Other Seminars

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Fri 1 May 2015 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Ex vivo characterization of competition during secondary immune responses

Viveka Mayya (Dustin Group)

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 1 May 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

WTCHG High Profile Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

Genetic Associations in the MHC

Professor Paul de Bakker

Across the human genome, the major histocompatibility complex region on chromosome 6 harbors the largest number of genotype-phenotype associations identified to date. I will give an overview of some of the advances that have helped in the characterization of inherited DNA sequence variation across the region as well as the fine-mapping of MHC associations for a wide range of diseases.

Across the human genome, the major histocompatibility complex region on chromosome 6 harbors the largest number of genotype-phenotype associations identified to date. I will give an overview of some of the advances that have helped in the characterization of inherited DNA sequence variation across the region as well as the fine-mapping of MHC associations for a wide range of diseases.

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 1 May 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, The Large Lecture Theatre, Ground Floor, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Professor Aziz Aboobaker : ‘Understanding stem cells and regeneration using the planarian model system’

Professor Aziz Aboobaker

We are focused on leveraging planarian biology as a model with which to make fundamental insights into stem cell biology and regeneration. The pluripotent stem cell population of these animals allows them to regenerate entire animal from small starting fragments. These stem cells also provide... Read more

We are focused on leveraging planarian biology as a model with which to make fundamental insights into stem cell biology and regeneration. The pluripotent stem cell population of these animals allows them to regenerate entire animal from small starting fragments. These stem cells also provide amazing homeostatic capacity, allowing them to grow and de grow in response changing nutrient availability while retaining perfect scaling of all organs and tissues. An emergent property of this life history is that planarians also entirely avoid the biological ageing process and may effectively be immortal. I will present our work to understand the mechanisms that underpin key planarian life history processes and demonstrate that we can make novel insights relevant to human disease processes.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

GUEST SPEAKER

Fri 1 May 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Career paths, work/life balance and quality/diversity (Athena Swan - Equality and Diversity Seminar)

Tudor Fulga, Irene Roberts, Professor Marella de Bruijn

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Athena Swan - Equality and Diversity Seminar

Tue 5 May 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Electronic Health Records (EHR) Systems in Kenya

Dr Chris Paton

EHR systems have been widely adopted across the developed world, with governments and healthcare organisations now investing significant funds to provide systems for healthcare workers to store medical records and other health data electronically. In low-resource settings such as Kenya, the cost... Read more

EHR systems have been widely adopted across the developed world, with governments and healthcare organisations now investing significant funds to provide systems for healthcare workers to store medical records and other health data electronically. In low-resource settings such as Kenya, the cost of commercial EHR systems is prohibitive for publically funded hospitals and the use of Open Source EHR systems, such as OpenMRS, is being explored as an alternative. This talk will cover several research projects we are undertaking to assess the EHR landscape in Kenya and current large-scale projects to roll out Open Source EHR systems to public hospitals. About Chris Paton Dr Chris Paton is a Clinical Researcher in Global Health Informatics at the Centre for Tropical Medicine at the University of Oxford. He trained as a medical doctor in the UK and was a Senior Research Fellow at the National Institute for Health Innovation at the University of Auckland in New Zealand before joining the University of Oxford.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Francois Van Loggerenberg

Refreshments will be provided. Please arrive promptly.

Tue 5 May 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Preferentially targeting Jak2-mutant cells in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN)

Ann Mullally

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 5 May 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

UK Biobank: an update on the challenges and opportunities

Professor Cathie Sudlow

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 5 May 2015 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Library, please note the building closes at 4pm, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Prof. Steven Gill "GDNF: Back to the Clinic"

Professor Steven S Gill MB FRCS MS

Professor Steven Gill pioneered the original work using Glial cell line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (GDNF) in people with Parkinson’s. Since the initial pilot study, he has designed a new delivery system to enable this key growth factor to be delivered optimally, not only in terms of safety and... Read more

Professor Steven Gill pioneered the original work using Glial cell line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (GDNF) in people with Parkinson’s. Since the initial pilot study, he has designed a new delivery system to enable this key growth factor to be delivered optimally, not only in terms of safety and efficacy, but also in a way which can be administered to patients practically and accurately. Professor Gill’s Functional Neurosurgery Research Group has extensive pre-clinical and clinical Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) research experience and has successfully completed a number of studies which have led directly to clinical trials. This group has unique and world-leading CED catheter technology which is currently being used to treat patients with a range of neurological disorders including adults and children with malignant brain tumours and Parkinson’s Disease.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Tue 5 May 2015 from 16:00 to 17:30

Cortex Club

Le Gros Clark Building, Lecture Theatre, off South Parks Road OX1 3QX

Imaging activity in the freely moving animal: from the eye to the plastic cortex

Dr Jason Kerr

Arguably understanding how the cortex operates is one of the biggest challenges that faces science, but what is being done to advance our understanding? Although we have started gathering a vast amount of detailed information about the components that make up the cortex, one of the next challenges... Read more

Arguably understanding how the cortex operates is one of the biggest challenges that faces science, but what is being done to advance our understanding? Although we have started gathering a vast amount of detailed information about the components that make up the cortex, one of the next challenges is to place all of this information back into the context of the behaving animal: For it is how the vast interconnected circuits of the cortex are used by the animal that will ultimately lead to the greatest understanding of brain function. Motivation underlies the performance of self-determined behavior and is fundamental to decision making, especially with regard to seeking food, mates, and avoiding peril. As many decision making based behaviors in rodents involve a combination of head movements, eye movements, vestibular driven neuronal activity and active sensing of the environment to guide the behavior, studying the freely moving animal is of advantage. This lecture will be broken down into three topics that we are currently working on: Multiphoton calcium imaging of neuronal populations in the freely moving rodent and the accurate extraction of spikes, head and eye tracking during decision making tasks in the freely moving mammal, and finally how spike timing dependent plasticity rules can change the spiking of visual cortex neurons. I will present results from our lab showing how different freely moving mammals have distinct eye movement strategies that are of major evolutionary benefit.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Alexandru Calin

Wed 6 May 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

G-actin as a signalling molecule

Prof. Richard Treisman

Richard Treisman studies the ways in which signalling pathways can lead to specific gene activation, including in the context of cancer and development. His research uses a broad range of biochemical, genomic and cell biological approaches. In particular, he has worked extensively on the... Read more

Richard Treisman studies the ways in which signalling pathways can lead to specific gene activation, including in the context of cancer and development. His research uses a broad range of biochemical, genomic and cell biological approaches. In particular, he has worked extensively on the transcriptional regulator SRF and the Myocardin Related Transcription Factor (MRTF) family, which are G-actin binding proteins.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Wed 6 May 2015 from 14:30 to 16:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

New Radcliffe House, Room 2, Walton Street OX2 6NW

Socioeconomic Inequalities in Access to Healthcare: Does Patient’s Choice Explain the Gradient? Evidence from the English NHS

Professor Luigi Siciliani

Luigi’s research focuses on modelling purchaser-provider interactions in health care, waiting times for elective surgery, patient's choice, efficiency analysis (DEA and Stochastic Frontiers) applied to the hospital sector, performance indicators, and the economics of obesity. If anyone would like to meet a speaker please contact Catia Nicodemo: catia.nicodemo@economics.ox.ac.uk

Luigi’s research focuses on modelling purchaser-provider interactions in health care, waiting times for elective surgery, patient's choice, efficiency analysis (DEA and Stochastic Frontiers) applied to the hospital sector, performance indicators, and the economics of obesity. If anyone would like to meet a speaker please contact Catia Nicodemo: catia.nicodemo@economics.ox.ac.uk

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Catia Nicodemo

Thu 7 May 2015 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

New Radcliffe House, Room 2, Walton Street OX2 6NW

Online patients; what projects are we doing in the Department?

Dr Helen Atherton

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Thu 7 May 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Transcriptomics Seminar: Democratizing Systems Approaches for Human Immunology and Clinical Studies

Dr Damien Chaussabel

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Thu 7 May 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Oncology / Acute General Medicine Firm D

Dr Ketan Shah, Dr Sreenath Pillai, Dr David Lewis

Oncology: “Oxford Cancer Centre Ethics Forum”, Dr Ketan Shah. Acute General Medicine Firm D: "Too much of a good thing?", Dr Sreenath Pillai and Dr David Lewis.

Oncology: “Oxford Cancer Centre Ethics Forum”, Dr Ketan Shah. Acute General Medicine Firm D: "Too much of a good thing?", Dr Sreenath Pillai and Dr David Lewis.

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 7 May 2015 from 17:00 to 18:30

Burdon Sanderson Cardiac Science Centre Lecture Series

BSCSC Speed Talks

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Antonella Surdi

Fri 8 May 2015 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Fast-tracked trials for Ebola vaccines

Katie Ewer (Hill Group)

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 8 May 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting Rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

A life in pieces: fragments for drug discovery and chemical biology

Professor Rod Hubbard

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eleanor Martin

Fri 8 May 2015 from 13:00 to 13:30

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, ground floor, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Dr Keith Buckler : Mechanisms of oxygen sensing in arterial chemoreceptors.

Dr Keith Buckler

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Fri 8 May 2015 from 13:30 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, ground floor, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Dr Melissa Bowerman : ‘Spinal muscular atrophy: more than just a motoneuron pathology’

Dr Melissa Bowerman

Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the most common genetic disease resulting in infant death, affecting approximately 1 in 6000 to 10000 births. This autosomal recessive disorder, resulting from the loss-of-function of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, is characterized by severe loss of spinal... Read more

Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the most common genetic disease resulting in infant death, affecting approximately 1 in 6000 to 10000 births. This autosomal recessive disorder, resulting from the loss-of-function of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, is characterized by severe loss of spinal cord motoneurons, muscular atrophy and eventual paralysis. While the spinal cord motoneuron is undeniably the primary cellular target in SMA, we, along with others, have uncovered various non-neuronal roles for Smn at the neuromuscular junction, in skeletal muscle, in heart, in glial cells, in the pancreas as well as in glucose metabolism. However, the precise pathological pathways that are misregulated in these Smn-depleted non-neuronal compartments and/or tissues are not fully understood. With the contribution of peripheral tissues to SMA pathogenesis in mind, we are therefore investigating i) specific aberrant muscle atrophy signaling cascades that may promote and maintain the denervation-induced muscular atrophy, ii) the extent of metabolic perturbations in various metabolic tissues and iii) the therapeutic potential of targeting an ASO-conjugated cell penetrating peptide to both the central nervous system and the periphery for SMA therapy. Our overall goal is to better understand the cell- and non-cell-autonomous pathways that contribute to the pathophysiology of SMA and importantly, develop novel therapeutic strategies to correct the identified defects.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Mon 11 May 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Linking Cis-acting Elements

Cis-acting elements (promoters, enhancers, silencers, locus control regions, boundary elements) can often be identified via their conserved, non-coding DNA sequences. In addition, when active, they may have characteristic chromatin signatures and are bound by transcription factors and polymerase... Read more

Cis-acting elements (promoters, enhancers, silencers, locus control regions, boundary elements) can often be identified via their conserved, non-coding DNA sequences. In addition, when active, they may have characteristic chromatin signatures and are bound by transcription factors and polymerase II. Such features can now be identified across the entire genome by chromatin immunoprecipitation (using ChIPseq). However, cis-elements (e.g. promoters and enhancers) may be located 100s or even 1000s kb apart and therefore it is often not clear which regulatory sequence (e.g.enhancer) interacts with which promoter or additional regulatory element. The chromosome conformation capture (3C) technique was designed to analyse physical interactions between specific, previously characterised, widely separated DNA elements and it has been shown that such interactions are an inherent feature of their function. We have adapted the 3C protocol (Hughes et al Nat Genetics 2014) and developed a method which is capable of identifying all DNA elements interacting with a selected sequence (e.g. promoter) without any prior knowledge of these elements. To validate this approach, we have initially applied this method to the human  globin locus in which the interacting cis-elements have been previously characterised in detail. Further modification of the technique provides unprecedented sensitivity for analysing chromosome conformation capture and enables researchers to identify long-range cis-interactions, trans-interactions and allele-specific interactions in a manner that will help in the prioritisation of SNPs identified in GWAS studies (Davies et al in preparation).

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Wulf Forrester-Barker

Mon 11 May 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Single molecule approaches to intracellular regulation

Johan Elf

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Mon 11 May 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

NDM Seminar Series

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Structural biology / Computational genomics

Professor Liz Carpenter, Professor Gerton Lunter

Structural Biology of human membrane proteins: how an ion channel is inhibited by Prozac. Variants from DNA: the large and small of it.

Structural Biology of human membrane proteins: how an ion channel is inhibited by Prozac. Variants from DNA: the large and small of it.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Catherine King

Tue 12 May 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

MHU Student Presentations

Akiko Hashimoto, Anthony Cheong, Christopher Booth

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 12 May 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Getting the best out of electronic health records

Professor Liam Smeeth

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 13 May 2015 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

MAITS and their mates

Prof. Paul Klenerman

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 14 May 2015 from 10:30 to 11:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NPEU Seminar - Are we making progress in predicting and preventing pre-eclampsia and its complications?

Dr Lucy Chappell

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 14 May 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Dynamic Imaging of Lymphocyte Activation – From Single Molecule to Living Tissue

Professor Facundo Batista

B lymphocytes form an integral part of the immune system via the production of specific antibodies and by establishing immunological memory. In the Lymphocyte Interaction Laboratory, we strive for a comprehensive understanding of the cellular and molecular events leading to B cell activation as... Read more

B lymphocytes form an integral part of the immune system via the production of specific antibodies and by establishing immunological memory. In the Lymphocyte Interaction Laboratory, we strive for a comprehensive understanding of the cellular and molecular events leading to B cell activation as well as elucidating how they differentiate into memory or antibody-producing cells. We address this by combining the power of genetics with biochemistry and advanced imaging technology. For instance, by tracking single particles of BCR we have previously shown that BCR diffusion is restricted by an ezrin-defined actin network, and that this restriction regulates receptor signalling. We have since explored this novel concept of signalling regulation in greater detail by implementing super-resolution microscopy methods. As well as studying lymphocyte interactions at the micro- and nano-scale, we actively pursue the understanding of how, where and when B cells are activated in vivo. We have recently focused special attention on the importance of lymph node architecture: specifically, investigating B cell activation in a model of double infection. We have seen that the changes that occur in the structure of the inflammatory lymph node have a dramatic effect on the ability of B cells to respond to pathogens and suggest a potential mechanism for increased susceptibility to secondary infections. Up-to-the-minute unpublished data from the group will be presented, adding to a body of work that shows how a clear understanding of lymphocyte interactions and signalling has wide-ranging implications for the study of cancer and infectious disease.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sandra Lock

Thu 14 May 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Clinical Genetics / Acute General Medicine - Firm B

Dr Lisa Walker, Prof Julian Knight

Clinical Genetics: "A life less ordinary" Acute General Medicine - Firm B: "Sepsis-omics: defining the individual response state"

Clinical Genetics: "A life less ordinary" Acute General Medicine - Firm B: "Sepsis-omics: defining the individual response state"

Audience: Public

Fri 15 May 2015 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

The thymus: an evolutionary accident of no great significance?"

Georg Hollander

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 15 May 2015 from 13:00 to 13:30

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, ground floor, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Professor Victoria Baja Lorenzana : ‘Practice makes perfect – Neural circuits for auditory plasticity’

Professor Victoria Baja Lorenzana

We have a remarkable ability to identify and localise sounds, based on spectral content and binaural cues that change depending on the relative positions of the head and the sound source. Differences in the time of arrival, intensity and frequency content of sounds at the level of the ear are... Read more

We have a remarkable ability to identify and localise sounds, based on spectral content and binaural cues that change depending on the relative positions of the head and the sound source. Differences in the time of arrival, intensity and frequency content of sounds at the level of the ear are computed in the brain in a manner that enables us to maintain a stable percept of auditory objects over time. At the same time, experience modifies our sensorial perception, a process that is the basis for learning and is fundamental for survival. My research is focused upon identifying neural circuits essential for perceptual stability and plasticity. In this seminar, I will present two examples of auditory plasticity. Using a model of reversible conductive hearing loss and a sound localisation behavioural paradigm, I will reveal the role of the auditory cortex, its descending corticofugal projections and its cholinergic modulatory inputs in adult experience-dependent plasticity. In the last part of my talk, I will explore the emergence of “abnormal” plasticity following selective cochlear lesion, with gap detection behaviour employed to identify a tinnitus-like percept in a new animal model.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Fri 15 May 2015 from 13:30 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, ground floor, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Professor Simon Lovestone : 'Deconvoluting the amyloid cascade in Alzheimer’s disease; the role of wnt signalling’

Professor Simon Lovestone,

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

GUEST SPEAKER

Fri 15 May 2015 from 15:00 to 16:00

DPAG Guest Speakers

Le Gros Clark Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off South Parks Road OX1 3QX

Development and Evolution of Neocortical Projection Systems

Professor Nenad Sestan, MD, PhD

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Zoltan Molnar

Cellular and Systems Neuroscience Seminar

Fri 15 May 2015 from 16:00 to 17:30

Cortex Club

Sherrington Building, Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Development and Evolution of Neocortical Projection Systems

Dr Nenad Sestan

Audience: Public

Organisers: Alexandru Calin

Mon 18 May 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, The Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

The Genetic Structure of the British Population

Professor Walter Bodmer

After a brief review of the use of genetic markers for describing human population relationships , I will review our study of the genetic fine structure of the population of the British Isles. This is based on a rural sample of more than 2000 volunteers from throughout the UK each of whose four... Read more

After a brief review of the use of genetic markers for describing human population relationships , I will review our study of the genetic fine structure of the population of the British Isles. This is based on a rural sample of more than 2000 volunteers from throughout the UK each of whose four grandparents came from more or less the same area and using a method of analysis on data on about 500,000 SNPs called fineSTRUCTURE, that takes into account linkage disequilibrium. The results show a remarkable concordance between genetic and geographical clustering. This clustering can be interpreted in terms of genetic admixture from the European countries that surround the UK and related to the known history and archaeology of the British people. Some preliminary results of our studies on the genetics of facial features of this British population sample will also be outlined.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sandra Lock

Mon 18 May 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Genome regulation during developmental transitions

Eileen Furlong

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Mon 18 May 2015 from 17:00 to 18:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

God, evolution, global warming and heart disease: a personal reflection on population health

Professor Mike Rayner

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 19 May 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

How does the embryo make haematopoetic stem cells?

Prof Alexander Medvinsky

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 19 May 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Wed 20 May 2015 from 14:30 to 16:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

New Radcliffe House, Room 2, Walton Street OX2 6NW

Hospital market structure, patient choice, and hospital quality.

Professor Hugh Gravelle

Hugh Gravelle's research interests include: Equity, Measurement of performance, Incentives for quality, Budgets for general practices, Geographical distribution of GPs, Rationing by waiting time. If anyone would like to meet a speaker please contact Catia Nicodemo: catia.nicodemo@economics.ox.ac.uk

Hugh Gravelle's research interests include: Equity, Measurement of performance, Incentives for quality, Budgets for general practices, Geographical distribution of GPs, Rationing by waiting time. If anyone would like to meet a speaker please contact Catia Nicodemo: catia.nicodemo@economics.ox.ac.uk

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Catia Nicodemo

Thu 21 May 2015 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

New Radcliffe House, Room 2, Walton Street OX2 6NW

Variation in GP referral and treatment rates

Dr Catia Nicodemo

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Thu 21 May 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Renal Unit / ICU

Dr Akshay Shah, Dr Adrian Wong, Dr Stuart McKechnie, Dr Katherine Bull, Prof Chris Pugh

Renal Unit: "An INDELible family trait - making a diagnosis after 40 years of care at the Oxford Kidney Unit" ICU: "Are we Surviving Sepsis?"

Renal Unit: "An INDELible family trait - making a diagnosis after 40 years of care at the Oxford Kidney Unit" ICU: "Are we Surviving Sepsis?"

Audience: Public

Fri 22 May 2015 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

PA-X prevents activation of the RIG-I pathway by Influenza A

Rachel Rigby (Rehwinkel Group)

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 22 May 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, ground floor, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Dr Sarah De Val : ‘Transcriptional pathways controlling blood vessel development and differentiation’

Dr Sarah De Val

The aim of our research group is to understand how signals are converted into gene expression in the vasculature through the study of transcriptional regulation during both developmental and disease angiogenesis. Although often considered a homogenous entity, endothelial cells are extremely... Read more

The aim of our research group is to understand how signals are converted into gene expression in the vasculature through the study of transcriptional regulation during both developmental and disease angiogenesis. Although often considered a homogenous entity, endothelial cells are extremely heterogeneous, varying in origin, developmental stage, between and within vessels from different parts of the vascular tree and in different organs, and at different states of proliferation and quiescence. Our approach focuses on the identification, characterisation and very detailed dissection of vascular enhancers that direct expression within different sub-groups of the vasculature, combined with a study of the roles of both known and novel transcription factors in providing the activating and repressive signals necessary to pattern this complex vascular network.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

GUEST SPEAKER

Tue 26 May 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Regulation of bone morphogenesis by vascular niche

Dr. Anjali Kusumbe

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 26 May 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Wed 27 May 2015 from 13:15 to 14:15

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Stem Cells, Clones and Cancer

Dr Connie Eaves

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 27 May 2015 from 15:00 to 16:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Room 1, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

Thu 28 May 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Haematology / Psychological Medicine

Dr Bart Sheehan, Dr Matt Sims, Dr Karthik Ramasamy

Haematology: "Myeloma bone disease" Psychological Medicine: "When delirium goes on and on……..and on"

Haematology: "Myeloma bone disease" Psychological Medicine: "When delirium goes on and on……..and on"

Audience: Public

Fri 29 May 2015 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Approaches for genetic fine-mapping of susceptibility loci to immune-mediated diseases.

Adrian Cortes

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 29 May 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

DPAG Guest Speakers

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Room, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Regulation of Epithelial Growth and Homeostasis by Intrinsic and Exogenous Factors

Dr. Jeremiah Zartman

The revolution in molecular biology within the last few decades has led to the identification of multiple, diverse inputs into the mechanisms governing the measurement and regulation of organ size. In general, organ size and homeostasis is controlled by both intrinsic, genetic mechanisms as well as... Read more

The revolution in molecular biology within the last few decades has led to the identification of multiple, diverse inputs into the mechanisms governing the measurement and regulation of organ size. In general, organ size and homeostasis is controlled by both intrinsic, genetic mechanisms as well as extrinsic, physiological factors. Examples of the former include the spatiotemporal regulation of organ size by morphogen gradients, and instances of the latter include the regulation of organ development by endocrine hormones, oxygen availability, nutritional status and the mechanics of the microenvironment. However, integrated model platforms, either of in vitro experimental systems amenable to high-resolution imaging or in silico computational models that incorporate both extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms are lacking. Here, I will discuss collaborative efforts to bridge the gap between traditional assays employed in developmental biology and computational models through quantitative approaches. These interdisciplinary efforts are being applied to develop integrated models of epithelial growth and homeostasis in the larval wing imaginal disc, due to the wealth of previous genetic knowledge for the system. In particular, I will discuss our current understanding of how intrinsic and extrinsic factors impact the spatiotemporal dynamics and possible functional roles of Ca2+ signalling in development and homeostasis using a combination of microfluidics devices, organ culture and computational modeling. An integrated model of intrinsic and extrinsic growth control is expected to provide greater insight into how cells communicate to coordinate tissue-level responses.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sara Bouskela