Other Seminars

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Mon 3 Oct 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Molecular Instruments

Professor Niles Pierce

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Mon 3 Oct 2016 from 14:00 to 15:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

NanoString ‘molecules that count’ and applications in disease research

Ajay Johni, Jamie Rose Kuhar, Ph.D.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Tue 4 Oct 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Introducing GSK Discovery Partnerships with Academia - Innovative Medicines from integrated industry-academia partnerships

Dr Andrew Pearce

GSK Discovery Partnerships with Academia Discovery Partnerships with Academia (DPAc) is an innovative drug discovery model that brings together the deep biology and disease knowledge of world-class scientists in academia with the drug discovery expertise and resources of GSK, with the goal of... Read more

GSK Discovery Partnerships with Academia Discovery Partnerships with Academia (DPAc) is an innovative drug discovery model that brings together the deep biology and disease knowledge of world-class scientists in academia with the drug discovery expertise and resources of GSK, with the goal of making innovative medicines to benefit patients. DPAc projects work as fully integrated project teams. Both sides contribute, and share in the reward, with everyone playing to their strengths. The partnership runs all the way from project initiation through to the launch of a medicine. We look for specific opportunities for drug discovery, covering almost all disease areas and with either small molecule or biopharmaceutical modalities. Projects are assessed based on a variety of criteria, including the strength and novelty of the therapeutic hypothesis, the unmet medical need, and the expected tractability for drug discovery and the clinical testing of the hypothesis. If you have a drug discovery project idea please get in touch - we are very happy to discuss potential projects and to provide feedback.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 5 Oct 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Not desperately seeking healthcare; autistic adults and an ‘uncommon’ sense

Dr Sara Ryan

Recent evidence suggests that autistic people die earlier than non-autistic people. This is across all the categories of death although there is a predominance of deaths through epilepsy and suicide. The engagement of autistic patients with primary care is clearly important given that primary care... Read more

Recent evidence suggests that autistic people die earlier than non-autistic people. This is across all the categories of death although there is a predominance of deaths through epilepsy and suicide. The engagement of autistic patients with primary care is clearly important given that primary care is the first point of contact in the UK healthcare system. The need for better healthcare for autistic patients has been recognized in the UK. For example, the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) made autism a clinical priority in 2014 and produced a set of online guidelines and resources. We conducted a secondary analysis of 37 in-depth interviews conducted with autistic adults using an ethnomethodological approach. We found that rather than using a ‘common sense’ and taken for granted help seeking rationality, autistic people draw on ‘uncommon sense’ to negotiate the social world. Intertwined with a tendency to have a deep seated focus on particular topics, people may not recognise that they need help or know where to seek it. We argue that a focus on biomedically informed, deficit based understandings will not help autistic people seek and engage with healthcare more effectively. The current guidance for primary care patients misses the (autistic) point around help seeking behavior and that the ways in which healthcare is organized and popularly conceptualized may work either to exclude, or generate further anxiety for autistic people. We offer recommendations for improving the healthcare offered to autistic patients.

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 5 Oct 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI Basement seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Epigenetic Targets for the Treatment of Human Diseases

Rab Prinjha

Biography: Rab Prinjha currently leads the Epinova Epigenetics DPU in the Immuno-Inflammation therapy area (II-TA) and is co-chair of the GSK Biology Council. Prior to this he led the Target Progression department with responsibilities for target selection, validation and epigenetic compound... Read more

Biography: Rab Prinjha currently leads the Epinova Epigenetics DPU in the Immuno-Inflammation therapy area (II-TA) and is co-chair of the GSK Biology Council. Prior to this he led the Target Progression department with responsibilities for target selection, validation and epigenetic compound characterisation along with coordinating academic collaborations. He joined Epinova from the II-virtual group which was responsible for implementing the externalisation and portfolio diversification strategy of the TA. Previously he led a Target Validation group in the Neurology CEDD focussed on neurodegeneration. In addition to advancing many programs while in Neurology he cloned a novel inhibitor of CNS regeneration called Nogo-A and led this program from gene cloning to Candidate Selection and into clinical trials. Rab joined GSK from academia including a post-doc in developmental neuroscience at Guy’s Hospital and PhD in molecular biology of the cell cytoskeleton at UCL.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

All welcome.

Thu 6 Oct 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1

Cardiology / Gastroenterology

Cardiology: "Acute Myocardial infarction – a chance to open the window?", Prof Robin Choudhury -- Gastroenterology: "Checkpoint Colitis", Dr Michael Fitzpatrick, Dr Lai Mun Wang, Dr Oliver Brain and Dr Mark Middleton -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Cardiology: "Acute Myocardial infarction – a chance to open the window?", Prof Robin Choudhury -- Gastroenterology: "Checkpoint Colitis", Dr Michael Fitzpatrick, Dr Lai Mun Wang, Dr Oliver Brain and Dr Mark Middleton -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 6 Oct 2016 from 16:00 to 17:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

CUSTOM –DESIGNED MOUSE AND RAT MODELS FOR YOUR RESEARCH

Matthew Wheeler, PhD

Part 1. Accelerating your research with custom-designed animal models from Cyagen While the generation of transgenic mouse and rat models clearly provides invaluable insights into gene function and human disease, the process of generating transgenic animals is often complicated, time-consuming and... Read more

Part 1. Accelerating your research with custom-designed animal models from Cyagen While the generation of transgenic mouse and rat models clearly provides invaluable insights into gene function and human disease, the process of generating transgenic animals is often complicated, time-consuming and costly. Cyagen (www.cyagen.com) is the world’s leading provider of custom-designed transgenic mice and rats offering a one-stop solution to all your animal needs. In this seminar we will give an overview of our services including: • PiggyBac transgenic mice and rats - single copy transgene integration • CRISPR-mediated genome editing – Knockouts/knockins • CRISPR-based Rosa26 large-fragment knockin – Up to 8kb • TurboKnockout® - conditional KO/KI mice in 6-8 months Backed by our unique 100% guarantee and lowest prices in the industry, Cyagen can help you reach your research goals faster and more cost effectively, saving you and your lab time and money. Part 2. VectorBuilder: The only online tool for vector construction and ordering The only reason cloning is not outsourced is because of cost and a need for communicating the precise details of each individual vector design for the experimental purpose. With VectorBuilder, this is no longer a problem. We will introduce and perform a live demo of VectorBuilder (www.vectorbuilder.com). VectorBuilder is a revolutionary new online tool that not only allows you to create your custom vectors with ease but also allows you to simply order them within minutes at an exceptionally competitive prices and rapid turnaround times. Highlights of VectorBuilder include: • Plasmids • Lentivirus • Adenovirus • AAV (adeno associated virus) • Tet-on/off • CRISPR • Cre-lox • Massive collections of ORFs • Tissue-specific promoters • Add tags/reporters/drug-selectable markers

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Thu 6 Oct 2016 from 16:30 to 17:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, Seminar Room 2B, Post Grad, Headington OX3 9DU

"Serine hydrolases: Shining a MAGLite on inflammation" and "Mouse cancer models"

Dr Tim Ambrose, Dr Leonard Lee

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 7 Oct 2016 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Re-examining the role of CD2 in the immunological synapse

Professor Mike Dustin

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 7 Oct 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Tracing Memory Circuits in Drosophila melanogaster Using Whole-Brain Electron Microscopy

Davi Bock

We imaged the complete brain of a female adult fruit fly at EM resolution. The resulting dataset comprises 21 million images occupying 106 TB. A cluster-backed image processing pipeline was developed to stitch, register, and intensity correct these images, enabling manual tracing of neuronal... Read more

We imaged the complete brain of a female adult fruit fly at EM resolution. The resulting dataset comprises 21 million images occupying 106 TB. A cluster-backed image processing pipeline was developed to stitch, register, and intensity correct these images, enabling manual tracing of neuronal connectivity throughout the brain. Pilot efforts have focused on the interface between the olfactory system and the mushroom body (MB), the site of associative learning. Each MB contains ~2,000 Kenyon cells (KCs), which receive olfactory input from the antennal lobe via second-order olfactory projection neurons (PNs) in the MB calyx, in what is thought to be a random fashion. KC axons then form a bundle called the pedunculus, which gives rise to the lobes of the mushroom body, where synaptic modulation underlying memory occurs. We traced about 10% of the KCs in the calyx, and their presynaptic PN inputs, to generate a PN-to-KC connectivity graph. We find that KCs that fasciculate with one another in the pedunculus are much more likely to receive input from a common PN, and are also more likely to make axo-axonic synapses with one another. This network structure might be used to sharpen and amplify olfactory signals prior to their arrival in the MB lobes, where synapses are modified during associative Learning.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Mon 10 Oct 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

Title TBC

Professor Paul Lockhart

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eric O'Neill

Mon 10 Oct 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Immunity in atherosclerosis

Prof Ziad Mallat

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 10 Oct 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Regulation of distinct states of stem cells during development and regeneration

Shahragim Tajbakhsh

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Mon 10 Oct 2016 from 14:00 to 15:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, The Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NDPH Seminar: The Breathless Genes: Lung function genetics and risk of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Dr Louise Wain

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natasha Bowyer

Tue 11 Oct 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, The Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NPEU Seminar: Uterine natural killer (NK) cells role in pregnancy

Dr. Kalle Soderstrom

Audience: Public

Organisers: Dr Manisha Nair

Tue 11 Oct 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, The Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminars: Preventing Colorectal Cancer by Screening

Professor Wendy Atkin

Audience: Public

Organisers: Natasha Bowyer

Wed 12 Oct 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Synaptic Vesicle Tethering to the Drosophila Active Zone Cytomatrix

Robert J Kittel

Bruchpilot (Brp) is a core protein component of the Drosophila active zone (AZ), where it promotes calcium channel clustering to ensure adequate transmitter release. In addition, the C-terminal region of Brp tethers synaptic vesicles to the AZ cytomatrix. In a C-terminally truncated allele, brpnude... Read more

Bruchpilot (Brp) is a core protein component of the Drosophila active zone (AZ), where it promotes calcium channel clustering to ensure adequate transmitter release. In addition, the C-terminal region of Brp tethers synaptic vesicles to the AZ cytomatrix. In a C-terminally truncated allele, brpnude (lacking the last 17 amino acids), impaired vesicle tethering is accompanied by short-term synaptic depression and impaired sustained transmitter release. We set out to test the hypothesis that neuronal expression of a C-terminal Brp fragment would mimic the synaptic phenotype of brpnude mutants by competitively binding the putative vesicular interaction partner(s) of Brp. Our electrophysiological analysis of larval neuromuscular synapses supports this hypothesis and sets the basis for a subsequent in vivo screen to identify the interacting protein(s). To this end, a membrane-bound C-terminal Brp fragment was neuronally expressed to misdirect synaptic vesicles to ectopic locations. RNAi lines against vesicle-associated proteins were then scored for their ability to revert the ectopic vesicle localisation.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Wed 12 Oct 2016 from 13:00 to 19:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Headington OX3 7LF

Please join us to celebrate Patrick Venables’ career in medicine & science

Speakers include: Justin Mason, Imperial College Robin Weiss, UCL Jan Potempa, University of Louisville & Jagiellonian University Chris Buckley, University of Birmingham Vivi Malmstrom, Karolinska Institute Angela Vincent, University of Oxford Paul Thompson, University of Massachusetts Medical... Read more

Speakers include: Justin Mason, Imperial College Robin Weiss, UCL Jan Potempa, University of Louisville & Jagiellonian University Chris Buckley, University of Birmingham Vivi Malmstrom, Karolinska Institute Angela Vincent, University of Oxford Paul Thompson, University of Massachusetts Medical School Anna Montgomery, University of Oxford Nick La Thangue, University of Oxford Natalia Wegner, Carpmaels and Ransford Liz Price, Great Western Hospital Chas Bountra, University of Oxford

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof Kim Midwood

With an introduction from Fiona Powrie and Marc Feldmann, and tributes from Tiny Maini, Peter Taylor and Ted Mikuls Please RSVP to Kim Midwood to attend: kim.midwood@kennedy.ox.ac.uk

Wed 12 Oct 2016 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Improving the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy

Prof Benoit Van den Eynde

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 12 Oct 2016 from 14:00 to 15:00

WTCHG Spotlight Series

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B , Headington OX3 7BN

Spotlight on Translational Genetics

Pauline Robbe, Lukas Lange, Dr Samantha Knight

Pauline Robbe: 'Getting personal: DNA driven treatments for leukaemia' Lukas Lange: 'Sequence analysis for the molecular diagnostic environment: getting the most out of clinical information'

Pauline Robbe: 'Getting personal: DNA driven treatments for leukaemia' Lukas Lange: 'Sequence analysis for the molecular diagnostic environment: getting the most out of clinical information'

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Catherine Green

Chaired by Dr Sam Knight who will give an Overview entitled, 'The TARDIS of Translational Genetics'

Thu 13 Oct 2016 from 09:30 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Are you interested in learning about the underlying science of joint disease?

Professor Jeremy Saklatvala, Dr Linda Troeberg, Associate Professor Chris Murphy, Professor Tonia Vincent

Join us to learn about the concepts behind osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis The lectures form part of the NDORMS postgraduate research core teaching programme, but are open to any researchers in the University, as part of a week marking National Arthritis Day. 9:30 Collagen... Read more

Join us to learn about the concepts behind osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis The lectures form part of the NDORMS postgraduate research core teaching programme, but are open to any researchers in the University, as part of a week marking National Arthritis Day. 9:30 Collagen biology Professor Jeremy Saklatvala Emeritus Professor, Kennedy Institute 10:15 MMP’s Dr Linda Troeberg University Research Lecturer, NDORMS 11:00 Coffee 11:15 Cartilage Biology Associate Professor Chris Murphy Director of Graduate Studies, Kennedy Institute 12:00 Osteoarthritis Professor Tonia Vincent Professor of Musculoskeletal Biology, NDORMS

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Thu 13 Oct 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Co-designing research into experiences of female genital mutilation (FGM); A report on a PPI project

Dr Lisa Hinton, Dr Sharon Dixon

Lisa Hinton and Sharon Dixon will be presenting findings from a PPI project to co-design research work into female genital mutilation (FGM) in the UK. Estimates suggest that nearly 140,000 women are living with FGM in the UK, a procedure that can have lifelong physical and emotional consequences.... Read more

Lisa Hinton and Sharon Dixon will be presenting findings from a PPI project to co-design research work into female genital mutilation (FGM) in the UK. Estimates suggest that nearly 140,000 women are living with FGM in the UK, a procedure that can have lifelong physical and emotional consequences. FGM complicates 2.4% of pregnancies in Oxford, 6.3% in London. Although FGM has been a specific offence in UK law since 1986, recent extensions to the Serious Crime Act 2015 and the introduction of mandatory recording have changed the landscape for women and health professionals. In 2015-2016 we held a series of focus groups and interactive workshops with community groups and professionals in Oxford and London asking for their thoughts on what research priorities should be. We will present our findings, and include reflections on the challenges of seeking a range of community voices, not only activist ones, and the challenges of sharing learning and experiences across different communities. We have heard much about the perceived impact of the new UK laws and legislations on both communities and professionals and the potential impact this may have on the interface between affected communities and health services, which is the question we are working to take forwards.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Susan Kirkpatrick

Thu 13 Oct 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, NDM building (please note NOT ORCRB), Headington OX3 7FZ

Ubiquitin in cancer and neurodegeneration

Professor Michael Clague, Professor Sylvie Urbe

We will offer some thoughts about the ubiquitin code as an emergent property of our understanding of the ubiquitin system. We will discuss the rationale for targeting deubiquitylases (DUBs) in cancer and neurodegeneration and for systematic analysis of the family. Illustrative examples of... Read more

We will offer some thoughts about the ubiquitin code as an emergent property of our understanding of the ubiquitin system. We will discuss the rationale for targeting deubiquitylases (DUBs) in cancer and neurodegeneration and for systematic analysis of the family. Illustrative examples of functional studies will include regulation of endocytosis, mitophagy/cell death and hedgehog signaling pathway. Michael Clague obtained a PhD in biological chemistry from University of Essex. For post-doctoral work he moved to NIH, Bethesda USA to study the biophysics of membrane fusion and later obtained an EMBO long term fellowship to study cell biology (membrane trafficking) at EMBL. He was then appointed to a faculty position at University of Liverpool and is currently Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology. Early work at Liverpool focused on the role of phosphoinositide metabolism along the endocytic pathway. He has defined the endosomal degradation pathway of the c-Met receptor and undertaken further mechanistic studies of EGFR trafficking and signaling. Working together with Sylvie Urbé he characterised endosomal deubiquitylases, providing the first example of a ubiquitin chain-linkage specific enzyme. This has lead to a broader interest in ubiquitin biology and the deubiquitylase family as potential drug targets. Current work investigates these enzymes in pathways germane to cancer and neurodegeneration, uses mass spectrometry to investigate cell signaling networks and various cell biology approaches to study membrane organisation in breast cancer cells. Sylvie Urbé obtained a Diploma in Biology from the University of Heidelberg/EMBL where she began to study small GTPases of the rab family. For her post-graduate work, she moved to ICRF, London, UK, where she established an in vitro assay measuring homotypic fusion events between secretory granules in neuroendocrine cells. Her post-doctoral work was conducted at the University of Liverpool, studying the endosomal scaffold protein, HRS, and its role in the regulation of growth factor receptor trafficking. She was able to establish her own laboratory through a Wellcome Trust Career Development Award and a subsequent Cancer Research UK Senior Fellowship, to study the regulation of growth factor receptor trafficking and signalling by endosomal deubiqutylases (DUBs). She is currently Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology. Current work is focused on understanding DUB function and validation of these enzymes as potential drug targets.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 13 Oct 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1

Haematology / Neurology

Dr Henna Wong, Dr Simon Stanworth, Dr Maria Isabel Leite

Haematology: "Major haemorrhage: trials and tribulations", Dr Henna Wong and Dr Simon Stanworth -- Neurology: "Two cases of autoimmune neurology - one old, one new", Dr Maria Isabel Leite -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Haematology: "Major haemorrhage: trials and tribulations", Dr Henna Wong and Dr Simon Stanworth -- Neurology: "Two cases of autoimmune neurology - one old, one new", Dr Maria Isabel Leite -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 14 Oct 2016 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Prostate cancer and the ProtecT study – The story…

Professor Freddie Hamdy

Professor Freddie Hamdy is Head of Department at the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, and the Chief Investigator of The ProtecT Trial - the first trial to evaluate the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and acceptability of three major treatment options: active monitoring, surgery (radical... Read more

Professor Freddie Hamdy is Head of Department at the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, and the Chief Investigator of The ProtecT Trial - the first trial to evaluate the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and acceptability of three major treatment options: active monitoring, surgery (radical prostatectomy) and radiotherapy for men with localised prostate cancer. In September 2016, Professor Hamdy and his team published the first results of their 10 year study and made international headlines. A trial of 1,643 men with small prostate cancers resulted in the same 99% survival rate after a decade for those who had had surgery, radiotherapy or simply monitored the tumour.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 14 Oct 2016 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Development of a Vaccine against Zika Virus

Dr Cesar Lopez-Camacho

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 14 Oct 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Nuclear inositide pathways: Phospholipase C signalling and initiation of cancer

Professor Lucio Cocco

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Fri 14 Oct 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Guest Spkr Prof Ester Hammond - ‘Hypoxia induced replication stress: causes, consequences and opportunities’

Professor Ester Hammond

Regions of low oxygen (hypoxia) occur in most solid tumours and correlate with poor patient prognosis. Importantly, hypoxia also leads to resistance to radiotherapy. Previous work from my lab has described the DNA damage response which is initiated in response to hypoxia-induced replication stress.... Read more

Regions of low oxygen (hypoxia) occur in most solid tumours and correlate with poor patient prognosis. Importantly, hypoxia also leads to resistance to radiotherapy. Previous work from my lab has described the DNA damage response which is initiated in response to hypoxia-induced replication stress. The cause and consequence of this replication stress is the subject of on-going work in the lab. Currently, we are focused on the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) enzyme, which is an oxygen-dependent enzyme that is responsible for the de novo conversion of NDPs to dNDPs – the building blocks of DNA synthesis. One of the small subunits of RNR (RRM2B) has been shown previously to be induced after DNA damage and specifically after irradiation. The purpose of our study was to investigate if RRM2B has a role for maintaining replication in hypoxic conditions (<0.1% O2), these data will be discussed.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Mon 17 Oct 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Neutrophil-vessel wall interactions in vivo: Mechanisms & Complexities of two way trafficking

Sussan Nourshargh PhD FBPhS FMedSci

Summary of Research The principal objective of our research is to investigate the mode, dynamics and mechanisms of leukocyte transmigration, the final stage in the leukocyte adhesion cascade that describes the movement of leukocytes from the vascular lumen into inflamed and/or injured tissues. To... Read more

Summary of Research The principal objective of our research is to investigate the mode, dynamics and mechanisms of leukocyte transmigration, the final stage in the leukocyte adhesion cascade that describes the movement of leukocytes from the vascular lumen into inflamed and/or injured tissues. To achieve this goal we rigorously investigate the interactions of leukocytes with different components of microvessel walls (endothelial cells, pericytes and the vascular basement membrane) using both physiologically relevant as well as pathological inflammatory models. A key component of our work is a research programme that investigates how pathological inflammatory insults impact the dynamics of neutrophil-vessel wall interactions and the implications of disrupted modes of neutrophil transmigration (eg neutrophil reverse transmigration) on inflammatory disease development and dissemination. Collectively through the application of advanced imaging platforms such as confocal intravital microscopy to analyse leukocyte-vessel wall interactions in vivo, our work aims to unravel previously unexplored cellular and molecular physiological concepts and identify disease-specific phenomena. Our work is largely funded by the Wellcome Trust (Senior Investigator Award) and several grants from the British Heart Foundation and the Arthritis Research UK.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 17 Oct 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

En route to mending broken hearts

Paul Riley

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Tue 18 Oct 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, The Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Tue 18 Oct 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Eavesdropping on embryonic development with multimodal imaging

Dr Scott Fraser

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 18 Oct 2016 from 14:30 to 15:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Mechanisms controlling intestinal IgA production

Dr Andrea Reboldi

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 19 Oct 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

NHS England and Care Quality Commission: How arms-length bodies help shape health and care services (TBC)

Catherine Thompson, Tim Read

At a national and a local level, the health and social care system is so highly complex that it can be hard to understand the different roles and responsibilities of all the organisations. This seminar will provide an overview of the key actors at a national level, and will look in detail at how... Read more

At a national and a local level, the health and social care system is so highly complex that it can be hard to understand the different roles and responsibilities of all the organisations. This seminar will provide an overview of the key actors at a national level, and will look in detail at how CQC and NHS England are involved in the collection, measurement and use of patient experience information in order to improve care quality. It will touch on the current challenges facing CQC and NHS England in making most effective use of patient experience and whether the current methods fit with how the health and care system is changing. This will be followed by an opportunity for discussion on any of the topics raised or other areas of interest for attendees.

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 19 Oct 2016 from 12:30 to 13:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, Level 5 Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DU

Human Focus Group

Dr Alessandra Geremia

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Annabel Gordon

Wed 19 Oct 2016 from 14:00 to 15:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

New insights into the role of type I Interferons in regulating the innate immune response in infectious and inflammatory diseases

Professor Paul Hertzog

Professor Paul Hertzog is the Director of the Centre for Innate Immunity and Infectious Disease; Deputy Director of the Hudson Institute of Medical Research in Melbourne, Australia. He is a Research Professor in the Dept. Molecular & Translational Sciences at Monash University, Senior Principal... Read more

Professor Paul Hertzog is the Director of the Centre for Innate Immunity and Infectious Disease; Deputy Director of the Hudson Institute of Medical Research in Melbourne, Australia. He is a Research Professor in the Dept. Molecular & Translational Sciences at Monash University, Senior Principal Research Fellow of the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia; and an Adjunct Professor at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. He was educated at the University of Melbourne where he obtained his PhD then undertook postdoc positions in the USA at the Eppley Institute of Cancer Research in Omaha; then at the University of York in the UK. Paul’s research interests broadly concern the role of innate immune responses in inflammatory and infectious diseases and cancer. Specifically, this includes the role of interferons in innate immune signaling via pattern recognition receptors, structure-function of type I interferon receptors and signal transduction, negative regulation by SOCS proteins, characterization of their newly discovered interferon epsilon in mucosal immunity of the female reproductive tract and other organs and a systems biology approach to the innate immune response. This work resulted in him being awarded the international 2013 Milstein Award for Excellence in Interferon and Cytokine Research by the ICIS. He has published over 200 research papers in reviews in prestigious journals including Cell, Science, Nature Immunology and Nature Medicine. He has had consistent funding from major national and international agencies including NIH, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Wellcome Trust and has longstanding interactions with industry. He is co-founder of the Victorian Infection and Immunity Network, its Industry Alliance Program and co-convenes the annual Lorne Infection and Immunity conference. He is currently on sabbatical as a distinguished visiting fellow at Christ’s College Cambridge and in the Biochemistry Dept. (with Prof. Nick Gay et al.) and Welcome Trust Sanger Institute ( with Trevor Lawley, Sam Forster and Gordon Dougan).

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Thu 20 Oct 2016 from 12:30 to 13:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Decoding the human antiviral gene expression code

Dr Marios Agelopoulos

Viral-Infections cause dramatic changes in gene expression by mobilizing defined sets of transcriptional regulatory proteins. We speculate that Virus-Infection reprograms the human genome by inducing global transcriptional changes and alterations in chromatin structure. We aim to understand at the... Read more

Viral-Infections cause dramatic changes in gene expression by mobilizing defined sets of transcriptional regulatory proteins. We speculate that Virus-Infection reprograms the human genome by inducing global transcriptional changes and alterations in chromatin structure. We aim to understand at the molecular level the mechanisms by which human cells reconfigure their genome in order to respond accurately to Viral-Infection signal(s) by applying genomics in naïve and infected human cell lines. Thus, we perform an holistic genome-wide study in distinct human cell lines to decode the molecular logic/mechanism that cells employ to switch on or off the appropriate battery of genes required for an efficient antiviral response.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Penny Berry

Thu 20 Oct 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1

Respiratory Medicine / Renal Unit

Prof Ian Pavord, Dr Rahul Shrimanker, Dr Martin Wilcock, Dr Will Herrington

Respiratory Medicine: "Airways disease: from umbrella labels and empirical management to precision medicine", Prof Ian Pavord and Dr Rahul Shrimanker -- Renal Unit: "Hepatobiliary complications of polycystic kidney disease: from bedside to big data", Dr Martin Wilcock and Dr Will Herrington -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Respiratory Medicine: "Airways disease: from umbrella labels and empirical management to precision medicine", Prof Ian Pavord and Dr Rahul Shrimanker -- Renal Unit: "Hepatobiliary complications of polycystic kidney disease: from bedside to big data", Dr Martin Wilcock and Dr Will Herrington -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Organisers: Michael Thompson

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 21 Oct 2016 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Flow disrupters for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms unsuitable for endosaccular coiling

Professor James Byrne

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 21 Oct 2016 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Impact of oxygen and time on virus replication

Prof Jane McKeating

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 21 Oct 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Int'l Guest Spkr Professor Christian Broberger MD, Dept. of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute - ‘Neurons and transmitter actions that underlie the switch between network states associated with sleep and wakefulness’

Professor Christian Broberger MD

Tuberoinfundibular dopamine (TIDA) neurons in the hypothalamus control pituitary hormone release and play a central role in regulating fertility and parental behaviours. The recent demonstration that rat TIDA neurons in vitro exhibit a remarkably robust and regular membrane potential oscillation... Read more

Tuberoinfundibular dopamine (TIDA) neurons in the hypothalamus control pituitary hormone release and play a central role in regulating fertility and parental behaviours. The recent demonstration that rat TIDA neurons in vitro exhibit a remarkably robust and regular membrane potential oscillation suggests that the system can also be used to study how neuronal ensembles organize into rhythmic output. We have recently made the unexpected discovery of a striking species difference in the TIDA system, where rat TIDA cells discharge in slow, stereotyped and synchronized oscillations, whereas the mouse displays a wide range of faster, asynchronous rhythms. Through electrophysiology, imaging and immunofluorescence, we could attribute this difference to the presence of powerful (coupling coefficient 0.18) gap junction connectivity in the rat, but a total absence of electrical coupling in the mouse. Resonance studies suggest that gap junctions mask a substantial heterogeneity within the rat network, and harmonizes the network according to the slowest cell in the population. Furthermore, the presence of dynamic coupling helps the network to maximize synchronization towards the spiking phase of the duty cycle. The TIDA species difference allows for new insight into the broader role of gap junction coupling in neuronal networks.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Mon 24 Oct 2016 from 18:00 to 19:00

Trinity College, Broad Street OX1 3BH

Biostars

Adam Stoten, Andrew McClean, Professor Hagan Bailey

The event will be a panel discussion on Biotech startups and will serve as an information session for our accelerator Biostars. The event will consist of a short informative session, providing an overview, key dates and the application process for the BioStars programme. We also have scheduled a... Read more

The event will be a panel discussion on Biotech startups and will serve as an information session for our accelerator Biostars. The event will consist of a short informative session, providing an overview, key dates and the application process for the BioStars programme. We also have scheduled a panel discussion involving members of different areas of expertise. A drinks reception will be held following the session, which will serve as an ideal opportunity to network with like-minded individuals. Biotech startups: trends, opportunities and challenges Schedule • h1800 - Registration opens • h1815 - Welcome keynote • h1820 - Introduction to BioStars • h1840 - Panel discussion: Biotech start-ups: trends, opportunities and challenges • h1940 - Final remarks/questions • h2000-2100 - Drinks reception Panellists • Prof. Hagan Bayley - Professor of Chemical Biology at the University of Oxford | Co-founder of Oxford Nanopore • Dr. Adam Stoten - Head of Technology Transfer, Life Sciences at Oxford University Innovation • Dr. Andrew McLean - ‎Principal Investor at Oxford Sciences Innovation • Dr. Jon Rees - Managing Director at Jon Rees Associates • Dr. Dara Henry - Director, Immunology Innovation Fund at GSK • Dr. Inna Pertsovskaya - BioStars Alumna | Founder and CEO at Pepper Biomarkers

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 25 Oct 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Room 1, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

QUARITE: A Randomised Controlled Trial of an intervention to reduce maternal mortality in Africa

Professor Alexandre Dumont

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Merlin Willcox

Tue 25 Oct 2016 from 12:00 to 12:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Molecular mechanisms regulating human pluripotent stem cell differentiation

Dr Siim Pauklin

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 25 Oct 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Medical Sciences Division Events

NDM Building, NDM-RB seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Beyond natural killing: unexpected roles for NK cells in immunity and disease

Stephen Waggoner

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alison Brindle

Tue 25 Oct 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, The Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminars: Prevention of osteoporotic fracture throughout the lifecourse

Professor Cyrus Cooper

Audience: Public

Organisers: Natasha Bowyer

Tue 25 Oct 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Single cell analysis of the bone marrow niche identifies novel regulators of haematopoietic regeneration

Dr Lev Silberstein

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 25 Oct 2016 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, please note doors are locked at 4pm, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

* CANCELLED * Title TBC

Dr Alastair Noyce

Alastair Noyce is a Parkinson's UK Doctoral Research Fellow at UCL Institute of Neurology and Specialist Registrar in Neurology in London. Alastair's clinical interests are movement disorders, particularly Parkinson's and related conditions, and general neurology. His main research focus is on... Read more

Alastair Noyce is a Parkinson's UK Doctoral Research Fellow at UCL Institute of Neurology and Specialist Registrar in Neurology in London. Alastair's clinical interests are movement disorders, particularly Parkinson's and related conditions, and general neurology. His main research focus is on early features of Parkinson's and markers including laboratory, genetic and imaging markers. Alastair heads up a longitudinal pilot study called PREDICT-PD, in which members of the healthy UK population are stratified for risk of future PD.

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 26 Oct 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI Basement seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Regulation of polyA tail length by cellular machines

Lori Passmore

Abstract: Almost every eukaryotic mRNA has a 3' polyA tail that contributes to post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression by regulating translation and mRNA stability. My laboratory studies the macromolecular protein complexes that control addition and removal of polyA tails: CPF,... Read more

Abstract: Almost every eukaryotic mRNA has a 3' polyA tail that contributes to post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression by regulating translation and mRNA stability. My laboratory studies the macromolecular protein complexes that control addition and removal of polyA tails: CPF, Ccr4–Not and Pan2–Pan3. We use a hybrid approach combining structural (cryo-EM, x-ray crystallography, NMR), biochemical, biophysical and genetic techniques to gain insights into their molecular mechanisms. I will discuss structural and mechanistic studies that have provided insights into the functions of these complexes. In addition, I will discuss recent advances in specimen preparation for electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) that we are using to study these complexes.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Wed 26 Oct 2016 from 15:00 to 16:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Advancing the rational development of a malaria vaccine using systems immunology and genome-based technological advances

Prof Denise Doolan

Vaccines are one of the most efficient health care interventions but the generation of effective vaccines against many diseases caused by complex pathogens has proven difficult. A significant advance of the past decade has been the elucidation of the genome, proteome and transcriptome of many... Read more

Vaccines are one of the most efficient health care interventions but the generation of effective vaccines against many diseases caused by complex pathogens has proven difficult. A significant advance of the past decade has been the elucidation of the genome, proteome and transcriptome of many pathogens. This information provides the foundation for new 21st Century approaches to identify target antigens for the development of vaccines, drugs, and diagnostics. Development of an effective vaccine also requires an understanding of the type of immune response that needs to be induced by vaccination. Thus other work in the laboratory focuses on the molecular profiling of adaptive immunity to Plasmodium infection in humans using systems immunology; and dissecting the mechanisms of immunity in murine models. This talk will discuss progress using systems-based approaches to advance the rational development of a vaccine against malaria, and inform the development of vaccines against other diseases caused by complex pathogens.

Audience: Members of the University only

Please email lisbeth.soederberg@ndm.ox.ac.uk to set up a meeting with the speaker.

Thu 27 Oct 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

The Good Citizen with cancer: managing an ambivalence in Sweden, Denmark and the UK

Professor Sue Ziebland

Our team has conducted narrative interviews with patients recently diagnosed with either lung or colorectal cancer in three European countries. Around 160 interviews were collected by a sociologist (UK) an anthropologist (Denmark) and nurse researchers (Sweden) using a common approach and... Read more

Our team has conducted narrative interviews with patients recently diagnosed with either lung or colorectal cancer in three European countries. Around 160 interviews were collected by a sociologist (UK) an anthropologist (Denmark) and nurse researchers (Sweden) using a common approach and interview guide. The wider aim of the study is to seek explanations, through narrative interviews, for the different cancer outcomes for patients in these three countries and to identify potentially modifiable factors in awareness, diagnosis and referral. In this paper we will focus on people’s accounts of the process that led to the diagnosis, including their recognition of symptoms and their decisions to consult a doctor, and their descriptions of self care during and after treatment. We find that patients in all three countries present certain health related behaviours as creditable while others are positioned as understandable deviations. For example, assuming that a symptom cannot be serious because the person otherwise feels well, or for which they can find another rational explanation. A third group of behaviours were described as less acceptable, but this last category was usually applied to hypothetical behaviours, not to themselves ( and may be considered a distancing mechanism). Drawing on sociologist Robert K Merton’s 1976 essays on Sociological Ambivalence, we demonstrate that cancer patients in these northern European settings display numerous examples of ambivalence in relation to their health behaviours. For example we show that the good patient (and good citizen) is characterised as someone who is attentive to their health (but not obsessed with it) , who responds to media campaigns on symptom awareness (but does not present at the doctors as a ‘worried well’ patient), who follows advice from the doctor (but also listens to their own body and is prepared to challenge advice) who is optimistic, positive and hopeful (but is not gullible or prey to wild theories). In this paper we will demonstrate that the ‘Goldilocks Zone’ that patients are trying to inhabit as good citizens and responsible partners in their health care presents considerable difficulties in all three countries.

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 27 Oct 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

The oncogenic functions of mutant p53 proteins

Dr Patricia Muller

p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in most cancers. Mutations can lead to loss of p53 expression or mutant p53 expression. Mutant p53 proteins are often impaired for wild type functions and have been shown to dominant negatively regulate any remaining wild type p53. Interestingly, p53 mutants... Read more

p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in most cancers. Mutations can lead to loss of p53 expression or mutant p53 expression. Mutant p53 proteins are often impaired for wild type functions and have been shown to dominant negatively regulate any remaining wild type p53. Interestingly, p53 mutants in mice and cells have been shown to do more and act like an oncogene in driving metastasis and promoting chemoresistance. Previously, we have investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying this oncogenic behaviour and have shown that mutant p53 promotes invasion and metastasis by enhancing RCP dependent recycling of integrins and growth factor receptors from intracellular vesicles to the plasma membrane. Novel data in the lab now show that other molecules including the multi-drug transporter p-glycoprotein are also regulated by mutant p53 in an RCP-dependent manner and thereby convey chemoresistance. In addition, we have encountered a novel phenomenon of mutant p53 in promoting cancer cell engulfment. We can see this in cells and in patients samples and have demonstrated this to be important for tumour growth in xenografts and are currently determining the consequences and the molecular mechanisms underlying this behaviour. A better understanding of mutant p53 function will be pivotal to help in designing strategies to use p53 status in the clinic for therapeutic purposes.

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 27 Oct 2016 from 12:30 to 13:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

British doctors: 40 years of studies of their career aspirations and career trajectories with particular emphasis on gender

Professor Michael Goldacre

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Catia Nicodemo

Thu 27 Oct 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1

Cardiothoracic Surgery / Acute General Medicine Firm D

Prof David Taggart, Dr Maheshi Ramasamy

Cardiothoracic surgery: "The Use of Randomized Clinical Trials to Distort Best Clinical Practice", Prof David Taggart -- Acute General Medicine Firm D: "A Thai Takeaway", Dr Maheshi Ramasamy -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Cardiothoracic surgery: "The Use of Randomized Clinical Trials to Distort Best Clinical Practice", Prof David Taggart -- Acute General Medicine Firm D: "A Thai Takeaway", Dr Maheshi Ramasamy -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 28 Oct 2016 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Bariatric surgery: new challenges

Mr Bruno Sgromo

Mr Bruno Sgromo has been a Consultant Upper GI and Bariatric Surgeon in Oxford since 2009, and worked as an honorary Bariatric Consultant in Chichester. He has been performing weight loss surgery since 2004, specialising in laparoscopic gastric band, gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and... Read more

Mr Bruno Sgromo has been a Consultant Upper GI and Bariatric Surgeon in Oxford since 2009, and worked as an honorary Bariatric Consultant in Chichester. He has been performing weight loss surgery since 2004, specialising in laparoscopic gastric band, gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and revisional bariatric surgery. Mr Sgromo is part of the educational and research committee for the British Obesity and Metabolic Surgery Society (BOMSS) and he regularly attends the International Federation for the Surgery of Obesity (IFSO) and the American Society of Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS) conferences.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 28 Oct 2016 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Evolution of Seasonal Influenza

Townsend Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Sat 29 Oct 2016 from 10:00 to 16:00

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture theatre 1

Oxford Global Surgery Conference

Miss Kokila Lakhoo, Dr Brenda Kelly, Mr Shahnawaz Rasheed, Mr Andy Leather

Oxford Global Surgery Conference to be held at the John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford on Saturday 29th October 2016. This free national conference is for students and doctors who have a general interest in global surgery and global health. The conference will offer: 1. Stimulating lectures from a... Read more

Oxford Global Surgery Conference to be held at the John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford on Saturday 29th October 2016. This free national conference is for students and doctors who have a general interest in global surgery and global health. The conference will offer: 1. Stimulating lectures from a number of influential speakers including: Mr Andy Leather (Director of the King’s Centre for Global Health, Co-Chair of the Lancet Commission for Global Surgery) Miss Kokila Lakhoo (Chair of the Interntional Forum for the British Association of Paediatric Surgeons) Mr Shahnawaz Rasheed (Medical Director of Humanity First) Dr Brenda Kelly (Clinical Lead for FGM in Oxford) 2. Panel discussion 3. Poster presentations 4. Free lunch We are also accepting abstracts for poster presentations on the theme of Innovative Interventions in Global Health - be that in surgery, medicine, public health, informatics... Tickets can be reserved here - http://www.oxforduniversitystores.co.uk/ - search Global Surgery Conference Deadline for abstracts: Friday 30th September 2016 Email globalsurgeryconference@gmail.com for more details or abstract submission

Booking Recommended

Audience: Public

Mon 31 Oct 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Role of lymphocyte macroautophagy in the humoral response

Frédéric GROS

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 31 Oct 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Call 281231on arrival for entry, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Progression from latent M. tuberculosis infection to TB disease

Dr Thomas Scriba

Up to one-third of the global population is thought to harbour M. tuberculosis infection, but only a fraction of infected persons progress to active TB disease. It is unclear why only some infected individuals progress to TB disease, while others do not. Using systems immunology we dissected the... Read more

Up to one-third of the global population is thought to harbour M. tuberculosis infection, but only a fraction of infected persons progress to active TB disease. It is unclear why only some infected individuals progress to TB disease, while others do not. Using systems immunology we dissected the immunobiology underlying progression from M. tuberculosis infection to active disease in a longitudinal study, and developed transcriptomic and proteomic correlates of TB risk that identify progressors before diagnosis of TB disease is possible. Predicting disease progression in asymptomatic individuals provides an opportunity for chemotherapeutic intervention and potential prevention of M. tuberculosis transmission.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: John Frater

Mon 31 Oct 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Delivering precision medicine: are we ready yet?

Richard Marais

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Mon 31 Oct 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

NDM Seminar Series

Henry Wellcome Building of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Seminar Rooms A & B, Roosevelt Drive OX3 7BN

Mon 31 Oct 2016 from 15:00 to 16:00

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Mucosal Associated Invariant T cells: Friend or Foe?

Professor James McCluskey

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

PLEASE NOTE THE DATE (Monday 31st) and time (3pm) - not the usual slot