Other Seminars

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Mon 2 Mar 2015 from 09:00 to 17:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Personalized Medicine and Resource Allocation Conference

http://www.ndph.ox.ac.uk/upcoming-events/personalised-medicine-and-resource-allocation-conference

http://www.ndph.ox.ac.uk/upcoming-events/personalised-medicine-and-resource-allocation-conference

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 2 Mar 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Epigenetic pathways and their role in cancer

Prof. Tony Kouzarides

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Tue 3 Mar 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

MHU Student Presentations

Helen Doolittle, Joanna Green, Laura Stenson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 3 Mar 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Wed 4 Mar 2015 from 10:30 to 11:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

New Radcliffe House, Room 2, Walton Street OX2 6NW

An overview of health technologies to reduce unplanned hospital admissions

Nik Bobrovitz

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 4 Mar 2015 from 11:00 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

New Radcliffe House, Room 2, Walton Street OX2 6NW

Wed 4 Mar 2015 from 12:30 to 13:30

NDM Seminar Series

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

The RNA virus genome - an immunological and evolutionary melting pot

Professor Peter Simmonds

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 4 Mar 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Guest Speakers

Henry Wellcome Building of Gene Function, Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3QB

Nucloetide-binding domain motions during gating in CFTR channels, the ABC proteins whose dysfunction causes cystic fibrosis

Prof David C. Gadsby, PhD

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sara Bouskela

Thu 5 Mar 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Emergency Medicine / Dermatology

Dr Suzy Stokes

Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS . Emergency Medicine: 'Avalanche on Everest: challenges of working at the worlds highest ED', Dr Suzy Stokes. Dermatology:

Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS . Emergency Medicine: 'Avalanche on Everest: challenges of working at the worlds highest ED', Dr Suzy Stokes. Dermatology:

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 6 Mar 2015 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 6 Mar 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Functions, mechanisms and therapeutic potential of chromatin looping

Dr. Gerd Blobel

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Fri 6 Mar 2015 from 13:00 to 13:30

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Dr Rhys Evans - Substrate selection by the myocardium: the role of triacylglycerols in cardiac energy provision

Dr Rhys Evans

Cardiac function depends on provision of blood-borne substrates to maintain adequate myocardial metabolism. Metabolic substrates vary in efficiency and energy yield, and the ability to flexibly switch between substrates according to varying pathophysiological states is key to maintaining adequate... Read more

Cardiac function depends on provision of blood-borne substrates to maintain adequate myocardial metabolism. Metabolic substrates vary in efficiency and energy yield, and the ability to flexibly switch between substrates according to varying pathophysiological states is key to maintaining adequate cardiac function. Cardiac utilisation of carbohydrate in the form of glucose, and lipid in the form of non-essential fatty acids, is well defined, but cardiac utilisation of triacylglycerols (triglycerides; TAG), a potentially large source of exogenous energy, has been harder to examine. Studies defining cardiac TAG utilisation in a variety of pathophysiological states, their selection preference and their contribution to cardiac function, will be discussed. Novel issues of routes of cardiac TAG uptake, and the potential role of TAG-rich lipoproteins as metabolic signals, will also be discussed. DPAG

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 6 Mar 2015 from 13:30 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Mon 9 Mar 2015 from 14:00 to 15:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Department of Oncology seminar room (71A/B/C), ground floor, Headington OX3 7DQ

Empowering T cells to combat cancer

Prof. Aymen A-Shamkhani

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 9 Mar 2015 from 17:00 to 18:30

Dopamine Club

Sherrington Building, Sherrington library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Fast Scan Cyclic Voltammetry: Promises & Pitfalls

Dr Mark Walton, Dr Katie Jennings

Fast Scan Cyclic Voltammetry (FSCV) has been critical for advancing understanding of dopamine transmission. With FSCV application constantly evolving we take a timely look at how you can expect to apply the technique, what it can't do and what considerations should be kept in mind. After a short... Read more

Fast Scan Cyclic Voltammetry (FSCV) has been critical for advancing understanding of dopamine transmission. With FSCV application constantly evolving we take a timely look at how you can expect to apply the technique, what it can't do and what considerations should be kept in mind. After a short presentation from the speakers the floor will be opened for questions and discussion. Refreshments and snacks will be provided. Dopamine Club is an informal, lab meeting-style forum that brings dopamine researchers together from across the University to exchange and discuss our different perspectives on dopamine.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Katie Jennings

Tue 10 Mar 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Headington OX3 9DS

Human gamma/delta T cells: from immunobiology to immunotherapy

Prof. Marc Bonneville

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 10 Mar 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Wed 11 Mar 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Autoimmunity and Immune Modulation in Complex Regional Pain Syndrom

Dr Andreas Goebel

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 11 Mar 2015 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Headington OX3 9DS

Tissue-specific control of tolerance by Dendritic Cells

Prof. Thomas Brocker

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 12 Mar 2015 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

New Radcliffe House, Room 2, Walton Street OX2 6NW

The NIHR Diagnostics Evidence Co-operative Oxford - an overview

Dr Ann van den Bruel

Contact dan.richards-doran@phc.ox.ac.uk if you would like to attend this seminar.

Contact dan.richards-doran@phc.ox.ac.uk if you would like to attend this seminar.

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 12 Mar 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Rheumatology / Clinical Biochemistry

Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins. Rheumatology: Clinical Biochemistry:

Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins. Rheumatology: Clinical Biochemistry:

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 12 Mar 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Fri 13 Mar 2015 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Elina Lipina

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 13 Mar 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Professor Amanda Fisher, Director, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College - Linking epigenetics and signalling in the early mammalian embryo

Prof. Amanda Fisher

GUEST SPEAKER. Our laboratory is interested in how cells acquire specialised functions, and how this identity is transmitted when cells divide. We have a longstanding interest in the role of repressors in development, and using reprogramming strategies to test both the resilience of cellular... Read more

GUEST SPEAKER. Our laboratory is interested in how cells acquire specialised functions, and how this identity is transmitted when cells divide. We have a longstanding interest in the role of repressors in development, and using reprogramming strategies to test both the resilience of cellular memory mechanisms and the requirements for stable lineage conversion. I will present some new studies showing that Jarid2, a component of the Polycomb Repressor Complex 2, regulates cell-to-cell signalling in the developing blastocyst. Our studies show that Jarid2 is required for Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) pathways in mouse embryonic stem cells. Depletion of Jarid2 or its downstream PCP signalling components in vivo generates blastocysts in which more a single inner cell mass (ICM) is initiated and where twinning‚‚ is common. The mechanistic basis and implications of these results will be discussed. David Landeira, Hakan Bagci, Andy Malinowski, Jorge Soza-Ried, Karen Brown, Amelie Feytout, Irene Cantone, Matthias Merkenschlager & Amanda Fisher Lymphocyte Development Group, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, Du Cane Road, London, W12 0NN DPAG

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 13 Mar 2015 from 16:00 to 17:30

Cortex Club

Sherrington Building, Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Competition and Cooperation between Model-based and Model-free decisions

Prof Peter Dayan

Substantial recent work has explored multiple mechanisms of decision-making in humans and other animals. Functionally and anatomically distinct modules have been identified, and their individual properties have been examined using intricate behavioural and neural tools. I will discuss the... Read more

Substantial recent work has explored multiple mechanisms of decision-making in humans and other animals. Functionally and anatomically distinct modules have been identified, and their individual properties have been examined using intricate behavioural and neural tools. I will discuss the background of these studies, and describe a number of recent experiments that have cast a stronger, albeit more confusing, light on the interactions between these mechanisms. I will also talk about other related dichotomies of control.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Michael Song

Mon 16 Mar 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

3D Chromatin interaction dynamics and gene regulation

Wouter de Laat

Hosted by Lars Hanssen

Hosted by Lars Hanssen

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 17 Mar 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

FoldSynth: A physics-based interactive visualisation platform for proteins and other molecular strands

Prof Frederic Fol Leymarie, Stephen Todd

FoldSynth is an interactive multimedia platform designed to help understand the characteristics and commonly used visual abstractions of molecular strands with an emphasis on proteins. It uses a simple model of molecular forces to give real time interactive animations of the folding and docking... Read more

FoldSynth is an interactive multimedia platform designed to help understand the characteristics and commonly used visual abstractions of molecular strands with an emphasis on proteins. It uses a simple model of molecular forces to give real time interactive animations of the folding and docking processes. The shape of a molecular strand is shown as a 3D visualisation floating above a 2D triangular matrix representing distance constraints, contact maps or other features of residue pairs. As well as more conventional raster plots, contact maps can be shown with vectors representing the grouping of contacts as secondary structures. The 2D visualisation is also interactive and can be used to manipulate a molecule, define constraints, control and view the folding dynamically, or even design new molecules. Frederic will also introduce a related recent (on-going) project: BioBlox, a gamification of 3D protein docking. This is a BBSRC funded project which involves the team of Frederic at Goldsmiths (with Stephen, Peter Todd, William Latham, Andy Thomason, Ian Shaw) and the team of Michael Sternberg at Imperial (with Lawrence Kelley, Ioannis Filippis); FoldSynth also emerged from a collaboration with the team at Imperial. Stephen will cover some of the technical aspects of the FoldSynth platform and the recent application to DNA data (in discussions with the team of Stephen Taylor at Oxford). Keywords: Interaction, multimedia, proteins, DNA, folding, 2D/3D, scientific visualisation, molecular design, physically based modelling. Video (version 0.5): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B1wksNB0zvk

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 18 Mar 2015 from 14:30 to 16:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

New Radcliffe House, Room 2, Walton Street OX2 6NW

Reform of Eligibility Criteria for Adult Social Care in England

Dr Jose Luis Fernandez

Dr Jose Luis Fernandez is Deputy Director and Principal Research Fellow at Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU), London School of Economics and Political Science. A health and social care economist, he specialises in ageing-related policies, the interaction between health and social care,... Read more

Dr Jose Luis Fernandez is Deputy Director and Principal Research Fellow at Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU), London School of Economics and Political Science. A health and social care economist, he specialises in ageing-related policies, the interaction between health and social care, and the economic evaluation of health and social care services. Organised by the Centre for Health Service Economics and Organisation. To meet the speaker, contact catia.nicodemo@economics.ox.ac.uk

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 19 Mar 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Combined Medical-Surgical Grand Round

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 20 Mar 2015 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Paul Klenerman

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 20 Mar 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Breaking the Rules of CD8+ T Cell Recognition with Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Vectors

Prof. Louis Picker

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 20 Mar 2015 from 16:00 to 17:30

Cortex Club

Sherrington Building, Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Self Organization in the Developing Nervous System

Dr Michael Crair

Most of the complex brain circuitry responsible for our ability to perceive the world with precision actually develops in the womb, before sensory experience is even possible. For instance, visual circuits responsible for our ability to perceive depth and see shapes and colors are already well... Read more

Most of the complex brain circuitry responsible for our ability to perceive the world with precision actually develops in the womb, before sensory experience is even possible. For instance, visual circuits responsible for our ability to perceive depth and see shapes and colors are already well formed at birth, however visual deprivation later in life leads to permanent blindness. Similarly, children are born with the ability to perceive a full complement of sounds but it is only later in life that they lose the ability to distinguish sounds that are unfamiliar in their native tongue. This implies that intrinsic mechanisms, apart from sensory experience, are responsible for wiring the complex brain circuits mediating basic perception. Research in the Crair Lab examines the limits and links between genetic mechanisms and spontaneous or intrinsic neuronal activity in wiring the brain during development. The Crair Lab uses a broad array of experimental approaches, from gene expression analysis to optical imaging and stimulation in living organisms to study the properties, role and mechanisms of spontaneous neuronal activity in guiding neural circuit development. The research suggests that the remarkable development of complex brain circuitry that occurs in the womb is due, in part, to the generation of complex and patterned spontaneous activity in the peripheral nervous system that then spreads into and through the brain, wiring it along the way. Disruption of this ongoing activity may play an important role in neurodevelopmental disorders such as amblyopia and autism.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Michael Song

Mon 23 Mar 2015 from 10:30 to 11:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Mon 23 Mar 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Immunoregulation of Intestinal Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease (GVHD) and Germinal Center Responses in Chronic GVHD

Professor Bruce Blazer

My laboratory has had a longstanding interest in the biology of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) for ~30 years with studies into the basic biology, translational clinical approaches, and clinical trials. We identified ex vivo tolerization approaches to prevent GVHD using costimulatory pathway... Read more

My laboratory has had a longstanding interest in the biology of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) for ~30 years with studies into the basic biology, translational clinical approaches, and clinical trials. We identified ex vivo tolerization approaches to prevent GVHD using costimulatory pathway blockade, showed that natural regulatory T cells (nTregs) were required for tolerance induction by costimulatory blockade, and tex vivo expanded murine nTregs could prevent GVHD lethality. We were able to isolate and expand human nTregs, demonstrate their capacity to prevent xenogeneic GVHD, and translate these findings into a first-in-human study. We developed novel methods to expand human nTregs to massive numbers, being tested in an ongoing clinical trial and to produce and expand inducible Tregs (iTregs), for a first-in-human study. We also has provided the first proof-of-principle in rodent models that lead to studies in patients of the following strategies to prevent GVHD or promote alloengraftment including the drugs FK506 (Tacrolimus), and rapamycin (Sirolimus). We are pursuing approaches to improve Treg potency in vivo.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sandra Lock

Mon 23 Mar 2015 from 16:00 to 17:30

Cortex Club

Sherrington Building, Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Dendritic spine dynamics underlying animal behaviours

Dr Haruo Kasai

Dendritic spines are the major memory elements in the brain, and their properties deeply influence brain functions and disorders. I will introduce recent findings in our laboratory: GABA actions on spine shrinkage and elimination, a critical time window for dopamine on spine enlargement for... Read more

Dendritic spines are the major memory elements in the brain, and their properties deeply influence brain functions and disorders. I will introduce recent findings in our laboratory: GABA actions on spine shrinkage and elimination, a critical time window for dopamine on spine enlargement for reinforcement learning, intrinsic turnovers of spines in wild type and fragile X mice, spine enlargement in neocortical pyramidal neurons of awake adult mice, and protein-synthesis dependent optogenetic probes to image and manipulate memory spines and animal behaviors.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Michael Song

Tue 24 Mar 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

MHU Student Presentations

Aimee Fenwick, Jon Kerry, Marta Tapia

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 24 Mar 2015 from 13:30 to 15:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Target and Polypharmacology Discovery with 3D Models of Everything

Ruben Abagyan

The number of protein structures in the Protein Data Bank is over 107 thousand and even the most recalcitrant to crystallization membrane proteins, G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and channels, are no longer out of reach. These structures are converted into a collection of flexible small... Read more

The number of protein structures in the Protein Data Bank is over 107 thousand and even the most recalcitrant to crystallization membrane proteins, G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and channels, are no longer out of reach. These structures are converted into a collection of flexible small molecule binding pockets, the Pocketome, together with co-crystallized ligands, and converted to specific ‘dockable’ three-dimensional models. These 3D and 2D data can be used to build accurate models for predicting activity and polypharmacology of compounds and designing efficient libraries with specific binding and safety profiles. The Pocketome derived models can also be used to raise alerts concerning possible adverse effects, or, in some cases identify targets of a phenotypic screen. The models can be assembled into the organismal Pocketome models, enriched from the homologous proteins and cross-compared. Further extension of the set with homology models requires improved techniques and force fields for sequence-structure alignments, and prediction of flexible ends and loops. The combined platform of experimentally identified and predicted pockets enriched with high quality models, activity data and organized into organismal sets provides a new powerful instrument for biological discovery and chemical design. Dr. Ruben Abagyan is a Professor in the Skaggs School of Pharmacy at the University of California, San Diego, which he joined in 2009. He received his Master’s degree in molecular physics from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and his Ph.D. in molecular modeling and biophysics from the Moscow State University. At the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg he co-developed internal coordinate mechanics and docking approach (ICM). He headed computational biology and chemistry laboratories and cores at the Skirball Institute of New York University, Novartis Institute in La Jolla, Scripps Research Institute and San Diego Supercomputer Center, founded Molsoft company, and served on boards of several biotechnology companies. Currently Dr. Abagyan serves on steering or review committees in Switzerland, UK-EBI and Hong Kong. He authored and co-authored over 240 papers and book chapters, received two CapCure awards, and Princess Diana Award and medal in Sydney, Australia.

Audience: Public

Wed 25 Mar 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

NDM Seminar Series

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room A/B, Headington OX3 7BN

Neurogenetics / Bacterial genomics

Dr Angela Brueggemann, Dr Dianne Newbury

Talking Genetics. Using genomics to understand bacterial evolution

Talking Genetics. Using genomics to understand bacterial evolution

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 25 Mar 2015 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Regulation of inflammasome activation

Dr Mohamed Lamkanfi

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 25 Mar 2015 from 14:30 to 16:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

New Radcliffe House, Room 2, Walton Street OX2 6NW

The effect of changes in the statutory minimum working age on educational, labor and health outcome

Sergi Jimenez

Sergi Jimenez is an associate professor at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra. He is the Director of the Barcelona Microeconometrics Summer School (BMiSS, Barcelona GSE), and of the Chair LaCaixa-FEDEA Econome de la Salud y abitos de Vida at FEDEA. Organised by the Centre for Health Service Economics and Organisation. To meet the speaker, contact catia.nicodemo@economics.ox.ac.uk

Sergi Jimenez is an associate professor at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra. He is the Director of the Barcelona Microeconometrics Summer School (BMiSS, Barcelona GSE), and of the Chair LaCaixa-FEDEA Econome de la Salud y abitos de Vida at FEDEA. Organised by the Centre for Health Service Economics and Organisation. To meet the speaker, contact catia.nicodemo@economics.ox.ac.uk

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 26 Mar 2015 from 14:30 to 15:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Molecular signals that regulate γδ T cells in human health and disease

Dr Erin Adams

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 27 Mar 2015 from 13:00 to 15:00

WTCHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

Research Professional Master Class

Claudia Kozeny-Pelling

Find research funding using ResearchProfessional.com Claudia Kozeny-Pelling, Senior Funding Information & Communications Officer (Research Services), will show you how to use the online service ResearchProfessional.com to find and keep abreast of research funding opportunities in your area of... Read more

Find research funding using ResearchProfessional.com Claudia Kozeny-Pelling, Senior Funding Information & Communications Officer (Research Services), will show you how to use the online service ResearchProfessional.com to find and keep abreast of research funding opportunities in your area of interest, and how to share these with others. We will look at how to get the most out of the search functionality and how to set-up weekly e-mail alerts based on your tailored funding searches. Intended audience: Suitable for beginners. Mainly aimed at post-doctoral students, academics/contract researchers, research support staff, and anyone else interested in finding research funding in your department.

Audience: Members of the University only