Other Seminars

seminar-banner

Mon 2 Nov 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

Development of AZD5363, an inhibitor of AKT with activity in tumours containing mutations in the P13K-AKT pathway

Dr Barry Davis

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Nemerofksy-Birks

Mon 2 Nov 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Metabolic reprogramming in innate immunity and inflammation: prospects for new therpeutics

Luke O'Neill

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Mon 2 Nov 2015 from 14:00 to 15:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

At the intersection of ER protein quality control and lipid droplets

Dr James Olzmann

ALL WELCOME The Olzmann research group aims to improve understanding of protein and lipid homeostasis in health and disease. Although dysregulation of lipid droplet functions is central to the etiology of metabolic diseases, very little is known regarding the mechanisms that control lipid droplet... Read more

ALL WELCOME The Olzmann research group aims to improve understanding of protein and lipid homeostasis in health and disease. Although dysregulation of lipid droplet functions is central to the etiology of metabolic diseases, very little is known regarding the mechanisms that control lipid droplet biogenesis and function. The Olzmann group is applying advanced technological platforms to achieve a comprehensive and mechanistic understanding how lipid droplets are formed and regulated to maintain health.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Tue 3 Nov 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Chromatin repllication and epigenome maintenance

Dr Anja Groth

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 3 Nov 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

The benefits and risks associated with CT scan

Professor David Brenner

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 3 Nov 2015 from 18:30 to 21:00

Centre for Personalised Medicine Seminars

Medicine for the 21st Century: a Personalised Approach to Clinical Practice – talks by Jenny Taylor, Rajarshi Banerjee & Katharine Owen

Prof Katharine Owen, Assoc Prof Jenny Taylor, Rajarshi Banerjee

The Centre for Personalised Medicine is pleased to announce its first event of this academic year. The Symposium is taking place at 6:30pm on 3rd November in the Tsuzuki Lecture Theatre, St Anne’s College and is titled 'Medicine for the 21st Century: a Personalised Approach to Clinical Practice'.... Read more

The Centre for Personalised Medicine is pleased to announce its first event of this academic year. The Symposium is taking place at 6:30pm on 3rd November in the Tsuzuki Lecture Theatre, St Anne’s College and is titled 'Medicine for the 21st Century: a Personalised Approach to Clinical Practice'. The speakers will be Jenny Taylor, Rajarshi Banerjee and Katharine Owen. The talks will be followed by drinks and canapés. . This event is free to attend and is open to everyone. You can register here: http://goo.gl/forms/yh5LAVPGXx. Any queries can be directed to cpm@well.ox.ac.uk. The Centre for Personalised Medicine is an innovative partnership between the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics and St. Anne’s College at the University of Oxford. The Centre aims to provide a focus for multidisciplinary collaboration amongst stakeholders, to enhance the educational experience of students, faculty and public, and also to facilitate new programmes of research that will contribute to an integrative and more individualised approach to healthcare.

Booking Recommended

Audience: Public

Organisers: Catherine Lidbetter

Wed 4 Nov 2015 from 11:30 to 12:30

DPAG Guest Speakers

Sherrington Building, Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Regulation of human pluripotent stem cell differentiation by the cell cycle

Siim Pauklin

Siim Pauklin studies the molecular mechanisms that govern human pluripotent stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, particularly their specification to endoderm and to pancreatic insulin-producing beta-cells. He is interested in the function of TGFß / Activin / Nodal signalling pathway in... Read more

Siim Pauklin studies the molecular mechanisms that govern human pluripotent stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, particularly their specification to endoderm and to pancreatic insulin-producing beta-cells. He is interested in the function of TGFß / Activin / Nodal signalling pathway in these processes, since this pathway is essential for pluripotent stem cell self-renewal and early embryonic development but is also involved in human pathologies such as pancreatic cancer and diabetes. His talk will focus on his recent discoveries on the regulation of human pluripotent stem cell differentiation (Pauklin 2013 Cell; Pauklin 2015 Genes Dev; Bertero 2015 Genes Dev). This research has uncovered important mechanisms how stem cell differentiation is orchestrated by the cell cycle.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Katherine McNeil

Wed 4 Nov 2015 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Regulation of Immunity in the Allergic Lung

Prof Clare Lloyd

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 5 Nov 2015 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Primary Care, Meeting Room 1, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

Thu 5 Nov 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

HERC Seminar: Gregory Merlo PhD Student CRE-RHAI, Queensland University of Technology

Gregory Merlo

Objectives Economic evaluation is well regarded by policymakers as a tool for healthcare priority setting, but is often not used in practice. We explored the perspectives of both users (stakeholders) and producers (health economists) of economic evaluations to understand the underutilisation of... Read more

Objectives Economic evaluation is well regarded by policymakers as a tool for healthcare priority setting, but is often not used in practice. We explored the perspectives of both users (stakeholders) and producers (health economists) of economic evaluations to understand the underutilisation of economic evidence in healthcare decision making. Methods A mixed methods approach was used. Stakeholders (health professionals, healthcare administrators or managers, and health researchers) were surveyed to understand the factors that determine whether they use evidence from economic evaluations. The relative importance of these factors was measured using a discrete choice experiment. Perspectives of health economists were gathered through semi-structured interviews. Results The survey was answered by 93 stakeholders. Important factors to stakeholders included quality of clinical evidence, quality of economic evidence, timeliness, applicability, communication and conflicts of interest. Ten health economists participated in semi-structured interviews. They discussed methods they used to translate their research into healthcare practice. Topics discussed included the nature of stakeholder engagement and how the production of economic evidence was tailored to meet specific contextual needs. It was generally considered best when stakeholder engagement begins early and is maintained throughout the research process. Conclusions These findings are being used to inform recommendations for translating evidence from economic evaluation into clinical practice. Such recommendations need to balance stakeholder needs with the constraints that health economists face. Biography: Gregory has a Masters of Health Economics and over five years’ experience working in health economics and health technology assessment. Before joining Queensland University of Technology in mid-2013, Gregory was a senior analyst at a Sydney-based health technology assessment consultancy. Gregory is in the final year of his PhD, investigating the translation of evidence from economic evaluation into healthcare practice. Time and Date: Thursday 5 November, 12-1pm Venue: Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre

Audience: Public

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 5 Nov 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Acute General Medicine Firm B / Oncology

Dr David Church, Prof Chris Conlon

Acute General Medicine Firm B: "Clots on take", Prof Chris Conlon Oncology: "Improving risk stratification in oncology – a small piece in a large jigsaw", Dr David Church Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS

Acute General Medicine Firm B: "Clots on take", Prof Chris Conlon Oncology: "Improving risk stratification in oncology – a small piece in a large jigsaw", Dr David Church Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 5 Nov 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Genetic and epigenetic roots of an autism spectrum disorder

Professor Adrian Bird

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Fri 6 Nov 2015 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

"Haemodynamic monitoring in the critically ill patient: current and evolving echo techniques"

Dr David Garry

Dr Garry's talk will cover the theory underlying haemodynamic monitoring, how we have done it up to now and why echocardiography is a good way of doing it. He will be using clinical cases to illustrate the practical everyday utility of this modality and will touch on what the future holds. Dr... Read more

Dr Garry's talk will cover the theory underlying haemodynamic monitoring, how we have done it up to now and why echocardiography is a good way of doing it. He will be using clinical cases to illustrate the practical everyday utility of this modality and will touch on what the future holds. Dr Garry is a Specialty Registrar (ST6) in Anaesthesia and Intensive Care in Oxford, now part of Health Education Thames Valley. He graduated from Cambridge in 2003 and moved to Oxford after completing his House Officer year. He has a particular interest in echocardiography in the critically ill, and is currently completing a fellowship that will result in British Society of Echocardiography accreditation in transthoracic echocardiography. He also has a strong interest in teaching and training. He is a regular faculty member on FICE courses and currently leads weekly bedside FICE teaching for the Oxford Deanery ICM trainees. He has been an ALS Instructor for the last seven years and also teaches on a regional simulation based transfer training course. He was previously the ICM Trainee Representative and ICS Trainee Linkman for the Oxford Deanery (2012-2013), and hopes to build on this role as the FICM Trainee Representative Elect.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 6 Nov 2015 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Unnatural Killer Cells

Andrew McMichael, McMichael Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 6 Nov 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, DPAG Sherrington Building, OX1 3PT, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Guest Speaker: Professor Jean Rossier - ‘Cortical fast-spiking parvalbumin interneurons enwrapped in the perineuronal net express the metallopeptidases Adamts8, Adamts15 and Neprilysin’

Professor Jean Rossier

The in situ hybridization Allen Mouse Brain Atlas was mined for proteases expressed in the somatosensory cerebral cortex. Among the 480 genes coding for protease/peptidases, only 3 were found enriched in cortical interneurons: Adamts8 and Adamts15 belonging to the class of metzincin proteases... Read more

The in situ hybridization Allen Mouse Brain Atlas was mined for proteases expressed in the somatosensory cerebral cortex. Among the 480 genes coding for protease/peptidases, only 3 were found enriched in cortical interneurons: Adamts8 and Adamts15 belonging to the class of metzincin proteases involved in reshaping the perineuronal net (PNN) and Mme encoding for Neprilysin, the enzyme degrading amyloid β−peptides. The pattern of expression of metalloproteases (MP) was analyzed by single cell RT multiplex PCR after patch-clamp and was compared with the expression of 10 canonical interneurons markers and 12 additional genes from the Allen Atlas. Clustering of these genes by K-means algorithm displays five distinct clusters. Among these 5 clusters, two fast spiking (FS) interneurons clusters expressing the calcium-binding protein Pvalb were identified, one co-expressing Pvalb with Sst (PV-Sst) and another co-expressing Pvalb with three metallopeptidases Adamts8, Adamts15 and Mme (PV-MP). PV-MP interneurons were found surrounded by PNN while the one expressing Sst, PV-Sst were not. These observations will be discussed in view of current hypothesis on brain plasticity, critical period and long term mem

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

GUEST SPEAKER

Mon 9 Nov 2015 from 10:30 to 11:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NPEU Seminar: How to deal with deaths and other perplexing issues in neonatal trial analyses

Dr Ed Juszczak, Associate Professor & Director

NPEU Research Seminar

NPEU Research Seminar

Audience: Public

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Mon 9 Nov 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Using zebrafish to unpick the relationship between genes and loading in shaping and maintaining joints

Dr Chrissy Hammond

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Lunch Provided

Mon 9 Nov 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

The human retrovirus HTLV-1 alters higher-order chromatin structure in the host cell

Professor Charles Bangham

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Tue 10 Nov 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

The African Partnership for Chronic Disease Research (APCDR)

Dr Manjinder Sandhu

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 10 Nov 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, Seminar Room (Basement), Headington OX3 7FZ

Super-resolution optical microscopy: Current state-of-the-art of biomedical applications

Prof Christian Eggeling

Super-resolution optical microscopy techniques such as STED microscopy allow the study of living cells with nanoscale resolution, otherwise impeded by the limited spatial resolution of conventional microscopes. This talk will highlight the basics, prospects and limitations of this technique for... Read more

Super-resolution optical microscopy techniques such as STED microscopy allow the study of living cells with nanoscale resolution, otherwise impeded by the limited spatial resolution of conventional microscopes. This talk will highlight the basics, prospects and limitations of this technique for biophysical research. Besides the recording of images, the combination of STED with single-molecule sensitive spectroscopic tools such as Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) discloses complex dynamical processes hidden to the conventional observations. For example, STED-FCS offers novel insights into important cellular processes, such as lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions in the plasma membrane of living cells, and their role in cellular functionality, e.g. in the activation of immune cells such as T-cells. Christian Eggeling MRC Human Immunology Unit & Wolfson Imaging Centre Oxford, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom The main research interests of my laboratory are focused on the application and development of ultra-sensitive, live-cell fluorescence microscopy techniques with a spatial resolution down to the molecular level (super-resolution microscopy or nanoscopy), superior to conventional optical microscopes. These super-resolution microscopes will be used to unravel nanoscopic changes at the molecular level in living cells following cellular immune responses. We are planning to visualize previously un-detectable molecular interactions (such as protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions), which will shed new light on different molecular pathways triggered at the cell surface and intracellularly during antigen presentation by dendritic cells and T cell activation.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Stefania Bocchi

Wed 11 Nov 2015 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

New Radcliffe House, Meeting room 2, Walton Street OX2 6NW

The Effects of Immigration on NHS Waiting Times

Catia Nicodemo

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Wed 11 Nov 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

NDM Seminar Series

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Wed 11 Nov 2015 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

ER Stress and Autophagy Conspiring in the Crohn's Disease Epithelium

Prof Arthur Kaser

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 12 Nov 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Linking angiogenesis and metabolism through FOXO transcription factors

Dr Michael Potente

NOTE CHANGE OF TIME: 11 AM ALL WELCOME Michael Potente's laboratory focuses on the regulation of blood vessel growth (angiogenesis) by metabolism. Angiogenesis and metabolism are tightly coupled as blood vessels supply nutrients and oxygen to energy-consuming tissues (e.g. brain, heart or skeletal... Read more

NOTE CHANGE OF TIME: 11 AM ALL WELCOME Michael Potente's laboratory focuses on the regulation of blood vessel growth (angiogenesis) by metabolism. Angiogenesis and metabolism are tightly coupled as blood vessels supply nutrients and oxygen to energy-consuming tissues (e.g. brain, heart or skeletal muscle). A reduction in tissue oxygen tension or nutrient availability is a primary stimulus for angiogenesis, which prompts endothelial cells (ECs) to become motile, invasive and to form new vessel connections. His group studies how ECs sense such environmental signals and how they use this information to build vascular networks of organ-specific size, shape and density. They are also interested in the metabolism of ECs, aiming to understand how endothelial metabolic state controls vessel growth and function, and how deregulation contributes to disease. The forkhead box O (FOXO) family of transcription factors have been shown to control cell proliferation, metabolism, and stress resistance (Oellerich and Potente, 2012). FOXOs are key transcriptional effectors of the PI3K / AKT pathway that coordinates growth and metabolism in normal and cancer cells. PI3K signalling inhibits FOXO activity through AKT-mediated phosphorylation leading to the exclusion of FOXOs from the nucleus. Previous work from the Potente laboratory has shown that FOXOs suppress endothelial angiogenic behaviour in surrogate assays of angiogenesis (Potente et al., 2005). However, the specific cellular functions of FOXOs in angiogenesis in vivo remain unclear. Michael Potente uses a combination of genetic, biochemical and imaging technologies to define the role of individual FOXO family members for endothelial growth and metabolism in models of vascular development, homeostasis and disease.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

NOTE CHANGE OF TIME: 11 AM

Thu 12 Nov 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Neural Population Dynamics in Prefrontal Cortex Indicate Changes-of-mind on Single Behavioral Trials

William Newsome

The neural mechanisms underlying decision-making are typically examined by statistical analysis of large numbers of trials from sequentially recorded single neurons. Averaging across sequential recordings, however, obscures important aspects of decision-making such as 'changes of mind' (CoM) that... Read more

The neural mechanisms underlying decision-making are typically examined by statistical analysis of large numbers of trials from sequentially recorded single neurons. Averaging across sequential recordings, however, obscures important aspects of decision-making such as 'changes of mind' (CoM) that occur at variable times on different trials. I will show that the covert decision variables (DV) can be tracked dynamically on single behavioral trials via simultaneous recording of large neural populations in prefrontal cortex. Vacillations of the neural DV, in turn, identify candidate CoM in monkeys, and show that they closely match the known properties of human CoM. Thus simultaneous population recordings can provide insight into transient, internal cognitive states that are otherwise undetectable.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Thu 12 Nov 2015 from 12:00 to 17:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

OIG Post Doc Day

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

The event is directed at Post-docs working in immunology at Oxford, but everyone from the University is welcome. This time we have a very special set of guest speakers talking about: • Grant writing from a medical director’s perspective - Professor Alan Silman (Arthritis Research UK’s medical director for 8 years) • Career options for PhD holders: a patent attorney and a medical/scientific writer will be sharing their experiences • Techniques: genomics, CRISPR technology and imaging Registration is free and open to all: http://oig-post-doc-day.eventbrite.co.uk

Thu 12 Nov 2015 from 12:30 to 14:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Meeting Room 1, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

Does greater autonomy among women provide the key to better child nutrition?

Prof Wiji Arulampalam

With Anjor Bhaskar and Nisha Srivastava. Professor Wiji Arulampalam is an applied econometrician who has worked in labour, education, health and public economics. She is currently working on public policy effects on child outcome in India, union membership, medical school applications and offers... Read more

With Anjor Bhaskar and Nisha Srivastava. Professor Wiji Arulampalam is an applied econometrician who has worked in labour, education, health and public economics. She is currently working on public policy effects on child outcome in India, union membership, medical school applications and offers and corporation tax effects on mergers and acquisitions. If anyone would like to meet with the speaker please contact Catia Nicodemo: catia.nicodemo@economics.ox.ac.uk Booking recommended for non-NDPCHS staff.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Catia Nicodemo

Thu 12 Nov 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Tropical Medicine Day

Dr Naomi Platt, Dr Hanif Esmail, Dr Arun Mahendrayogam, Dr Bernard Maybury

Tropical Medicine: A diamond hunter returns from Africa with hidden treasures, Dr Naomi Platt and Dr Hanif Esmail Tropical Medicine: A young women stoops like an old man, Dr Arun Mahendrayogam and Dr Bernard Maybury Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS

Tropical Medicine: A diamond hunter returns from Africa with hidden treasures, Dr Naomi Platt and Dr Hanif Esmail Tropical Medicine: A young women stoops like an old man, Dr Arun Mahendrayogam and Dr Bernard Maybury Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 12 Nov 2015 from 14:15 to 18:00

Tropical Medicine Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 2

Tropical Medicine Day 2015

Dr Chris Paton, Professor Kevin Marsh, Professor Trudie Lang, Prof Philippe Guerin, Dr Amanda Rojek, Dr Georgina Murphy, Professor Hilton Whittle

Audience: Public

Thu 12 Nov 2015 from 17:30 to 19:15

Centre for Personalised Medicine Seminars

The Genomic Revolution in Medicine: Historical Perspectives by Prof Steve Sturdy

Prof Steve Sturdy

The Centre for Personalised Medicine is pleased to announce that Steve Sturdy, Professor of the Sociology of Medical Knowledge and Wellcome Trust Senior Investigator in Medical Humanities at the University of Edinburgh, will give a lecture The Genomic Revolution in Medicine: Historical Perspectives... Read more

The Centre for Personalised Medicine is pleased to announce that Steve Sturdy, Professor of the Sociology of Medical Knowledge and Wellcome Trust Senior Investigator in Medical Humanities at the University of Edinburgh, will give a lecture The Genomic Revolution in Medicine: Historical Perspectives at the Tsuzuki Lecture Theatre, St Anne’s College at 17:30 on Thursday 12 November. Refreshments will be served after the lecture. Please come along to what promises to be a fascinating talk. You can register at: http://goo.gl/forms/wVPTrrE0Ts. Any queries can be directed to cpm@well.ox.ac.uk. The Centre for Personalised Medicine is an innovative partnership between the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics and St. Anne’s College at the University of Oxford. The Centre aims to provide a focus for multidisciplinary collaboration amongst stakeholders, to enhance the educational experience of students, faculty and public, and also to facilitate new programmes of research that will contribute to an integrative and more individualised approach to healthcare.

Booking Recommended

Audience: Public

Organisers: Catherine Lidbetter

Fri 13 Nov 2015 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

"Surgery for advanced rectal cancer - crossing the boundaries"

Mr Richard Guy, Mr Roel Hompes, Mr Bobby Bloemendaal

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 13 Nov 2015 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Autophagy Regulates Intestinal Inflammation by Controlling CD4+ T Cell Homeostasis

Maloy Group, Agnieszka Kabat, Kevin Maloy

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 13 Nov 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting Room B, Headington OX3 7BN

Recent advances in Cryo-EM structure determination

Dr Sjors Scheres

Cryo-EM single particle analysis is undergoing rapid changes. In this talk, I will discuss how developments in sensitive and fast direct electron detectors yield movies with relatively high signal-to-noise ratios, and how new image processing techniques to deal with beam-induced motions and... Read more

Cryo-EM single particle analysis is undergoing rapid changes. In this talk, I will discuss how developments in sensitive and fast direct electron detectors yield movies with relatively high signal-to-noise ratios, and how new image processing techniques to deal with beam-induced motions and structurally heterogeneous samples are now yielding near-atomic resolution reconstructions for a wide range of specimens. I will illustrate the potentials of these methods by highlighting our recent results on various structures of human gamma-secretase, the intramembrane protease complex responsible for cleavage of amyloid precursor protein.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eleanor Martin

Fri 13 Nov 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

From Russia with Love: my journey in science

Dr Natalia Gromak

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Science Career Seminar

Fri 13 Nov 2015 from 13:00 to 13:30

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG Large Lecture Theatre, Ground Floor, OX1 3PT, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Dr Samira Lakhal-Littleton : A novel pathway of cardiac iron regulation that is critical for heart function

Dr Samira Lakhal-Littleton

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Fri 13 Nov 2015 from 13:30 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG Large Lecture Theatre, Ground Floor, off Parks Road OX2 3PT, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Dr Gaurav Das : ‘Fruit flies remember components of food’

Dr Gaurav Das

Food does not merely supply calories, but also provide specific components like carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, water, or minerals that are essential for proper functioning. At times, adulterated food could result in sickness and is better avoided subsequently. However, very little is known about... Read more

Food does not merely supply calories, but also provide specific components like carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, water, or minerals that are essential for proper functioning. At times, adulterated food could result in sickness and is better avoided subsequently. However, very little is known about the neural circuit basis of how discrete components of food are learned and remembered to help us make correct food choices. To define food component specific circuits and their interactions, I use the sophisticated genetic toolbox in Drosophila to control specific neurons while they learn and recall compound food cues. Further, I study how physiological states like hunger or thirst influence the processes of componentspecific learning and memory recall. My recently published work showed that in flies trained to associate an odour with an edible sugarbitter tastant mix, the separation of positive and negative components of food could take place at the level of mushroom body afferent dopaminergic neurons in the brain. Fly dopamine neurons assigning reward or punishment values can be physically segregated, based on component quality. This segregated layout allows the compound mixture of bitter tasting sugar to be encoded as two opposing bitter and sugar memories through the parallel recruitment of both the negatively and positivelyreinforcing subsets of dopaminergic neurons. I am currently studying the influence of internal states on memories reinforced by two positive food components: sugar and water. A default view in the fly learning field is that a stimulus could only be rewarding if it redresses a deficiency state; thus flies seem to learn sugar as a reward only when hungry. Surprisingly, I show that thirsty but nonhungry flies can learn the rewarding value of sugar when constrained to consume sugarwater mix during associative olfactory training. This enables me to determine whether learning under different states (hungry or thirsty) engages distinct circuit elements in the fly brain. Lastly, hunger and thirst specifically control the expression of sugaronly or wateronly reinforced memories. Strikingly, when flies are trained with compound sugarwater reward, the resultant memory is expressed when flies are both hungry or thirstyirrespective of the state of the flies when trained. I intend to explore how such specific connections are made between deprivation states and the reward (hunger with sugar memory or thirst with water memory).

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Mon 16 Nov 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

Maximising anti-tumour immune activation with oncology virotherapy

Professor Alan Melcher

Professor Melcher graduated in medicine from the University of Oxford in 1989, and trained in Clinical Oncology (radiotherapy and chemotherapy) in Cardiff, London and Leeds. Following completion of his PhD at the Imperial Cancer Research Fund (now Cancer Research UK) in London, he was a... Read more

Professor Melcher graduated in medicine from the University of Oxford in 1989, and trained in Clinical Oncology (radiotherapy and chemotherapy) in Cardiff, London and Leeds. Following completion of his PhD at the Imperial Cancer Research Fund (now Cancer Research UK) in London, he was a post-doctoral research fellow at the Mayo Clinic, Minnesota, before returning to the UK, where he is currently Professor of Clinical Oncology and Biotherapy in Leeds. He combines a clinical practice in melanoma, with laboratory and translational research focused on oncolytic viruses and immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer. KEY PAPERS 1) Qiao et al. Purging Metastases In Lymphoid Organs Using A Combination Of Antigen-Nonspecific Adoptive T Cell Therapy, Oncolytic Virotherapy And Immunotherapy. Nature Medicine. 2008; 14: 37-44. 2) Kottke et al. Broad Antigenic Coverage Induced By Vaccination With Virus-Based cDNA Libraries Cures Established Tumors. Nature Medicine, 2011; 17: 854-9. 3) Aldouri et al. Cell Carriage, Delivery And Selective Replication Of An Oncolytic Virus In Tumor In Patients. Science Translational Medicine, 2012; 4:138ra77. 4) Ilett et al. Cytokine Conditioning Enhances Systemic Delivery and Therapy of an Oncolytic Virus. Molecular Therapy. 2014; 22: 1851-63. 5) Rajani et al. Combination therapy with reovirus and anti-PD-1 blockade controls tumor growth through innate and adaptive immune responses. Molecular Therapy. 2015 [Epub ahead of print]

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Nemerofksy-Birks

Mon 16 Nov 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

A Role for Neutrophils in Alzheimer's Disease

Prof Gabriela Constantin

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Jo Silva

Mon 16 Nov 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

* CANCELLED * THIS TALK AS BEEN CANCELLED AND WILL BE RESCHEDULED

Peter Cameliet

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Mon 16 Nov 2015 from 15:00 to 16:00

Oxford Genomic Centre Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room B, Headington OX3 7BN

10xGenomics seminar: Long Range Applications with Short Read Sequencing

Rob Tarbox

Dear all, The Oxford Genomics Centre would like to invite you to a seminar by 10xGenomics titled: Long Range Applications with Short Read Sequencing. The seminar will take place on Monday 16th November 2015 at 3.00pm in Room A at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics. Spaces are limited... Read more

Dear all, The Oxford Genomics Centre would like to invite you to a seminar by 10xGenomics titled: Long Range Applications with Short Read Sequencing. The seminar will take place on Monday 16th November 2015 at 3.00pm in Room A at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics. Spaces are limited therefore it is highly recommended to register using the following link: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/10xgenomics-long-range-applications-with-short-read-sequencing-tickets-19511043055 where you will find some information about the speaker Rob Tarbox. We are still awaiting an abstract and the registration page will be updated as soon as we receive it.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Marta Guderska

Tue 17 Nov 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

The Dementias Platform UK: integrating epidemiology and experimental medicine

Professor John Gallacher

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 17 Nov 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Floor meeting - 2 groups will give an update on the research work in their laboratory

Dr Dimitris Karamitros, Dr Diu Nguyen

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 18 Nov 2015 from 15:00 to 16:00

WTCHG Seminars

Incorporating geographic context into intervention evaluation: cholera and malaria vaccine trials

This paper presents two case studies that show the value of adding a geographic component to vaccine trials for cholera and malaria. Generally we think of clinical trials as being well controlled and completely randomized experimental studies. However, rarely is the spatial distribution of trial... Read more

This paper presents two case studies that show the value of adding a geographic component to vaccine trials for cholera and malaria. Generally we think of clinical trials as being well controlled and completely randomized experimental studies. However, rarely is the spatial distribution of trial subjects considered important to the randomization procedure. As a result, disease risk may not be homogeneously distributed across study subjects, and inference about the efficacy of a particular treatment regime may be confounded. Individuals are randomized according to treatment allocation, not infection risk. So, despite treatment being randomly and uniformly distributed across study subjects, the risk of infection for individuals randomly allocated will not be uniformly distributed, since these risk factors are not accounted for during the randomization procedure. The oral cholera vaccine trial was conducted in Matlab, Bangladesh. This double-blind trial measured the efficacy of two vaccines, the B subunit-killed whole cell and the killed whole cell only vaccines. Females aged 15 years and older and children aged 2–15 were the target groups in the trial. Three vaccine doses were given to 62,285 people in the target group in six-week intervals. The vaccine trial used a passive surveillance system to identify cholera cases in the study area during 3 years of follow-up. All households were mapped and information about the water and sanitation environment was collected through a health and demographic surveillance system. The spatial database was used to determine the proportion of people who were vaccinated by neighborhood. The malaria case study determines the effect of geographic context on RTS,S vaccine efficacy in Lilongwe, Malawi for a cohort of 1,623 infants in two age groups: 6-12 weeks at enrollment and 5-17 months at enrollment. The vaccine was administered as 3 doses with or without a booster. We mapped all households and administered surveys every 6 months to capture factors about the geographic context that could affect the vaccine performance, including household ecological characteristics, neighborhood ecology, bed net use, and travel history (location and duration). We hypothesized that RTS,S effectiveness would vary within the study area that it would be impacted by neighborhood-level differences including community bed net use, malaria transmission intensity, nearness and duration of standing water, and proportion of household members travelling to high malaria prevalence regions. In both trials we used multilevel regression analysis to investigate the influence of individual factors and neighborhood ecological factors on vaccine efficacy. Results show that an important geographic contextual variable that influences oral cholera vaccine effectiveness is proportion of neighborhood vaccination particularly in women 15 and older. RTS,S efficacy was modified by individual and neighborhood bed net use. This paper concludes that geographic context is essential for properly evaluating the effectiveness of some interventions.

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 19 Nov 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

OCDEM / Rheumatology

Dr Bahram Jafar-Mohammadi, Prof Raashid Luqmani, Dr El Muhtadi Saeed

OCDEM: "Casting the 'NET'", Dr Bahram Jafar-Mohammadi and Dr El Muhtadi Saeed Rheumatology: "The TABUL study", Prof Raashid Luqmani Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

OCDEM: "Casting the 'NET'", Dr Bahram Jafar-Mohammadi and Dr El Muhtadi Saeed Rheumatology: "The TABUL study", Prof Raashid Luqmani Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 20 Nov 2015 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

'Helping with breathing and eating - reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint'

Mr Nadeem Saeed

Mr Saeed is a Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon at The John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford. The unit he is presently working within offers the full range of oral and maxillofacial services and he is an integral member of the trauma service for this department and the craniofacial trauma... Read more

Mr Saeed is a Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon at The John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford. The unit he is presently working within offers the full range of oral and maxillofacial services and he is an integral member of the trauma service for this department and the craniofacial trauma service. He provides a TMJ service involving joint reconstruction in both children and adults utilising biological methods and alloplastic techniques. He has been in this post since September 2003 following a comprehensive training in oral and maxillofacial surgery, including dual qualifications in medicine and dentistry and fellowships in dental surgery, general surgery and maxillofacial surgery.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 20 Nov 2015 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

S-FLU

Alain Townsend

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 20 Nov 2015 from 15:30 to 16:30

Jenner Seminars

Establishment of robust salivary gland-specific expression in transgenic anopheline mosquito

Shigeto Yoshida

Recent advances in the genetically engineering of Anopheline mosquitoes have raised hopes for their use as new strategies for malaria control and provided a powerful tool to investigate parasite-mosquito interactions. The interruption of the parasite cycle in the mosquito using transgenic... Read more

Recent advances in the genetically engineering of Anopheline mosquitoes have raised hopes for their use as new strategies for malaria control and provided a powerful tool to investigate parasite-mosquito interactions. The interruption of the parasite cycle in the mosquito using transgenic strategies can occur at the midgut level, interfering with ookinete invasion or oocyst differentiation, and at the salivary gland level, blocking invasion of gland cells or the transmission of infective sporozoites from the salivary glands. So far, only the carboxypeptidase and vitellogenine promoters have been used for driving transgenes in mosquitoes for the gut- and fat body- specific expression, respectively. Therefore, research on transmission blockade using transgenic mosquitoes has been limited to the midgut stage of the parasites. In the seminar, Shigeto Yoshida will present the development of transgenic Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes that specifically express Discosoma sp. red fluorescent protein (DsRed) in their salivary glands. Using advanced 3D confocal microscopy, robust expression of DsRed in the distal-lateral lobes of the salivary glands is observed, where the sporozoites invade preferentially, driven by a newly isolated salivary gland-specific promoter in a living mosquito as well as in dissected salivary glands. Furthermore, by using GFP-expressing sporozoites, Shigeto Yoshida will also show the parasites passing through the salivary glands from the outer surface. These results open up the possibility of elucidating the process and molecules involved in the salivary glands-parasites interactions, and may lead to the development of transmission-blocking strategies by using genetically modified mosquitoes that express anti-parasitic genes in a salivary gland-specific manner.

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 23 Nov 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Lessons from Animal Models of Giardiasis

Prof Steven Singer

Giardia duodenalis is one of the most widespread intestinal parasitic infections in humans. Infections can by asymptomatic or cause diarrhea, cramps and nausea. The Singer lab has used a mouse model of Giardia infection to understand the development of immune responses against the parasite and to... Read more

Giardia duodenalis is one of the most widespread intestinal parasitic infections in humans. Infections can by asymptomatic or cause diarrhea, cramps and nausea. The Singer lab has used a mouse model of Giardia infection to understand the development of immune responses against the parasite and to determine which responses contribute to parasite elimination and which contribute to pathology. Recent studies in the lab have focused on the CD8+ T cell response and the role of macrophages in this system. Activation of CD8+ T cells is dependent on the microbiota and contributes to reduced nutrient absorption following infection. Macrophage responses are also somewhat dependent on microbiota and preliminary results suggest an anti-inflammatory phenotype.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 23 Nov 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Transcriptional responses to Ras and Rho

Richard Treisman

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Mon 23 Nov 2015 from 13:30 to 14:30

Oxford Genomic Centre Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A and B, Headington OX3 7BN

The Biomark™ HD System, a Platform for Reliable Production-Scale Throughput and Exquisite Single-Cell Sensitivity

Nick Jordan

Discover the BioMark™ HD System and its family of IFCs (integrated fluidic circuits), offering flexible throughput, from dozens up to thousands of sample vs target combinations per run. We will present its use in multiple PCR applications, including Gene Expression, Genotyping, digital PCR and... Read more

Discover the BioMark™ HD System and its family of IFCs (integrated fluidic circuits), offering flexible throughput, from dozens up to thousands of sample vs target combinations per run. We will present its use in multiple PCR applications, including Gene Expression, Genotyping, digital PCR and Copy Number Variation (CNV). We will also discuss the use of the Access Array Platform and it’s function in the preparation of sequencing libraries for most current NGS platforms. In conjunction with this seminar the High Throughput Genomics lab at the Welcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics and the Fluidigm Field Application Specialist will organise a training day on how to run a Gene expression project on the 96.96 IFC on the 24th of November 2015 with only limited place available so if you are interested in running your own project in the future and learning on how to use the Biomark HD system, please contact Dr Christine Blancher to book a space as soon as possible by emailing: christin@well.ox.ac.uk Thanks a lot and kind regards, Christine Dr Christine Blancher High Throughput Arrays Manager High Throughput Genomics - Oxford Genomic Centre Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics Oxford University Roosevelt Drive Oxford OX3 7BN Tel: 01865 287632 Fax: 01865287587 Email: christin@well.ox.ac.uk http://www.well.ox.ac.uk/ogc/home

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Marta Guderska

Tue 24 Nov 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Catering provided so please arrive promptly - First come, first served, Headington OX3 7FZ

Research papers that make a difference: discussing research waste, reproducibility and impact

Dr Iveta Simera

Poor reporting seriously affects the integrity of health research literature and critically limits the use and impact of published studies. Publications that lack or selectively present important information are one of the major contributors to the avoidable waste of financial and human investments... Read more

Poor reporting seriously affects the integrity of health research literature and critically limits the use and impact of published studies. Publications that lack or selectively present important information are one of the major contributors to the avoidable waste of financial and human investments in medical research. The EQUATOR (Enhancing the QUAlity and Transparency Of health Research) Network is an international programme of work set up to improve the reliability and usability of health research publications. It provides a free online portal with essential resources for researchers, authors, journal editors, peer reviewers and everyone involved in health research and its publication (www.equator-network.org). The EQUATOR team supports the use of these resources through education and training activities and assists in the development, dissemination and implementation of reporting guidelines. In my talk I will outline key problems identified in the current health research literature, highlight the consequences of inadequate reporting of research and will discuss some possible solutions to improve transparency, usability and impact of research papers, including the use of reporting guidelines and other resources hosted by the EQUATOR Network.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Francois Van Loggerenberg

Refreshments provided - please arrive early. First come, first served.

Tue 24 Nov 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Adaptation to Natural Input Statistics: a Key to Dendritic Computation and Plasticity

Mate Lengyel

It is unknown how dendritic nonlinearities and plasticity mechanisms contribute to computations at the level of neural circuits. We developed a theory that formalises how dendritic nonlinearities that are optimal for integrating synaptic inputs depend on the statistics of presynaptic activity... Read more

It is unknown how dendritic nonlinearities and plasticity mechanisms contribute to computations at the level of neural circuits. We developed a theory that formalises how dendritic nonlinearities that are optimal for integrating synaptic inputs depend on the statistics of presynaptic activity patterns. Our theory accurately predicts the responses of two types of cortical pyramidal cell to patterned two-photon glutamate uncaging. We also derived optimal rules for structural and intrinsic plasticity which ensure that neurons stay tuned to the statistics of their inputs. The optimal structural plasticity rule efficiently identifies ensembles by clustering synapses along the dendritic tree. The same principle suggests an intrinsic plasticity rule for fine-tuning the nonlinear properties of dendritic branches to the dynamics of their presynaptic ensembles, reproducing experimentally observed forms of branch-strength potentiation. These results reveal a new computational principle underlying dendritic integration and plasticity by suggesting a tight functional link between cellular and systems-level properties of cortical circuits.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Tue 24 Nov 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

* CANCELLED * Prevention of osteoporotic fracture across the lifecourse - CANCELLED

Professor Cyrus Cooper

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Please note that this talk has been cancelled.

Tue 24 Nov 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Cohesin proteins bridge genome topology and function

Dr Suzana Hadjur

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 24 Nov 2015 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, 2nd floor (note main door closes at 4pm), off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Prof Giovanna Mallucci: Neurodegeneration: molecules to medicines

Professor Giovanna Mallucci

Professor Giovanna Mallucci is a Programme Leader at the MRC Toxicology Unit, Leicester, and a Professor of Clinical Neurosciences at the University of Cambridge. Her research group works on understanding the mechanisms of neurodegeneration and neurotoxicity. The central research theme is the... Read more

Professor Giovanna Mallucci is a Programme Leader at the MRC Toxicology Unit, Leicester, and a Professor of Clinical Neurosciences at the University of Cambridge. Her research group works on understanding the mechanisms of neurodegeneration and neurotoxicity. The central research theme is the identification of common pathways across the spectrum of neurodegenerative disorders (which include Alzheimer's and related diseases) that are relevant for both mechanistic insights and therapy. Her group focuses on both the ‘toxic’ processes that can be targeted to prevent neuronal death, and on regenerative processes that can be harnessed for repair. Using mouse models, the group has described the pathogenic role of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in neurodegeneration, which led to the discovery of the first small molecule - an inhibitor of this pathway - to prevent neurodegeneration in vivo. Her group also recently discovered the phenomenon of failure of synaptic repair processes in neurodegeneration and the underlying mechanisms: failure of another stress response involving 'cold shock' proteins, which they have successfully harnessed for neuroprotection. They aim to translate this research for new treatments for dementia.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Wed 25 Nov 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre (press CTSU bell to enter), Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Alphavirus, encephalitis and arthralgia

Prof John Fazakerley

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Wed 25 Nov 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WTCHG Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Earliest Cortical Circuits

Prof Zoltan Molnar

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Rosie Butler

Wed 25 Nov 2015 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Human cytomegalovirus IE1: an enigmatic regulatory protein antagonizing innate immune defense mechanisms mediated by PML nuclear bodies

Prof. Dr. Thomas Stamminger

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 26 Nov 2015 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

New Radcliffe House, Meeting Room 2, Walton Street OX2 6NW

BuMP Study: Self-monitoring of blood pressure during pregnancy

Dr Kath Tucker

Self-monitoring of blood pressure in pregnancy: developing the evidence base in primary care. This study aims to determine whether a programme to support women monitoring their own blood pressure through pregnancy is practical to implement, and acceptable. The study results will help us to develop... Read more

Self-monitoring of blood pressure in pregnancy: developing the evidence base in primary care. This study aims to determine whether a programme to support women monitoring their own blood pressure through pregnancy is practical to implement, and acceptable. The study results will help us to develop schedules for self-monitoring and thresholds for the diagnosis of raised blood pressure in pregnancy based on the home readings. For further information about this study visit http://www.phc.ox.ac.uk/research/hypertension/pregnancy/bump

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Thu 26 Nov 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Novel system-wide methods to study protein-RNA interactions in infection and cell-fate decisions

Dr Alfredo Castello Palomares

ALL WELCOME The main goal of the Castello lab is to elucidate the role that RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play in cell-fate decisions and infection with human viruses. They aim to determine the repertoire of RBPs involved in virus infection and cell-cycle progression by applying the state-of-the-art... Read more

ALL WELCOME The main goal of the Castello lab is to elucidate the role that RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play in cell-fate decisions and infection with human viruses. They aim to determine the repertoire of RBPs involved in virus infection and cell-cycle progression by applying the state-of-the-art proteomics and RNA sequencing. Identified cell-fate regulators are further characterized using molecular and cellular biology methods as well as animal models. Through understanding the biological role of these RBPs, they hope to uncover unexplored aspects of cell division and infection.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Thu 26 Nov 2015 from 12:30 to 14:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Meeting Room 1, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

"For revenue or for reputation? A longitudinal analysis of changes in general practitioner motivation"

Professor Matt Sutton

Professor Sutton is the Centre Lead for the Manchester Centre for Health Economics, the Deputy Director of the Institute of Population Health and the Theme Lead for the Faculty Cross-Cutting Theme on Health and Social Inequalities. If anyone would like to meet with the speaker please contact Catia Nicodemo: catia.nicodemo@economics.ox.ac.uk Booking recommended for non NDPCHS staff.

Professor Sutton is the Centre Lead for the Manchester Centre for Health Economics, the Deputy Director of the Institute of Population Health and the Theme Lead for the Faculty Cross-Cutting Theme on Health and Social Inequalities. If anyone would like to meet with the speaker please contact Catia Nicodemo: catia.nicodemo@economics.ox.ac.uk Booking recommended for non NDPCHS staff.

Booking Recommended

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Catia Nicodemo

Thu 26 Nov 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Dermatology / Jenner Institute

Dr Antonia Lloyd Lavery, Dr Emily Ryder, Dr Charles Archer

Dermatology: "Legs 11", Dr Antonia Lloyd Lavery, Dr Emily Ryder and Dr Charles Archer Jenner Institute: "Malaria: time for a vaccine?", Prof Adrian V. S. Hill Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS

Dermatology: "Legs 11", Dr Antonia Lloyd Lavery, Dr Emily Ryder and Dr Charles Archer Jenner Institute: "Malaria: time for a vaccine?", Prof Adrian V. S. Hill Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 27 Nov 2015 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

'Restoring quality of life: functional nerve transfers following composite neurological deficits'

Miss Lucy Cogswell, Mr Sinclair Gore, Mr Henk Giele, Roba Khundkar, Miklos Perenyei, Mr Jeremy Reynolds

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 27 Nov 2015 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

A New Way to Control (Some) Infections

Drakesmith Group, João Arezes, Andrew Armitage

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 27 Nov 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Imaging heart formation and function in zebrafish

Prof Didier Stainier

ALL WELCOME Didier Stainier's group investigates questions related to organogenesis including cell differentiation, tissue morphogenesis, organ homeostasis and function, as well as organ regeneration. In particular, they study these questions in zebrafish and utilize both forward and reverse... Read more

ALL WELCOME Didier Stainier's group investigates questions related to organogenesis including cell differentiation, tissue morphogenesis, organ homeostasis and function, as well as organ regeneration. In particular, they study these questions in zebrafish and utilize both forward and reverse genetic approaches, and aim to dissect cellular processes using high-resolution live imaging. Zebrafish, Danio rerio, offers unique advantages as a vertebrate genetic system and is also ideal for embryological studies. The zebrafish heart is accessible for continued observation and manipulation at all stages of development and offers single cell resolution of its components. Through several genome-wide screens in zebrafish, they have identified a large number of mutations that affect heart formation and function.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Fri 27 Nov 2015 from 13:00 to 13:30

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Building (DPAG Large Lecture Theatre, Ground Floor, OX1 3PT), off Parks Road OX1 3PT., off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Dr Michiko Yamasaki-Mann : Ca2+ dynamics in neurons: from neuronal growth to oscillations

Dr Michiko Yamasaki-Mann

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Mon 30 Nov 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

Liver Fibrosis: making sense of inflammation, repair and resolution

Professor John Iredale

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eric O'Neill

Mon 30 Nov 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, The Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Early Life Microbiota-Host Interactions

Dr Lindsay Hall

The gut is home to an astonishingly diverse, dynamic, and populous ecosystem. This complex microbial community, termed the microbiota, is critical for host wellbeing. Disturbances in our microbiota, such as via caesarian sections and antibiotic exposure, can lead to increased susceptibility to... Read more

The gut is home to an astonishingly diverse, dynamic, and populous ecosystem. This complex microbial community, termed the microbiota, is critical for host wellbeing. Disturbances in our microbiota, such as via caesarian sections and antibiotic exposure, can lead to increased susceptibility to pathogens, as well as atopic, and chronic inflammatory diseases. Bifidobacteria constitute a substantial proportion of the gut microbiota, particularly during early life and high-levels are associated with the development of mucosal defence. Currently there are many bifidobacterial species and strains with claimed health promoting or 'probiotic' attributes, however the mechanisms through which these strains reside within their host and exert benefits is far from complete. In this talk I will discuss the role of the gut microbiota with the host, focusing on the example of bifidobacteria in host colonisation, epithelial cell cross-talk, pathogen protection, and how probiotics represent a powerful opportunity for strategically manipulating the early life microbiota when bacterial assembly is disturbed within the context of preterm birth.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 30 Nov 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Gene expression oscillations control neural progenitor maintenance and the timing of differentiation

Nancy Papalopulu

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Mon 30 Nov 2015 from 17:00 to 19:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF