3 9DU

NOTCH1 mediates a reciprocal switch between two distinct secretomes during senescence

Dr Matthew Hoare

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Annabel Gordon

Wed 7 Sep 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Inhibition of the AAA-ATPase p97 with the first in class inhibitor CB-5083 as a novel approach to treat cancer

Dr Daniel Anderson

Dr. Anderson has over 7 years of experience in cancer drug discovery and early-stage research. Prior to joining Cleave in early 2012, Dr. Anderson contributed to a number of oncology-focused small molecule drug discovery programs at Genentech. During this period he led a group responsible for... Read more

Dr. Anderson has over 7 years of experience in cancer drug discovery and early-stage research. Prior to joining Cleave in early 2012, Dr. Anderson contributed to a number of oncology-focused small molecule drug discovery programs at Genentech. During this period he led a group responsible for developing novel cellular assays to report on drug activity and mechanism of action. His group contributed key mechanistic insights into the function of clinically approved drugs targeting the MAPK pathway and apoptosis. Dr. Anderson received a PhD in cell biology and biochemistry from the University of California, San Diego in conjunction with the Salk Institute where he was awarded the Martin D. Kamen Cell Biology Thesis Prize. He earned his BS degree in Biology from the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Anderson has authored over 20 scientific publications including several in top-tier journals.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Wed 7 Sep 2016 from 12:30 to 13:30

Oxford Genomic Centre Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar Rooms A & B , Headington OX3 7BN

Counting on Illumina transition: Why RNASeq compared to Gene Expression Arrays?

Scott Brouilette

Seminar - “Counting on Illumina: Transition” The switch from expression arrays continues to gather pace. Since the seminal publication describing the application of NGS technology to gene expression analysis in 2008 (Mortazavi 2008, Nat. Methods) the community has continued to develop... Read more

Seminar - “Counting on Illumina: Transition” The switch from expression arrays continues to gather pace. Since the seminal publication describing the application of NGS technology to gene expression analysis in 2008 (Mortazavi 2008, Nat. Methods) the community has continued to develop innovative methods to study RNA biology, including single-cell and ribosomal profiling. But arguably the most powerful benefit of RNA-seq is its unbiased nature… Key Benefits or RNA-Seq: • Unbiased survey of transcription with the ability to identify novel transcripts & isoforms • Single-base resolution defines transcriptional boundaries & can reveal underlying sequence variation • None of the background hybridisation issues with promiscuous probebinding when using arrays • A larger dynamic range (typically 5-6 logs versus 3-4 for microarrays) Despite the advances in methodology and the benefits described above it has become apparent there are still some aspects of the technique that remain unclear. Therefore in this seminar we will review the principles of RNA-seq and discuss some key aspects of experimental design before deconstructing a number of myths (using extensive and recent peer-reviewed data) including: Myth 1: “You need 200M reads to get meaningful data” Fact 2: There are indeed experimental designs that may require 200M reads or more, but to get data comparable to a generic 3’-array 10-20M single-end (SE) reads of 50bp can suffice. Myth 2: “RNA-seq lacks reproducibly” Fact 2: This claim is likely linked to Myth 1, as increasing read depth is often viewed as the best approach to improve statistical output. However both technical and biological replicates are highly reproducible, with sample size a major influence. Myth 3: “Data analysis is too complex” Fact 3: Data analysis pipelines differ from array-based methods, but Illumina’s BaseSpace Sequence Hub offers cloud-based storage & analysis with a host of informatics tools wrapped into a simple, graphical user interface. Data can also be analysed in R-studio via Illumina’s BaseMount tool, or downloaded for entry into in-house pipelines. So please join us as we take an end-to-end deep dive into this key application: • Overview of NGS & Illumina Technology • Principles of RNA-Seq, including experimental design • Extensive Library Preparation options for RNA-Seq • Data Analysis using BaseSpace Sequencing Hub

Audience: Public

Organisers: Susan Wilson

Wed 7 Sep 2016 from 15:00 to 16:00

SGC Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

The development of Keap1-interactive compounds that regulate Nrf2 transcriptional activity

Dr Geoff Wells

Brief bio: Geoff Wells is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Pharmaceutical and Biological Chemistry at UCL School of Pharmacy. He pursued a PhD in medicinal chemistry at the University of Nottingham under the supervision of Professor Malcolm Stevens FRS. He spent four years as a postdoctoral... Read more

Brief bio: Geoff Wells is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Pharmaceutical and Biological Chemistry at UCL School of Pharmacy. He pursued a PhD in medicinal chemistry at the University of Nottingham under the supervision of Professor Malcolm Stevens FRS. He spent four years as a postdoctoral researcher in the CRUK Gene Targeted Drug Design Research Group at the School of Pharmacy, University of London, followed by two years working for Pharminox Ltd, an anticancer drug discovery company, as Drug Discovery Project Leader. In October 2007, Dr Wells took up the position of Lecturer in Medicinal Chemistry at The School of Pharmacy. His research work has focused on the design and synthesis of compound classes that affect redox homeostasis, interact with DNA in a sequence selective manner and that have selective cytotoxicity profiles. His current interests include the rational design of agents that modulate cytoprotective effects such as the Keap1-Nrf2 system that regulates antioxidant response element genes.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Thu 8 Sep 2016 from 14:00 to 15:00

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Breaking the in vitro impasse: human lung small airway-on-a-chip for clinical translation

Dr Kambez Benam

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 9 Sep 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Bioinformatics Tools and Pitfalls with single-cell Data

Davis McCarthy

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Fri 9 Sep 2016 from 15:00 to 16:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting Rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

Mechanisms of Cortical Development: Migration, Circuit Formation and Synaptic Plasticity

Prof Mary E Hatten

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof Robert Gilbert

Mon 12 Sep 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Structural insights into LARP1, a significant player in epithelial cancers

Dr Andrea Berman

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eric O'Neill

Mon 12 Sep 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Realising the promise of stratified medicine in asthma

Prof Stephen Holgate

Stephen is MRC Professor of Immunopharmacology at the University of Southampton. After qualifying in Medicine in London, he pursued a research career on the mechanisms of asthma and allergy involving a wide range of different approaches. He has a particular interest in the toxicology of air... Read more

Stephen is MRC Professor of Immunopharmacology at the University of Southampton. After qualifying in Medicine in London, he pursued a research career on the mechanisms of asthma and allergy involving a wide range of different approaches. He has a particular interest in the toxicology of air pollutants and the roles of viruses and allergens as drivers of airway inflammation and remodelling. His work has resulted in over 1000 peer reviewed publications. He was a member of the Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution, was founder chair of the DH Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollution, Past President of the British Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and British Thoracic Society and, until 2011, chaired the UK MRC Population and Systems Medicine Board. He currently chairs the MRC Translational Research Group, the ERS Science Board and the Board of the National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction in Animals in Research (NC3Rs), and the UK Hazardous Substances Committee. He is a Trustee of the British Lung Foundation and Cancer Research UK. He was the Chair of the recent RCP Working Party on Air Pollution. His contributions have been recognised by a number of awards including The King Faisal International Prize in Medicine, the BSACI William Frankland Medal for Allergy Services, the Paul Ehrlich Award by the EAACI, the American Thoracic Society (ATS) Recognition Award for Scientific Accomplishments and the British Thoracic Society Medal. In 2011 he was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in the Queen’s New Year’s Honours list for services to Clinical Science.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 12 Sep 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Probiotic and Prebiotic modulation of Brain Function

Dr Philip Burnet

Dr Burnet received a BSc (Hons) in Biochemistry in 1985 from Hull University, an MSc in Neurochemistry from the Institute of Psychiatry, London, in 1986, and a PhD from Imperial College, London, in 1989. From 1989-1992, he was a post-doctoral Fogarty Visiting Fellow at the NIMH, USA, where he... Read more

Dr Burnet received a BSc (Hons) in Biochemistry in 1985 from Hull University, an MSc in Neurochemistry from the Institute of Psychiatry, London, in 1986, and a PhD from Imperial College, London, in 1989. From 1989-1992, he was a post-doctoral Fogarty Visiting Fellow at the NIMH, USA, where he developed his interest in the neurobiology and treatment of psychiatric disorders. In 1992, Dr Burnet received an MRC Training Fellowship at the University Department of Psychiatry, Oxford, to study the neuropharmacology of antipsychotics drugs and the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Dr Burnet is now an Associate Professor, and is currently investigating how the augmentation of gut microbial growth with prebiotics influences brain function.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 12 Sep 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Characterising transcriptional heterogeneities during cellular differentiation

Professor Fabian Theis

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Mon 12 Sep 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Athena SWAN Seminar: Plasticity and Juggling (in science and in life)

Professor Heidi Johansen-Berg

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 13 Sep 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Exploring the experiences of mothers of inpatient sick newborns in Nairobi, Kenya: an ethnographic approach.

Dorothy Oluoch

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Susan Kirkpatrick

Tue 13 Sep 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Role of DNA damage signaling machinery in innate immune regulation

Professor Nelson Gekara

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 14 Sep 2016 from 12:30 to 13:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

What is impact? A lunchtime seminar for early-career researchers

Professor Trish Greenhalgh

As part of our impact series, we are running a 1-hour lunchtime department seminar on research impact, aimed at DPhil students and early-career researchers. If you are interested in attending, please contact Karen Morecroft. Recommended background reading: Research impact: a narrative review. Greenhalgh T, Raftery J, Hanney S, Glover M. BMC Medicine 2016. DOI: 10.1186/s12916-016-0620-8

As part of our impact series, we are running a 1-hour lunchtime department seminar on research impact, aimed at DPhil students and early-career researchers. If you are interested in attending, please contact Karen Morecroft. Recommended background reading: Research impact: a narrative review. Greenhalgh T, Raftery J, Hanney S, Glover M. BMC Medicine 2016. DOI: 10.1186/s12916-016-0620-8

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

For Primary Care staff and students only

Fri 16 Sep 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting Room A/B, Headington OX3 7BN

Structures of Dengue and Zika viruses

Prof Shee-Mei Lok

Dengue and Zika virus are members of the family flaviviridae and are major human pathogens. These viruses are mainly spread to humans via the bit of an infected mosquitoes, although Zika virus can also be transmitted by sexual contact. Both dengue and zika virus particles are made up of only 3... Read more

Dengue and Zika virus are members of the family flaviviridae and are major human pathogens. These viruses are mainly spread to humans via the bit of an infected mosquitoes, although Zika virus can also be transmitted by sexual contact. Both dengue and zika virus particles are made up of only 3 proteins. Dengue virus has been shown to exhibit tremendous structural flexibility during their infection cycle. Here we will describe the structural changes of the surface proteins of dengue virus in different hosts and at different stages of infection in the cell. We will also describe the structure of mature Zika virus and relate the findings to its observed increase in thermo-stability compared to dengue virus.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Mon 19 Sep 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

Essential functions of the Zinc-finger transcription factor ASCIZ in DNA damage responses, development and cancer

Professor Jorg Heierhorst

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eric O'Neill

Mon 19 Sep 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Cellular and Molecular Aspects of Thymus Function

Prof Georg Holländer

Prof. Georg A Holländer was trained in both Paediatrics and Experimental Immunology in Switzerland and the U.S. He held academic positions at Harvard Medical School, Boston, U.S. and the University of Basel, Switzerland, before he joined the University of Oxford, UK (2010). He is interested in the... Read more

Prof. Georg A Holländer was trained in both Paediatrics and Experimental Immunology in Switzerland and the U.S. He held academic positions at Harvard Medical School, Boston, U.S. and the University of Basel, Switzerland, before he joined the University of Oxford, UK (2010). He is interested in the development and function of the immune system in health and disease. His particular scientific focus concerns the molecular and cellular control of thymus development and function.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 19 Sep 2016 from 15:00 to 16:00

SGC Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Birth of the Cool: Multitemperature Multiconformer X-Ray Crystallography and Allostery

Dr James Fraser

Protein conformational landscapes are complex and predicting the conformational response to physiologically relevant perturbations like mutation or small molecule binding is a major challenge. Often, functionally-relevant states are nearly isoenergetic (separated in energy by a few kT, or less),... Read more

Protein conformational landscapes are complex and predicting the conformational response to physiologically relevant perturbations like mutation or small molecule binding is a major challenge. Often, functionally-relevant states are nearly isoenergetic (separated in energy by a few kT, or less), meaning that at physiological temperatures, multiple conformational states populate the ensemble. Using newly developed multiconformer models of X-ray data, we have shown how population shifts can result from temperature perturbation. Our experience over multiple systems has demonstrated that temperature sensitive conformational states are the same ones used by evolution to create new functions, by small molecules in creating new binding sites, and by enzymes to transit through a catalytic cycle. Using an easily controllable physical perturbation (temperature) to predict the conformational response to physiological perturbations suggests the specific conformations to enforce at allosteric sites to achieve long-range control over protein activity.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Tue 20 Sep 2016 from 10:00 to 11:30

CPM - WTCHG Career Equality Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

CPM - WTCHG Communications Career Workshop

Dr Dan Gluckman, Dr Emily Scott-Dearing, Dr Mary Muers

The panel will each give a short presentation sharing the challenges and rewards they have experienced in their academia and communications positions. After the presentations, the floor will be opened to a Q & A session, and followed by coffee, tea and biscuits for informal chat with panellists.

The panel will each give a short presentation sharing the challenges and rewards they have experienced in their academia and communications positions. After the presentations, the floor will be opened to a Q & A session, and followed by coffee, tea and biscuits for informal chat with panellists.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Donna Seymour

Please email brcpa@well.ox.ac.uk for catering purposes

Tue 20 Sep 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, The Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NPEU Seminar: Probiotic in Preterm babies Study (PiPS)

Professor Kate Costeloe

Audience: Public

Organisers: Dr Manisha Nair

Tue 20 Sep 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

HERC Seminar: A brief history of Economic Evaluation

Professor Philip Clarke

This lecture will provide a broad overview of the development of economic methods for evaluating public health and medical interventions prior to the 1970s. It will be divided into three sections: • Early contributions primarily from the United States, such as the work of Chapin and... Read more

This lecture will provide a broad overview of the development of economic methods for evaluating public health and medical interventions prior to the 1970s. It will be divided into three sections: • Early contributions primarily from the United States, such as the work of Chapin and Sydenstricker to evaluate public health interventions prior to World War II • Development of economic evaluation during and after World War II, with an emphasis on the development of methods both by the military and by public health researchers such Klarman and Mushkin. • Proposals for the evaluation of pharmaceuticals and other aspects of the NHS in the United Kingdom that arose from the late 1950s. In addition to providing a review of the key contributions to health economic thought, the lecture will try to identify commonalities in the problems faced and in the methods of evaluation employed. It will end with a list of five classic papers that all health economists should read so they can appreciate the history of their discipline. About the speaker: Prof Philip Clarke heads the Health Economics Unit, in the Centre for Health Policy at University of Melbourne, Australia. He has been involved in the economic evaluation of many large diabetes studies including UKPDS, FIELD and ADVANCE. His broader health economic research interests include developing methods to value the benefits of improving access to health care, health inequalities, the use of simulation models in health economic evaluation and ways to improve collection of health economic data. His contribution to health economics has recently been recognised when he became a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Social Sciences.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 21 Sep 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

3-minute summaries of theses

DPCHS Dphil students

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Catia Nicodemo

Wed 21 Sep 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Prevalence and Outcomes of Viral Respiratory Tract Infections in Adult ICU Patients - a Prospective Observational Study

Dr Frank van Someren Greve

Frank van Someren Greve, MD, is a PhD candidate at the dept. of Intensive Care and dpt. of Medical Microbiology in the Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. His research focuses on the epidemiology and clinical significance of detecting seasonal respiratory viruses in critically ill patients: do they matter?

Frank van Someren Greve, MD, is a PhD candidate at the dept. of Intensive Care and dpt. of Medical Microbiology in the Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. His research focuses on the epidemiology and clinical significance of detecting seasonal respiratory viruses in critically ill patients: do they matter?

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Emmanuelle Denis

Thu 22 Sep 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Complex origins of autoimmunity: genes, sex and the microbiome

Dr Jayne Danska

Dr. Danska was raised in New York City, and educated in the United States at Kenyon College, Cornell University, Cold Spring Harbor Labs and Stanford University. She holds The Anne and Max Tanenbaum Chair in Molecular Medicine, is a Senior Scientist at the Hospital for Sick Children and a Professor... Read more

Dr. Danska was raised in New York City, and educated in the United States at Kenyon College, Cornell University, Cold Spring Harbor Labs and Stanford University. She holds The Anne and Max Tanenbaum Chair in Molecular Medicine, is a Senior Scientist at the Hospital for Sick Children and a Professor in the Faculty of Medicine at University of Toronto with appointments in the Departments of Immunology, and Medical Biophysics. Her research is focused on defining the mechanisms underlying immune system diseases and application of this knowledge to improve their diagnosis, prevention and treatment. Her lab works on the genetic and environmental causes of autoimmune disease, particularly Type 1 diabetes (T1D), the molecular mechanisms of acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL), and innate immune surveillance of leukemia and leukemia stem cells. She has led multi-disciplinary projects applying genetic, genomic and immunological analysis to identify T1D-risk genes and to determine how these variants control autoimmune pathogenesis. An evolving focus is the roles of environmental factors in the rising rates of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, specifically the role of the intestinal microbiome in modifying inherited risk of autoimmunity in rodent models and in longitudinal studies in children with high genetic risk for type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This work is also investigating the impact of sex as a key determinant of autoimmune diseases, many of which are far more prevalent in females. In addition, Dr. Danska and her collaborators discovered a signaling pathway in macrophages pivotal to the survival of human normal hematopoietic stem cells and acute leukemia stem cells that sustain leukemic growth. They have developed a biologic therapy to manipulate this immune checkpoint to impair the survival of leukemia and other blood cell cancers that is now in clinical trials. Dr. Danska has an active training program of post-doctoral fellows, graduate students and technologists. She has chaired and served on grant panels at the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Canadian Diabetes Association, the Canadian Cancer Society and the National Institutes of Health (U.S.), and serves as a Scientific Advisor of The Centre for Applied Genomics at SickKids. She was recently appointed as a Chair, College of Reviewers of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. She is actively engaged in knowledge translation beyond the medical community to patients, their advocates and government policy makers.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Thu 22 Sep 2016 from 12:30 to 13:30

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

A Point-of-Care Assay to Detect Antimalarial Drugs from Finger Stick Blood Samples

Erin Coonahan

The goal of this research is to develop a low-cost, field-based test to detect several slow-clearing ACT drug compounds from unprocessed fingerstick blood samples. The test will detect drugs through the binding of target-specific aptamers or antibodies and provide a colorimetric readout of drug... Read more

The goal of this research is to develop a low-cost, field-based test to detect several slow-clearing ACT drug compounds from unprocessed fingerstick blood samples. The test will detect drugs through the binding of target-specific aptamers or antibodies and provide a colorimetric readout of drug levels. The ability to detect small molecule antimalarial drugs in a patient’s blood at point-of-care would enable healthcare workers to identify a previous treatment failure and adjust the patient’s new treatment to improve its efficacy and thus reduce the spread of resistant parasites. A simple assay to detect these drugs in patient samples would also facilitate real-time mapping of drug usage and compliance.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Georgina Humphreys

Refreshments are provided, please arrive in good time.

Thu 22 Sep 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Defining models of primary health care structure in Europe: an international Delphi process.

Dr Ana Espinosa Gonzalez

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Catia Nicodemo

Thu 22 Sep 2016 from 16:30 to 17:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, Post Grad Centre Level 3, Headington OX3 9DU

Which activity indices should we use for IBD in clinical practice?

Dr Alissa Walsh

Dr Walsh is currently collaborating in Oxford and will be talking on activity indices in IBD

Dr Walsh is currently collaborating in Oxford and will be talking on activity indices in IBD

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Annabel Gordon

Fri 23 Sep 2016 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Bones, BMPs and bad B cells: a new approach to multiple myeloma

Sarah Gooding (Drakesmith Group)

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 23 Sep 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Novel mechanisms regulating B cell activation

Prof Bebhinn Treanor

Bebhinn is Assistant Professor at the university of Toronto, Canada since 2011. Her current research investigates the potential for extracellular regulatory mechanisms for receptor organization, such as glycan-based domains generated by the binding of galectins to cell surface glycoproteins. The... Read more

Bebhinn is Assistant Professor at the university of Toronto, Canada since 2011. Her current research investigates the potential for extracellular regulatory mechanisms for receptor organization, such as glycan-based domains generated by the binding of galectins to cell surface glycoproteins. The galectins are a family of lectins that can bind ?-galactoside on cell surface glycoproteins to form an extracellular molecular lattice. Her laboratory uses advanced optical microscopy techniques to explore how these cell-surface scaffolding proteins could modulate the interaction, function and turnover of immune cell glycoproteins.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Due to unforeseen circumstances this seminar has been cancelled. Apologies for any inconvenience caused

Sat 24 Sep 2016 from 09:30 to 17:00

Crossing Boundaries: Challenges in Global Health

Jacqueline du Pré Music Building, St Hilda's College

Crossing Boundaries: Challenges in Global Health

MULTIDISCIPLINARY GLOBAL HEALTH CHALLENGES UPDATE (4 CPD credits) 9.30 Registration; tea/coffee 10.00-10.45 Vaccine against Ebola and Zika Virus Dr Matthew Snape, Consultant in General Paediatrics and Vaccinology Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. 10.45-11.30 Female Genital... Read more

MULTIDISCIPLINARY GLOBAL HEALTH CHALLENGES UPDATE (4 CPD credits) 9.30 Registration; tea/coffee 10.00-10.45 Vaccine against Ebola and Zika Virus Dr Matthew Snape, Consultant in General Paediatrics and Vaccinology Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. 10.45-11.30 Female Genital Mutilation Dr Brenda Kelly, Consultant in Obstetrics, Clinical Lead for FGM, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust 11.30-12.15 Novel ways of improving learning experiences in conflict zones: The OxPal Medlink Dr Hasanen Al-Taiar, Locum Consultant in Forensic Psychiatry, The Oxford Clinic MSU, Littlemore Hospital, Oxford. 12.30-14.00 LUNCH 14.00-14.45 The Romance of Building Children’s Orthopaedic Hospitals in Africa Professor Chris Lavy, Professor of Orthopaedic and Tropical Surgery and Consultant Orthopaedic and Spine Surgeon, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. 14.45-15.45 Reports from the field: St Hilda’s Year Six Student Electives Francesca Johns, Alexis Rodriguez, Jack Herlihy, Hannah Petho 15.45-16.15 Tea/coffee break 16.15-17.00 PAMELA MACKINNON LECTURE Refugee Health Dr Juliet Cohen (St Hilda’s 1980), Head of Doctors, Freedom from Torture EXHIBITION OF IMAGES "FACE TO FACE", relating to NOMA disease, Dr Alison Boyes, Dr David Ball, FACE AFRICA CHARITY

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Philippa Hulley

Mon 26 Sep 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Department of Physiology, Anatomy & Genetics, Sherrington Library, Sherrington Building , off Parks Road OX1 3PT

At the Physical Limit - How to Detect a Single Molecule

Ulrich Benjamin Kaupp

Sperm are exquisitely sensitive: they can detect a single molecule of chemoattractant that evokes an electrical signal followed by a behavioral motor response. I will outline the signalling pathway that endows sperm with such ultrasensitivity. Moreover, I will discuss how this pathway controls... Read more

Sperm are exquisitely sensitive: they can detect a single molecule of chemoattractant that evokes an electrical signal followed by a behavioral motor response. I will outline the signalling pathway that endows sperm with such ultrasensitivity. Moreover, I will discuss how this pathway controls precise navigation in 2D and 3D gradients of chemoattractants provided by the egg. Finally, the common motifs of ultrasensitive signalling in photoreceptors and sperm will be discussed.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Mon 26 Sep 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Epigenetic analysis of cartilage aging and osteoarthritis

Dr Louise Reynard

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Lunch Provided

Mon 26 Sep 2016 from 12:15 to 13:15

Department of Oncology

Alternative End joining, the lesser of two evils

Dr Macel Tijsterman

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eric O'Neill

Tue 27 Sep 2016 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, please note doors are locked at 4pm, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Emulating physiological dopamine receptor activation in Parkinson’s Disease

Professor John Reynolds

John Reynolds is an Associate Professor in Neuroscience in the Department of Anatomy at University of Otago, New Zealand. His research team studies the application of neuroplasticity approaches to Parkinson’s disease and stroke. His interest is in applying the principles of neuromodulation to... Read more

John Reynolds is an Associate Professor in Neuroscience in the Department of Anatomy at University of Otago, New Zealand. His research team studies the application of neuroplasticity approaches to Parkinson’s disease and stroke. His interest is in applying the principles of neuromodulation to modify synaptic plasticity and recover function in affected brain areas. The primary focus of his research is on learning and movement generation processes in the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex. In the basal ganglia the emphasis is on unraveling the normal role of dopamine in learning and memory in vivo. Normal functioning of this process is critical to our ability to learn and perform new skills, whereas dysfunction of cells in the substantia nigra and striatum underlies the pathophysiology of brain disorders such as Parkinson's and Huntington's, respectively. This research involves a variety of techniques including electrophysiological recording, molecular biology, immunohistochemistry and operant behaviour. He has received an international Brain Research Young Investigator Award and a National Tertiary Teaching Award, and he currently holds a Rutherford Discovery Fellowship from the Royal Society of NZ. He served 5 years as chair of the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Neurological Foundation of NZ and is a member of the Directorate for Brain Research New Zealand.

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 29 Sep 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Departmental Impact Seminar - The Health Research Authority: An opportunity for dialogue

Professor Jonathan Montgomery

The HRA was established in December 2011 to promote and protect the interests of patients in health research and to streamline the regulation of research. According to its website, the HRA "aims, with partners, to make the UK a great place to do health research, to build confidence and... Read more

The HRA was established in December 2011 to promote and protect the interests of patients in health research and to streamline the regulation of research. According to its website, the HRA "aims, with partners, to make the UK a great place to do health research, to build confidence and participation in health research, and so improve the nation’s health". Professor Montgomery, whose academic background is in law and ethics, is also Chair of the HRA and a driving force behind recent reforms to the research approval system and the more effective engagement of patients and the public with the research process. He will explain recent developments in the work of the HRA and also hear our perspective on gaining research governance approvals.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 29 Sep 2016 from 12:30 to 13:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Temporal regulation of genome replication

Professor Conrad Nieduszynski

Accurate and complete genome replication is essential for all life. Deregulation of DNA replication can lead to genome instability and is linked to several human disorders. My research focuses on the cellular regulation of DNA replication in diverse eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Eukaryotic... Read more

Accurate and complete genome replication is essential for all life. Deregulation of DNA replication can lead to genome instability and is linked to several human disorders. My research focuses on the cellular regulation of DNA replication in diverse eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Eukaryotic genomes are replicated in a reproducible temporal order. To investigate this, we have developed high-throughput sequencing methods to quantitatively measure at high resolution the temporal order of genome replication. This approach is driving fundamental discoveries about how genomes replicate across the domains of life. For example, comparing genome replication in different species allowed us to discover that replication origin activity is regulated in cis and that these mechanisms contribute to faithful chromosome inheritance. Recently, we have started to investigate the physiological significance of replication timing. We have identified genomic features that show an evolutionary conservation in their replication time, for example, genes that replicate early in S phase across many species. To test the physiological importance, we specifically delayed the replication time of such genes and discovered that this resulted in reduced gene expression. This is one of the first demonstrations of a physiological requirements for regulated replication time and provides a direct link between replication time and gene expression.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Penny Berry

Fri 30 Sep 2016 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Germinal centers: programmed for antibody affinity maturation

Dr Oliver Bannard

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 30 Sep 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Enhancing Immunotherapy by Targeting the Cancer Stem Cell Niche

Dr Vicki Plaks

Immunotherapy is the new promise in effectively combating cancer. It has proven to be effective in solid tumors of an inflamed phenotype but still faces challenges, especially in tumor lesions that are less invaded by immune cells. Cancer stem/initiating cells (CSCs) are defined as tumor cells that... Read more

Immunotherapy is the new promise in effectively combating cancer. It has proven to be effective in solid tumors of an inflamed phenotype but still faces challenges, especially in tumor lesions that are less invaded by immune cells. Cancer stem/initiating cells (CSCs) are defined as tumor cells that have the principal properties of self-renewal, clonal tumor initiation capacity, and clonal long-term repopulation potential. CSCs reside in niches, which may be anatomically distinct regions within the tumor microenvironment. These niches maintain the principle properties of CSCs, preserve their phenotypic plasticity, protect them from the immune system, and facilitate their metastatic potential. According to the CSC paradigm, only complete eradication of these CSCs will prevent cancer from recurring. By combining methods of mouse genetics, 3D primary organotypic cultures, biomedical live imaging and high throughput analyses on the single cell level, my research aims at understanding how immune cells and cancer stem cells interact within the niche during breast cancer evolution and metastasis. Subsequently, my team will explore ways by which engineering the CSC niche will render it more susceptible to immunotherapy.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Fri 30 Sep 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

WTCHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room A/B, Headington OX3 7BN

Diversity and interactions in tumor growth and treatment

Dr Philipp Altrock

Genetic, epigenetic and functional diversity between tumor cells can affect tissue dynamics, tumor growth and treatment dynamics in many ways. I will talk about two examples of diversity. First, I will describe a setup in which non-cell-autonomous interactions led to maintenance of diversity in in... Read more

Genetic, epigenetic and functional diversity between tumor cells can affect tissue dynamics, tumor growth and treatment dynamics in many ways. I will talk about two examples of diversity. First, I will describe a setup in which non-cell-autonomous interactions led to maintenance of diversity in in vivo breast cancer tumor growth. Second, I will describe an approach to describe the basic features of cancer stem cell and differentiated cancer cell dynamics, which can be used to analyze tumor burden from individual patient trajectories, and to make predictions for treatment continuation, e.g. in leukemia.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Gil McVean

Fri 30 Sep 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Meeting Room 1, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

Lunchtime Talk - Tom Sheldon, Science Media Centre

Tom Sheldon

The Science Media Centre is an independent press office for the UK scientific community. It exists to help ensure that science and engineering in the UK national news is reported accurately and responsibly, particularly when a story has the potential for controversy. They give journalists the... Read more

The Science Media Centre is an independent press office for the UK scientific community. It exists to help ensure that science and engineering in the UK national news is reported accurately and responsibly, particularly when a story has the potential for controversy. They give journalists the opportunity to speak to real experts, and actively encourage scientists to speak out when stories break. They also run regular press briefings, which allow scientists and engineers to set the news agenda on important subjects of public interest. Although independent, the SMC is unashamedly pro-science and has no public ‘brand’ to promote. This gives them the freedom to concentrate on what is important: keeping sound, evidence-based science at the top of the news agenda. Tom will give a talk about the work of the SMC and hopes scientists from the CEBM and the University will be persuaded to work with the SMC to help achieve these goals.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 30 Sep 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

From the Bench to Computer Science

Jim Hughes, Dominic Waithe

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alice Mayer

Fri 30 Sep 2016 from 13:45 to 14:45

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI Basement seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Advanced Chemical Genetics for Epigenetics: Bump-and-hole and PROTACs

Dr. Alessio Ciulli

Advanced Chemical Genetics for Epigenetics: Bump-and-hole and PROTACs Alessio Ciulli Division of Biological Chemistry and Drug Discovery, School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, James Black Centre, Dow Street, DD1 5EH, Dundee, UK Chemical genetics is the use of small molecules (chemical... Read more

Advanced Chemical Genetics for Epigenetics: Bump-and-hole and PROTACs Alessio Ciulli Division of Biological Chemistry and Drug Discovery, School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, James Black Centre, Dow Street, DD1 5EH, Dundee, UK Chemical genetics is the use of small molecules (chemical probes) to investigate the functions of gene products, through the modulation of protein activity. The difficulty in generating single-target selectivity has long been a thorn in the side of chemical genetics, and potentially limits its scope to study epigenetics. However recent developments in advanced forms of chemical genetics promise to bypass this, and other, limitations [1]. In my talk, I will first describe our development of a ‘bump-and-hole’ strategy with which we have engineered an allele-specific derivative (ET) of BET bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 that achieves up to 540-fold selectivity for a BET bromodomain Leu/Ala mutation [2]. Using this approach, we have showed that blockade of the first bromodomain of the BET protein Brd4 is sufficient to displace the protein from chromatin [2]. I will then describe how we could achieve for the first time selective intracellular targeting of Brd4 over the homologous BET family members Brd2 and Brd3 by conjugating the pan-selective ligand JQ1 to a potent and specific ligand that we had previously developed against the VHL E3 ubiquitin ligase [3]. Our proteolysis-targeting chimeric (PROTAC) molecule MZ1 achieves rapid and long-lasting preferential removal of Brd4 over Brd2 and Brd3, and induces a more profound anti-proliferative effect than BET inhibition in cancer cells [4]. The bump-and-hole approach now demonstrated successfully with BET bromodomains, may be applicable to other epigenetic domains and has potential to enhance target validation of epigenetic cancer targets in future. Meanwhile targeted protein degradation by PROTACs has been shown to be significantly more efficacious than standard domain inhibition, and has the potential to enhance on-target selectivity, with attractive untapped therapeutic potential.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley