Other Seminars

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Tue 1 Sep 2015 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

New Radcliffe House, Room 2, Walton Street OX2 6NW

Methods to calculate reference ranges

Dr Maria Vazquez-Montes

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Tue 1 Sep 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

Basic Mechanisms of Fibrosis and Epigenetic Control

Professor Derek Mann

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Nemerofksy-Birks

Tue 1 Sep 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Tue 1 Sep 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

The dynamic epigenome - challenges and opportunities for healthy ageing

Professor Peter Adams

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Mon 7 Sep 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

Pluripotent stem cells to study neurodegenerative disease and treat neurological disorders

PD Dr Philipp Koch

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Nemerofksy-Birks

Mon 7 Sep 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library , off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Taste Processing in Drosophila

Professor Kristin Scott

The ability to identify nutrient-rich food and avoid toxic substances is essential for an animal's survival. Although olfaction and vision contribute to food detection, the gustatory system acts as a final checkpoint for food acceptance or rejection. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster tastes... Read more

The ability to identify nutrient-rich food and avoid toxic substances is essential for an animal's survival. Although olfaction and vision contribute to food detection, the gustatory system acts as a final checkpoint for food acceptance or rejection. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster tastes many of the same stimuli as mammals and provides an excellent model system for comparative studies of taste detection. We have utilized a combination of molecular, behavioral, and calcium imaging studies to determine the taste ligands of different gustatory neurons and understand how taste information is processed in the higher brain. More recently, we have begun to examine how hunger, satiety and learning influence activity in taste circuits and regulate feeding decisions. These studies provide insight into how taste compounds are detected and processed by the brain.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Tue 8 Sep 2015 from 12:30 to 13:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

New Radcliffe House, Room 2, Walton Street OX2 6NW

Biological variation and its impact on clinical decision making in relation to renal markers

Dr Edmund Lamb

Booking Recommended

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Julie McLellan

Wed 9 Sep 2015 from 10:00 to 11:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

Study of the early radiation-induced DNA damage: a computational approach

Professor Dr Mario Bernal

M. A. Bernal is Nuclear Engineer graduated Summa Cum Laude at the High Institute of Nuclear Science and Technologies, in Havana, Cuba (1995). He obtained a Master in Medical Physics degree at the Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Investigation (2003, sponsored by the IAEA). Afterward, he got a... Read more

M. A. Bernal is Nuclear Engineer graduated Summa Cum Laude at the High Institute of Nuclear Science and Technologies, in Havana, Cuba (1995). He obtained a Master in Medical Physics degree at the Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Investigation (2003, sponsored by the IAEA). Afterward, he got a Doctorate in Physics at the Simon Bolivar University (USB) in Venezuela, Graduated with Honours. He worked as Medical Physicist for more than 6 years before coming to the academic environment. He was professor of Medical Physics for one year at the School of Physics of the Central University of Venezuela (2006-2007) and Assistant Professor of Physics at the USB since September 2007 until February 2011. He has been working on radiation transport Monte Carlo simulations since 1993 and was Invited Researcher at the Radiological Sciences Lab, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro since February, 2010 until January, 2011. During two years, he remained as Visiting Professor of Physics at the Gleb Wataghin Institute of Physics, State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), in Brazil, where he is now Associate Professor of Physics.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Nemerofksy-Birks

Wed 9 Sep 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Population Health Seminars

New Richards Building, Teaching Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LG

Using CART to identify thresholds and hierarchies in funding decisions

Chris Schilling

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 9 Sep 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

WTCHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

"Fine-scale genetic population structure in Finland" and "Efficient variable selection among thousands of correlated genetic variants using summary data from genome-wide association studies"

Sini Kerminen and Christian Benner

Sini Kerminen and Christian Benner from the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM) at the University of Helsinki in Finland will give 2 short consecutive talks on “Fine-scale genetic population structure in Finland” (Sini) and “Efficient variable selection among thousands of correlated genetic variants using summary data from genome-wide association studies” (Christian).

Sini Kerminen and Christian Benner from the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM) at the University of Helsinki in Finland will give 2 short consecutive talks on “Fine-scale genetic population structure in Finland” (Sini) and “Efficient variable selection among thousands of correlated genetic variants using summary data from genome-wide association studies” (Christian).

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 9 Sep 2015 from 13:30 to 14:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Opposing Roles of Obesity on Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

Dr William J Murphy

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 10 Sep 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Post-translational control of protein homeostasis through regulatory ubiquitylation of the translation machinery

Dr. Eric Bennett

ALL WELCOME Eric Bennett studies how the proteome is remodelled in response to stress. In particular, his research focuses on the quality control function of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS), which is a crucial mechanism of selective protein degradation. His work is relevant to age-related... Read more

ALL WELCOME Eric Bennett studies how the proteome is remodelled in response to stress. In particular, his research focuses on the quality control function of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS), which is a crucial mechanism of selective protein degradation. His work is relevant to age-related degeneration and disease states, including Parkinson's Disease and cancer. Topics that his lab investigates include understanding how defective translation products are selectively targeted for degradation, the dynamics of mRNA sequestration into stress granules and proteomic approaches for understanding global UPS function and alterations in response to stress.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Thu 10 Sep 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Video Conferencing Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Immunomodulatory Effects of Malaria Protein PfEMP1

Natalia Sampaio

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 11 Sep 2015 from 10:00 to 11:00

Strubi seminars

Using Kinematics and modeling to decipher how Toxoplasma parasites apply force to invade host cells

Dr Isabelle Tardieux

A major interest of my lab is to delve deeper into the molecular machinery that drives Toxoplasma tachyzoites into their host cells with a primary focus on force production during the process. To decipher the origin and feature of the force(s) powering parasite entry, we combined kinematic and... Read more

A major interest of my lab is to delve deeper into the molecular machinery that drives Toxoplasma tachyzoites into their host cells with a primary focus on force production during the process. To decipher the origin and feature of the force(s) powering parasite entry, we combined kinematic and modeling analysis of cell invasion using parasites that express a fluorescent and functional version of RON2, the core component of the critical parasite-zoite junction. We showed that the majority of invasion events occur with a typical forward rotational progression of the parasite through a static junction. However, when the parasites encounter resistance in their way in or when the junction is not properly anchored to the host cell cortex, the junction is instead capped backwards together with the host cell membrane to eventually enclose the parasite in a functional vacuole. kinematic analysis allowed to demonstrate a similar parasite driven force controlling static and capped junction scenarios. Next, we have compared the effect of (i) a stronger defect in junction anchorage by a motor-competent tachyzoite and of (ii) a deficiency of myosin motor in tachyzoites and we will present data showing that both lead to invasion success or failure but with distinct sequences and consequences. Overall, our detailed live imaging analysis has allowed better phenotype assessment of mutants for proteins involved during invasion and has provided new evidence that (i) tachyzoites need to engage myosin motor with the junction molecular complex to promote force production (ii) this sequence depends on the anchorage of the junction to the host cell cortex.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eleanor Martin

Mon 14 Sep 2015 from 10:30 to 11:30

NDM Research Building Seminars

NDM Building, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Mon 14 Sep 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

Mechanisms of synergy between ionizing radiation and a therapeutic HPV vaccine

Professor Eric Deutsch

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Nemerofksy-Birks

Mon 14 Sep 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Vessel-tissue Interactions in the Skeletal System

Dr Anjali Kusumbe

Anjali Kusumbe is a postdoctoral scientist at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine, Muenster, Germany. Before her move to Germany, she pursued her doctoral research with a research fellowship from Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, India, in the field of Cancer Stem Cell... Read more

Anjali Kusumbe is a postdoctoral scientist at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine, Muenster, Germany. Before her move to Germany, she pursued her doctoral research with a research fellowship from Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, India, in the field of Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) biology at the National Centre for Cell Science, Pune, India. Her doctoral thesis focused on deciphering the contribution of CSCs and endothelial cells in ovarian cancer progression. After gaining deep insight into the principles of analyzing dormant cell populations and tumor vascularization, she started her postdoctoral research in the field of endothelial cell biology. Her postdoctoral research focuses on understanding the vessel-tissue interactions in the skeletal system by utilizing high-resolution three-dimensional imaging, intravital imaging and cell-specific inducible genetic approaches in Mus musculus. Her recent work represents a very fundamental advancement in the understanding of bone vasculature and the links between blood vessel growth, bone formation and bone ageing. She has received the Werner-Risau Memorial Award for her work.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sandra Lock

Wed 16 Sep 2015 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

New Radcliffe House, Meeting room 2, Walton Street OX2 6NW

Quality of Diabetes Primary Care in Older Patients Diagnosed with Cancer: A Study Based on CPRD

Robert Griffiths

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dan Richards-Doran

Wed 16 Sep 2015 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Ubiquitin networks in blood pathologies

Dr Heike Laman

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 18 Sep 2015 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Autophagy is Essential for Neutrophil Differentiation – Guiding an Energy-Metabolic Switch

Simon Group, Tom Riffelmacher - Simon Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 18 Sep 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Sherring Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

What are Fruitless proteins really doing for LOVEly fruit flies?

Daisuke Yamamoto

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Fri 18 Sep 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Interference with Immunological and Neurological Synapses as Virulence Mechanisms of hRSV

Professor Alexis Kalergis

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sandra Lock

Mon 21 Sep 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Immunological in Synpases in Human Health and Disease

Dr Salvatore Valitutti

Salvatore Valitutti, M.D., former full professor of immunology at the University of Toulouse, France is Director of Research at INSERM. He has been working for more than twenty years on T lymphocyte activation by antigenic determinants displayed on antigen presenting cell (APC) surface and has... Read more

Salvatore Valitutti, M.D., former full professor of immunology at the University of Toulouse, France is Director of Research at INSERM. He has been working for more than twenty years on T lymphocyte activation by antigenic determinants displayed on antigen presenting cell (APC) surface and has acquired uncommon expertise on in vitro and in tissue study of human primary immune cells. Dr. Valitutti has been member of the Basel Institute for Immunology in Basel, Switzerland where he contributed to the understanding of basic mechanisms of T lymphocyte activation. More recently, in Lausanne (Switzerland) and in Toulouse (France), Dr. Valitutti has contributed to define the structure, dynamics and function of immunological synapses, formed by both helper and cytotoxic T cells. His research team develops, at the INSERM U1043 in Toulouse, a multi-disciplinary research program in which, biologists in collaboration with clinicians, physicists and mathematicians, investigate different aspects of the intercellular communication occurring at immunological synapses in human health and disease.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sandra Lock

Tue 22 Sep 2015 from 10:00 to 11:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Forward genetic screens in haploid mammalian stem cells: looking beyond CRISPR/Cas9

Dr Josep Forment

ALL WELCOME Josep Forment works on mechanisms of DNA damage in mammalian and yeast cells, with Prof. Steve Jackson at the Gurdon Institute, Cambridge. His talk will be on the subject of approaches for forward genetic screens.

ALL WELCOME Josep Forment works on mechanisms of DNA damage in mammalian and yeast cells, with Prof. Steve Jackson at the Gurdon Institute, Cambridge. His talk will be on the subject of approaches for forward genetic screens.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Tue 22 Sep 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, The Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Modeling and Tracking Glycan Diffusion Near Integrin Adhesions Using Biorthogonal Click-Chemistry and Interference Microscopy

The dynamics of integrin adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is critical for cell motility and growth, yet metastatic cells are capable of anchorage-independent survival with loss of adhesion from the primary tumor and subsequent adhesion in the microenvironment of the metastatic niche.... Read more

The dynamics of integrin adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is critical for cell motility and growth, yet metastatic cells are capable of anchorage-independent survival with loss of adhesion from the primary tumor and subsequent adhesion in the microenvironment of the metastatic niche. Unfortunately, we do not yet have a clear understanding of the detailed mechanisms that govern the nucleation, clustering and adhesion of integrins to the ECM in the presence of the myriad of cell-surface glycoproteins that extend into the extracellular space. In order to explore how interactions between integrins and glycans alter clustering and adhesion, we have adopted a three-pronged approach that includes: (1) modeling the energetic landscape that governs membrane bending and integrin adhesion; (2) tracking bioorthogonally tagged cell-surface glycans with single-molecule sensitivity and (3) measuring membrane topography using phase-shifted laser feedback interference microscopy.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sandra Lock

Tue 22 Sep 2015 from 14:30 to 15:30

Oxford Genomic Centre Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

A novel nanowell system based on SmartChip™ technology for the isolation and processing of 1000s of single cells

Dr Maithreyan Srinivasan

: Advances in Next-Generation Sequencing have increased our ability to work with small/precious samples and grow our understanding of basic biological principles. Such biological insights are typically derived from data “averaged” over bulk cell and tissue samples. However, single cell... Read more

: Advances in Next-Generation Sequencing have increased our ability to work with small/precious samples and grow our understanding of basic biological principles. Such biological insights are typically derived from data “averaged” over bulk cell and tissue samples. However, single cell analyses suggest that cell-specific transcriptome differences may have profound functional consequences. While technologies to isolate and process hundreds of single cells have made progress, advancements in single cell biology require new technologies that can enhance and automate the isolation and processing of tens of thousands of individual cells in a selective and flexible manner. To satisfy this need, we have engineered a single-cell system (SCS) to accommodate a number of downstream applications including RNA-seq. The WaferGen SCS includes a 5184 nanowell array based on SmartChip™ technology, imaging station, multi-sample nano-dispenser (for accurate dispense of cells and reagents into nanowells) and an image-analysis software that can identify 1000s of single-cell containing wells in an automated fashion. Using Poisson dispense method, the WaferGen SCIS can routinely isolate up to ~1800 viable single cells. Analysis of acquired chip images by proprietary software quickly evaluates cell staining to assess cell viability. The image analysis software is then used to select viable isolated cells for further processing. Well locations of selected cell are then uploaded to the dispenser to add reagents into wells of interest. This unique selective processing of individual cell-containing wells can dramatically help to minimize data analysis noise from wells containing multiple cells. The new WaferGen SCS moves the science of single-cell analysis forward by offering: Power – up to 1800 viable cells/chip across the broadest range of cell types per sample (5-100um), Control – ability to selectively process ONLY single-cell containing wells and Insight - process up to 8 samples per chip. We present data that demonstrate the reproducible dispensing of individual cells/nuclei using preprinted oligonucleotide-barcodes and processing of the cells for RNA-seq.

Booking Recommended

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Marta Guderska

Wed 23 Sep 2015 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Wed 23 Sep 2015 from 17:00 to 18:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 seminar room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Memory T cell formation and vaccine development

Dr Ramon Arens

Dr Arens’s research aim is to understand the immunobiology of T cell responses and to use this knowledge for the development and improvement of prophylactic and therapeutic strategies against pathogens and cancerous cells.

Dr Arens’s research aim is to understand the immunobiology of T cell responses and to use this knowledge for the development and improvement of prophylactic and therapeutic strategies against pathogens and cancerous cells.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof Lynn Dustin

Thu 24 Sep 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Synthetic Physiology: Optical Control of Cellular Signals

Dr Harald Janovjak

ALL WELCOME Harald Janovjak works in the new research field synthetic physiology, which is the interface of synthetic biology and mammalian physiology . The Janovjak group is exploring synthetic principles for understanding and manipulating animal physiology. They have established new methods to... Read more

ALL WELCOME Harald Janovjak works in the new research field synthetic physiology, which is the interface of synthetic biology and mammalian physiology . The Janovjak group is exploring synthetic principles for understanding and manipulating animal physiology. They have established new methods to control the signaling and behavior of nerve cells, cancer cells and key cell populations involved in metabolism. The methods provide spatial and temporal precision and include, but are not limited to, optogenetics. The Janovjak group is also focusing on understanding and manipulating cell signaling and behavior in tissues affected by disease.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Fri 25 Sep 2015 from 11:00 to 19:00

Tropical Medicine Seminars

Sheldonian Theatre, Sheldonian Theatre & Examination Schools , Broad Street OX1 3AZ

18th World Congress of the International Society on Toxinology

Various

IST 2015 will explore the structural, pharmacological, evolutionary and clinical aspects of natural toxins. The congress invites poster abstracts in the key thematic areas of the scientific programme below. All submitted abstracts will be reviewed by members of the congress committees. (For... Read more

IST 2015 will explore the structural, pharmacological, evolutionary and clinical aspects of natural toxins. The congress invites poster abstracts in the key thematic areas of the scientific programme below. All submitted abstracts will be reviewed by members of the congress committees. (For session scheduling see Congress Timetable) 1.Natural toxins and drug discovery 2.Toxins and their derivatives in clinical use or in development 3.Proteomics, venomics, antivenomics 4.Genomics and transcriptomics 5.Ion channel toxins 6.Conotoxins and other marine ion channel toxins 7.Snake venom metalloproteinases, phospholipases and other toxins mediating inflammation 8.Antivenom-1: Innovation and commercialisation 9.Antivenom-2: Pre-clinical and clinical assessment 10.Clinical-1: Snake-bites 11.Clinical-2: Arthropod bites and stings 12.Discovering new toxins in unexpected taxa: mammals, amphibians, annelids, crustaceans, ticks, etc. 13.Toxins in natural history and evolution 14.Venoms as an emerging evolutionary model 15.Marine and freshwater algal and dinoflagellate toxins 16.Toxins and the haemostatic system 17.Biotoxins and bioterrorism 18.Advances in the understanding of bacterial and fungal toxins 19.Venom and toxin pharmacology 20.Plant and mushroom poisoning 21.Marine and freshwater stings and venoms 22.Introduction to the VAPAGuide – Venomous And Poisonous Animals Guide There will also be three one-day, pre-congress didactic introductory courses for younger doctors and scientists held on Thursday 24th September 2015, addressing: •Basics of clinical envenoming and poisoning: (Organisers: David Warrell & Julian White) •Omics, an introduction: (Organisers: Juan Calvete & Bruno Lomonte) •Realities and practicalities of drug discovery and development: (Organisers: Alan Harvey & Glenn King) Public engagement with science On Sunday morning 27th September, the session at the magnificent Sheldonian Theatre will be freely open to the public and advertised as a “public engagement with science” event. With the help of the head master and head of Biology at Magdalen College School, this event will be publicised among most Oxfordshire (and adjacent) state and private schools. We will invite interested 6th formers and hope to ignite in them an interest in toxins and Toxinology’s wide range of cognate disciplines (from proteomics to behavioural zoology).

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Mon 28 Sep 2015 from 10:30 to 11:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NPEU Seminar: Listening to Parents: a survey of parents of babies who died in the perinatal period; the impact of holding a stillborn baby

Jane Henderson, Julie Hennegan

NPEU Research Seminar

NPEU Research Seminar

Audience: Public

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Mon 28 Sep 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Coordination of the Humoral Immune Response by the B Cell Identity Factor Pax5

Professor Stephen Malin

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sandra Lock

Mon 28 Sep 2015 from 14:00 to 15:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre (ring CTSU bell to enter), Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Advances in Structural Biology that might help Vaccine Design

Prof David Stuart

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 29 Sep 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Systems Immunology – Using an Holistic Approach to Understand the Molecular Mechanisms of Immunity

Dr Helder Nakaya

Biological processes operate through an intricate and elaborate network of molecules. Systems biology approaches provide a comprehensive way of dissecting the complex interactions within these processes, and can lead to a better understanding of biological systems. In recent years, systems biology... Read more

Biological processes operate through an intricate and elaborate network of molecules. Systems biology approaches provide a comprehensive way of dissecting the complex interactions within these processes, and can lead to a better understanding of biological systems. In recent years, systems biology has been successfully applied in analyzing the immune response to a wide range of vaccines and infectious agents. This seminar highlights the recent technological and methodological advances in the field and shows how systems biology can be applied to unraveling novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of immunity.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 30 Sep 2015 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Meeting room 1, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

CLAHRC

Alex Gardiner

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dan Richards-Doran

Wed 30 Sep 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

CPM - WTCHG Career Equality Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

Women in Science

Prof Dame Carol Robinson

The aim of these sessions is for the speaker to share their own experience of a career in science & how they have balanced this career with lifestyle, and for them to provide advice to scientists. Professor Robinson is the first female Professor of Chemistry at the University of Oxford and was... Read more

The aim of these sessions is for the speaker to share their own experience of a career in science & how they have balanced this career with lifestyle, and for them to provide advice to scientists. Professor Robinson is the first female Professor of Chemistry at the University of Oxford and was previously the first female Professor of Chemistry at the University of Cambridge. She is renowned for pioneering the use of mass spectrometry as an analytical tool and for her ground-breaking research into the 3D structure of proteins.

Booking Recommended

Audience: Public

Organisers: Susan Wilson

An informal talk followed by a buffet sandwich lunch* *If you would like to attend the talk followed by a sandwich lunch, please notify, Donna (brcpa@well.ox.ac.uk).

Wed 30 Sep 2015 from 14:00 to 15:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Disruptive technologies, developing drugs, and building companies to treat disease

Prof. Harvey Lodish

ALL WELCOME Prof. Harvey Lodish will share some of his experiences as a researcher who has been active in biotechnology industry for over 35 years. He has started 7 companies including Genzyme and Millennium, and most recently Rubius, a company that is developing engineered red cells as a vehicle for introducing into the human body novel therapeutics that function for several months.

ALL WELCOME Prof. Harvey Lodish will share some of his experiences as a researcher who has been active in biotechnology industry for over 35 years. He has started 7 companies including Genzyme and Millennium, and most recently Rubius, a company that is developing engineered red cells as a vehicle for introducing into the human body novel therapeutics that function for several months.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers