Other Seminars

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Tue 3 May 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Haematopoietic stem cells in development and disease

Dr Katrin Ottersbach

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 3 May 2016 from 15:00 to 16:00

WTCHG High Profile Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

The Institute Josep Carreras: Research on Hematologic Neoplasms (HN)

Prof Evarist Feliu

The Institut Josep Carreras (IJC) promote the development of quality research, competitive and excellence as well as postgraduate training of high quality in the field of Hematologic Neoplasms (HN). This is one of the few global centers exclusively dedicated to research on the HN. IJC Research... Read more

The Institut Josep Carreras (IJC) promote the development of quality research, competitive and excellence as well as postgraduate training of high quality in the field of Hematologic Neoplasms (HN). This is one of the few global centers exclusively dedicated to research on the HN. IJC Research Campus ICO-Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol (ICO-GTP), abbreviated GRIJC-ICO-GTP, is a multidisciplinary group with different lines of research related to the study of leukemias and other hematological malignancies.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christine Webb

Wed 4 May 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Crosstalk between RNA processing and chromatin remodelling as a modulator of genome integrity

Dr Andres Aguilera

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 4 May 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Thu 5 May 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Can patient and public involvement (PPI) enhance recruitment and retention in clinical trials?

Dr Joanna Crocker, Keira Pratt-Boyden

Abstract: Poor recruitment and retention of participants is one of the major causes of clinical trial extension (both time and cost) and failure. It has been proposed that PPI could prevent or lessen this problem in clinical trials, but evidence to support this claim is currently weak. The PIRRIST... Read more

Abstract: Poor recruitment and retention of participants is one of the major causes of clinical trial extension (both time and cost) and failure. It has been proposed that PPI could prevent or lessen this problem in clinical trials, but evidence to support this claim is currently weak. The PIRRIST project will develop and evaluate a PPI intervention aimed at enhancing recruitment and retention in surgical trials. We will present preliminary findings from stage 1 (a survey of current PPI practice in UK surgical trials) and stage 2 (focus groups with surgical trial staff and PPI contributors), and describe our plans for subsequent stages of the project.

Booking Recommended

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Thu 5 May 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Tissue micro environments in immune tolerance

Prof Herman Waldmann

ALL WELCOME Herman Waldmann's group works on harnessing mechanisms of immunological tolerance for therapeutic purposes. Unwanted immune responses have a major impact on human health and wealth. Their management has required long-term immunosuppressive drugs which penalise the whole immune system.... Read more

ALL WELCOME Herman Waldmann's group works on harnessing mechanisms of immunological tolerance for therapeutic purposes. Unwanted immune responses have a major impact on human health and wealth. Their management has required long-term immunosuppressive drugs which penalise the whole immune system. The big challenge has been to understand how the individual is naturally tolerant to self, and to exploit this knowledge for treatments better targeted to the relevant antigens. The group is undertaking basic research into the mechanisms of immune tolerance and how these can be harnessed, using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and other modern biotherapeutics, to develop clinical treatments for human diseases that involve disregulation or inappropriate reactions of the immune system such as in autoimmunity or transplant rejection.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Thu 5 May 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Infection-Microbiology / Dermatology

Dr Crystal Williams, Prof Tim Peto

Infection-Microbiology: "Weekend Mortality at the OUH - The Facts", Prof Tim Peto. -- Dermatology: "Stuffed Crust", Dr Crystal Williams. -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Infection-Microbiology: "Weekend Mortality at the OUH - The Facts", Prof Tim Peto. -- Dermatology: "Stuffed Crust", Dr Crystal Williams. -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 5 May 2016 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Lymphocyte population dynamics and genetic susceptibility to autoimmune disease

Prof Rose Zamoyska

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 5 May 2016 from 16:30 to 18:00

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, Lecture Room, Level 3, Post Graduate Centre, Headington OX3 9DU

Fri 6 May 2016 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

'Personalised medicine for aortic disease'

Professor Rachel Clough

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 6 May 2016 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

A vaccine against Salmonella for Africa. Opportunities and Challenges

Prof Cal Maclennan

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 6 May 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off Parks/South Parks Road, OX1 3PT T: 01865 272500 , off Parks Road OX1 3PT

GUEST: Professor Jordan Raff, Sir William Dunn School of Pathology - ‘The molecular mechanisms of centriole and centrosome assembly'

Professor Jordan Raff

Centrosomes are the major microtubule organising centres in animal cells and centrosome dysfunction has been linked to several human diseases including cancer, microcephaly and primordial dwarfism. It is unclear if there is a common theme linking these pathologies, but our research in flies... Read more

Centrosomes are the major microtubule organising centres in animal cells and centrosome dysfunction has been linked to several human diseases including cancer, microcephaly and primordial dwarfism. It is unclear if there is a common theme linking these pathologies, but our research in flies suggests that centrosomes play a particularly important part in organizing the asymmetric division of certain types of stem/progenitor cells. Centrosomes comprise a pair of centrioles surrounded by pericentriolar material (PCM), and centriole and centrosome numbers are strictly controlled. Centrosomes contain several hundred proteins, including many cell cycle regulators and checkpoint proteins, but it is unclear how all of these proteins are organized to form a functional centrosome, and how cells always manage to assemble two centrosomes of the same size during mitosis. We have been studying the process of centriole and centrosome assembly using Drosophila as a model system. We find that a surprisingly small number of proteins are essential for centriole and centrosome assembly, and we are beginning to understand how these molecules work together to ensure that centrioles and centrosomes are only assembled at the right place and at the right time.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

GUEST SPEAKER

Fri 6 May 2016 from 13:30 to 14:15

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting Room A/B, Headington OX3 7BN

Surface dynamics of ion channels

Dr. Martin Heine

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Mon 9 May 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

Translational control visualised in human tumour tissue

Dr John Le Quesne

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eric O'Neill

Mon 9 May 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Control of stem cell fate in mammalian epidermis

Fiona Watt

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Mon 9 May 2016 from 16:00 to 17:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Dissecting GlcNAc-1-Phosphotransferase Function - the key to understanding lysosomal enzyme trafficking

Stuart Kornfeld

Stuart Kornfeld received his M.D. degree in 1962 from Washington University in St. Louis. Following clinical training in Internal Medicine, he spent 2 years at the NIH before returning to Washington University where he began his studies in the field of glycobiology. His early work dealt with the... Read more

Stuart Kornfeld received his M.D. degree in 1962 from Washington University in St. Louis. Following clinical training in Internal Medicine, he spent 2 years at the NIH before returning to Washington University where he began his studies in the field of glycobiology. His early work dealt with the structure and biosynthesis of Asn-linked oligosaccharides in mammalian systems. Most recently his lab has focused on the mannose 6-phosphate recognition system which mediates the trafficking of newly synthesized acid hydrolases to lysosomes.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Tue 10 May 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Tue 10 May 2016 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, 2nd floor (note main door closes at 4pm) , off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Dr Valerio Zerbi - 'The structural basis of large-scale functional connectivity in the mouse'

Dr Valerio Zerbi

Valerio Zerbi got his masters degree in Biomedical Engineering (2008) at the Politecnico of Milano, Italy. Thereafter he moved to the Netherlands, where he successfully obtained a PhD in Medical Sciences (2013) at the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, as well as the diploma at... Read more

Valerio Zerbi got his masters degree in Biomedical Engineering (2008) at the Politecnico of Milano, Italy. Thereafter he moved to the Netherlands, where he successfully obtained a PhD in Medical Sciences (2013) at the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, as well as the diploma at the Donders Graduate School for Cognitive Neuroscience. In these years he became responsible for the small-animal MRI work in his research group, which led him on several international collaborations in the field of neuroscience. In 2014 he moved to Zurich, where he won the prestigious ETH Postdoctoral Fellowship award, to work in the Neural Control of Movement lab in collaboration with Prof. Wenderoth. During his PhD, Dr. Zerbi pioneered several methodologies in the field of magnetic resonance neuroimaging to quantify the functionality of the brain in animal models of neurodegenerative disorders, e.g. by measuring cerebral blood volume and blood flow, grey and white matter structural proprieties via diffusion imaging, brain metabolism with proton and phosphorus MR spectroscopy, and lastly, functional brain connectivity during the resting-state. His main interest involves the development and application of MRI-based methodological deliverables to reveal best-practice protocols for quantification of brain function as well as testing new fundamental paradigms on the behaviour-to-neural activity correlation at the systems level. His current project involves the understanding of the neural processes involved in the control of autistic behaviour.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Serena Cerritelli

Wed 11 May 2016 from 01:30 to 02:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Immunotherapy with dendritic cell nanovesicles

Prof Jonathan Sprent

Dongbin Jin and Jonathan Sprent. Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, Australia Interest in cancer immunotherapy has been bolstered by the recent success of T cell checkpoint (PD-1) blockade with specific antibodies. This approach might be especially effective if combined with methods... Read more

Dongbin Jin and Jonathan Sprent. Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, Australia Interest in cancer immunotherapy has been bolstered by the recent success of T cell checkpoint (PD-1) blockade with specific antibodies. This approach might be especially effective if combined with methods for enhancing tumor immunogenicity, eg injection of dendritic cells (DC) expressing tumor antigens. Currently, DC therapy is successful in only a small proportion of patients, perhaps reflecting poor homing of injected DC. To overcome this problem, we have generated cell-surface membrane nanovesicles from in vitro-generated bone-marrow-derived mature DC. When loaded with specific peptide, the vesicles are stimulatory for naïve TCR transgenic CD8 T cells in vitro without APC, though only with aggregated vesicles and not with vesicles dispersed into nano-vesicles by sonication. By contrast, after IV injection in vivo, the nanovesicles are much more immunogenic than aggregates and generate strong proliferation and effector function of CD8 cells in both spleen and LN, reflecting widespread distribution of the vesicles and uptake by host APC. Preliminary work has shown that injection of the vesicles can be used to reject established tumours in mice.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 11 May 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Wed 11 May 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Wed 11 May 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

NDM Seminar Series

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Eliminating malaria / Pioneering Chromatin for Neural Crest Specification.

Professor Tatjana Sauka-Spengler, Professor Nicholas White

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 11 May 2016 from 17:30 to 18:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Radcliffe Primary Care, Meeting room 1, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Does LTC Coverage Expansion and Coordination Reduce ‘Bed Blocking’?

Sergi Jimenez

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Catia Nicodemo

Thu 12 May 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Radcliffe Humanities, seminar room, 2nd floor, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

TEXT ME: Findings and Future Directions

Assoc Prof Clara Chow

The Tobacco, Exercise and Diet Messages (TEXT ME) trial was a parallel-group, single-blind, randomized clinical trial that recruited 710 patients with proven coronary heart disease (prior myocardial infarction or proven angiographically) between September 2011 and November 2013 from a large... Read more

The Tobacco, Exercise and Diet Messages (TEXT ME) trial was a parallel-group, single-blind, randomized clinical trial that recruited 710 patients with proven coronary heart disease (prior myocardial infarction or proven angiographically) between September 2011 and November 2013 from a large tertiary hospital in Sydney, Australia. The aim of the TEXT ME trial was to examine the effect of a lifestyle-focused semipersonalized support program delivered by mobile phone text message on cardiovascular risk factors. At six months, levels of LDL-C were significantly lower in intervention participants, with concurrent reductions in systolic blood pressure and BMI, significant increases in physical activity, and a significant reduction in smoking. The majority reported the text messages to be useful (91%), easy to understand (97%), and appropriate in frequency (86%). Assoc Prof Clara Chow is Director of the Cardiovascular division of The George Institute, Program Director Community Based Cardiac Services, Westmead Hospital and Associate Professor with the Faculty of Medicine University of Sydney. She has a PhD in Medicine from the University of Sydney and completed a postdoc in Cardiovascular epidemiology and clinical trials at McMaster University, Canada. Clara holds a Career Development Fellowship of the NHMRC co-funded by the National Heart Foundation. Her research focus is clinical and community approaches to cardiovascular disease prevention.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof Andrew Farmer

Thu 12 May 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Clinical Genetics / Acute General Medicine Firm C

Prof Joanna Poulton, Dr Ku Shah

Clinical Genetics: "Mitochondrial dynamics impair vision in an 8 year old", Prof Joanna Poulton -- Acute General Medicine Firm C: "It's a bit of a headache...", Dr Ku Shah -- Chair: Prof Chris O'Callaghan

Clinical Genetics: "Mitochondrial dynamics impair vision in an 8 year old", Prof Joanna Poulton -- Acute General Medicine Firm C: "It's a bit of a headache...", Dr Ku Shah -- Chair: Prof Chris O'Callaghan

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 12 May 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Fri 13 May 2016 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Virus restriction and beyond: an update on SAMHD1

Prof Jan Rehwinkel, Jonathan Maelfait, Tamara Davenne

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 13 May 2016 from 13:00 to 13:30

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off Parks/South Parks Road, OX1 3PT T: 01865 272500 , off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Dr Duncan Sparrow : Environmental influences on mouse heart development

Dr Duncan Sparrow

Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common type of human birth defect with an incidence of ~1% of live births. However, despite the rapid advances in research into the genetic causes of rare diseases brought about by next-generation sequencing technologies, still only about 20% of CHD cases... Read more

Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common type of human birth defect with an incidence of ~1% of live births. However, despite the rapid advances in research into the genetic causes of rare diseases brought about by next-generation sequencing technologies, still only about 20% of CHD cases have been shown to have a simple genetic cause. This suggests that many CHD cases have multifactorial causes. One of these factors is likely to be environmental. Although embryonic development is primarily controlled genetically, it has long been known that perturbation of the environment in which the embryo forms can have a dramatic effect. For example, fetal under- or over-nutrition can have long-lasting metabolic or epigenetic effects, manifesting in altered physiology in adult life. By contrast, I have shown that one particular environmental insult, short-term exposure of mouse embryos in utero to hypoxia, can have a transient effect and results in a variety of specific gross morphological abnormalities including heart and vertebral defects. The majority of the heart defects induced in this way are conotruncal in nature, and arise as a result of interrupted development of the outflow tract and its precursor tissue, the second heart field. This effect is mediated at the molecular level by an interruption of FGF signalling, and the penetrance and severity of both heart and vertebral defects can be further exacerbated by genetic risk factors. FGF signalling has key roles in many other processes during embryogenesis, including brain, kidney, limb and craniofacial development. This raises the possibility that interactions between an environmentally-induced reduction of FGF signalling, coupled with a genetic deficit, may play an important role in the etiology of a wide range of “sporadic” human congenital defects.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Fri 13 May 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Science in the midst of Surf and The Bay: Biotech Culture and Careers in California

Dave Ruff

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Margarida Rei

Fri 13 May 2016 from 13:30 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off Parks/South Parks Road, OX1 3PT T: 01865 272500 , off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Dr Diogo Pimentel - 'Operation of a Homeostatic Sleep Switch’

Dr Diogo Pimentel

Sleep disconnects animals from the external world, at considerable risks and costs that must be offset by a vital benefit. Insight into the nature of this mysterious benefit will likely come from understanding sleep homeostasis: to monitor sleep need, an internal bookkeeper must track physiological... Read more

Sleep disconnects animals from the external world, at considerable risks and costs that must be offset by a vital benefit. Insight into the nature of this mysterious benefit will likely come from understanding sleep homeostasis: to monitor sleep need, an internal bookkeeper must track physiological changes that are intimately linked to the core function of sleep. In Drosophila, a crucial component of the machinery for sleep homeostasis is a cluster of neurons innervating the dorsal fan-shaped body (dFB) of the central complex. Artificial activation of these cells induces sleep, whereas reductions in excitability cause insomnia. I will present evidence that homeostatic sleep control works by switching these sleep-promoting neurons between active and quiescent states. State switching involves the antagonistic modulation of two identified potassium conductances by the neuromodulator dopamine.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Mon 16 May 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Transcription activation and termination in a dynamic system: lessons from macrophages

Prof Gioacchino Natoli

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 16 May 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Chemotaxis using self-generated gradients - planning your own route works better than waiting for a signal

Prof Robert Insall

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Tue 17 May 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Tue 17 May 2016 from 14:00 to 15:00

WTCHG Spotlight Series

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar Rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

Spotlight on Big Data

Professor Gil McVean, Dr Catherine Moyes, Dr Christoffer Nellaker

The WTCHG Internal Affairs committee are pleased to introduce a new seminar series : The WTCHG SPOTLIGHT 2016 series. Our inaugural lecture will be chaired by Professor Gil McVean, who will present "Making sense of biomedical big data", followed by talks from Dr Catherine Moyes "Using novel data... Read more

The WTCHG Internal Affairs committee are pleased to introduce a new seminar series : The WTCHG SPOTLIGHT 2016 series. Our inaugural lecture will be chaired by Professor Gil McVean, who will present "Making sense of biomedical big data", followed by talks from Dr Catherine Moyes "Using novel data sources for disease surveillance" and Dr Christoffer Nellaker "Rare diseases phenotypes from photographs". This seminar series aims to highlight the fantastic science being done across the centre, in order to increase intra-mural communication and collaboration. The committee is aware that, because of the breadth of research topics covered in this centre, we are not as individuals always good at connecting with colleagues within the building outside of our direct scientific niche. We hope that this series will showcase the work being done here, at a level that will be informative and interesting to all in the centre.

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 18 May 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Oxford Genomic Centre Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar room A and B, Headington OX3 7BN

Discovery and Functional Profiling with Mass Cytometry Single-Cell Proteomics

Nina Lane

We will describe the basic principles and workflow of the technology, including recent advancements incorporated into the newest CyTOF® system, Helios™. Using data from published reports, we will discuss the scientific questions that are being addressed with mass cytometry, the analysis methods... Read more

We will describe the basic principles and workflow of the technology, including recent advancements incorporated into the newest CyTOF® system, Helios™. Using data from published reports, we will discuss the scientific questions that are being addressed with mass cytometry, the analysis methods used to explore the high-content data that is generated, and the unique insights and discoveries gained by using this technology. We will also discuss the suite of reagents and tools that simplify development and execution of large-panel experiments, enabling researchers to unravel the complex heterogeneity inherent to biological systems. We will briefly introduce the groundbreaking Helios™ Imaging System which provides the unparalleled ability to generate high-resolution phenotypic and functional profiles of cells while maintaining their spatial context.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Emilia Witczak

Wed 18 May 2016 from 16:00 to 18:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Nuffield College, Room TBC, New Road OX1 1NF

Inequalities in the NHS

Professor Luigi Siciliani

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Catia Nicodemo

Thu 19 May 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Radcliffe Humanities, Seminar Room (RH07), Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Maximising your PPI to make a good SPCR grant application

Dr Sian Rees, Lynne Maddocks

This is aimed at researchers putting together funding applications for the School for Primary Care Research

This is aimed at researchers putting together funding applications for the School for Primary Care Research

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 19 May 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI (Basement seminar room) (Note: not the ORCRB), Headington OX3 7FZ

Host factors that account for influenza host range barriers - what is the difference between a human and a chicken?!

Professor Wendy Barclay

Wendy Barclay's expertise is in the field of respiratory viruses, in particular influenza virus. Her studies aim to understand the molecular and cellular basis of the pathogenesis, host range restrictions and transmissibility of influenza viruses. The approach includes the generation of recombinant... Read more

Wendy Barclay's expertise is in the field of respiratory viruses, in particular influenza virus. Her studies aim to understand the molecular and cellular basis of the pathogenesis, host range restrictions and transmissibility of influenza viruses. The approach includes the generation of recombinant viruses with defined mutations. This strategy has contributed to the production of novel influenza pandemic vaccines. In principle the work employs the most appropriate virus strains and relevant cell or animal models. Translational aspects include analysing mode of action and resistance mechanisms of antiviral compounds, and characterization of novel cell substrates and attenuated virus backbones for influenza vaccines.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 19 May 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Guest Speaker - Gordon Caldwell / Intensive Care

Dr Gordon Caldwell, Dr Melvin Leong

Guest Speaker: "Ward Rounds, The Danger of the Ordinary", Dr Gordon Caldwell, Consultant Physician, Worthing Hospital -- Intensive Care: "It's an Ill Wind that Blows..", Dr Melvin Leong -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Guest Speaker: "Ward Rounds, The Danger of the Ordinary", Dr Gordon Caldwell, Consultant Physician, Worthing Hospital -- Intensive Care: "It's an Ill Wind that Blows..", Dr Melvin Leong -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 20 May 2016 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Surgical Grand Round

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 20 May 2016 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Resolving TYK2 locus genotype-to-phenotype conflict reveals therapeutic optimum for autoimmunity

Dr Calliope A Dendrou

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 20 May 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Role of TP53 in DNA methylation

Dr Touati Benoukraf

Dr Touati Benoukraf’s research focus is the role of non-coding segments of the genome in order to identify novel regulatory elements such as enhancers or silencers with the aim of understanding their function in human physiology and pathology. More specifically, he uses epigenetic marks and... Read more

Dr Touati Benoukraf’s research focus is the role of non-coding segments of the genome in order to identify novel regulatory elements such as enhancers or silencers with the aim of understanding their function in human physiology and pathology. More specifically, he uses epigenetic marks and transcription factor binding site datasets derived from high-throughput sequencing technologies to annotate and predict the function of these uncharacterized loci. This information allows the investigation of genomic and epigenomic aberrations in cancers beyond genes and the delineation of novel disease-related signaling pathways. Dr Benoukraf has developed several open source software applications to manage large epigenetic datasets and one of his contributions in this field was to describe the association between histone post-translational modifications and enhancer activities which enables the prediction of enhancer states from in vivo epigenetic data.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Fri 20 May 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off Parks/South Parks Road, OX1 3PT T: 01865 272500 , off Parks Road OX1 3PT

GUEST: Professor William Wisden Dept Life Sciences, Imperial College London : Capturing the neuronal ensembles underlying sleep and sedation

Professor William Wisden MA PhD FRSB FMedSci

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

GUEST SPEAKER

Mon 23 May 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

Structural mechanisms of innate immune recognition of cytosolic DNA

Professor Dr Karl-Peter Hopfner

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eric O'Neill

Mon 23 May 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Signalling, cell biology, and rhomboids

Prof Matthew Freeman

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Tue 24 May 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NPEU Seminar: The use of routinely collected clinical data to support neonatal studies

Professor Kate Costeloe

Audience: Public

Organisers: Dr Manisha Nair

Tue 24 May 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Tue 24 May 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Single-cell analysis of Blimp1+ cell types at the maternal-foetal interface

Dr Andrew Nelson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 24 May 2016 from 17:00 to 18:30

Building capacity on disability in low- and middle-income countries

Kellogg College, Mawby Room, 62 Banbury Road OX2 6PN

From health care training to overcoming structural barriers: can technology help?

Prof Niall Winters, Dr Anne Geniets

In this third talk of the seminar series on ‘Building Capacity on disability in low- and middle-income countries’, Drs. Niall Winters and Anne Geniets will ask the question: From health care training to overcoming structural barriers: can technology help? Many low- and middle-income... Read more

In this third talk of the seminar series on ‘Building Capacity on disability in low- and middle-income countries’, Drs. Niall Winters and Anne Geniets will ask the question: From health care training to overcoming structural barriers: can technology help? Many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are characterised by an acute shortage of trained doctors and nurses, and a strong reliance on community health workers. In this talk, drawing on recent research in urban and rural Kenya, we explore whether mobile technologies can help overcome barriers to health care training, leading to improved provision and delivery of health care services for marginalised populations. Analysing the barriers to care experienced by mothers of children with disabilities, we ask how technology can contribute to the more equitable provision of health care, the challenges of integrating mobiles into existing health care structures and implications for future research agendas. Everyone is warmly invited. Please let anne.geniets(at)education.ox.ac.uk know if you have any special requirements. For more info, please see http://www.mhealthpartners.org

Audience: Public

Organisers: Dr Anne Geniets

Thu 26 May 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Neurology / Psychological Medicine

Dr Chris Butler, Dr Zehanah Izmeth

Neurology: "Personality change in a 62 year-old ex-boxer", Dr Chris Butler -- Psychological Medicine: "Starvation", Dr Zehanah Izmeth -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Neurology: "Personality change in a 62 year-old ex-boxer", Dr Chris Butler -- Psychological Medicine: "Starvation", Dr Zehanah Izmeth -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 26 May 2016 from 14:00 to 15:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

* CANCELLED * CANCELLED: Conversation analysis and communication training for medical and health professionals

Professor Elizabeth Stokoe

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Morrish

Thu 26 May 2016 from 16:30 to 17:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, Lecture room, Level 3, Post Grad, Headington OX3 9DU

A simple method to increase the immunosuppressive potency of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

Dr John Girdlestone

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 27 May 2016 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

‘Magnetic guidance in cancer surgery’

Professor Michael Douek

Professor Michael Douek is a breast surgeon with an interest in breast cancer surgery and breast reconstruction. He is professor of surgical oncology at King’s College London and honorary consultant surgeon at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust. He was awarded a prestigious Hunterian Professorship by the Royal College of Surgeons of England in 2015.

Professor Michael Douek is a breast surgeon with an interest in breast cancer surgery and breast reconstruction. He is professor of surgical oncology at King’s College London and honorary consultant surgeon at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust. He was awarded a prestigious Hunterian Professorship by the Royal College of Surgeons of England in 2015.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 27 May 2016 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

To bnAb or not to bnAb- Are Tregs the answer?

Dr Isabela Pedroza-Pacheco

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 27 May 2016 from 13:00 to 13:30

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off Parks/South Parks Road, OX1 3PT T: 01865 272500 , off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Fri 27 May 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

HSC developmental diversity

Professor Elaine Dzierzak

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Fri 27 May 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WTCHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar Rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

Opportunities for Scaling Up Genetic Analysis

Prof Ben Neale

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christine Webb

Fri 27 May 2016 from 13:30 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off Parks/South Parks Road, OX1 3PT T: 01865 272500 , off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Dr Simon Guiraud : Utrophin modulation strategy in the therapy of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Dr Simon Guiraud

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating, X-linked muscle-wasting disease caused by lack of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. There is currently no cure for DMD although various promising approaches (e.g. stop codon readthrough, exon skipping, gene therapy) are progressing through... Read more

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating, X-linked muscle-wasting disease caused by lack of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. There is currently no cure for DMD although various promising approaches (e.g. stop codon readthrough, exon skipping, gene therapy) are progressing through human clinical trials. By pharmacologically modulating the dystrophin-related protein utrophin, we aim to develop a therapy applicable to all DMD patients, regardless of the underlying genetic fault in the dystrophin gene, by targeting the primary defect and restoring sarcolemmal stability. In partnership with Summit Therapeutics, we previously developed SMT C1100, an oral small molecule utrophin modulator that reduces dystrophic symptoms in the mdxmouse and successfully completed a Phase 1b trial with an excellent safety profile in DMD patients. The successful progression of SMT C1100 to date provides validation for the strategy we developed. We are now optimising second and third generations utrophin modulators with improved physicochemical properties and a more robust metabolism profile. Pre-clinical in vivo studies in the mdx mouse demonstrate that daily oral administration of these compounds increases utrophin expression in target muscle groups, including the diaphragm and heart. This results in improved sarcolemmal stability and prevents dystrophic pathology through a significant reduction of regeneration, necrosis and fibrosis with no change in fibre type composition. These improvements combine to provide functional enhancement and protection of muscle from contraction induced damage. The use of small molecules to increase utrophin expression in skeletal, respiratory and cardiac muscles emphasises the potential of utrophin modulation as a disease-modifying therapeutic strategy for all DMD patients, irrespective of their mutation in dystrophin.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Tue 31 May 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

MHU Student Presentations

Cristina di Genua; Florian Bonkhofer; Alexander Thomas

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 31 May 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Seminars: Understanding breast cancer risk

Professor David Hunter

Audience: Public

Tue 31 May 2016 from 17:00 to 18:30

Building capacity on disability in low- and middle-income countries

Kellogg College, Mawby Room, 62 Banbury Road OX2 6PN

How can research contribute to building capacity on disability in the developing world?

Professor Nora Groce, Dr Maria Kett

In this fourth talk of our seminar series on ‘Building Capacity on disability in low- and middle-income countries’, Professor Nora Groce and Dr Maria Kett, Leonard Cheshire Disability and Inclusive Development Centre, UCL, will ask the question: How can research contribute to building capacity... Read more

In this fourth talk of our seminar series on ‘Building Capacity on disability in low- and middle-income countries’, Professor Nora Groce and Dr Maria Kett, Leonard Cheshire Disability and Inclusive Development Centre, UCL, will ask the question: How can research contribute to building capacity on disability in the developing world? Professor Groce and Dr Kett will discuss some of the ways in which they consider that research has actively contributed to building capacity on disability amongst researchers and practitioners in high and lower income countries. They will speak about their experiences of leading a number of disability-focused research grants, and how disability research has gradually come into the mainstream; as well as the ways in which researchers – as well as advocates and practitioners - have had to adapt to this inclusion. Thanks in part to a shifting global context, including a human rights-based agenda and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (2008), disability issues have become more visible in mainstream development research. This is not without a number of challenges, not least an inherently politicised agenda on behalf of some groups; variations in social and cultural contexts and understandings of disability; lack of agreed or unified positions on definitions – all of which have led to challenges in data collection and a lack of data – or rather, a lack of evidence-based, robust data that is accepted and agreed by the range of impairment groups. These challenges themselves raise a number of questions. The presentation will discuss the challenges of building the capacity of researchers and other stakeholders to mainstream disability across a range of approaches and practices. Time: 5pm – 6.30pm Date: Tuesday, 31th May 2016 Location: Mawby Room, Kellogg College, 60-62 Banbury Road, Oxford, OX2 6PN Disabled access For more information, please see: http://www.mhealthpartners.org/seminars/

Audience: Public

Organisers: Dr Anne Geniets