Other Seminars

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Tue 1 Mar 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Catering provided so please arrive promptly, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Travel Medicine in the era of Chikungunya, Ebola, and Zika virus

Dr Daniel Caplivski

Travel Medicine and Infectious Diseases have evolved rapidly in recent decades as outbreaks such as SARS, Avian Influenza, Ebola, MERS, Chikungunya, and Zika virus have demonstrated how quickly infections can cross international borders. The practicing clinician must be attuned to international... Read more

Travel Medicine and Infectious Diseases have evolved rapidly in recent decades as outbreaks such as SARS, Avian Influenza, Ebola, MERS, Chikungunya, and Zika virus have demonstrated how quickly infections can cross international borders. The practicing clinician must be attuned to international events as many different types of infections may present with overlapping signs and symptoms. Using a case-based approach we will examine how the evaluation of returned travelers is informed by data from international health bodies and local health departments. We will also review the latest information and limitations of testing methods for Zika virus. More about the speaker: Dr Daniel Caplivski is an associate professor of medicine at the Icahn Sinai School of Medicine at Mount Sinai who specializes in Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine. He completed his undergraduate studies at Harvard College and his medical degree at Yale University. He trained in Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases at Mount Sinai and attended the Gorgas Course in Tropical Medicine in Peru. He is a course co-director for the medical microbiology course and clinical director of the Travel Medicine Program at Mount Sinai. Dr Caplivski is the author of two books published by Oxford University Press: "HIV and Comorbidities" and "Consultations in Infectious Diseases: A Case-based Approach to Diagnosis and Management”.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Francois Van Loggerenberg

Tue 1 Mar 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI (Basement seminar room) (Note: not the ORCRB), Headington OX3 7FZ

Tissue-targeted therapy for cancer using a platform called AvidinOX

Dr Rita De Santis

Rita De Santis directs the Department of Biotech Products at Sigma Tau SpA, Italy. Rita’s group previously published that injected oxidised Avidin, called AvidinOX, exhibits the distinctive property to form Schiff’s bases with tissue proteins thus constituting a stable receptor for biotinylated... Read more

Rita De Santis directs the Department of Biotech Products at Sigma Tau SpA, Italy. Rita’s group previously published that injected oxidised Avidin, called AvidinOX, exhibits the distinctive property to form Schiff’s bases with tissue proteins thus constituting a stable receptor for biotinylated therapeutics. AvidinOX is currently under clinical investigation in Europe and USA to target radioactive biotin to inoperable tumor masses. Previous data also proved that AvidinOX can be employed for targeting biotinylated cells or biotinylated antibodies. Interestingly, a strong anti-tumor activity of AvidinOX-anchored biotinylated Cetuximab (bCet) was observed, against EGFR+ tumor cells. The talk will illustrate how to exploit this unexpected result for new cancer therapies.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Tue 1 Mar 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminars: Intervening in ageing

Professor Dame Linda Partridge

Audience: Public

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 2 Mar 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

New Radcliffe House, Room 2, Walton Street OX2 6NW

Thu 3 Mar 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

WIMM / WIMM

Prof Alain Townsend, Dr Calliope A Dendrou

WIMM: "Resolving TYK2 locus genotype-to-phenotype conflict reveals therapeutic optimum for autoimmunity", Dr Calliope A Dendrou. -- WIMM: "The parallel worlds of Influenza and Ebola", Prof Alain Townsend. -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

WIMM: "Resolving TYK2 locus genotype-to-phenotype conflict reveals therapeutic optimum for autoimmunity", Dr Calliope A Dendrou. -- WIMM: "The parallel worlds of Influenza and Ebola", Prof Alain Townsend. -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 4 Mar 2016 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Progress on the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery

Professor Chris Lavy

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 4 Mar 2016 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

Location, Location, Location: CD8+ T cells and liver-stage malaria

Hill Group, Alex Spencer

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 4 Mar 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off Parks/South Parks Road, OX1 3PT T: 01865 272500 - See more at: https://new.talks.ox.ac.uk/talks/id/07c0c2cc-f258-44c6-b033-91cca75840e5/#sthash.aIlXBy5M.dpuf, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Int'l Guest Speaker - Dr Aurélie Goyenvalle, Université de Versailles St Quentin : Tricyclo-DNA: highly promising antisense oligonucleotides for splice switching therapeutic approaches

Dr Aurélie Goyenvalle

Antisense oligonucleotides (AON) hold promise for therapeutic splice-switching correction in many genetic diseases; however, despite advances in chemistry and design, systemic use of AONs is still limited due to poor tissue/cellular uptake. This talk will describe a novel class of AONs made of... Read more

Antisense oligonucleotides (AON) hold promise for therapeutic splice-switching correction in many genetic diseases; however, despite advances in chemistry and design, systemic use of AONs is still limited due to poor tissue/cellular uptake. This talk will describe a novel class of AONs made of tricyclo-DNA (tcDNA), which displays unique pharmacological properties and unprecedented uptake in many tissues after systemic administration. These outstanding properties have been demonstrated in different mouse models of genetic diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). DMD is a neurogenetic disease typically caused by frame-shifting deletions or nonsense mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin and characterized by progressive muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy, respiratory failure and neurocognitive impairment. While current naked AONs do not significantly enter the heart or cross the blood brain barrier, systemic delivery of tcDNA-AONs allow high levels of dystrophin rescue in skeletal muscles as well as in heart and to a lower extent in the brain. Our results demonstrate for the first time physiological improvement of the cardio-respiratory functions and correction of behavioural features linked to the emotional/cognitive deficiency associated with the lack of dystrophin. These properties, together with the safe toxicology profile of tcDNA make this chemistry particularly attractive for future therapies in DMD patients as well as in other neuromuscular disorders or diseases eligible for splice-switching approaches requiring whole-body treatment.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

INT'L GUEST SPEAKER

Fri 4 Mar 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

"Career paths, work/life balance and equality/diversity"

Professor Angela Vincent, Professor Katja Simon, Professor Paresh Vyas

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Sat 5 Mar 2016 from 09:30 to 17:30

Mathematical Institute, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

OxFEST's 5th annual conference - Signposts and Pathways: How to get ahead in your STEM career

Prof. Alison Noble, Prof. Ulrike Tillmann, Prof. Rhian Touyz, Sue Kershaw, Jessica Griggs, Prof. Elena Rodriguez-Falcon

Oxford Females in Engineering, Science and Technology (OxFEST) would like to invite you to our 5th annual conference aiming to inspire and promote women in STEM. This year, we hope to provide an opportunity for people of all career stages in STEM subjects to explore various career pathways and to... Read more

Oxford Females in Engineering, Science and Technology (OxFEST) would like to invite you to our 5th annual conference aiming to inspire and promote women in STEM. This year, we hope to provide an opportunity for people of all career stages in STEM subjects to explore various career pathways and to prepare themselves on the journey to success. If you are the kind of person who would like to get informed and get ready for your STEM career, this is an event not to be missed. The day will consist of several talks from prominent speakers about their career stories, followed by three interactive workshops and a panel discussion. There will also be plenty of opportunities to network, share and discuss experiences with both peers and some of STEM’s most influential figures. We are currently calling for student speakers or poster submission. Abstract submission deadline: Thursday 18th of February, 2016. For further information, please visit http://conference.ox-fest.org/.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Mon 7 Mar 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

Translating genomic discovery into improved therapies for childhood brain tumours

Professor Steve Clifford

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eric O'Neill

Mon 7 Mar 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Molecular anatomy of the brain by large-scale single cell RNA-seq

Sten Linnarsson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Tue 8 Mar 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

MHU Student Presentations

Anthony Cheong; Jennifer Chambers; Lucas Greder

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 9 Mar 2016 from 17:00 to 18:00

Burdon Sanderson Cardiac Science Centre Lecture Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Evolutionary Biology meets Physiology

Prof Mike Joyner MD

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Vicki Dunn

To be followed by a drinks reception in the Library.

Thu 10 Mar 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement seminar room. (Note: not the ORCRB), Headington OX3 7FZ

Cyclic nucleotide-phosphodiesterase signalling in cardiac neurons: therapeutic target?

Professor David Paterson

ALL WELCOME David Paterson leads a research team in the area of cardiac neurobiology. They are interested in how both branches of the cardiac autonomic nervous system communicate at the end organ level and whether oxidative stress plays a role in uncoupling pre-synaptic and post synaptic... Read more

ALL WELCOME David Paterson leads a research team in the area of cardiac neurobiology. They are interested in how both branches of the cardiac autonomic nervous system communicate at the end organ level and whether oxidative stress plays a role in uncoupling pre-synaptic and post synaptic signalling. The endogenous gas nitric oxide is now thought to be a key intermediary in cardiac inter/intracellular signalling, where it has been shown to regulate several ion channels that control cardiac excitability. His group has developed a method for targeting the enzyme involved in making nitric oxide using a gene transfer approach involving cell specific viral vectors to study the physiology of this messenger in normal and diseased hearts.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Thu 10 Mar 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Guest Speaker

Prof Mike Joyner MD

"Precision Medicine: Time for a Second Opinion?" Prof Mike Joyner MD Mayo Clinic -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

"Precision Medicine: Time for a Second Opinion?" Prof Mike Joyner MD Mayo Clinic -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 11 Mar 2016 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Fri 11 Mar 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting Rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

Rare events and increasing opportunities: Towards combatting amyloid disease

Prof Sheena Radford

Understanding how different proteins assemble into the ordered, insoluble aggregates associated with amyloid disease is a formidable challenge. Whilst it is generally accepted that protein misfolding is required for the formation of amyloid fibrils, the point at which the folding and aggregation... Read more

Understanding how different proteins assemble into the ordered, insoluble aggregates associated with amyloid disease is a formidable challenge. Whilst it is generally accepted that protein misfolding is required for the formation of amyloid fibrils, the point at which the folding and aggregation free energy landscapes diverge, and the role of different amino acid residues in determining folding versus aggregation, remain obscure. Even more challenging is the identification of early aggregation-prone monomers and oligomeric species and their structural characterisation, since such species are aggregation-prone, short-lived and rapidly equilibrating. In this lecture I will describe how different biophysical methods are being used to reveal the mechanism by which normally soluble proteins convert into amyloidogenic conformations, how bimolecular collisions between protein variants can result in very different outcomes of assembly and how we have used small molecules to modulate the aggregation process.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eleanor Martin

Fri 11 Mar 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off Parks/South Parks Road, OX1 3PT T: 01865 272500 , off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Int'l Guest Speaker Professor Martina Muckenthaler, Heidelberg University Hospital : The role of the hepcidin/ferroportin regulatory system in health and disease

Professor Martina Muckenthaler

Imbalances of iron homeostasis account for some of the most common human diseases. Pathologies result from both, iron deficiency or overload and frequently affect the hepcidin/ferroportin regulatory system that balances systemic iron metabolism. The small hepatic peptide hormone hepcidin... Read more

Imbalances of iron homeostasis account for some of the most common human diseases. Pathologies result from both, iron deficiency or overload and frequently affect the hepcidin/ferroportin regulatory system that balances systemic iron metabolism. The small hepatic peptide hormone hepcidin orchestrates systemic iron fluxes and controls plasma iron levels by binding to the iron exporter ferroportin on the surface of iron releasing cells, triggering its degradation and hence reducing iron transfer to transferrin. Hepcidin thus maintains transferrin saturation at physiological levels assuring adequate iron supplies to all cell types. My presentation will focus on mechanisms that control hepcidin and ferroportin expression as well as on pathologies that arise when this key regulatory circuitry underlying systemic iron homeostasis is disrupted.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

INT'L GUEST SPEAKER

Fri 11 Mar 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Single-cell analysis of haematopoietic stem cell identity and behaviour

Dr David Knapp

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Mon 14 Mar 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

The maternal microbiota drives early postnatal innate immune development

Prof Andrew Macpherson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Jo Silva

Mon 14 Mar 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Health Economics Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Mon 14 Mar 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Nutritional control of neural stem cells

Prof Andrea Brand

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Mon 14 Mar 2016 from 14:00 to 15:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

Maintenance of spermatogenic stem cell pool by mitogen competition

Professor Shosei Yoshida

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Mon 14 Mar 2016 from 16:00 to 18:00

Dopamine Club

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library , off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Mon 14 Mar 2016 from 16:00 to 18:00

Dopamine Club

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, Sherrington Building, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Tue 15 Mar 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Chaperones turned oncoproteins: calreticulin mutants pathologically activate TpoR and the JAK-STAT pathway in myeloid cancers

Prof Stefan Constantinescu

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 15 Mar 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

The role of inflammation in osteoarthritis

Virginia Byers Kraus, MD, PhD

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Tue 15 Mar 2016 from 15:00 to 16:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, 2nd floor (note main door closes at 4pm). , off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Translational stem cell biology: Developing Cell Therapy for Parkinson's Disease

Professor Malin Parmar

Professor Malin Parmar’s group works with translational stem cell biology. The focus of her research is to understand cell fate specification in the developing brain and in human neural progenitor cells using cell-based models of neuronal differentiation. Their current focus is to learn how to... Read more

Professor Malin Parmar’s group works with translational stem cell biology. The focus of her research is to understand cell fate specification in the developing brain and in human neural progenitor cells using cell-based models of neuronal differentiation. Their current focus is to learn how to direct and efficiently drive controlled differentiation of human stem cells into subtype-specific neurons. They also develop technologies for direct conversion of human fibroblasts into functional and subtype-specific neurons in vitro, and the conversion of endogenous glia into neurons in vivo. The ultimate aim is to develop these cells and technologies for use in brain repair, with focus on Parkinson’s disease.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Serena Cerritelli

Tue 15 Mar 2016 from 17:30 to 20:30

Tropical Medicine Seminars

The Oxford Union, https://www.oxford-union.org/, St Michaels' Street OX1 3JB

CLIMATE CHANGE AND HEALTH DEBATE

The MSc in International Health and Tropical Medicine students will be participating in a formal debate on Climate Change and Health. They will be taking part in two debates back to back. Topics will be announced to the students the week before the debate.

The MSc in International Health and Tropical Medicine students will be participating in a formal debate on Climate Change and Health. They will be taking part in two debates back to back. Topics will be announced to the students the week before the debate.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Mrs Christelle Kervella-Jones

Wed 16 Mar 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Digital Patients: A Typology of Emerging Patient Roles

Professor Axel Tjora

Booking Recommended

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Sue Ziebland

Wed 16 Mar 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Neural Mechanisms Underlying State Dependent Modulation of Sexual Behaviour

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Wed 16 Mar 2016 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Natural Killer cell receptors and MHC class I ligands in humans and chimpanzees

Professor Peter Parham

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 17 Mar 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Studying highly proliferative pluripotent animal adult stem cells and the potential for fundamental insights relevant to cancer biology

Professor Aziz Aboobaker

Aziz Aboobaker's group uses planarians as a model to study fundamental questions about, regeneration, stem cell behaviour and cancer. Planarian adult stem cells are highly proliferative and must correctly differentiate to form all cell types organised in tissues and organs. One question that is... Read more

Aziz Aboobaker's group uses planarians as a model to study fundamental questions about, regeneration, stem cell behaviour and cancer. Planarian adult stem cells are highly proliferative and must correctly differentiate to form all cell types organised in tissues and organs. One question that is often asked is whether planarians develop cancer, as their large stem cell population might increase the chance that individual system cells might become transformed and cycle out of control. The Aboobaker group uses planarians to as a simple model system to study aberrant stem cell behaviours that underpin human diseases, particularly cancers caused by rogue adult stem cells. They use planarians to find new genes that control stem cell migration, proliferation and differentiation with a particular focus on genes conserved in mammals.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Thu 17 Mar 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Jenner Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

A universal influenza virus vaccine strategy based in the conserved hemagglutinin stalk domain

Prof Florian Krammer

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Fri 18 Mar 2016 from 08:00 to 09:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Combined Medical-Surgical Grand Round

Dr Jodie Buckingham, Dr Garry Tan, Prof Linda Hands, Dr Constantine Loizou

Diabetes, Multidisciplinary Foot Team: "A step in the right direction: improving diabetic foot disease", Dr Jodie Buckingham, Dr Garry Tan, Prof Linda Hands and Dr Constantine Loizou. -- Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS

Diabetes, Multidisciplinary Foot Team: "A step in the right direction: improving diabetic foot disease", Dr Jodie Buckingham, Dr Garry Tan, Prof Linda Hands and Dr Constantine Loizou. -- Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 18 Mar 2016 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Update from the Cornall group

Cornall Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 18 Mar 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

From bench science to a career in science policy

Dr Georgina Drury

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Mon 21 Mar 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

A role for neutrophils in Alzheimer’s disease

Prof Gabriela Constantin

Gabriela Constantin, MD, PhD is a Professor of General Pathology and Immunology and Head of the Laboratory of Neuroimmunology at the University of Verona, Italy. Dr. Constantin received her medical degree and completed her residency in neurology at the University of Milan, Italy. She obtained a PhD... Read more

Gabriela Constantin, MD, PhD is a Professor of General Pathology and Immunology and Head of the Laboratory of Neuroimmunology at the University of Verona, Italy. Dr. Constantin received her medical degree and completed her residency in neurology at the University of Milan, Italy. She obtained a PhD in molecular and cellular pathology at the University if Verona. She is a recognized leader in neuroimmunology and her studies are focused on the role of leukocyte trafficking in brain autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. She contributed to the identification of key inflammation mechanisms in multiple sclerosis, epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease. Her group has recently demonstrated a role for neutrophil trafficking in Alzheimer's disease indicating new therapeutic strategies in this type of dementia. Her projects are funded by national and international agencies including the European Research Council (ERC), National Multiple Sclerosis Society (NMSS) NY, USA and Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation (ADDF).

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 21 Mar 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

The control of T cell metabolism and differentiation

Prof Doreen Cantrell

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Tue 22 Mar 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Cooperative and dynamic organisation of DNA regulatory elements

Dr Guillaume Orsi

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 23 Mar 2016 from 14:00 to 15:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Cellular Immunity for Influenza: Lessons from the Flu Watch Study

Prof Andrew Hayward

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 24 Mar 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI (Basement seminar room) (Note: not the ORCRB), Headington OX3 7FZ

Temporal regulation of genome replication

Prof Conrad A. Nieduszynski

Conrad Nieduszynski's group uses a variety of cellular, molecular, genomic, bio-informatic and modelling approaches to understand how DNA replication is regulated to ensure genome stability. By focusing on the basic biology that underpins cell growth and division, they aim to provide novel insights... Read more

Conrad Nieduszynski's group uses a variety of cellular, molecular, genomic, bio-informatic and modelling approaches to understand how DNA replication is regulated to ensure genome stability. By focusing on the basic biology that underpins cell growth and division, they aim to provide novel insights that will help our understanding of diseases such as cancer and congenital disorders. Their long-term research aims are to determine: i) how cells ensure that sufficient replication origins are activated to fully replicate the genome; ii) the mechanisms involved in faithfully completing genome replication; and, the physiological consequences of deregulated genome replication.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Thu 24 Mar 2016 from 12:30 to 13:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

How does the Fanconi pathway promote unhooking of DNA interstrand crosslinks?

Dr Puck Knipscheer

DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) are highly toxic DNA lesions as they prevent DNA strand separation. ICL repair requires several classes of repair enzymes including translesion DNA polymerases, structure-specific endonucleases, recombinases, and Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins. Mutation in any one... Read more

DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) are highly toxic DNA lesions as they prevent DNA strand separation. ICL repair requires several classes of repair enzymes including translesion DNA polymerases, structure-specific endonucleases, recombinases, and Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins. Mutation in any one of the 16 currently known FA genes leads to the cancer predisposition disorder Fanconi anemia. However, it is still largely unclear how the FA proteins and the other repair factors collaborate to repair ICLs. We study the molecular mechanism of ICL repair using a Xenopus egg extract-based system that recapitulates replication-dependent ICL repair in vitro. Previously we have shown that activation of the FA pathway by ubiquitylation of the FANCI-FANCD2 (ID) complex is important for a specific step in ICL repair, namely the incisions that unhook the lesion from one of the DNA strands. We next demonstrated that binding of this activated ID complex to the crosslink promotes the recruitment of the incision-complex, composed of the adapter protein SLX4 and the structure specific endonuclease XPF-ERCC1. Both XPF and SLX4 have recently been identified as FA genes highlighting their importance in ICL repair. Although ICL unhooking appears to be a major function of the FA pathway the biochemical details of this process are still unclear. I will present our latest findings regarding the role of XPF-ERCC1 and SLX4 in ICL repair.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Penny Berry